GB2445670A - Network based speech to text message conversion system - Google Patents

Network based speech to text message conversion system Download PDF

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Publication number
GB2445670A
GB2445670A GB0800321A GB0800321A GB2445670A GB 2445670 A GB2445670 A GB 2445670A GB 0800321 A GB0800321 A GB 0800321A GB 0800321 A GB0800321 A GB 0800321A GB 2445670 A GB2445670 A GB 2445670A
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United Kingdom
Prior art keywords
message
text
user
speak
email
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Withdrawn
Application number
GB0800321A
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GB0800321D0 (en
Inventor
Daniel Doulton
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SpinVox Ltd
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SpinVox Ltd
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Filing date
Publication date
Priority to GB0700379A priority Critical patent/GB0700379D0/en
Priority to GB0700376A priority patent/GB0700376D0/en
Priority to GB0702706A priority patent/GB2435147A/en
Priority to GB0708658A priority patent/GB0708658D0/en
Priority to GB0717249A priority patent/GB0717249D0/en
Priority to GB0717247A priority patent/GB0717247D0/en
Priority to GB0717246A priority patent/GB0717246D0/en
Priority to GB0717250A priority patent/GB0717250D0/en
Application filed by SpinVox Ltd filed Critical SpinVox Ltd
Publication of GB0800321D0 publication Critical patent/GB0800321D0/en
Publication of GB2445670A publication Critical patent/GB2445670A/en
Application status is Withdrawn legal-status Critical

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Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L51/00Arrangements for user-to-user messaging in packet-switching networks, e.g. e-mail or instant messages
    • H04L51/06Message adaptation based on network or terminal capabilities
    • H04L51/066Message adaptation based on network or terminal capabilities with adaptation of format
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q10/00Administration; Management
    • G06Q10/10Office automation, e.g. computer aided management of electronic mail or groupware; Time management, e.g. calendars, reminders, meetings or time accounting
    • G06Q10/107Computer aided management of electronic mail
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M1/00Substation equipment, e.g. for use by subscribers; Analogous equipment at exchanges
    • H04M1/72Substation extension arrangements; Cordless telephones, i.e. devices for establishing wireless links to base stations without route selecting
    • H04M1/725Cordless telephones
    • H04M1/72519Portable communication terminals with improved user interface to control a main telephone operation mode or to indicate the communication status
    • H04M1/72522With means for supporting locally a plurality of applications to increase the functionality
    • H04M1/72536With means for supporting locally a plurality of applications to increase the functionality for supporting an emergency service
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M1/00Substation equipment, e.g. for use by subscribers; Analogous equipment at exchanges
    • H04M1/72Substation extension arrangements; Cordless telephones, i.e. devices for establishing wireless links to base stations without route selecting
    • H04M1/725Cordless telephones
    • H04M1/72519Portable communication terminals with improved user interface to control a main telephone operation mode or to indicate the communication status
    • H04M1/72522With means for supporting locally a plurality of applications to increase the functionality
    • H04M1/72547With means for supporting locally a plurality of applications to increase the functionality with interactive input/output means for internally managing multimedia messages
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M3/00Automatic or semi-automatic exchanges
    • H04M3/42Systems providing special services or facilities to subscribers
    • H04M3/50Centralised arrangements for answering calls; Centralised arrangements for recording messages for absent or busy subscribers ; Centralised arrangements for recording messages
    • H04M3/53Centralised arrangements for recording incoming messages, i.e. mailbox systems
    • H04Q7/222
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W4/00Services specially adapted for wireless communication networks; Facilities therefor
    • H04W4/12Messaging; Mailboxes; Announcements
    • H04W4/14Short messaging services, e.g. short message services [SMS] or unstructured supplementary service data [USSD]
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L51/00Arrangements for user-to-user messaging in packet-switching networks, e.g. e-mail or instant messages
    • H04L51/04Real-time or near real-time messaging, e.g. instant messaging [IM]
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L51/00Arrangements for user-to-user messaging in packet-switching networks, e.g. e-mail or instant messages
    • H04L51/38Arrangements for user-to-user messaging in packet-switching networks, e.g. e-mail or instant messages in combination with wireless systems
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M2201/00Electronic components, circuits, software, systems or apparatus used in telephone systems
    • H04M2201/60Medium conversion

Abstract

A mobile telephone is programmed to allow a user to speak a message which is then automatically converted to text at a remote conversion system and then delivered to the appropriate recipient as text, in which the telephone displays an option to speak a text message which is selected by a first touch action and then the user has to perform no more than two further touch actions to the mobile telephone. The customer experience is therefore one button press to start the process (across any device) one click to select the addressee and the final click should be to end the phone call/recording process. The 'no more than 3 clicks' approach means that the user can send messages in situations where other systems could not be used, such as walking along a street, or in a situation where it's not possible to look at the screen for any length of time. i.e. while driving.

Description

RTM

The following terms are registered trademarks and should be read as such wherever they occur in this document:

NOKIA

VODAFONE

T-MOBILE

BLACKBERRY

UK lnteIIectiiI Pronrtv Cffir is an nnralinn namp nf Th Pateni C)ffir.p

A MOBILE TELEPHONE PROGRAMMED TO ALLOW A USER TO SPEAK A

MESSAGE WHICH IS THEN AUTOMATICALLY CONVERTED TO TEXT

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Inventu n

This invention relates to a mobile telephone programmed to allow a user to speak a message which is then automatically converted to text.

2. Description of the Prior Art

It is known to convert voicemail for a mobile telephone user into text, with that text then sent as an SMS or email to the user. This is descrihed in more detail in W() 2004/095821 A2, to Spinvox, the contents of which are incorporated by reference.

It is also known for a user to be able to select an option on a mobile telephone to send a SMS text message by speaking a voice message; the user speaks his message, which is then converted to a SMS text messa and sent out to the required recipient. This is described in more detail in WO 2004/095422 A2, to SpinVox, the contents of which are incorporated by reference. Reference ma' also be made to GB2406757B. We call this Speak-a-Text'. Speak-a-Text differs from voicemail conversion to text because in Speak-a-Text, it is the sender that determines that the voice message should be converted to text.

The present invention takes the idea of enabling a user to Speak-a-Text' and refines its operation and enhances its functionality.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The invention is a mobile telephone programmed to allow a user to speak a message which is then automatically converted to text at a i-emote conversion system and then delivered to the appropriate recipient as text, in which the telephone displa s an option to speak a text message which is selected by a first touch action, ith the user then needing to perform no more than two further touch actions to the mobile telephone.

There are rnan situations when someone would choose to speak a text message, as opposed to typing OflC or making a oice call. The common theme is that the user needs a fast, simple way of getting some information to someone and they either can't or don't want to stop what the are doing. The key insight here is that accessmg /hejiinctiona/i/y and sinipI/yiiig Ihe tiddre.c.cin of the message is as important (if not more important than the voice to text element (which s/xni/d be taken for granted).

The cust)mer experience is one burt)fl press to start the process (across any device) one click to select the addressee and the final click should be to end the phone call/recording process.

The no more than 3 clicks' approach means that the user can send messages in situations where other systems could nor be used, such as walking along a street, or in a situation where it's not possible to look at the screen for an length of time.

The Speak-a-message application is also designed for one-handed use, with all the functions easily accessible using a single ke click and the menu navigation device of the handset.

Messages can he sent in the form of an email, SMS or MMS message, depending upon the details stored in an address book of the mobile telephone. Multiple recipients can he sent the same message b using a broadcast' facility. Messages can also be delivered to Blogs or other web-based applications.

Additional functionality can be brought to the telephone, by adding new menu items into the standard menu tree. A menu option functionall equivalent to "Speak-a-Message" is added to the one or more of the following applications: * Text Messaging Application * T\IMS Messaging Application * Email Application * Instant Messaging (IM Application * Address Book * Call Logs * I -tome screen, using a soft key The functionalits that the "Speak-a-Message" menu option gives can change dvnamicalls, depending upon which application the user is in.

Where the application is the Text messaging application and selecting the Speak-a-Message option allows the user to do one or more of: (i) Create a new message using a contact's Mobile number as the destination; (ii) Reply to a previous message using the number provided.

Where the email applicatk)n and selecting the Speak-a-Message option allows the user to do one or more of: (i) Create a new message using a contact's email address as the destination; Oi) Create a new message to multiple recipients using their email addresses as the destination; (iii) Reply to a previous message using the contacts email addresses as the destination.

\\ here the application is the Address Book application and selecting the Speak-a-Message option allows the user to create a new message.

Where the application is the Call Logs application and selecting the Speak-a-Message option allows the user to do one or more of: (i) Create a messagc for numbers listed in the i\Iissed Call log using SMS as the reply path; (ii) Create a message for numbers listed in the Outgoing Call log using SMS as the reply path; (iii) Create a message for numbers listed in the incoming Call log using SMS as the reph path.

\nothcr aspect (which can be implemented independently of any of the preceding features) is that the telephone can generate and display an intelligently compiled list of recent contacts, which is produced by understanding the user's previous behaviour by building a list of the most recent people the user has been in contact with, taking into consideration one or more of the following: (i) Tbc communicating type email, text message, phone call, or spoken text; Oi) The frequenc of communication with that contact; (iii) How recent the last communicathrn was; (iv Alphabetical order.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Figure 1 shows a Spoken text message from Dan Mobile'. it includes the X-IJnk 84004p123 in the message.

Figure 2 shows how using X-Link's address book, anybody who receives a spoken message as text can now call in anti listen to the original voice message that was left for them.

Figure 3 shows a typica] sequence of messages and the recurring use of the Speak a Reply' X-Link.

11) Figure 4 shows that message sender Zac Sandier leaves a voice mail which has been automatically converted to text using the SpinVox voice conversion system.

Figure 5 shows another variant, in which the links are incorporated into the message, with the address 20E & 9" Sf in the bod' of the message being selectable to call up the map browser, showing that address.

Figure 6 schematically illustrates the business model transformation and how SpinVox positions itself as the intermediary between the customer and the search-engine based advertising aegator, such as Google.

Figure 7 shows the end-to--end experience from when a calling pam leaves a message and to how the recipient (called pam) views the message.

Figure 8 shows a photograph taken on a camera phone.

Figure 9 shows the Speak a Comment option from the Options menu, which mas be used to annotate the photograph in Figure 8.

Figure 10 shows MCM with SpinVox Voicemail to Text also deployed.

Figure 11 shows how various conventional messaging products (voicemail, email, SMS, IM and voice) are distributed on a Time v Dialogue axes.

Figure 12 shows how various Spin\'ox products alter the landscape of Figure II.

Figure 13 shows an example of a deployment of Spoken email and Spoken SMS/MMS with a mobile service provider -SIP telephony connectivity.

Figure 14 shows an example of a deplot ment of Spoken email with a French mobile service provider -standard telephony and synchronised data.

Figure 15 shows the typical user experience of speaking a message from within the Text Messaging or Email Application.

Figure 16 shows a typical user experience of speaking a message from within the Address Book.

Figure 17 shows the typical user experience of speaking a message using the Call Log.

Figure 18 shows a typical user experience of speaking a message from within Speak a Message application.

Figure 19 shows a apical user experience for Speaking a Blog.

Figure 20 shows a typical user experience of speaking a reph in a Mobile 1M client.

Figure 21 shows the 3 clicks' user experience.

Figure 22 shows the Fire & Forget' system empl( yed by Speak a Message.

11) Figure 23 shows the Fast Address List -showing recent contacts that have Called, been Called, Texted (SMS or MMS) or Emailed (or any other messaglng/cornmunications process used).

Figure 24 shows screen shots which demonstrate the ideal user experience: the Fast Address list of recent contacts (people that have called, been called, texted, emailed etc) is selected, the one individual (David Wood is selected to automatically initiate a connection to the SpinVox voice conversion system so that the user can speak a message.

Figure 25 shows the end-tend experience from the A & B party perspective.

Figure 26 shows the apical behaviour of the Speak-a-Message application in the home screen of the phone.

Figure 27 sbows the application being accessed using a short cur displayed as the Spin Vox logo, after pressing the Multimedia Ke' on a Nokia N95.

Figure 28 shows the Fast Address list, which on an N95 device is limited to the last 5 people which you spoke to, ernailed, sent or received a text from or spoke a message to.

Figure 29 shows that any contact can have a message spoken to them by moving from the Recent' view to the Contacts' view.

Figure 30 shows that if a contact is selected in the Contacts' view that contains more than one phone number, then both numbers are shown and the user is given a choice 01 using either.

Figure 31 shows when the customer connects to the SpinVox service the name of the contact being sent the text is displayed.

Figure 32 shows the User Experience schematically for the Speak-a-Text product.

Figure 33 shows the typical behaviour of an email centric device prior to the SpinVox plug-in software being installed.

Figure 34 shows how the Inhox looks after the SpinVox plug-in has been installed.

Figure 35 shows how a Spin Vox voicemail message will look once the rccipient has opened it.

Figure 36 shows what happens when a customer clicks on the real name that has now

been put inro the "From:" field.

Figure 37 shows what happens when a customer clicks on the real name that has now been put into the message text in the section which starts You received a new voicemail from'.

Figure 38 shows an example of a QuickLink, which has been inserted at the bottom of the converted email message.

Figure 39 shows how additional funcrionalirv has been added to the device with the inclusion of new menu items.

Figure 40 shows how Spinvox unifies various communications types and channels.

Figure 41 shows the end-to-end experience of SpinVox Voice SMS service.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Spin\'ox has developed a simpler more natural user interface for messaging -Voice.

Messaging and communications in general is, in the prior art, symmetric -namely you either exchange text (SMS, email, Fax, letter, etc...) or ou talk to another person. Bs converting speaker independent free-form speech SpinVox transforms and enables asymmetric communication which now changes the rules of the game. It enables full voice messaging and is creating the \boicetoScreenTM messaging category that simply enables existing products/services and markets/users with a spoken input and a text output from any phone or speech input device to any screen.

in doing so, it leverages the increasing asymmetric ability of phones: phone screens for reading (which today are becoming good text displas devices) and human speech, which is one of the most natural forms of communicating and virtualls all humans on the planet can use, and is after all what phones are best at. Or put the other was, phones are poor text input devices, but great at voice input and decent at text display.

This transformation also enables new, deeper services, such as unifying all sources of voice messages into easily accessible text on screen and solves many of the complex system issues of getting two disparate worlds to appear to be one (telephony and email/web pages). But excitingh, bs having voice messages of any source as text, they can be indexed and intelligent search results embedded into the message. The value is that the majority of searches are triggered by information communicated between parties, and voicemail and voice messages have a high percentage of such data points. This solves many of the limitations of phone key-based or pen based input methods to do search in traditional forms via search engines and several stages to find the result. And because this is server-side, it will become intelligent to your context -intelligent-to-meTM.

This Detailed i)escription will describe a wide arietv of Spin Vox innovations and product features, in addition to the specific invention defined by the Claims.

Key Elements of SpinVox products includes the following * XLinksTM which enables communities to effintlesslv share use of Spin\'ox allows non-Spin\'ox subscribers/users to reply via speaking a text allows users to speak text across products, not just within * XLinksTM implicit address hook makes links seamless * Network based spoken text messaging * Call Return via spoken text messaging * Speaking an SMS/MFSIS or email * Speaking an instant Message * Nb)hile blogging * Mobile photo messaging * Push to message' -application for push to talk * All sen'ices/products are based on fire and forget' principle * The' all turn existing voicemail into a full two-was' push messaging service and off of existing technology, create new products and markets * They use the fact that we -ust people in our communities to message us, rather than call us: 80% of messages come from a limited number of people O Voicemail -8 people O SMS -4-6 people O instant Messaging -2-3 people * Missed Call Messenger (NC) Answer -Speak-a-TextTM -On-net + Off-net behaviour, F' use of X-Links, and new reenue sources as an evolution and deployment with carrier in Spain * Unified Communications for Voice Messaging -disconnected services, unified by conversion, distributed to any screen creates a new mode of multipoint voice messaging * S-Links detailing embedded nature of context based smart links within text messages converted from voice messages -a new approach to mobile search and Advertising Search markets * intelligent-to-MeTM: embedded intelligent passive search ability driven out of many-to-one communications, as opposed to one-to-one pull methods typically found in search today * Spoken community messaging via web and SMS -Twitter, Facebook, MvSpace, etc...

* Voice hlastsTM: concept of being able to speak a message and have it instantly sent as text in any form to your web-based community as a broadcast message directly from you.

The following sections x'ill consider these (and other features) in more detail: Section A: X-Links Section B: S-Links Section C: Web 2.0 Section D: Missed Call Messenger Section E: An ovemew of the main SpinVox products Appendix I: Speak-a-Text rppendix II: \oicemai] to email Appendix 111: Viral/link marketing campaigns Appendix IV: Unified Communications Appendix V: \Toice SMS Appendix Vi: Acronyms 21) SECTION A: XLinksTM This extends the original feature Spin\Tox deployed within VoicemailtoTextTNt whereby a link in the mcssage enabled the recipient to directly access and hear that message -QuickLinksTM (see GB2420942B, the contents of which are incorporated by reference).

N-links allows any recipient of any message converted by SpinVox to speak the sender a reply. By selecting the link, the user is connect directly to a Spin\'ox conversion scrvice, prompted to speak their message and it is then sent directl back to the person they received the original message from.

N-Links are placed in every message, so two parties can endlessly communicate via spoken messages sent as text wheneer they like.

For example, a user might receive a toicemail message as text and it will now contain an Link so that they simply select it and they can speak the person who originally left them a voicemail, a text reph. Likewise, if you're the recipient of a Spoken text message, ; ou will be offered an X-Link to speak them a reply by text For example, Figure 1 shows a Spoken text message from Dan Mobile'. It includes the N-Link S4.004pI23 in the message <To speak a text reply call 844pl23> X-Link works across different messaging products, so if for example you receive a spoken message as SMS with an X-Link in it, you could be speaking the person a reply by email, or visa versa.

Technology A link is formed by a sen-ice number and a unique identifier shown as: <service number> + <unique identifier> e.g. links in the UK could look like: O2079652000p 123 or 8'tOO4p 123 Service number -phone number which acts as access pint to the conversion system, e.g. o full standard phone number (e.g. a DDI such as 02079652000) o voice short code (e.g. 84004) o \oIP or network number if used within IP based telecommunication or messaging I Ii * Unique identifier -identifies who the sender is for the reply, e.g. o Over-dial digits used in standard telephony o Often uses a p' (pause) or equivalent network symbol when using DTMF driven s stems 0 Ma use a special digit to further den)te service type -e.g. or a digit I' o Can be either the full phone number (e.g. MS1SDN), or a code that links this on the system 0 84004pI 23 or o S4004pO?8121O1742 ln next generation systems, the link would be an embedded link to tlick to call' as found in \VAP pages and used extensively by operators such as Hutchison 3G in the UK. The benefit is that these links would be simple words, rather than phone numbers, so that it would read "Speak Text Reply" rather than "Speak Text Reply: X-List: Implicit Address Book In the above examples. the unique identifier is shown as a 3-digit code (e.g. 123). The length is arbitrary and becomes the full phone number if it reaches the same number of digits as the mapped phone number (e.g. pl2345678910 is no longer a useful code in the UK as all phone 3(ì numbers are 11 digits).

X-Links rel (in the service creating a list of people who you've received a message from and want to repl to. The reason this works as a limited list is because the number of people who call you 80% of the time is on average just 10-12.

Example

1. David speaks Jim a text message. Jim is not a SpinV ix subscriber.

2. Jim receives the text with an X-Link to speak David a reply. He clicks on it.

3. When Jim's call connects, the system uses his CLI to identify who has messaged him -David's number is one of these.

4. The unique identifier then tells the system which of these Spin\'ox people spoke Jim a message. In this case it finds David's CLI 1\ISISDN) 5. Jim speaks his text message.

6. David now reeeies a spoken text message from Jim with an X-I4ink in so that he can reph.

7. The loop goes on ad infinitum.

Key elements of this implicit X-Link address book are: * A list of MSISDNs (or equivalent phone numhers) is huilt up of all callers who left a message for each Spin Vox user on the X-Link service.

* This list is unique to each Spin\'ox user, identified by their MSISDN (or equivalent phone number). Each user has their own X-Link list keyed from their MSISDN.

* Every new person that leaves a message for the Spin\'ox user has a new entry created in this list, and a corresponding unique identifier allocated.

* The list grows to the allowable limit, which with just 3 numhers is 1000. It can be longer, or shorter depending on the needs of the user and service provider.

* Each time the Spin Vox user calls in using the X-Link, the ss stem knows hich list is theirs (by use of their MSISDN), and can then decode the unique identifier digits into the person's MSISDN they want to speak a message to.

* SpinVox users can save these X-Links straight into their address books for future reference and know that caffing it will always allow them to speak the associated person a text message.

* Optional: the system recycles the users' X-Link list so that as soon as it's full, it goes back and replaces the least used entry with the ne one. This keeps the unique identifier short (e.g. 3 numbers) and uses the basis that you're most likel to use the X-Link in the message ou recently received to repl and therefore correctly C( )nnect to that person. It is possible to dig out a very old message with an X-Link that now points at a new person.

Note: Users of this service don't have to he SpinVox subscribers. They only have to have received a message with an X-Link in to start benefiting from this.

X-List mechanism Unique X-Lists are created for each person (A-F in this example) and list elements generated by using the caller/speaker's CLI and an associated unique identifier (UID). In this case, the Ult) is *+3.djgjts' List owners ListeesA B C D E F A -*001 *079 *022 *333 x0l() B *003 -*012 *025 *334 *099 C 011 *007 -*003 *351 *015 D *002 *011 *001 -*002 *101 E *139 *099 *006 *011 -*069 F *001 *010 *589 *287 *006 -The address book is built up simpl by creating a list for each person who is either a recipient or a sender of a SpinVox message. The list contains links (shown as *Xy1 which map to the actual phone number (CLI/MSISDN). Anytime a new person messages another via this system, they are added to their list. So both Spin\Tox subscribers and non-subscribers both have lists created for them.

For example: A's unique address book is shown by the vertical list under A. A was called by F first (*001), D second (*002), B third (*003), then after 7 others, b C (*011) and h E 139th (*139).

Sc) if A uses the X-Link at the end of a message they receive (e.g. Phone_no.*002), the s stem knows that it's A calling from their network CLI (MSISDN), and that they want number 2 in the list to speak a text to. The s stem has ke ed A's list number 2 to D's phone number.

X-Lists are built up through the calling/messaging patterns between communities of people.

Bi-directional messaging Using the above list example, here's how A and B are linked in each other's Address list: 1. A is a Spin Vox user. B is not.

2. B called and left A a voice message which was converted and sent to A as text.

a. When B's first left A a message, B was added to the list and happened to be the third, hence *003 is given to B's number.

3. A now speaks B a text reply using the message X-Link.

a. This is the first time B has had a spoken message sent to them via SpinVox, so B's list is now created and A is added as the first entry (*001) in B's list 4. The ss stem send A's message to B with an X-Link UID as *001 5. B receives the message and by using the X-Link calls the SpinVox service, is identified as B (CLI/MSISDN) and presents *001 as the destination -namely A. 6. A now-receives a message hack with B's UID (*003) and the loop can continue ad infinitum.

Saving X-Links: reliable for local address book use Because the X-Link service reliabl links people to each other, users can safely save the X-Link in say their mobile phone's address/contact list for future use. So, A in this example could reliably save S4OO4p'OO3 in their phone's address list as the entry for speaking B a text message. likewise, in this example, B can also save an entry for speaking A a text message as 84004p*OOl.

This method allows communities to reliably connect using X-Links. On average, we receive 80% of our calls from just 12 people, 80% of our voicemails from just 8 people, 80% of our SI\ES messages from just 6 people and 80% of our Instant Messages from just 4 people.

D

Naturally, X-Lists have a finite limit, so in the example shown, 3 digit unique identifiers limits to 1000 other people. Changing the number of digits in the unique identifier changes the possible number of people you can be connected to through your X-List.

Note: 84004 is an example service number, but could he any other number/address depending on network and numbering plans.

X-List: Any Address or Identifier Although the method of X-Lists is explained using phone numbers, in fact ans t)-pe of address can be used -email, IP address, Instant Message, VoIP no., etc... -as long as it is a reliable identifier with which to address a message. So X-Lists can be used for any messaging community, not just phone number based communities.

This further means that a user may choose to receive messages as email, hut always speak messages back as SMS.

X-Link: Launch messaging application The concept of the X-Link reaches to another level when applied with any communication application. The link is not on]y a phone number or address, but also a link to launch the relevant application.

For example, the X-Link sent inside a standard spoken SMS or voicemail-to-text could be a link to call them hack via a VoIP application rather than standard voice call.

The link might just show VoIP Call hack? Clicking on this (or selecting this inside the applications menu, typically use detail') would: 1. Launch the phone's VoIP application -e.g. Skpe 2. Place the call automatically back to the caller, using the VoIP application.

3. If there was no VoIP application, it might actually connect to the VoIP provider's web sen-ice and either download the application, or request a call back' so that the' could connect via this method.

Note: this could he a ien powerful wa of acquiring subscribers to a \oIP service as each link is a call to connect and/or download their client and use their service.

X-Link as public QuickLink Q uickLinks arc used for Spin Vox subscribcrs to be able to dial in and listen (retrieve) to any voice message by simply entering the QuickLink digits (e.g. *12) found at the bottom of each message.

Using X-Link's address book, anybody who receives a spoken message as text can now call in and listen to the original voice message that was left for them, as shown in Figure 2 ("To listen to the original call 84007P123").

For example:

* You aren't a SpinVox subscriber, but receive a spoken message from a friend * Either the message is ambiguous, or it wasn't converted, hut you've a public QuickLink at the end of the message (see picture below) to call in and listen to it.

* You select the link (or dial the full number) and the original voice message is played back for you.

Technical Because the X-Link sen-ice has a list of numbers of both senders and recipients, it is able to match an' caller's CL1 (MS1SDN) to a history list of numbers that are linked. Then, the unique identifier allows the service to match which exact CLI from this list the message you want to hear relates to.

QuickLinks and X-Links requests to the Spin Vox sen-ice can be distinguished by: * Different characters/commands being inserted into the start of the Unique identifier to denote which type of call this is o Using an o Always starting with a I o Use of the p' command to mark the start of unique identifier * Using different service numbers o Calls to speak a message by text are on one service number range (e.g. 84004, 84007, 84009, etc...) o Calls to retrieve/listen to a message received as text are on a separate service number range (e.g. 94004, 94007, 94009) Using the same number, hut then prompting the caller/speaker to select which option they want.

o E.g.: "Please select 1 if you want to hear this message, or 2 to speak the sender a repls" Dedicated service numbers allow users to automatically retrieve, rather than call a number and enter a unique identifier manually. They are simply selecting a number to call from within the message.

X-Link across messaging products The above show how X-Links can be used within a given messaging product. However, if a user sets theirpreference, Spin\'ox or the sen-ice provider can actually send the converted message back in any message format/application the user desires.

For example

* James is not registered with SpinVox (or Spin\'ox sen-ice provider). He receives a spoken SMS from Adam who is registered with Spin\Tox.

* James receives a spoken SMS from dam.

* James uses the X-Link to rep]) and speaks his message.

Spin\'ox know that in fact Adam has opted to have spoken messages sent to him b email, not SMS. So, the system converts james' message into text and emails this to Adam.

* Adam sees James' reply in email, and uses the X-Link to speak him an SMS back.

This could work with an text based messaging application -SMS, MMS, Instant Messaging, email, etc...

X-Links User Experience As noted above, X-I.inks is a new product line for Spin Vox designed to increase the value of every converted voice message sent by a SpinVox product. It achieves this through the inc]usion of a billable reply path, which allows anyone to speak a reply to a message they receive.

For the first rime, a spoken reph path will he available, creating opportunities. In additkrn to offering an enhanced subscriber experience, this unique integration provides a means of monetizing every message sent to or from a Spin\'ox customer. X-Links will provide a huge, sustainable incremental revenue for Carriers.

The solution will primaril consist of: * SMS, MMS or email message with a highlighted reply path; either a phone number or HTML style link.

* New capabi1it to identif the calling pam and link their number with a unique number that allows a spoken * Integration with a premium billing solution to monetize ever message sent.

The following sections are covered in this document: General requirements -key features and benefits of the product User experience -customer experience for calling and called pant Product requirements end to end lifec cle experience General Requirements The product must meet the following criteria: End User Benefit Provide an ultra fast reply path, for situations where the customer can't or doesn't want to stop hat the are doing or does not have the dexterit or technical savv to use a keyboard.

Ease of Use Must be obvious to user that the highlighted word or nuniber can be tlicked'. Should be simple wa to activate and have a number automaticalh dialed. ideally, onl one click would be required to initiate the call to the I\TR.

Simple, Fast, Intuitive It must be obvious that clicking on the highlighted link will. Assumption is that MMS support is available on majori-of targeted devices and that these devices support User Experience Figure 3 illustrates a typical sequence of messages and the recurring use of the Speak a Reply' N-link.

Demo Definitions In order to rapidly demonstrate the capabilities and potential of X-Links, there will be 2 separate demo scenarios and milestones: SMS based Demo The purpose of the canned demo is to show N-Links proof of concept.

SMS / /MMS Field Trial

The purpose of the field trial version will he to demonstrate X-Links capabilities to customers, parmer and key industry influencers. The field trial is a working version of the product.

1. User interaction considerations Although the recipient of an X-Links message may be reading the message as an email on a PC or a high-end smartphone, die expectation is that most users will be using a more pical mobile phone. Therefore, interactions with an X-Links message should be designed with that user in mind. Access to the data that the user is requesting by clicking on a link should be immediate and require the smallest number of clicks to reach the desired information. IC)

Calling Party The experience for the calling party would be consistent with current Spin\'ox voice to text products. Callers would hear an 1\TR greeting to leave a message with prompts that incorporate Spin\'ox branding.

Called Party The called party would receive either an SMS message, MMS message or email of the converted voice message. When the message is displayed, a link at tile bottom of the message would he highlighted and ve the option to reply by clicking on a numher or link.

One they have initiated the reply, callers would hear an I\TR greeting to leave a message with prompts that incorporate Spin Vox branding.

2. Implementation considerations There will be 2 types of X-Links service offerings -X-Links for SMS and X-Links for MMS and email.

SMS

While SMS has the broadest reach in terms of subscribers and device support, there are limitations on the number of available characters in each message. This limit impacts the number and type of link that can he incorporated in an SMS message. A second consideration is the ability for the device to automatically dial a phone number. If the link conforms to a common number +44207772222 some hut not all devices will allow the link to he clicked and make a phone call.

The approach for SMS will be to include a phrase at the end of the message such as To Speak a reply call <+4420777222>'. 11)

MMS and Email MMS and email messages will provide a much richer X-Links experience for the end user in terms of message display and usability. Although usage is not as widespread when compared to SMS, i\IMS usage has recently experienced significant market growth.

For MMS, the X-Links message would contain a link at the end of the message which states: Click here to speak a reph' -spoken through SpinVox When the link is selected a call to a number (hidden from the end-user) will be made. This could be a geographic or non-geographic fixed line number or Voice shortcode.

X-Links Product Requirements 31) 1. Service Level Requirement The calling party should not have to sign up with Spin\'ox or the Carrier to use this service.

Customers can opt-out of the service by calling customer care or by sending an SMS messat to a shortcode.

The service should meet the same a ailahilitv requirement as the prevailing SpinVox service.

On initial launch the service must support the following languages: UK English US English Canadian English Canadian French German French Spanish Australian English South African English The SpinVox SMS server must hold a protile for the Carrier DDI to determine whether to deliver the message to the Carrier SMSC or deliver to an aegator to send to the customer n that profile, there must be a reference to the injection and ejection validation rules for that carrier 2. IVR Once connected to the Spin\Tox IVR, the customer simply needs to record their mcssagc then hang up in order for the message to be sent. There will be no option to review the message, nor will there he any option to receive a copy of the message.

Requirement The voice talent used to record any new voice prompts must he the same as currently used Ofl the Spin Vox 1\'R platfom.

IVR prompts must be recorded in all languages supported by the Spin Vox WR The destination parts will be automatically known and no additional number entry is required.

The duration for a spoken repl will be set to 30 seconds The option to re-record the message will be available by pressing (the star key) at an' time during recording.

The first (3) three times a customer initiates a call to reply by using an X-Link they will be prompted to con firm the charge for using the service.

Subsequent times a customer connects to the I\TR, the will nor be prompted to confirm the cost.

X-Link Confirm prompt: (played first 3 times) "Welcome. This service cost 25 pence per message. Please Press I to continue." Pressing I will confirm the action and the customer will then bear the following prompt X-Link normal prompt: "Speak our reply Now!" Once the message has been deposited a billing trigger will be activated and if appropriate the customer will he charged for the message.

3. Delivery to recipient

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\hen a voice message is successfull converted to text, an SMS, MMS, will be sent to the intended recipient.

Requirement The text message must be sent as from the original caller's phone number (i.e. the A partY).

The body of the message must use the appropriate SpinVox SMS boilerplate, as defined in Message Classification.

This includes the definition of the branded signature and the use of quotation marks.

WiLl. DIFFER DEPENDiNG ON DELIVERY METHOD The delivered message must automatical] contain an X-Link, linking the sender (uniquely) with the recipient.

4. X-Link There are no pre-requisites to using an X-Link. It is not necessary to have a SpinVox account, in fact, mans recipients will n( a know who or what Spin Vox are, until they click on the link.

Requirement It must he possible to link two people's numbers uniquely using a single geographic or non-geographic nunther that can be dialled directly from ant' handset.

5. Reporting Requirement It must he possible to report on all messages on this service.

Further X-Link Concepts * Original sender has a setting which can specift that the voice-to-text reply should go to more than one destination eg. to SkIS and to distinct e-mail address (office), and to a further e-mail address home). This setting can also he altered on a message-by-message basis. This setting could be handy as it could lead to an automatic "backup" of SMS messages received on a mobile phone to an e-mail account at the workplace, or to support staff at the workplace who can provide cover fin a busy individual.

* Each user has their own list of X-links, each X-link being associated with the unique MSISDN of a person that has sent a text to that user. Individual X-L.inks can be deleted, if desired.

* Include option tbr spoken text message to he saved to an intermediary, for sending on later at a specific time. Eg. in union-dominated environments, might not want to send such a message outside of working hours. Hence select it to be sent at exactly 9 am, which could be the exact start time of the working da. Option could be called "Speak delayed text message", with the future time (and possibly date) at which it is to be sent inputted using the number keys.

* Insertion of X-Link in the message is dc-selectable using an option eg. if the recipient speaks with a strong accent or dialect that cannot be converted to text reliably using existing technologi', and you do not want to waste time trying to decipher any such text message.

* When text message is sent to a non-Spinox customer, include a link SO that the flofl-Spinvox customer can click it to sign up to Spinvox eg. using an internet page, or by speaking to an operator.

* X-Link in a blog, or in a closed user group.

SECTION B: Content Based Links -SLinksTM Spoken Links (or smart links) One of the most useful features of receiving a spoken message as text is that if the speaker gave specific data relating to a place, time, address, name or other keywords it's in text and as the user, you can quickly refer to that at any time when VOU next need it.

Parsing of phone numbers, email addresses and websites into hperIinked objects is common in messaging applications (SMS, MMS, email, IM, etc...). In spoken messages, users often give reference to locations that aren't as obviously structured, but equally important to the recipient.

The concept of S-Links is to parse the text of a spoken message and use keywords to generate a set of useful, related links. The relevant links are inserted in the message and would take the user to a website or web resource that expands on the content linked.

For example, in Figure 4, message sender Zac Sandier leaves a voice mail which has been automatically converted to text using the Spin\'ox voice conversion system (see WO 2004/095821 and \X'() 2007/091096, the contents of which are incorporated by reference).

At the footer of the converted message are two separate links, one for directions and another for the drink caa'. Clicking on the Directions' link opens a map browser on the phone (in this Figure, a PC based Google Maps image is shown for clarity), showing the address mentioned in the voice message, now converted to SN IS.

In another variant, shown in Figure 5, the links are incorporated into the message, with the address 20E & 9" St' in the body of the message being selectable to call up the map hn)wser, showing that address. Likewise, the word cava' in the body of the message is selectable, to call up a browser with places where this wine can be bought and which (optionall) are near the parsed destination address. in this example, the user can be presented with options for buying a bottle of Cava that are on the planned route, rather than anywhere in their locality, optimising the relevance and theretbre value of the implicit search result. Further more, these can be added to the map presented to show where on route these items are.

So in this case, the message contained two clear opportunities from which to create a relevant link: an address and a product type.

l'he s stem first looks for key words or phrases that contain lik-el) words for links. It then takes these and automatically looks up likeI resources for each and then presents what it estimates is the best result.

The value of this is that relevant links are inserted which the user will accept as they are useful, relevant and generally unobtrusive. This is a very valuable way of marketing below the line' using User Generated Content to find and create valuable links for the recipient.

So S-Links increases the alue of converted voice messages through the inclusion of relevant contextual elements. B incorporating links to external information, such as maps, directions, advertisements or offers, S-Link-enabled messages can deliver an enhanced experience -evolving from the current explicit search paradigm to the significantly more valuable implicit search, i.e. something that was actually said in conversation.

For the first time, the massive volume of P2P messaging in the mobile sector will be harmonized with search. In addition to offering an enhanced subscriber experience, this unique integration provides a highly targeted platform for mobile monetization. S-Links will provide a huge, sustainable incremental revenue for Carriers and service providers.

Technical The way to create this links is by processing the converted text first, finding relevant key words, creating the links then adding them into the message, before sending to the recipient.

Spin Vox's \oice Message Conversion System post-processes all messages and is capable of making a call to a routine to parse text and create any relevant S-Links. \TMCS is defined in more detail in \X'02007/09l096, the contents of which are incorporated by reference.

Alternatively, the message can be first sent to an intermediary who can perfbrm this link creation stage.

Link types The links can either he the full URL where the application rcading the text is unable to create fully aliased hvperlinks, or just the hperlink itself from the key word. E.g.

L1RL onk: http: / /maps.google.com/ Hperlinked: 20E 9Qth St if the links are fully hvperlinked, they can be placed within the text of the message: From: Zac Sandier Hi. The party's on at 20 east 9th street at 9pm. Don't forget to buy a bottle of çya for Mandy's Spanish silver bullet game. See sa.

Implicit Search with Intelligent-to-MeTM The system can he enhanced to provide truly smart links that are relevant not just to the message, but the user and their habits, histors of use and preferences. The concept is that the S-Links serb ice learns and uses other resources to make an links presented Intelligent to the specific user, or "Intelligent-to-MeTM". Issue

The issue of mobile search is today predicated on the fact that users will behave the same way and have the same needs when they're mobile as when they're at their PC. Three basic issues exist when translating search from PC to mobile: 1. When people get up and go somewhere, the nearly always know where they're going, whs and kes information about that trip, even if local, so their requirements for search are normally contextually constrained to the task at hand.

2. In thc cvcnt that people want to search whilst mobile, it's well known that today's solutions require input on a small alpha-numeric keypad or even a touch screen that is not easy and rcquires the user to ti pically stop somewhere to perform the search.

3. Even if the person does achieve input of a search term, they still need to click through several pages and scroll to find the rele ant outcome. This can equate to some 30-key press sequences including switching to their browser, typing in the search string or query (oftcn more than once to tind the right one), scrolling and then selecting pages/links to View.

Key insight The source of many of our searches is actually driven by messages we receive from others, such as names of something we didn't know about, locations, brands, etc... On a PC, these sources are wide as the can come from more than just our community or colleagues. But tortunately, large keyboards, rich screens and connectivity make our task of explicitly transposing the idea to some ke words, invoking our browser and typing in a couple of search queries and then browsing through many options, an acceptable task. This is Explicit' search, because the user has to consciously think about what they need to find, how and then tilter down results to their target.

Messages we receive from our community or voice messages contain a high proportion of ke task information for our dail likes -e.g. a time for a meeting, an address, items to bring/buy, things to do/sec and even reminders.

SpinVox research into converted voicemail-to-text results shows a surprisingly high number of appointments; locations, tasks and items are received by voice messages, some 25%. And people use this to navigate and success fulls work through their day.

What this means is that a significant part of anyone's trier to undertake search comes from voice messages. Coupled with the fact that people often rely on text messages (SMS, MMS, email, etc...) once they're on their task or tiip, to look up details en-route (e.g. check address, time or name of items to get, the solution becomes apparent.

By linking ke words in any message the user has directly to the destination (search answer), the user's life becomes much simpler and effective. No need to explicitly think about searching and which way to do it, just click on the link and he taken straight to an answer.

All tile middle steps that explicit search relies on are removed. Used the highlighted word or reference in the message and get straight to the answer: implicit Search.

Implicit Search By first converting all voice messages into text, Spin\'ox has all the key words that could be used to perform an intelligent search. Further, it also has the ability to build up a history of 11) user messages, who they were from, which source and tile response to such links to continually optimise how they're presented in future and therefore fit with what the recipient/user actually needs. So the system learns what a user is likely to be searching for through its entire history of messages sent and received -not lust the specific search.

Keys to optimising implied search include: O Gaffing/sending parts A-partv) o Key words used and their relative meanings O Message type -voicemail, SMS, email, social network, broadcast/blast, etc...

O Location of both called party (B-part)) and calling/sending party (A-party) U Location based services (LBS) to improve the context of key words (e.g. addresses, or locations for certain items en-route) O 1 listory of clicks and actions of recipient O History of response to messages to better know what was say ambiguous or likely to he done next in a typical sequence between these two parties 0 Time of day, date and place that actions were taken to optimise what things are relevant vs. not O Preferences for brand, place, method or mode based on purchase history or message history and link usage VMCS related patent filing WO 2007/091096 describes the system used to implement the indexing of ke-words/t-erms needed to generate a full index that can form the basis of an aderi-ising supported search system -i.e. that is sufficiently reliable, robust and scalable to provide advertisers that bid for a particular index term to he reliably and appropriately referenced or linked to in a message when that index term appears.

By looking at all a user's messages. whether they received them or sent them, a significant amount of personal context can be derived to learn and thereby better provide a user with ID intelligent options or links to delivering what the' want. This constant learning helps provide a network-based service that is with you and is: Intelligent-to-?\leTM.

Many-to-one widens scope and relevance This also changes traditional search which is in essence a one-to-one relationship, namely that as a user it is onl my input to sai Google or Yahoo! that generates results and the only thing they know about me is m IP address, which changes as I move around. With S-Links, search input is widened to become from many-to-one. It is also reliably for one user, as \ our phone number rarely changes. Therefore, the search is far more relevant to the user as it's using a fuller set of key words that a user depends on, rather than the few that are rememhered or transposed from one application to another. It can also be specific to the demographic of the user, because that information is either explicitly provided to the system by the user, or can be inferred by the s stem b looking (with the consent of the user) at the content and profile of messages.

We believe that a significant amount of mobile search will come from implicit search options embedded in messages and probably be larger than traditional explicit forms of search in mobile.

Permission based One of the key issues that this idea solves is that in mobile, there's a large resistance to any advertising that is explicit or clearly what is know as above the line' and effectively occupies parts of the user's screen. in mobile, screen real estate is at a premium.

By embedding the links as the words, it will immediately remove this problem and the service and any adverts associated with it will only appear when the user actively selects they want to use this option. This vi1] likely transform user experience and acceptance of commercial senices and advertising in mobile.

Gesture based Search Because the system is providing single click answers to tpical search task, the user only needs undertake the simplest of actions, a click which is a common gesture and which takes the user straight to their destinati rn, rather than work their keyboard and navigation keys through some 20-30 or more inputs (keystrokes and clicks) to achieve the same result. it's well known that every step loses some 30% of users and this is even more accentuated in mobile. S-Links minimise this to just 1 step.

Location Based Search A simple feature is the option to not only displa the Address someone has given you, but to then use intelligence in the network (typically Location Based Services) to give you: U The actual route to take to get you from wherever you are to the address given in the message U if you've other items to visit or collect bu) on the was, the mapping function can now populate your route with options to find these items, rather than just in a uni-directional radius around you O Use our history to know which places, routes and features you prefer to improve the relevance of the results presented U Use A-part)' location to also optimise local references and instructions or information to improve relevance of results presented -e.g. meet me at my Starhucks' would be able to automatically map the nearest to the caller's phone that made the call.

Business Model Transformer Using implied links will drive mobile users to online resources, many of which are paid for by online adverts that appear. implicit search will do several key things for pla ers in the value-chains that provide both the mobile sen-ice and web-based searches: j o Increase traditional Advertising Search (online advertisin revenues such as those derived by Google, Yahoo!, MSN, etc...

O Increase mobile revenues from data traffic and data products purchased O Increase online transactions from mobile U Provide sources of revenue for the networks to subsidise the SpinVox sen-ice that enables this capacity. Users may no longer have to pay, but instead get a higher quality service instead.

O Drive use of new messaging products or modes, such as MMS and \VAP, both of which are under-utilised but very capable multi-media resources that networks are keen to see a return on.

Business 3usiness Rationale Upside SpinVox Incremental.einforce Spin\'ox position as ncome from an innovator and as the market share of click eader tvenue :arrier Lncremental)rhe ne sales of data plans ncome from Lnd uplift take-rate of Iata/\\AP:ompatihle handsets session Search Incremental \lonetize SMS -not previously Engine ncome from,ossiblc due to routing and click-through olume Figure 6 schematically illustrates the business model transformation and ho SpinVox positions itself as the intermediar between the customer and the search-engine based advertising aggregator, such as Google.

Single Search Result Premiums Due to the nature of the single link and its design to take you straight to the right outcome (destination), this service will further heighten the value of these search results to advertisers and commercial service providers as there will onl be one or a couple other search results shown, rather than the pages of results provided in PC based explicit search which tends to dilute the value of the slot bought.

This will offset the industry's concerns about mobile advertising in genera] being less valuable as web content and resources are generally less available to mobile users.

Summary of S-Link features

Now voice is in text, it can he massiveh indexed * Voicemail is the 2nd largest form of mail after email * \oice messages have rich personal context -ke task information * Search can be erv targeted and relevant * Permission based: intelligent-to-MeTM * Smart-links: learns from history and use from all messages to me from my communities, not just my individual searches (e.g. Google) * Implicit vs. Explicit search * Current search is PC-centric -Explicit search * Requires user to think of search term, switch apps, type in via tiddl keypad, surf to find results = 20-30 click exercise (30% loss at every step) * Naturally limited market -in mobile! * S-Links pros ide result in context (message) -implicit Search * Voicernaii (and SMS) contains over 70% of key info for day's tasks -addresses, time5, names, sequences, products, ideas, etc... -i.e. keywords that drie i-pical search * Take mu straight to destination, not the long ride -I gesture = result! * Implicit recurring behaviour -voice messages are received ever)-day * Link is discreeth in message and takes s ou straight to the result * Links are smart -the' can gie local context to ensure results shown is right for the user first time -e.g. providing local options for maps, products, places and sen-ices.

* implicit navigation -it knows where you are and where mu are going. It uses network LBS (location based services) to find you and then map sen-ices to provide you with a route to where you are going. It dynamically updates depending on where and when you clink on a link.

* 1 click simple to reach destination -the link is persistent and is there in the message after you close and then re-open the message mans' days alter; there is no need to re-type anything.

* Preferences enable different commercial resources to be displayed * Drives much higher value single search result S-Links User Experience This document details the user experience and highlights specific requirementsand considerations for Spin\'ox S-Links. The solution will primarily consist of: 1. SMS, MIiS or email message with highlighted keywords 2. New capahility to identify and highlight keywords in voice to text processing 3. Integration with 31d1 party ad and content servers to support husiness model The following sections are covered in this document: 1. General requirements -key features and benefits of the product 2. User experience -customer experience fbr calling and called parts 3. Product requirements -end to end lilecvcle experience

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General Requirements ihe product must meet the following criteria: End User Benefit Highlighted words must he relevant to message content and have perceived value for the user. Consensus that 2 or 3 links per message is the maximum threshold.

Ease of Use Must be obvious to user that highlighted words can be clicked'. Should be simple way to activate links to render associated results. ideally, only one click would be required to retrieve and display the requested information.

Simple, Fast Display Results Clicking on highlighted words should require the smallest possible number of additional clicks to displa results. Assumption is that NAP support is availahle on majority of targeted devices Performance Turn around time (TAT) for message delivery should not be impacted. The message TAT should remain within the current SLA parameters.

Figure 7 shows the end-to-end experience from when a calling parts leaves a message and to how the recipient (called part)) views the message. The message content, display and interaction will diffcr depending on message sent and displas type.

1. Calling party initiates call to a called party. Alternatively the caller could be replying to an email, creating a memo, preparing a blog or social network posting or responding to an instant message. Calling party is prompted to speak their message using normal product 1VR prompts.

2. The oice message is recorded in the audio capture ss stem within a carrier, ser ice operator or Spin Vox. The \X'A\' file is then sent to VIVICS for conversion.

3. Spin Vox \TMCS converts voice \X'AV tile into text message.

4. Spin\ox interrogates message to determine if an relevant keywords are present.

5. SpinVox highlights relevant keywords and inserts one or more of the following associated links: a. Ad click b. Map c. Ad tag in nicssage d. Ad tag at bottom of the message 6. Message goes back to carrier for deliver to called party destination via SMS-C, MMS-C, or email gateway 107. Called part receives message cm device. Message display and linking capabilities will be dependanc on message type sent (SMS, MMS).

8. Called party clicks on highlighted words with embedded links to display more information.

9. Link goes to 3i part service providers for maps, ads or search results.

10. Link results are displayed to the uscr. Display results and speed wc be dependant on the VAP/wch capabilmes of the called party's device.

Demo Definitions In o t-' rinidl demonstrate the canahilities and notential of S-Tinks there will he 2 separate demo scenarios and milestones: Canned Demo The purpose of the canned demo is to show S-Links proof of concept. The demo will be limited to a predefined set of keywords and display results.

Field Trial

The purpose of the field trial version will he to demonstrate S-Links capabilities to customers, parmer and key industry influcncers. The field trial is a working version of the product though there will likely still be limitations on available ke words afld search results.

1. User interaction considerations Although the recipient of an S-Links message ma\ be reading the message as an email (in a PC or a high-end smartphone, the expectation is that most users will be using a more typical mobile phone. Therefore, interactions with an S-Finks message should he designed with that user in mind. Access to the data that the user is requesting by clicking on a link should be immediate and require the smallest number of clicks to reach the desired information.

Calling Party The experience for the calling parts-would be consistent with current SpinVox voice to text products. Callers would hear an i\'R greeting to leave a message with prompts that incorporate Spin\Tox branding.

Called Party The called parts would receive either an SMS message, MMS message or email of the convened voice message. When the message is displayed, certain keywords would he highlighted, ideall those that are most relevant to the message content. Message should contain a minimum of 1 and maximum of 2 or 3 keyword links. The type of content displayed and the user interaction with that content will vary depending on the message type and the device capabilities. (see implementation Considerations section below) For capable devices, selecting a highlighted keyword will initiate a WAP or web session and displa ad, map or search results associated with the keywords.

Canned Demo Field Trial

Keyword Minimal pre defined list of List developed in conjunction with strategy keywords ad sen-er or search parmer.

Link Type Keywords link directly to set Based on keyword selected and of pre-defined results related links.

a. Ad click a. Hotel -> WAP site Ii Map b. Map -> static map c. Ad tag in c. Audio clip message d. Movie clip d. Ad tag at bottom of the message Device N/A 3i parts for adaptation/transcoding adaptation for mobile devices Location N/A Simple user profiles for containing based most frequent locations services N/A Default is opt out Opt-in/Out 2. Implementation considerations There will be 2 types of S-Links service offerings -S-Links for SMS and S-Links for MMS and email.

SMS

\X bile SMS has the broadest reach in terms of subscribers and device support, there are limitations on the numher of available characters in each message. This limit inipacts the number and type of link that can be incorporated in an SMS message. A second consideration is the abi1it for the device to render the link, if the link conforms to common URL form ht://www.anysite.com some hut not all devices will allow the link to be clicked and launch a WAP browser.

The approach for SMS will be to embed a single link or advertising tagline in the message.

The link should be relevant to at least one of the words in the message. Alternatively there could also he a response option e.g. -Reply M for more info -that could be sponsored.

Another approach will he to auction specific keywords to the highest bidder -e.g. Hotels = 1-lilton, Coffee = Starhucks. This approach will not be taken initially since keywords will have low value until the ad inventory increases as more ad-supported messages are implemented.

Canned Demo Field Trial

Keyword Coffee List developed in conjunction with ad sen-er or search partner.

Display Taglines TBD based on partner list results Option I: "To find a local Starhucks, go to h t: / /mohile.starhucks.com" Option 2: "Looking for Starhucks? Reply S to find the closest one to you" MMS and Email MMS and email messages will provide a much richer S-Links experience for the end user in terms of message display and usability. Although usage is not as widespread when compared to SMS, MMS usage has recently experienced significant market growth. MMS has the ability to support rich data types such as images, audio and video, and does not have the same character limitations as SNIS. Handsets that support MMS are also more likely to have some type of web access built into the device. Additionally S-Links can he a major driver for increasing traffic of higher priced Ml\lS messaging services for carriers.

For MMS, the S-Links message would contain between 1 and 3 highlighted kenvords. When a ke word is selected, a or web browser will open and the relevant information will l)e displayed. If the information is an address, the browser should open up a map with the address highlighted and standard options for receiving directions if possible. If a like word "coffee" or "Starbucks" is highlighted, clicking the link would bring up list of coffee shops or Starbucks that are local to that users. These may or may not he relevant at the time the user is viewing the message. Clicking on a highlighted item could also bring up an ad, either separateh or as part of the other results. A future option would also he to consider integrating an ad as part of the actual message.

Email and I M messages would function similarly to MMS.

Product requirements 1. Customer interaction with IVR There will be no change to the calling party experience.

2. Delivery to recipient 1ien a voice message is successfully converted to text, an SMS, MMS, email or IM will he sent to the intended recipient.

SMS/MMS B Party The text message must be sent as from the original caller's phone number (i.e. the A party).

Message body The body of the message must use the appropriate SpinVox SIIS boilerplate, as defined in Message Classification.

This includes the definition of the branded signature and the use of quotation marks.

\XThL DIFFER DEPENDING ON DELIVERY METI I( )D Message Delivery Canned demo -party aregator

Field Trial -Carrier MMSC

3. S-Link Highlighted Keywords A minimum of I and a maximum of 3 keywords will be highlighted in the body of the message.

User actions when clicking -see table below for demo and trial requirements impact on message loads (see 2.2) Choice of words 1. Carrier specific 2. Auction 3. Ad-search partner defined Inclusion of location click through?

Canned Demo Field Trial

Keyword Minimal pre defined list of List developed in conjunction with strategy keywords ad server or search partner.

Display Keywords link directly to set of Based on keyword selected and results pre-defined results related links.

a. Hotel -> I hilton AP site Eg.

a. Ad click b. I1ap -> static map a. Hotel -> Hilton -show list of h. Map c. Audio -> Foo Fighters -Hilton Hotels, preferably those that c. Ad tag in flash page are relevant to user location message d. Movie -> I Am Legend" h. Map -> 1)namic map (like d. Ad tag at flash page Google Maps) showing local bottom of business and options for directions the message C. TBD based on partner d. TBD based on partner Content Spin\'ox built demo site 3rd party serviced content Sources 4. Service level -Trial Only Sign-up requirements The caffing party should not have to sign up with Spin\1ox or the Carrier to use this service.

Customers can opt-out of the service Service Level The service should meet the same availability recuiremenr as the prevailing Spin Vox service.

VMCS Language support On initial launch the service must support the following languages: * UK English * US English * Canadian English * Canadian French * German * French * Spanish * Australian English * South African English Carder Profile The SpinVox SMS sen-cr must hold a profile for the Carrier DDI to determine whether to deliver the message to the Carrier SMSC or deliver to an aregator to send to the customer In that profile, there must be a reference to the injectfrrn and ejection validation rules for that carrier 7. Reporting -Trial Only It will be necessar to report on the activity on for S-Links. The audience for all reporting will be both internal and external, Carrier facing and for advertisers or ad networks. a

Reporting requirements It must be possible to report on all messages on this service Reporting requirements It must be possible to report on the following product metrics.

* Usage * Traffic Reporting requirements \ord impressJons per da /week/month Click through on each word per day/week/month Links clicked vs. links displayed on each work per day/week/month.

Filter by Carrier, service provider etc SECTION C: WEB 2.0 Mobile Blogging -M0B10TM Blogs have become a ver popular method of people sharing thoughts, facts, photographs, images and other information freclv across the internet. Blogs are largclv based around the concept that you're sharing something with a community to whom your bhg is relevant, often highly personal.

11) Blogs now exist for sharing information on films, concerts/gigs, shows and all sorts of entertainment, and more recently, a large rise in their use fir Citizen journalism where any member of the public can post news or information about a current issue. The BBC has recently introduced such ser ices along with other leading news pros iders.

The issue is that often people want to post something to a blog site when they're not at their computer (PC), but actually as it's happening or when it's relevant. For instance, having just left a cinema you'd be more likely to want to post a comment up about the film ou just sav than waiting till later when you're back home. Likewise, if you've seen or heard a news story that suddenly affects your or you have an interest, you want to post an entry then and there.

In many cases, you'll he out an about, not necessarily at your PC.

Current solutions are to use the micro-browsers available on high-end mobile phones to log in and use either the alpha-numeric keypads or micro keyboards to type in your entry. That's fine if you're patient, technically competent and dexterous enough to type more than a sentence or two. For the rest of us, it's still highly impractical.

SpinVox Mobile Blogging is simple. Just call the blog site phone number, speak your blog message and it's converted to text and posted up as an entry.

Imagine seeing a film on new release you love and being the first to blog about it: "I saw the new X-I\len film last night and MoBlo'd it to your site with a five star rating!". Or being able to blog a news item: Just seen a major crash on the M4 at junction 10 involving a petrol tanker. Avoid this route. Police are on their way." How it works * The owner of a hiog site decides either they want to enable spoken blog entries on their blog site * They contact Spin\'ox and sign up for an account and provide standard information, including their hiog site host * They register the location (URL) and email address * SpinVox gives the blog owner a phone number (DDI) * SpinVox vi11 convert any voice messages left on their DDI into text and either o Email to the blog site email address o Post it via HTTP or similar IP protocol directl to their blog site if the owner then decides to publish this number, for instance bs putting up on their blog site or emailing it to select people, anyone can use this number to speak them a blog entry.

They can simply save this phone numl)er in their contacts/address 1)00k SO that speaking this blog and enuv is always to hand.

Registering your name or handle When people blog, they often want to say who they are. SpinVox Mobile Bloing gives users the following options: 1. When mu call the blogs phone number for the first time, the SpinVox service will prompt you to speak your name or your handle.

For example:

a. "Welcome to SpinVox mobile blog. Please first speak our name or handle as mu want it to appear each time you speak a blog, or press # to remain anonymous" h. User either speaks their name or handle ("Fred Flinstone'), or hits # c. "Thank you. Please speak your blog message after the tone. This will he converted to text arid posted on this blog site".

2. You can go to a Spin Vox website and register that when you call a given blog site (e.g. blog URL: www.filmmaxblog.com) from a phone number you provide (e.g. your mobile: 07812101742), it should display your name (e.g. Fred Flinstone or enter a default, such as Anonymous'.

3. You can optionally chose to display any other details with your entries such as: a. Your email address b. Your Instant Message ID c. Your VotP ID (e.g. Skpe name) d. Your phone number e. A web address f. Etc...

Technical solution The major blog site pros. iders (e.g. hlogspot, bloer.com, Yahoo!, Google, etc...) provide an interface so that hiog sites they host can receive an email which is then automatically posted to the intended blog site. The also provide standard HYFP post interfaces which allow applications to post entries via the internet.

SpinVox determines which of the blog providers a user is on, and then automatically provisions the right type of interface to use to be able to post the text on to a blog hosted with the provider, either via email or an l-ITTP post method.

The converted text is then formatted and relevant fields populated to ensure the text posted is displayed correctl on the blog site and has the right information showing. E.g.: * Time and date * Text is optionally in quotes (e.g. "Just seen Madonna's confessions and it stank!'D * User name displayed o Blog spoken hy: <user name or handle> (e.g. Fred Flinstone) o Anonymous blog entry * Any other chosen data the user restered and chose to display o E.g. email address, IM ID, phone number, VoIP ID, web address, etc...

X-Links in Blog Blog providers are able to automaticalls alert users when a new item has been added, including via email, SMS or IM.

B simple adding in the blog's spoken message phone number (Spin Vox Mobile Blog phone number to the text message or email, all recipients can chose to respond to this entry by calling this number (clicking on it in the SMS).

In addition, Spin Vox helps direct people's to respond to a particular blog entr by putting an N-Link into the text message 50 that it is posted with a particular reference.

For example:

* Albert speaks a blog entry via Spin\'ox b calling the blogs Spin\'ox number SpinVox posts his entry with an N-Link in (e.g. O2O79652000plOl) * The blog site automatically alerts signed-up readers with a message that contains this X-Link * Readers who call this X-Link will have their reply associated with Albert's original entry and thereby create a thread under his entry.

Mobile Photo Messaging -M0Ph0TM The market for taking pictures on a mobile device that's connected to the Internet, typically a mobile phone with a camera, is evolving from trying to send other phone users a picture message (typically MMS) or download the picture from the device to a computer and then save it, email it or burn it to CD.

A new genre of mobile photography has emerged whereby a photograph taken on your mobile device can he automatically uploaded to a website for private or shared use. It solves several problems with copying or moving photographs off the device, sharing them and on larger screens where the quality of the photograph can be best appreciated.

However, users often want to post a comment with their photograph as it is being uploaded onto a website for them. Much of the impact (fun or seriousness) of a photograph is best expressed at the moment it was taken, not hours, days or weeks later when you're next at a PC to view and add comments. Using the device's small alpha-numeric keypads to do this when mobile is fiddly at best.

Spin Vox enables today's standard mobile photograph3 services (e.g. Cognima's Shozu) with a simple means of also adding a comment as it happens. The user simply now speaks their comment which is c)nverted to text and automatically p)sted aic ng with the photograph.

Example:

* Max takes a photograph on his mobile phone whilst on holidas of two friends in front of a famous building * They decide to add a comment to the photograph before posting it * "ust bumped into Bill and Ben in front of ses, you guessed it, Big Ben!" * Their message is converted and posted along with their photograph on their photograph sharing website * Max's two young children are at home in Scotland. Thes see that a new photograph has just been added to their father's photograph sharing website.

* They laugh and call their father to see if can take another photograph of Bill and Ben with Sherlock Holmes.

The mobile photographs service provider would update their application to provision the user with a phone number that is automatically called when thes select Speak a Photo Comment'. This number is mapped to SpinVox's conversion service which then converts their message and sends it back to a designated location for posting with the user's photograph.

1. Photograph taken on camera phone -Figure 8 2. User then selects from Options menu: Speak a Comment -Figure 9 3. Application connects to a SpinVox service, sends oer a unique identifier to link the speaker, photograph and message.

4. User then prompted to speak their message: "please speak your photo comment after the tone" 5. Converted message is sent to mobile photography service provider's system which adds the comment to the photograph Spoken Mobile Messaging in an online Community SpinVox has launched several products in the SpinX family which includes users being able to speak a message and have it-converted and automatically posted to a blog site, or speak a message and have it converted and sent to multiple recipients as either an SMS, email, MMS, TM or other messaging format.

Twitter SpinVox is launching a service whereby users of the increasingly popular Twitter sen-ice nwn'itter.com) can simply use their phone to call a local number, speak their message and have it automatically posted to their Twitter account for them as a text. Naturally, users no longer ha e to be at a PC and online to use Twitter.

Echo message -live post confirm And every time they post, they'll get an SMS reply (or an echo) confirming their posting went live, or not to allow them to retry. This idea applies to all types of web based service you'd post to as ou need to know that you're enty/post was successfully converted and posted live to the web, simply because you're not online, but on a phone instead. Echos can be returned as email or IM or other firm of messaging and shared wider to keep a group informed too.

This echo beha jour complements the sen-ice that Twitter has whereby users can elect to receive an SNIS ever time someone in their group posts an entr). So with Spin\'ox, all users can truly stay in touch with their Twitter communiP by phone wherever they are. If one of the group posts by SpinVox, the rest will automatically get an SMS with what they said, and naturally the option to call in a reply or update. So there's no longer a dependency that anyone is actually online fUr the group to stay in touch.

This is a significant-step forward in removing the existing dependency of Twitter and in fact all other weh (PC hased) messaging set-vice providers.

Social Network Messaging In fact, an social network, community forum or other type of online communit) can benetit from SpinVox providing them with a simple means of staying in touch with their community just by calling in their message, letting Spin\ox convert it and post it to their accc unt and then leveraging existing messaging services to let others see your new post. They may be mobile too.

X-Links open up the ability for these communities to use Spin\'ox without complex sign-ups and decisions. Once the get a converted message, they ma also be offered a link which will allow them to speak a reply and have it also posted online, thereby enabling the whole group to sta in touch wherever they are just by a simple phone call.

For example, Yahoo! offers messenger services to its users and as groups, they can now broadcast messages via Yahoo! online to each other, but only when online and they're all logged in. With SpinVox, they'll he able to shout out' a message to members of their group and know it'll reach them all whether they're online or not.

Voice Blast The idea is a Voice blast' that reaches users either online or off-line as a text message of one fbrm or another (SMS, email, IM, etc...). A form of group broadcasting via voice to text where the group is defined by their online connections, but messaged anywhere, particularly mobile.

Dial-tone = web-tone in short, this expands upon the idea that with SpinVox as a network service, anyone can now use phone networks of any type to speak a message that will appear as text online in an account or place of their choice.

What this also means is that no user, in fact the whole group, actually needs to be lod into their online service/account (e.g. Twitter, Yahoo!, etc...) to stay in touch with each other. This means these services can be used by the whole group fully off-line and via a simple phone call.

Reducing the Username/PIN barrier to a phone call \X1at this also means is that a user's phone number (i.e. their CLI or i\ISISDN in mobile networks) becomes their identity for posting to online services. The elegance of this is that to post to an account or blug or other online service, you don't have to remember URLs, user names or passwords -just make a phone call and you're in! Twitter Micro-blog implementation This section covers the requirements for launching a new product specifically for use with www.Twitter.com. Twitter is a micro-blogging environment, where users (tweeters) sign-up and then post in short updates (rweets) about what they're doing, using IM, SMS or web.

These bulletins appear on www.twitter.com in their personal page and are sent out to their friends as web updates or by SMS. Tweets are limited to 140 characters. Twitter provide an API which lets 3rd party developers integrate applications and services.

There are two strands to the product strategy. First is the demo: A user can try out the Spin Vox Twitter demo b calling a country-local DD1, and seeing the resulting conersion on the SpinVox demo twitter account. This doesn't rcuire any sign-up: just call the number and check the web site. It's analogous to the Spin-mv-Blog demo on our web site. The other strand is a more t pical Spin-mv-Tweet style service: Users sign up for a Spin-mv-Tweet style account. They can then call a country local DDI to leave a short message, which is converted and sent to Twitter.

Product Overview

DEMO

* Customer can try the demo out on www.spinvox.com b calling the country local "SpinVox for twitter" demo number. Their tweets will show up on the Spin\'ox for twitter page within www.spinvox.com and on the SpinVox demo page within twltter.com. No account created.

* SMS delivered back on succcssful/unconvertible conversion * NC) SMS sent for hangups.

* Entries will he moderated, hut this will he after submission to Twitter.

LIVE

* Customer opens SpinVox for Twitter account on www.spinvox.com and enters their Twitter username and password. User is encouraged to sign up with, and use, a mobile number.

* User is sent initial PIN via SMS and asked to login to create account.

* On login, customer is sent 2nd SMS welcoming them to Spin Vox and asking them to save DDI to phone-in their Tweets.

* Customer calls country-local SpinVox for Twitter number and leaves message * if deposit is converted, the text is sent to Twitter.

* Optional notification SMS on converted and unconvertible.

* For hangups, no notification SMS will be sent.

* All SpinVox fir Twitter accounts are automatically added to friends list of SpinVox Corporate on www.twitter.com (through API) Twitter implementation requirements 1. Service Level 1.1 The end-user will signup at www.spinvox.com to use the lull SpinVox for Twitter service.

1.2 The service should meet the same availabilit requirement as the Spin-mv-Vmail service.

1.3 Recordings should be limited to 30 seconds.

This will he reviewed periodically after launch, to decide whether the limit should he lowered (e.g. to 20 or 15 seconds).

1.4 All SMS delis eries should be limited to a single SMS.

There should he a configurat.krn parameter to specify the number of characters, which will initially he set to 160.

1.5 TAT should be 98% of messages within 10 minutes, measured across a calendar month, where the daily average is 18 seconds or less. I.e. should meet the same TAT requirements as Spin-mv-Vmail 1.8 On initial launch the service (demo and live) must support the following languages: * UK English * US English * Canadian English * Canadian French * German * French * Spanish * AustraLian English * South African English 1.9 Oninitial launch country-local DDIs must be provisioned for the following countries for both demo and live (i.e. two DD1s for each enrr in the list below).

* UK (language: en-GB) * US (language: en-US) * US (language: es-ES initially es-US when available) * Canada (language: en-CA) * Canada (language: fr-CA) * Germany (language: de-DE) * France (language: fr-FR) * Spain (language: es-ES) * Australia (language: en-AU) * South Africa (language: en-ZA) 1.10 Country-local DDIs need to be "golden" memorable numbers e.g. in U.S -415 TWITTER or similar. Priority should be given to live numbers over demo numbers, and to the US and UK numbers.

1.11 After initial launch, the LIVE service numbers need to be capable of handling high volumes of concurrent calls 2. Customer interaction with IVR It is envisaged therc will be minimal interaction between a customer depositing a message and the IVR system.

Live service CLI withheld 2.1 For the live service, if the caller has withheld their CLI, the caller should be told to turn off number withholding and call back.

Language selection 2.2 LIVE service -If the caller has a SpinVox account, and the account's language is one of those listed in requirement 1.9, then we should use that language. Otherwise the language should be whatever is associated with the number dialed. Note for the DEMO service -customer does not need a Spin\Tox or Twitter account to call the Demo DDI's. If the caller does have a Spin Vox account th nigh, we should take their language preference, rather than using the language associated with the countr -local DDI.

Use from unregistered phone 2.3 If the caller's numher does not have a SpinVox for Twitter account associated with it, the caller should he directed to the Spin\'ox website.

Demo greeting 2.4 When a user calls a SpinVox for Twitter demo DDI, they should hear the greeting "Welcome to SpinVox for Twitter, please speak your message and it will appear on screen at web address-tbc" If the caller has withheld their CLI, they should also be told: "You will not receive any con firmation SMS, as you withheld your number".

Live service greeting 2.5 When a customer calls a regular Twitter DDI, (s)he will hear the following message: "Please speak your Twitter message after the tone." Voice to he used for all IVR will he female and the same as other current Spin Vox products.

2.6 When recording the voice message, the caller should he able to hit the # key to re-record the message. The caller should he informed of this feature, the first three (3) times they use the service. In this case the prompt fr( )m reclurement 2.5 should become: "Please speak your Twitter message after the tone. To re-record your message press the hash key (# at any time" 2.7 If a customer gres over the recording limit specified in requirement 1.3, they will be prompted to re-record the message or leave the message as is. This mirrors current hehaiour of other Spin Vox products.

2.8 There will l)e no DPA prompt.

3. Provisioning/Account management Sign-up information 3.1 To create a SpinVox for Twitter account on phuit s.u!n, a user has to enter: * mobile phone number * Twitter username and password * email address language preference * country lithe countn is the US, then the user should also have to provide * state A DDI should not be assigned to the user, but rather thc are told which of the country-local DI)ls (see requirement 1.9) the' should use. Use of the Spin\'ox Twitter demo does not require an account to be set up.

SpinVox tweet-out 3.2 B default, when a user signs up for a SpinVox for Twitter account, a tweet should be posted to their Twitter account: I've just signed up for Spin\Tox for Twitter at www.spinvox.com/twitter The sign-up page should have a checkbox which controls whether this announcement is posted. It should be on by default.

Twitter account validation 3.3 When a user is registering for a Spin Vox for Twitter account, we should validate whether the Twitter account details are valid, if the account isn't valid, then the user should he given a link to the account creation page at www.twitter.com.

PIN notification by SMS 3.4 When an account is created as per 3.1, an SMS should be sent to the user with an initial PIN, which they need to log in to the web site.

Welcome SMS 3.5 Welcome SMS is sent to customer as the successfully log-in for the first time onh.

Welcome SMS copy mc.

SMS notification 3.6 Customer can control whether thes' get SMS notification for the two cases: * message converted and sent to Twitter * message was unconvertihle These can be controlled independently via self-care, so a user can turn off the converted notification, but leave on notification of unconvertibles, for example. For new accounts, SMS notification should be turned off for successful conversions, and turned on fir unconvertible. These options should not be given on the sign-up page.

Friends of SpinVox 3.7 By default all new SpinVox for Twitter accounts should he added to the friends list of the Spin\'ox Corporate Twitter page (Marketing owned page). A user should be able to opt out (>1 this via a contiol in self-care. This control should not be proided on sign-up. This must be covered in the T&C's, which will [inked on the sign-up pa and in sell-care.

Self-care 3.8 The customer can change the following via self-care: * Twitter username * Twitter password The user will hc able to change all other fields given during signup as part of regular self-care usage.

Access control via PIN 3.9 Customer can enable PIN access to deposit message on their account. If enabled, then the caller should be asked for the account's PIN before getting the regular prompt (requirement 2.5).

4. SMS message to caller When a voice message is successfu11 or unsuccessfully converted to text, an SMS will be sent to the caller if rhe' have selected this option (see req. 3.6 above).

4.1 For the demo service, if the caller's CLI was withheld, no attempt should be made to send an confirmation SMS's.

4.2 The text message will come from the called number -either the DEMo or the LI\TE country local DDI.

4.3 On successful conversion the bod of the message shall be shown in Quotation marks e.g. DEMo = From: <S\T Twitter Demo DDI> Your tweet "<tweet extract>" is posted on www.spinvox.com/twitter (tbc LIVE = From: <SV Twitter Local DDI> Your tweet "<tweet extract>" was posted to Twitter -powered b SpinVox The full SMS text must not exceed the limit specified in req. 1.4. if the full tweet cannot be included, then the extract should finished with "..." frffipsis).

4.4 If unsuccessful, the mobile caller will be sent an SMS as below:-Sorry, the "tweet" ou left could not he converted to text. Please call <dialled-number> and tn again. Thank you -vw.spinvox.com 4.5 There will he no QuickLinkTM at the end of the message.

4.6 No confirmation SMS should be sent to the caller when a call is a hang-up.

5. Conversion lf the message is successfully con'.erted the tweet shall be sent to the customer's twitter page. The message should he taed with the SpinVox hvperlink.

5. 1 LIVE = Converted messages should be sent to the customer's twitter page with the Spin\'ox source link sending users to www.spinvox.com/twitter product page.

Moderation of Demo tweets 5.2 All tweets to the SpinVox Twitter demo can he removed by a moderator after posting to Twitter.

5.3 Twitter messages to begin with the word says and followed by the conversion in double quotation marks to indicate spoken message i.e. says "hi I am here speaking to twitter" The total post must not exceed 140 characters. If the converted text is too long, it should be truncated, and the extract should he ended with "..." (ellipsis).

6. Reporting It will he necessary to report on the activity on the SpinVox for Twitter service. The audience for all reporting is internal to Spin Vox, there is no external reporting.

6.1 It must be possible to report on all messages on this service * Split by language * Conversion breakdown by product and by customer (conversions, unconverted and hang-ups) * No. of daily sign-ups and successfull' created accounts (sign ups = not logged into website to open account) * Daily active users * Average message duration * Conversion length (in characters) * Avg. no of msgs/user per period hr/dav/week) * Traffic profile by time of da /week/rnonth 7. Future requirements Option to bill for this service in future using C/card.

* Option t switch terminating number to rated number to generate call time revenue from deposit calls.

* Ability to track call durations for per minute/second billing * Reiew private messages/commands and how use 10. Ability to block callers from calling certain number ranges/rates.

8. Web experience Customers arrive at w.spinox.com home page and see Twitter-branded logo or button on home page. The can also access the Spin\Tox for Twitter page through the products link on home page.

When customers click through they see a Spin Vox for Twitter page -containing - 1) A Twitter logo 2) 1nsuctions about the product and how it works with Twitter 3 Instructions about how to set-up Twitter to work with SpinVox and how to tell their friends to get SMS updates.

4 FAQ's button about Spin\'ox for I'witter (tweets posted using existing privacs settings etc) 5) A SpinVox for Twitter demo and demo button (showing page www.Twitter.com/spinvox OR www.spinvox.com/twitter) NI) account created during demo process as all entries posted as SpinVox 6 Click here button to invite them to set-up an account 7) User needs to input twitter username and password, along with mobile number and email.

Encourage user to input mobile phone no. as primary choice 8) Ability to manage the service within Mv Account.

SECTION D: MISSED CALL MESSENGER Missed Call MessengerTM Missed Call Ilesscngcr (MCM) solves the problem that faces many callers and carriers -namely, in markets where voicemail isn't enabled, callers now have the option of speaking the person they tried to call a text message of soic form and so stay in touch.

Many markets see less than 51!/o voicemail penetration, such as southern Europe (Spain, ltah, Greece, etc...). The reasons are mainly two-fold: 1. Voicemail is a chargeable service and in high pre-paid mobile phone markets, users tend to turn it off to save on costs as calls to deposit and retrieve a voice message are in the cent per event range.

2. Culturally, voicemail is perceived as too formal and business-like and often seen as a rude way for daily messaging.

Insight The insight here is that what callers do in this scenario is to not leave a voice message -where voicemail exists, or hit a dead-end (e.g. ring out, busy, oft) where none exists -hut instead hang- up and in some 30% of cases type a text message to the person they tried to call. So actuaU, in these cases their chosen form of messaging is to send a text when the' can't reach the person they're calling.

For carriers, missed calls (non-completed) of this type account for several billion events per year. In Spain, the second largest network (\Todafi)ne has some 2.3bn missed calls a year.

IICM solves this neatly for all parties. It is a network based service, SO flO handset dependency at all and works as follows: U \Vben a call is being placed to a subscriber/customer who hasn't got voicemail services, the network knows to catch the call before it fails -hits busy tone, rings out, phone is off or unavailable/out of range.

U The network then picks up the call anti plays back an 1\TR recording to the caller of the form: "If you would like to speak a text message to the person ou are calling, press 1".

o if the user selects this option (e.g. 1), then they're sinipi) offered a prompt to speak their message -e.g. "speak your text message after the tone".

o The system then records the audio, sends it to the Spin\'ox VMCS for conversion, and the converted te\t then sent on to the called parts and sent as if the message had originated from the calling party, not a system number or name. Tvpicall) this is done b using the callers CLI and putting it in the from' field of the sent message.

Today, this is being rolled out with SMS, but NiMS, email, WAP/HTML pages and any other form of text messaging can be used depending on the network's capability and user requirements.

The benefits are simple, but very large: o Callers get through first time when the need to O Recipients see immediately who needs them and can read the actual message O The role of message choice and charging is reversed. Typically, voicemail is a B-party service (recipient) because they pay and opt to have it. With MCIvI, it's actually 2() an A-parts (caller/sender) service as they opt-in every time they use it (no subscription) and the) can also be hilled for the use of the service.

O Carriers can generate new revenue from missed calls as now the caller (A-party) can be charged for the option of speaking a text either hs call termination charges, premium rate SMS or inter-network charging models -all of which exist today.

o Likewise, a more classic B-party charging model is possible two, just like oicemail is today.

O Call continuity (the number of additional calls or text messages or data traffic generated as a consequence rises. This is expected to be more than existing missed call alert products which are known to be some 2-3%, and Spinvox MCM is expected to be more similar to SpinVox Voicemail-to-Text which has an impressive 7% voice uplift and l7'', text uplift.

0 This service serves callcrs from any network, flot just those on the borne network.

E.g. Callers may call from network x to a person on network v. Network has enabled MCM and can offer this service to callers from network x and generatc additional revenues froi-n any missed call, not just on-net. Likewise, this can he reversed so that callers from the host network (nctwork v) may he oftered this service when unable to reach users on other networks (network x). These combinations provide the ability for the host network for MCM to capture all missed calls re]ating to their subscribers/customers regardless whether they're the A or B party. See table below.

O Some networks can deploy this as a recipient (B-party) service instead and bill them for use of service, much as voicemail is today, so MCM can [it existing business models.

How MCM is being deployed: Figure 10 shows MCM with Spin Vox Voicemail to Text also deploed.

MCM allows the host network to serve A party callers regardless of whether they are on the home (host) network or not, providing 100% reach for serving missed calls relating to their subscribers/customers: A party (caller) B party (recipient) MCM available On net On net Yes On net Off net Yes Off net On net Yes Off net Off net No Clearly, missed calls that occur betveen other networks are beyond reach.

Billing Options Where required. MCM can he charged for in different wa s: 0 Cal] termination charges to the A-party (caller) based on minimum and/or per second/per minute charges. This is similar to the va voicemail deposits arc charged.

0 Premium rate contirniation SMS sent to the A-parts' to charge them for each time the opt to use i\ICM 0 CrOSS net charges for the service, so networks x & would agree that they'd charge each other and therefore their users a certain amount for each event which would appear on their bill. The difference here is that this could be done via premium product billing API's or protocols to put the product/service into a different billing class, not standard voice call charge.

0 Free -the call-continuity and call completion impacts can he highly favourable and offset any need to generate revenue explicitly from each event.

Again, this can be reversed so that it's a B-parts serice and the) pa for it as shown in an) of these methods, or it is a standard feature as voicemail currently is today.

Product Options Given that not all networks can manage calls as shown in the above designs, there are other ways of providing NICM: Option 1: Call hack for message * Call is attempted to B-parts, fails and clears * A-pam is called from network and offered service * If accepted, message recorded and processed * A-party is charged only if message is converted * If not converted, B-part receives standard missed call alert Option 2: Text hack for message * Similar to Option 1, but service offered via SMS * A-pam responds to SMS if they wish to invoke service * A-party calls IVR via embedded link in SMS (free call) -see X-Links above * Charged for service only if message successfully converted * If not converted, B-parts-receives a standard missed call alert (MCA) Retrieval options In all the abovc options for MCM, the B-part-v (recipient) may want to bear the voice message. In this case they can be offered a number to call and have that message played back to them.

This is either as an extension to Spin\'ox's existing QuickLinkTM technology whereby the convened text message for the B-part-v contains a link that either places a call to a network service (typically IVR) that then automaticall plays back this message. The link itself can either be a real phone number and then a set of digits that when the user types them in tells the system which exact message to play back.

Alternatively, this can he a virtual number that the network can create which means that in one call the network knows both the type of call arid which exact message this relates to.

Attached or embedded audio Alternativeh, the audio is hosted on a web site and streamed back over a data channel, or it's sent as an attachment/embedded file which is possible with MMS, email and other multimedia capable forms of messaging.

Naturally, retrieving the audio can create new incremental revenue for the carrier which didn't exist he fore.

SECTION E: OVERVIEW OF SPINVOX PRODUCTS The preceding Section D described a specific innovation, Missed Call Messenger. This Section E provides an overview of the array of SpinVox products.

D

Two generic types of product are available: * Sender: where you choose to speak a text message * Recipient: where you choose that people speak y( )U a text message All of these share the ability of one person to speak another a text message of some format.

Figure 11 shows how various conventional messaging products (voicemail, email, SMS, 1M and voice) are distributed on a Time v Dialogue axes. Figure 12 shows how various Spin\'ox products alter this landscape.

* Recipient products extend a dialogue; reduce inherent delays in receiving message; give real-time voicemail (push); use a seamless interface; are ubiquitous, and work on any device, any technology, any network.

* Sender products initiate new dialogues; use a simpler interface to make mobile messaging more intuitive; allow ordinary users to Say it, Not Thumb Type It!; require nothing new to learn; allow existing applications to be enhanced; generate new modes for messaging to provide real mobility' -such as safe and fast use even whilst driving, walking, etc.; allow new revenues from existing products.

We will now look at each category in more depth.

Recipient Products These are all products where you actively decide to enable others to message you by speaking you a text message.

E.1 Voicemai1toTextTM When people leave a user a voicemail message, it is converted and sent to the user as an SMS message.

QuickLinkTM allows users to listen to the original message the text relates to.

E.2 Voicemai1toEmailTM \X:hen people leave a user a voicemail message, it-is conserted and sent to the user as an email.

When the message was not conerted, tile) can optiona]l be sent the original audio mcssagc as an email attachment.

QuickLinkTM allows users to listen to the original message the text relates to.

E.3 CalltoMailTM Designed for call centres, direct marketing response and other customer facing functions, callers can either * opt out of the queue in favour of speaking a message that's converted and sent as email * always be asked to speak a message that will be converted and sent as email E.4 No answer -Speak a Text -(Missed Call Messenger -see also Section D) Designed for users who don't have voicemail, or want voicemail, typically high amongst the prepaid mobile phone market, or non-associated voicemail box market.

This is a network based service that manages unanswered calls and offers callers the option of speaking ci. text to the person they were trying to call. This applies to calls that are unanswered, busy or rejected (send busy tone).

A network operator simply deploys this to all accounts where there user has no voicemail or equivalent voice messaging service.

1. When a subscriber doesn't answer their call, the caller is offered a new option: "I'm sorry, this person is unavailable. To speak them a text, press I now." a. Optionally, the caller is billed either by time on the line, or per event, e.g. "Calls cost SOp per minute, minimum charge 20p" 2. Caller now records their message.

3. Subscriber who missed the call gets a text message from the caller with what they said as text.

a. Optionalk, subscriber given a number to call in to listen to the original message.

What's unique about this is that subscribers won't have to sign-up or pay for the benefit.

Callers are given this choice as it might he important to get a message to the person they're trying to reach.

Subscribers can choose how they want messages delivered to them: SMS/MMS, email, etc...

Sender Products -Network based These are all products where YOU decide to speak someone a message that is then converted and sent to them as text.

E.5 Call Return -by Speak a Text Service providers have been offering subscribers a way of returning a call within voicemail - call hack -which the subscriber initiates by selecting an option before or after message play-back. This adds a new option to return the call, hut instead by speaking them a text message reply: 1. User calls into listen to voicemaii messages. At the beginning or end of every message played back, the' are offered the option to speak the caller a text back.

"To speak this person a text, press I now" 2. They press 1, then speak their message; it's converted and sent süaight to the caller's number.

a. The voicemail system has both the caller's CLI and the subscribers, so can correctly form a converted message that is sent as if directly from the subscriber, directis to the original caller. The recipient (original caller) is offered a link to listen to original message.

6 IVR -Speak a Text (see also Appendix I) On an) IVR system, an option can be offered to an) caller whereby they can speak anyone a message and have it converted and sent as text.

I. User calls either a dedicated number, or calls their voicemail and is offered this option to speak someone a text: "To speak someone a text, press 1" 2. LTser then pronipted to enter the phone number of the recipient. They either enter the numbers on their phone keypad and the system detects the DTMF or equivalent signalling tones, or they select them from an address hook.

3. Sstem checks phone number is valid.

4. User then prompted to speak their message: "Please speak your message after the tone" 5. Th' speak their message, it's converted and sent straight to the caller's number.

a. The voicemail system has both the caller's CLI and the subscribers, so can correctly form a converted message that is sent as if directly from the subscriber, directly to the original caller.

E.7 Network Service -Speak a Text This is typically for landline networks where people are still accustomed to dialling phone numbers, but is technically possible on an)' network type -fixed, mobile, wireless, \olP.

If you want to speak someone a message, simply put a call modifier' (prefix or suffix) with the number of the person you want to message. Then the user hears "Welcome to Speak-a-Text. Speak your message after the tone." The user speaks the message and hangs up. The message is converted and then sent to the correct recipient. The recipient is offered a link to listen to the original message.

Sender Products -Handset Based This applies for users who want to speak someone a text message rather than call them, much like opting to send someone an email or an SMS. More details on this are given in Section E.1O below.

E.8 Spoken SMS Four options to Speak-a-Text on a handset: 1. Application on home' screen 2. Menu option in Address Book/Contacts 3. Menu option in Messaging apps 4. Menu option in Call/Missed call list a. Natural extension of existing native applications h. New option: SpeakTxt' Note: Although Spoken SMS is shown, the concept is the same for speaking an MMS, an email, an instant Message or an' other messaging product type.

E.9 Spoken Mail An application on the handset allows a user to select who the want to email, SMS or MMS.

They are then offered a Speak mail function. The user is connected to a SpinVox spoken message service where they are prompted to record their message. The application sends through who the mail is for -the destination email addresses or list of addresses, subject, and any other message parameters.

Figure 13 shows an example of a deployment of Spoken email and Spoken SMS/MMS with a mobile service provider -SIP telephony connectivity.

Figtirc 14 shows an example of a deployment of Spoken email with a French mobile service provider -standard telephony and synchronised data.

Fire & Forget Principle In am 1)1 the methods shown, there is a simple principle that makes the user experience unique: * minimum effort -just speak your message * nothing to learn -just like leaving a voice message on standard voicemail * reliable -few steps as possible to avoid confusion or technical failures * robust -only if the message isn't converted do you need to do anything, othenvise YOU know it's been done The following section will focus on handset based sender products.

E.1O Speaking a message from a mobile device Speaking a message SpinVox has created a software application; Speak-a-message (also called SpinMvText, which when loaded onto a device, such as a Nokia mobile phone, allows a user to speak a message, which is then delivered to the recipient as text.

The purpose of this service is to give a user the ability to speak a message rather than type it out on their phone keypad. This will make it more convenient, easier and faster than typing it on their phone keypad.

Messages can be sent in the fbrm of an email, SiMS or MMS message, depending upon the details stored in the Address Book of the device, for the recipient. Multiple recipients can be sent the same message by using the broadcast' facility of the application and messages can also he delhered to customers Blogs or other web-based applications.

Embedded menu items Additional functionality is brought to the device, by adding new menu items into the standard menu tree. The menu option "Speak-a-Message" is added to the following applications:

D

* Text Messaging Application * MMS Messaging Application * Email Application * instant Messaging (IM) Application * Address Book * Call Logs * i-iome screen, using a soft key The functionalin-that the menu option gives, changes dynamically, depending upon which application the user is in, as detailed below.

Text messaging application Selecting the Speak-a-message option allows the user to: * Create a new message using the contacts Mobile number as the destination * Reply to a previous message using the number provided * Applies to an' of SMS, MMS, 1M or other messaging application on the device Email Application Selecting the Speak-a-message option allows the user to: * Create a new message using the contacts email address as the destination * Create a new message to multiple recipients using their email addresses as the destination * Reply to a previous message using thecontacts email addresses as the destination Below are the generic actions a user will take in either the text messaging or email application to send a message.

1. Caller selects Nlessaging/SMS application and selects Speak a message' option from menu and is directed to Contacts.

2. When the Contact has been selected a connection to the SpinVox platform is established 3. An announcement requesting the user to speak their text message will then be played 4. The caller will leave an audio message.

5. The B Parry intbrmation is passed to SpinVox (Selected in Step 2).

6. The SpinVox platform will convert the audio to a text message for onward de1ierv.

7. The message is then sent from the A Party to the B Party as if they had typed it.

8. The B Pam-receives the message and it appears to have come from the A Party. No special system numbers are used or substituted.

Figure 15 shows the typical user experience of speaking a message from within the Text Messaging or Email Application Address Book Selecting the Speak-a-message option allows the user to: Create a new message (intelligent addressing decides the message path). Below' are the steps 21) taken by a user accessing Speak a message from within the address book application: 1. selects a contact from the Address Book.

2. Caller is presented with a menu option to Speak a message 3. \Xlen the Speak a message option has been selected the intelligent addressing function looks at the available methods for delivering a message and then makes a connection to the Spin\Tox platfiirm 4. An announcement requesting the user to speak their text message will then be played 5. The caller will speak a message.

6. The B Party email address or phone number is passed to Spin\Tox service (Selected in Step 1) 7. The Spin\tox platform will cons en the audio to a text message for onward delivery.

8. The message is then sent from the A Party to the B Party as if they had typed it.

9. The B Party receives the message and it appcars to have come from the A Parts. No special S) stem numbers are used or substituted.

Figure 16 sho s a typical user experience of speaking a message from within the Address Book Call Logs Selecting the Speak-a-message option allows the user to: * Create a message for numbers listed in the Missed Call log using SMS as the reply path * Create a message for numbers listed in the Outgoing Call log using SMS as the reply path * Create a message for numbers listed in the incoming Call log using SMS as the rep1 path The above methods are easily accessed using the main navigation buttons on the device, such as Call, or Menu. There is flO need to use lesser accessible alphanumeric keboard to type in information.

The steps below are the generic actions a user will take to reply to someone whose phone call they missed, or to whom they have recently spoken.

1. Caller selects a contact from the Call Log 2. Caller is presented with a menu option to Speak a message 3. When the Speak a message option has been selected a connecon is made to the Spin\Tox platform 4. An announcement requesting the user to speak their text message will then he played 5. The caller will leave an audio message 6. The B Pam number is passed to the SpinVox platform (Selected in Step I) 7. The Spins' x platform wil] convert the audio to a text message for onward delivery 8. The message is then sent from the A Party to the B Party as if they had typed it 9. The B Party receives the message and it appears to have come from the A Party. No special system numbers are used or substituted.

Figure 17 shows the ii pical user experience of speaking a message using the Call Log.

Soft key access It is possible to activate the Speak a message application from the Home Screen of a mobile phone, by using one of the soft key shortcuts, rather than having to navigate to a particular application, such as the Address Book, first.

Caller Access -Soft Key Below are the steps a user will take to speak a message from the Home Screen of a device.

1. Caller selects the Speak a message soft key and is directed to a list of Contacts they can speak a message to where they then choose a contact.

2. When the Speak a message option has been selected a connection to the SpinVox platform is established 3. An announcement requesting the user to speak their text message will then he played 4. The caller will leave an audio message.

5. The B Pam-number should he passed to SpinVox (Selected in Step I) 6. The Spin Vox plattbrm will convert the audio to a text message for onward delivery 7. The message is then sent from the A Party to the B Party as if the had t ped it.

8. The B Pam' receives the message and it appears to have come from the A Party. No special system numbers are used or suhstituted.

Figure 18 shows a typical user experience of speaking a message from within Speak a Message application Extend able application The Speak a message application can be easily extended to offer additional functionalit for many different pes of Spoken Messang. Additional message types include Social Networking applications such as Blogging and peer to peer communication, such as instant Messaging.

Figure 19 shows a typical user experience for Speaking a Blog Figure 20 shows a typical user experience of speaking a reply in a Mobile 111 client.

User experience Fire & Forget' in 3 clicks The Speak a message application uses a unique Fire & Forget' system for creating and delivering messages. This differs from other systems that require the user to speak, review ((in screen) and confirm before finall sending the message. Fire & Forget means: minimum effort -just speak your message * nothing to learn -just like leaving a voice message on standard voicemail * reliable -few steps as possible to avoid confusion or technical failures * robust -only if the message isn't converted do you need to do anything, otherwise ou know it's been done The Speak a message application takes control of the mobile dcice, providing a means (it always being able to speak a message within 3 clicks. Typically these 3 clicks are translated into the fillowing actions: 1. Select speak a text' 2. Choose whom to send a message to... speak a message 3. F lang-up Figure 21 shows the 3 clicks' user experience The Fire and Forget system combined with the no more than 3 clicks' approach means that the user can send messages in Situations where other systems could not be used, such as walking along a street, or in a situation where it's not possible to look at the screen for an length of time.

The Speak-a-message application i also designed for one-handed use, with all the functions easily accessible using a single key click and the menu navigation device of the handset.

Figure 22 shws the Fire & Forget' system employed by Speak a Message.

Intelligent message addressing and delivery When a user elects to speak a message to someone from his or her Address Book, the type of message that is to he sent is decided by the contact details available in the address book.

-If only an email address is available tile message is sent via email.

* if onh a mobile phone number is available, the message is sent via SMS or MMS * If an onhnc account name is present fir IM or other, the message is sent here * If multiple are available, the message can he sent to a selection of destinations, however h defliult the message will be delivered to the mobile number Fast address list The fast address list is an intelligentl compiled list of recent contacts, which is produced h understanding the users previous behaviour.

The algorithm builds a list of tile most recent people the user has been in contact with, taking into consideration the following: * The communicating type (email, text message, phone call, or spoken text) * The frequency of communication with that contact * How recent the last communication was * Alphabetical order This is then presented in a single, easy to read list; which still offers eas access to any contact in the customers Address Book. This differs from the existing Call Lists', such as the SMS Sent folder, as there is significant intelligence applied in creating the Fast Address list.

Figure 23 shows the Fast Address List -showing recent contacts that have Called, been Called, Texted (SMS or MMS or Emailed (or an) other messaging/communications process used). Because the Fast Address List is comprehensive, it becomes the central resource for all unified communications tasks the user needs to perform.

Unified messaging breaks down the barriers between various forms of communication, such as voice, email, and voice mail.

The Speak a message application effectively provides thc user with a single origination point for all these types of messages, thereby providing the user with a unified message centre on their mohile device.

Having the capability to respond to oice messages using text or text messages using voice may seem trivial, however, it is a means thr end users to enhance or even improve upon their productivity, especially if it saves them time in communicating with one another.

For mobile users, access to and use of the phone is essential, especially while the are in transit. With the Speak a message application offering a unified messaging experience, mobile users can receive and respond to voice messages, e-mail messages, and fax messages, by speaking a reply, and can maintain a higher level of productivity while they are out of the office.

Automated message transport selection Messages are sent to the SpinVox platform using the most appropriate transport method a ailable. For example, a spoken email will be captured on the de ice, ts picallv as a \X AV File, but can l)e any form of audio file, and tbrwarded to the VTi'lCS as an email, using a 3G or GPRS data channel, if it is available. Once conversion of the message is complete the result will he emailed to the recipient.

The routing of messages from the mobile device to the Spin\'ox platform is carried out on an intelligent basis depending upon the available transport methods. The choice is made from the thllowing list: * GPRS data connection * 3G data connection * SMTP interface * FITTP interface * IVR (fixed line) * MMS if the optimum method of transport is unavailable, the application automatically checks fin the availability of the next most appropriate method and uses it.

Asymmetric messaging This software creates a unique new set of options fin the user and recipient to continue in contact using a range of connected messaging options.

Outgoing call becomes a text message What makes this service unique is that the original message starts life as a spoken message and when it is tinall delivered to the end customer's device it not only appears in their 11) inbox, but it has been transposed into an email or SMS.

Incoming call replied to by an email or text message By creating this service Spin\'ox allows the recipient of the original voice message (or missed call) to choose to reply by speaking a text message or email, rather than by traditionally having to call the sender of the message using the telephone or type a message using the keypad of the device. This is unique in that once the recipient replies to the original message ia an email or text the end-to-end communication method has moved from being voice driven to text driven and once the repl is sent to the originator they too can then reply via a text message, email or hy speaking a message.

Product requirements for SpinMyText (SMT) The key to the success of this application is in its' simplicity of activation. It must be possible to invoke it through a single key press, which is available on any handset, and complete the process from start to finish in no more than 3 key presses. The SMT product offering will ideally he positioned at Mobile Operators and Enterprise Customers, enabling a user to select an option on their handset that allows them to speak a text message (The same functionality can also be applied to speaking an email message). This audio file is captured by the Spin\'ox platform and converted to a text message for delivery.

The product must meet the following criteria: One hand, one thumb accessible -The application must he so simple to start and use that it-almost feels like it could he a handsfree' application. The Acid test for the success of this application is whether it can be used in the fast lane of the motorwas safch and legally.

Nothing new to learn -it must he as simple as making a voice call, with no morc than 3 key strokes to initiate, use and complete the service.

Fire & forget -it must be as trustworthy as any other service e.g. voice-mail or text messaging, there should be no need to check the contents of the message.

Customer Touch points -must be a simple single click to initiate SMT addressing.

Familiar interaction & metaphors employed by the current UI must he used.

Called Party (B') information automatically sent -No additional interaction, e.g. speaking or typing in a number, should be required by the customer to use the service.

Simple Deployment-An application to enable the new functionality must be availahle to download using a simple LTRL, WAP link or short- range wireless connection e.g. Bluetooth.

The application should also he updateable b-the same method.

Upgradeable -It must he possible to upgrade the product to add new features, with minimal customer inten'ention and without having to terminate the application manually Non-Intrusive -The application should not prevent another application on the handset from running and consideration should be given to events that may impact the application e.g. how does the application react to an incoming call during SMT call set up.

Customer Insight There are many situations when someone would choose to speak a text message, as opposed to ti-ping one or making a voice call. The common theme is that the user needs a fast, simple way of getting some information to someone and they either can't or don't want to stop what they are doing. The key insight here is that accessng the /imctunmht and simp/fi;in, the addre.r.chg of the message is as important (if not morc important) than the voice to text element (which.cht-m//bc taken for granted).

NB. The customer experience needs to be one button press to start the process (across any device) one click to select the addressee and the final click should be to end the phone call/recording process.

The user experience should also exploit the fact that the mobile users' text messaging and caller log eco-svsrem are tvpicalls limited to a handful of numbers.

Contact Number Storage The format of how mobile phone numbers arc stored on a mobile handset is key to delivering a text message successfully from the SpinVox system.

Certain assumptions must be made in order to determine the destination Country of a text message, if the number submitted to SpinVox is in non-International format.

The following behaviours shape the assumptions that must be made, in order to resolve the destination delivery Country of a text message.

The International Business traveler Anyone that travels Internationally regularly is likely to have at least 80% of their contact list populated with International format numbers.

The remaining 20 /o are likely to be stored in the local format of the country the aveller resides in. It is vei-v unlikely they will have a number stored in local format for a country they are not a resident ot The infrequent Business traveler * Is likel to have a mixture of International and non-international format numbers * Any non- international format numbers stored on the handset will be from the country of residence.

The non-traveler The non-travellers contact list will lic populated with numbers in local format from the country they reside.

There may be the odd number that is stored in international fi)rmat, which has been updated when going abroad on holiday, in case they need to call home. 11)

From this we can conclude that when a customer uses SMT and the B parry' number arrives, as a local number the most likely country of origin is the users home Country.

The development team faces similar issues today, with our current products, and the above assumption is used for prefixing the outgoing SMS.

It is therefore essential that the 1-lome Country' of the user is captured somehow and associated with their MS1SDN.

21) SMT Application The SMT application sits in the background of the handset, waiting to be activated b a single special' button dick, in order to keep the user experience the same across any device or platform the same button must he available on an device, on any mobile platform.

Clearly this limits the choice of ke s available to the following: Numeric (0-9) Special ke s (* #) Call keys (..rr & terminate) This limit is actually something SpinVox can exploit; with a specific key e.g. SpeedDial #2 becoming the Spin Vox key', much in the same way that SpeedDial #1 is the Voicemail key.

An application working in this manner requires far less integration into each handsets functionality and for the customer it means im thinking,. no seatrhing. iiofiimb/ing,.

For proton-ping purposes reprogramming the right hand soft key' often used b carriers to access tile WAP Portals, should be reprogrammed to gh'e one button access to tile S1\I'l' application.

User Interface Using a single k-e to get access to tile functionality of SMT has tile effect of simplif ing the user experience and vastly reducing the amount integration into numerous menu options, in each of the possible places that someone might want to send a message from.

A user could still interact with their handset to initiate a SMT message in the following scenarios, however, the single button approach means they would be moved into the SMT app.

Cal] Logs Contacts Messaging/SMS Application Through an SMT on-screen Icon Navigation It should he possible to start a SMT message by pressing a single hutton For each of the above scenarios the user must imow where in the application the are and what options are available to them The user should be able to use the application through recognisahie controls on the handset Entering Information The user should not have to physically enter a recipient's number as part of the I\'R process; 31) it should he automatically sent from the handset to the IYR platform.

Information Presentation * Text used in menus should he familiar to the user * Considerathwi should he vcn to the icon used thr the SMT application (if one is required).

* Consideration should be given to colour or sound requirements that may affect the handset * Consideration should be given to the possible error conditions and how these will be displayed (Jr announced e.g. audio not captured, conversion not possible, It) text message not sent.

Caller Access -Contacts I. Caller selects a contact from the contacts menu 2. Caller is presented with a menu option to SMT 3. When the SMT option has been selected a connection to a voicemail platform needs to be established 4. An announcement requesting the user to speak their text message will then be played 5. The caller will leave an audio message.

6. The B Pam number should be passed to Spin\'ox (Selected in Step 1) 7. The Spin\' x platform will convert the audio to a text message for onward deiven.

Caller Access -Call Log 1. Caller selects a contact from the Call Log.

2. Caller is presented with a menu option to SlUT 3. When the SMT option has been selected a connection to a voicemail platform needs to be established 4. An announcement requesting the user to speak their text message wit] then be played 5. The caller will leave an audio message.

6. The B Party number should he passed to SpinVox (Selected in Step I) 7. The Spin\Tox platform wit] conert the audio to a text message for onward delivers Caller Access -Soft Key 1. Caller selects a SlUT soft ke and is directed to Contacts where a contact is selected.

2. Caller is presented with a menu option to SMT 3. When the SMT option has been selected a connection to a voicemail platform needs to be estahlished 4. An announcement requesting the user to speak their text message will then be played 5. The caller will leave an audio message.

6. The B Party number should be passed to SpinVox (Selected in Step I) 7. The Spin\'ox platform will convert the audio to a text message for onward delivery Caller Access -Messaging Application 1. Caller selects Messaging/SMS application and selects SMT option from menu and is directed to Contacts.

2. \\ hen the Contact has been selected a connection to a voicemail platform needs to be established 3. An announcement requesting the user to speak their text message viJ] then he played 4. The caller will leave an audio message.

5. The B Party number should he passed to Spin Vox (Selected in Step 2) 6. The Spin Vox platform w'il] convert the audio to a text message for onward delivery Handset user experience The Figure 24 screen shots demonstrate the ideal user experience: the Fast Address list of recent contacts (people that have called, been called, texted, emailed etc) is selected, the one individual (David Wood) is selected to automatically initiate a connection to the SpinVox voice conversion system so that the user can speak a message. This is easy to replicate across all chosen devices, to provide a consistent user experience.

End-to-end user experience The Figure 25 diagram below shows the end-to--end experience from the A & B party 1(1 perspective.

1. Suzs holds down the SMNI soft-key on her handset and is presented with the last 5 contacts that she contacted, either h text message, email, MMS or voice, in her Recent' list. She also has the option to select an) other Contact if the person she wants to contact is not presented in the list.

2. She selects the contact she wants to send a message to and a message on the screen of her device tells her that the SmT service is being contacted and to listen for an audio prompt.

3. The SpinVox Set-vice is contacted and A party information is sent to the 5MM service.

4. B pam-info is converted thr transfer to the SpinVox Sen-ice.

5. Once the connection is established with the SM NI sen-ice the DTMF B party info is sent.

6. The voice to text conversi n takes place and the B party receives the text message.

7. Th B part-v replies to the original message.

8. The A part-v can choose to speak another reply or use a keyboard based method to reply.

Handset Support / Target Platforms The following platforms will be supported in subsequent versions.

* Windows Mobile 5 * Windows Mobile 6 * RIM OS 4.1 and above (Rrf?nwce Blackberry device models and OS ersions) * Svmbian Series 60 (2"' Edition) * S' mhian Series 60 (3 Edition) * Java PsI IDP 2.1) capable devices Application Provisioning The option to pvc-provision handsets with the application prior to issue/despatch is possible, as is a simple mechanism for down]oading the application for users with existing handsets, options include: * Bluetooth * WAP link * 1\lemon Card Consideration should also be given for removal of the application from the handset.

The Figure 26 to 31 screenshots demonstrate only a small part of the Speak-a-Message application. it-shows the functionalit of a customer choosing to speak a text message to an individua]. It does not cover, sending to more than one person, or sending messages directly to a web application, such as a blog.

All the screenshots belo are taken from a Nokia N95 mobile phone, however the service is not restricted to any particular device.

Figure 26 shows the typical behavkur of the application in the home screen of the phone.

The application automaticali takes control of a soft button in the Home screen ("Speak a Text" on the screen bottom right, allowing one button access to the Speak-a-Message functionality.

The application can also be programmed to present itself using other short cut keys, if they are available on the device. For example in Figurc 27, the application is accessed using a short cut displayed as the SpinVox k, after pressing the Multimedia Key' on a Nokia N95.

Figure 28 shows the Fast Address list, which on an N95 device is limited to the last 5 people which you spoke to, ernailed, sent or received a text from or spoke a message to.

11) These are presented in using chronological then alphabetical order.

Speaking a message is not confined to this group of five people. any contact can have a message spoken to them b' moving from the Recent' view to the Contacts' iew as seen in Figure 29.

If a contact is selected in the Contacts' view that contains more than one phone number, then both numbers are shown and the user is given a choice of using either, as shown in Figure 30.

once the number has been selected the Spin\'ox service is contacted and the customer prompted to leave a message. The destination information is automatically sent to the Spin Vox Service and when the user hangs up the message is sent to the recipient.

Figure 31 shows when the customer connects to the SpinVox service the name of the contact being sent the text is displayed.

APPENDIX I

SPEAK A TEXT (IVR BASED) Key features: * Messaging \ ou can use when you can't or don't want to stop what ou are doing.

* No special application is needed on the handset.

* No need to remember someone's number.

* It is so intuitive to use, it requires no explanation.

* You can send both email and SMS messages to recipients.

* You can easily update the nunihers of the people you want to contact.

Introduction

This appendix details the user experience and highlights specific requirement for the Speak-a-Text product. The solution vilI consist of: * A dedicated phone number, voice shortcode or network access code * A Voice recognition system, connected to the I\TR platform This solution provides the ability to: Speak a Message & have it delivered as Text (Si\lS or Email).

Listen to previously saved Voicemail messages.

The User Experience is shown schematically in Figure 32 Product Requirements 1. Service Level In order to use the Speak a text (I\'R product the customer must have signed up for an account with Spin\Tox.

Requirement The end-user will alread have a Voicemail account.

The service will have an availabilit the same as that of Spin\'ox Voicemail.

Only the first 3(i seconds of an message will be converted.

TAT -must be the same as that defined for Spin\'ox \oicemail or SpinVox Blast.

Language support. On the initial launch the sen-ice must support the following languages: UK English US English Canadian English Canadian French German French Spanish Australian English Sc uth African English On initial launch the senice will be limited to retail customers onl.

2. IVR

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An access number, voice shortcode or network access code will connect the caller directly to the Spin\Tox IVR.

The IVR tree vi11 bc changed in order to include an option to speak a message to someone.

it will also contain options to have previously received voicemail read Out' to the customer, using a text to Voice s stem.

The caller can then access their list of alread registered contacts. This list will he limited to people.

Requirement The voice talent used to record an' new voice prompts must he the same as currentl used on the Spin Vox IVR platform.

The languages the IVR is recorded in must mirror the languages available for current products.

Access to the service will be b determined b' recognising the CLI of the incoming caller.

If the customers CL1 is withheld they will hear the fillowing voice prompt: "I'm son-v your phone number was withheld, please call back without withholding it".

The call will then be terminated.

The I\'R system must be capable of receiving Voice based commands, as well as DTiI F commands. The IVR system must be able to concatenate commands and names, in order

to create a simple voice based user interface.

E.g. [EmaiiJ [Dan Doulton] Where [Emaifi is the desired delivery method and [Dan Doulton] is the recipient.

The following Voice Commands must he recognised for creating and sending messages: Email Mail Text

SMS

The following \oice Commands must he recognised for listening to a1rrq saved messages: Play Listen The following Voice Commands must he recognised for managing messages that are already saved: Play Listen Delete Sae 3. Billing The Speak a text service is hilled per event. Meaning that each time a message is sent the customer will have their account decremented and either a hilling event will he triered resulting in a Premium SMS being sent to them or in the case of Credit Card billing one credit will he deducted from their bundle.

Requirement It must be possible to bill customers per conversion event using whichever payment system their account uses.

It must be possible to exclude customers who are defined as UFTAs from being hilled.

It must be possible to exclude customers who have been placed onto No conversion status, due to bad debt.

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4. Provisioning In order to use the speak a text (IVR) service it is necessary to sign up and register the details of the people oii wish to be able to contact.

This will be done using a web browser on a PC or Mac, it will not be possible to do this from a Mobile device.

A maximum of ten people can he registered at an)' one time. it will be possible to add or amend an) of the Contacts that are stored in the customer's profile.

Requirement The provisioning system must work with all popular browsers, such as; internet Explorer. Firefox, Safari and Netscape (PC & Mac versions).

It must be possible to add up to ten peoples contact details.

The fillowing inforrhation is mandatory when adding a contact: First Name Last Name Mobile Phone number Email Address It must be possible to choose and provision a payment plan from the web interface.

Payment plan options must include credit card and Premium SMS payment types.

5. Voice Recognition Once connected to the SpinVox 1VR it must he possible top navigate the menu system in a handsfree' mode, where it is not necessary to press a key in order to select the recipient or the type of message being sent.

Requirement The voice recognition system must integrate seamlessly with the SpinVox 1VR platform.

it will be possible to concatenate names and commands, such as; "Email David Ponsfird" and have them understood by the \oice Recognition system, without having to leave unnatural pauses.

The voice recognition system must be able to recognise tile names (First name and Last name) when spoken using the 1VR platform.

6. Reporting Requirement it must be possible to report on all messages generated by this product.

APPENDIX II VOICEMAIL TO EMAIL CONTACT PLUGIN

Mobile Plug-In: Voicemail to Email Contact Resolution Voicemail converted to email The SpinVox Spin-mv-\'mail scrvice replaces a customer's voicemail service, b) using call forwarding to a new voicemail system hosted by SpinVox. Spin\7ox converts the incoming spoken voicemail messages Jflto text and then sends that text to the recipient as either an SMS text message of as an email message.

In addition to this Spin\'ox has created software, which when loaded onto a mobile device, such as a RIM BlackBerry, recognises the incoming email message from the Spin Vox system and performs a number of actions on it prior to the email being replaced in the inbox of the customer's device.

The senders phone number is included in the email that is sent and the Spin\'ox software, on the device, reads this number and then searches the Address Book on the recipient's device for a match of that number. It not only checks for an exact match, it also checks fort a match against the number stored in a local format.

For example, the number +442079232854 sent by the SpinVox system will l)e matched on the recipients device to a real name and their contact details as found in the recipient's address book (contacts) by the following numbers: +442079232854 -An exact match +44 20 79232854 -The same number in another International format 7923 2854 -The local' portion of the number The number matching is independent of the type of phone number the sender is using.

Matched numbers can include mobile numbers (O7x), fixed line geographic numbers (Olx, 02x) and non-fixed line geographic numbers (05x), often used with Voice over IP (VioIP) services, such as Skvpe. In fact, any allowed type of phone number passed to the service can be matched.

If a match is found in the recipients Address hook the following actions occur.

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I. Fh email will be marked with a special icon, or the standard icon will be modified to signal to the recipient that this is a different type of email -voicemail converted into email. This is very important in sorting and managing a busy email inbox and being able to find key messages by type as weli as content.

2. The Name of the contact in the address hook is noted and displayed in the From: field of the email. This way the user knows who it's from and the name is displayed in the format that they're familiar with and ha e recorded in their address book.

e.g. call from +447812101742 would be resolved to Daniel Doukon with the associated email addrcss being DANIEL.DOULTONSPINVOX.COM 3. The from Field of the email flOW contains the caller's actual email address too enabling the recipient to also reply by email, not just a phone call or SMS (if the senders mobile number is also stored in the Address Book).

In the body of the email the phrase You have just received a new voicemail from' is appended with the name of the contact, enabling the recipient to reply by a call or SMS (if the senders mobile iiumber is stored in the Address Book).

4. Whether the phone number is resolved or not against a contact in the Address Book, the subject line is replaced with the first 30 characters of the converted message, prefixed with SpinVox:" e.g. SpinVox: "Hi Dave. We're on for 7.30 at..." 5. A QuickLink (see GB2420942B, the contents of which is incorporated by reference) is inserted at the end of the body of the email, which will enable a simple, one click method for the recipient to listen to just that voicemail message. The link calls the SpinVox voicemail service, then uniquely finds that specific message and immediatek plays it back.

For Example. "Click here to listen" is sho\vn. The user selects this within the message and they are taken to the SpinVox voicemail service and that precise message is played back, without the user having to do anything else.

Embedded menu items Additional functionality is brought to the device, by adding new menu items into the standard menu tree.

IS Listen'; offers the ability to hear the original voicemail message, simply by clicking on the menu item, when reading a converted voicemail message.

Call Support'; will instantly connect the customer to the Spin\'ox Customer Care team, allowing them to discuss their account status These menu items are embedded dynamically. They become available when a customer is viewing a converted voicemail. This is to ensure the are onl) available when it makes sense for a customer to use them and not when it might cause confusion.

Asymmetric messaging This plug-in creates a unique new set of options for the user and recipient to continue in contact using a range of connected messaging options: Incoming call ends in an email.

What makes this service unique is that the original message originally started life as a spoken message and when it is finally delivered to the end customer's device it not only appears in the inbox of their devices message application, it has been transposed into an email and it contains a valid From: field, which, depending upon the contents of the recipients Address Book, will provide a reply path via email.

Incoming call replied to by an email W creating this service Spin Vox allows the recipient of the original voice message to choose to repl hv email, rather than h traditionally having to call the sendcr of the message using the telephone. This is unique in that once the recipient replies to the orinal message via an email the end-to-end communication method has moved from being voice drien to email driven and once the reply is sent to the originator they too can then reply via an email.

Summary of key features

* Conversion of an incoming phone call to an email.

* Resolution of senders telephone number against contact name and email address stored on recipient's mobile device.

* Email Reply path available to originally spoken message.

* Listen to specific voicemail messages using a single button press.

* New functionality embedded in the standard menu tree.

* Communication moved from voice to email.

Voicemail-to-email Business Requirements

Introduction

This section presents the business requirements that will enable users of email centric devices, such as RiM's BlackBerry with a simple variation of the standard \oicemail-to-Text service.

The BlackBerry is primaril used as an Enterprise business tool for PIM s nchronisation and reading and responding to emails, this will be reflected in the business requirements detailed in this document.

An Enterprise customer can deplo the BlackBerry solution through any one of the following deployment models: BlackBern Enterprise Solution -on premise implementation of a BES (BlackBerry Enterprise Server BlackBerry internet S lution -internet based service offering can he used with web-based email providers such as Gmail, Yahoo as well as providing access to the corporate email.

1-losted BlackBerr Solution -where a hosted service provider has deployed the BlackBerry platform in a data centre environment. An enterprise would purchase this solution on a per user per month basis.

This product enhancement will enable Spin Vox to target both BlackBerr3 and mobile phone users within the Enterprise driving increased user activations as a result of more text or email messages being generated, as opposed to voice, it further enhances SpiriVox positioning as a device independent service provider.

This service will also enable SpinVox to switch off' text delivery, by default, to Blackberry users, so that duel messages are not received on the device, making significant savings to the business.

The service will enable an Enterprise to have all voice message conversions delivered as emails only (default setting for it's BlackBerry or other email centric device users. The uscr will he given the option to enable SMS de1iver if required.

Cons crted Messages A converted voice message will be issued as an email with NO WA\' file attached. The option to use the message Quick-Link to locate and listen to the voicemail will also be available..

Unconverted Messages A user will be notified via email when a voice message cannot be converted. The option to use the message Quick-Link to locate and listen to the voicemail will also be available.

The service will be aailable across both GSM and CI)MA networks and to Enterprises located in the US, Europe and Australia For email delier it is required that the sender CLI be resolved against the Local Address Book (LAB), SO that the From: field is populated with the Senders real name as stored in the device's address book.

it is also required that in the email body the first line would read You received a new voicemail from John Smith'; where John Smith is the real name of the contact The user will have the capability to click on the caller's namc to email a response, send a text or initiate a call.

If the number is not able to resolved against the contents of the LAB, the CLI of the incoming number should be shown The subject line of the email will be contain the first 32 characters of the converted message prefixed with Spin Vox: The service will be tested against the following deployment models with: BlackBerry Enterprise Solution (BES Ver 4.0) BlackBerry Internet Solution Hosted Black-Berry Solution The service will hc tested against the following devices as a minimum: Pearl 8100 BlackBerr 8700 BlackBerry 7130 BlackBerry 8707 The application must be compatible with RIM OS version 4.1 and above.

Modifications will be required to the following business support systems: Spin\'ox \Vebsite -A user should be given the option to identit\ themselves as a user of an email centric device, such as a BlackBerry and should then be provisioned against a specific service profile i.e. Email only deliverv as default, Converted messages sent without audio attachment, Unconverted messages sent with audio file attached A link to a downloadable application will he available from the SpinVox.com website.

Customcr Care Interface -Modified to include a BlackBerry service profile Enterprise Web Self Service Tool -Will be modified to capture device type as BlackBerry and provisioning against a BlackBerry set-vice profile.

Screen shots The fidlowing screenshots show how the service will actually work, once a voicemail has been left tbr a customer and the message converted to text and the email sent to them.

All the screenshots below are taken from a BlackBerry device, however the service is not restricted to an particular device type.

Figure 33 shows the typical behaviour of an email centric device prior to the SpinV x plug-in software being installed. The From Field and Subject give no indication of wither who the message is from or what the message is about. It is also impossible to distinguish between a standard email and a converted voicemail message, as the message indicator icons are identical.

Figure 34 shows how the inhox looks after the Spinvox plug-in has been installed. The default email icon has been replaced h a special icon, which shows that the message is a Spin Vox voicemail message. The From: field has been replaced by the real name of the sender, as stored in the recipients Address Book on the device and the subject line has been changed to include the first part of the converted voicemail message, prefixed with SpinVox:" which enables the message to be sorted and grouped with other Spin Vox email messages.

Figure 35 displays how a SpinVox voicemail message will look once the recipient has opened it. The Sender's phone number has been compared with all the numbers stored in the recipients Address Book and as a match has been found the real name of the sender is displayed in the From field. In the example below the real name is \Tadiraj Patel.

The subject line has been changed to display the first part of the converted message prefixed with Spin Vox:" Figure 36 shows what happens wben a customer clicks on the real name that has now been put into the From: field. It is now p >ssible to repI directly via email to the sender of the message, by clicking on Email \adiraj in the menu. It is important to remember that the original message was a spoken message that has been replied to via email, moving the communication method from voice to screen.

Figure 37 shows what happens when a customer clicks on the real name that has now been put into the message text in the section which starts You received a new oicemail from' It is now possible to reply directly via SMS, MS or voice to the sender of the message, IM clicking on the appropriate menu item. It-is important to remember that the original message was a spoken message that is being replied to via SMS or MMS, moving the communication method from VOiCe to screen.

Figure 38 shows an example of a QuickLink, which has been inserted at the bottom of the converted email message. The QuickLink gives a simple and eas one-click method of listening to the original voicemail message the customer is currentl-reading. it dials the Spin\'ox voicemail service and automatically repla s the correct message.

Figure 39 shows how additional functionality has been added to the device with the inclusion of new menu items. These new menu items have been embedded into specific places, to ensure their functionality is only shown to the user, when it is of use to them. if it were presented all the time, it would lead to a lot of confusion.

Appendix III VIRAL/LINK CAMPAIGNS This section describes viral or link marketing methods used to spread and market Spinvox products.

Refer a friend (RAFit 0 SpinKe: I] Call your own mobile from your mobile * We then kiiow you're attempting a special call * "Please enter sour friend's mobile number" o Type it in, or if a power user, look it up in contacts and hit Call/Send -DTMF to us o "Thank s ou. Activation codes have been sent to you and your friend" o This means you have their activation code on screen and can help them through this fuggv process or...

U Cal] sour voicemail box -new 1\TR option U Call 84004 we're going to get the voice enabled) U Text your friend's mobile to 84004 * Call your own voicemail box/84004 and leave a message: "Sign up 07812101742" * SpinDemo: o Call your own mobile from sour mobile * SV IVR hut this time enter * then friend's number, now you speak them a text APPENDIX IV Unified Communications This market, and its derivate Unified Messaging, has tried to unii\ all of a users' commiLnications into a single in-box for them to manage, typically in email format and accessed from s'our PC.

The issue is that: o it's only accessible from one point -your email inbox or a web page meaning you need to be at a particular point in such as your desk, to acccss your communications. This doesn't help the ever increasing mobile workforce that is estimated to be away from a desk over 50% of their working day.

o An audio (voice messages) which may now appear as attachments to an email or other format, still require you to listen to them, write down key notes and in effect do the work. in short, it's not transformed into a medium that is synonymous with the task -keyboard, screen, IP based messaging that it came in as. SC) the user has to be at their PC, listen to messages and do the work of transforming this into sa an email reply or notes for a colleague.

0 To deploy UC services requires dedicated hardware and software and typically are an expensive IT upgrade cost to deliver and then need maintaining.

SpinVox solves these issues very neatly by converting all voice messages into text and distributing them to any device immediately: 0 SpinVox uses existing network services and call management features to unify your voice messages, typically voicemail messages, by either diverting calls to a single voice mail box, or collecting the voicemails from different voicemail boxes. These voice messages are then sent to the Spin\'ox \MCS for conversion into text. There is no need for any new IT hardware or software or complex systems management.

0 For users, there's no need to work through what can be complex decisions on call management or messaging configurations, typically based on time of day and day of week in order to ensure that the caller gets a message to you. By convening any voice message to text, users can instantly receive and see all their messages regardless of where they are and where the message came from -e.g. desk phone, cell phone, sitchboard, home phone, etc...

o Once the messages are in text, they are in a format that is now' synonymous with the medium in which they are intended to be managed -namely SMS, MMS, email, 1P, Web formats. Spin\'ox can deliver the output text to your email inbox, a web page/service or as a mobile text message in an form. Now the user can choose whether to call or text/mail back or manage this information for colleagues or friends in the format most suited. And because it's in text format, it's immediately indexable and searchable which leverages the power of computers to improve information management and retrieval.

o W undertaking this n-ansform (conversion, Spin Vox removes all the existing limitations of uC sen-ices and allows the message to not only be delivered to a single point (your inhox/P9, but also as text to any device anywhere sol'.ing the land-lock' problem of most LJC design. This means users can now undertake the key tasks that UC promises, but from wherever the are and at any time.

The reason that unifying voice messages from different sources (mail boxes) makes sense and creates real value is because it the most disparate and difficult for users to access and manage.

Email is alreath largek unified and in a good format fbr indexing, storage and management, and increasingly accessible from mobile Blackberrv).

Figure 40 shows how Spins-ox unifies various communications types and channels.

The power of using SpinVox is that you can seamlessly connect for the user (i.e. the UI level) what are traditionally disconnected systems' (e.g. voice, blog, SMS, email, etc...) b) both standard call management features (diverts/forwards) and h convening the voice message into text, thereby overcoming the technical barriers that would othenvise exist between different communications systems.

Appendix V Voice SMS SpinVox Voice SMS allows people to speak a voice message and have the recipient notified by SMS, requesting them to then call a number and listen to the message.

The service overcomes issues of language and literacy around text messaging, opening up new revenue streams for wireless Carriers without any additional investment in either infrastructure or handset features. It is more cost-effective and discreet than traditional voicemail, and more expressive than traditional SMS.

SpinVox Voice SMS provides the thilowing end user benefits: * New, highly personal way to communicate * (Typically) costs less than a voice conversation * Easy to use * Overcomes text usability issues * Available in all languages * Does not require literacy * Less hassle than typing an SMS * Works with current handsets * No end user training required As there is no barrier to entn, and making a phone call is natural behavior thr a ireless user, this product has mass appeal to the entire Carrier user base.

Product Overview Product name Spin Vox Voice SMS Description Allows a spoken voice message to be deposited from an mobile handset and a notification sent to the recipient b SMS. The recipient can then dial a QuickLink short code to listen to the caller message.

Originating Network GSM and CDMA Terminating Network GSM and CDMA Voice SMS works much like SMS, instead of sending text, callers can easily send voice messages, using expression to convey more intormation than text alone. For the called party the scrvice is easy to usc and adds an emotional dimension to messaging.

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A callcr simply prefixcs a standard mobile number with a short code e.g. , the service records the voice message and sends an SMS notification to the called parts who can then replay the voice message by simply clicking on a QuickLink short c)dc e.g. *3 SpinVox \oice SMS will generate an incremental sustainable revenue stream for Wireless Carriers without cannibalizing existing services. The availability of \oice SMS creates new situations where people can use messaging, where they would not have thought to use it previoush. Subscribers are using Voice SMS to convey more emotional messages in a way that text-based messaging cannot achieve.

The user experience will he natural and straightforward -the calling party makes a normal voice call, prefixing the mobile number with a short code to initiate a session with the SpinVox Voice SMS platform. The calling party will reach an IVR, which will prompt them to speak their message and then simply select the send option from the IVR.

A typical voice message is expected to he a short duration intentional message. The maximum recording duration will he limited to 30 seconds.

The product must meet the following criteria: 1. No behaviour change in many developing counthes literacy levels may be low as well as the inability o1 the SMS interface to handle local languages -in these cases sending voice instead of text is a more relevant service proposition. Sending and retrieving a Voice SMS must he as simple as making or receiving a normal oice call.

2. Easy & inexpensive to deploy The appeal to Carriers is that service deployment should not require any infrastructure upgrades to their network. The service should be capable of being deployed within 8 weeks.

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3. Universal service offering Any customer should be able to use the service on any handset, without the need for any pre-provisioning or handset configuration. This will help drive mass-market penetration across the Carrier's user base. 11)

End-to-end user experience Figure 41 shows the end-to-end experience of SpinVox Voice SMS service: 1. Calling Party interaction with IYR it is envisaged there will be minimal interaction between depositing a message and the Voice SMS platform. The calling party will be presented with options to send, re-record or cancel their \oice SMS.

Language to use \Toice SMS is a standalone integration; it will not require integration with the Carrier voicemail platform.

The \oice SNIS platti)rrn vi11 support multi-lingual prompts in the following languages: o Arabic o French o English o Persian o Hebrew o Standard Chinese o Bahasa Indonesia o Japanese o Korean o Filipino o Sinhala o Thai o \Tietnamese o Spanish o Portuguese Initial voice prompt The calling party will hear the following intro after the Voice SMS service has diallcd and connected to the 1VR: "Please record our message after the tone" Press I to send this Voice SMS Press 2 to re-record this \oice SMS Press 3 to cancel this \oice SMS Message too long prompt If a caller goes over the time allowed to deposit a message they will be prompted to re-record the mcssage or leave the message as is.

End of message warning \Xhen the caller is approaching the end of the recording time, a series of beeps shall be played, getting closer together as thes get closer to the end of the message prior to Req 1.4 prompting the customer Forecast The Carrier will provide a volume forecast fhr SpinVox Voice SMS service Support Technical support for the Spin\'ox Voice SMS service will he covered by the support agreement, as outlined in the Carrier contract.

Storage The \Toice SMS platform will provide storage of the voice message audio. As standard the audio file will be retained for a period of 5 days. Audio

The sent voice message audio will not be accessible to the calling part SMS delivery to recipient When a voice message has been success ful1 deposited an SMS will be send to the intended recipient. The following requirements cover only this SMS.

SMS to the B Party The text message must he sent from the original calling parry phone number. If this CL1 is ithheld then Withheld' will be presented to the called party.

Message body The bod of the message will be specified as part of a new Message Classification template for that Carrier.

Note this will include a Spin\'ox message tag of Spoken through SpinVox' Message Retrieval -QuickLink Messagc retrieval vill he via a QuickLink short code e.g. *3* will retrieve the 3rd message 2. Recipient interaction with IVR Once the recipient has listened to the voice message they will he presented with a number of additional options to manage their Voice SMS experience. These are outlined below: Mailbox Configuration Each Voice SMS recipient will be allocated a virtual mailbox. The Carrier will specify the capacir) of this mailbox however it is recommended this is no more than enough for 5 messages for a given time period e.g. 5 days.

IVR -Retrieval of old messages A recipient must be able to listen to old messages stored in their mailbox. LIFO message playback will be used.

IVR -Share the voice SMS A recipient must have the option to forward their Voice SMS to another user.

This option will be available from the IVR e.g. Press 4 to share thisVoice SMS Enter the recipients number followed b the hash key IVR -Deleting voice messages A recipient must have the option to delete a voice message IVR -Skip to next message A recipient must have the option to skip to the next voice message IVR -Repeat voice message A recipient must have the option to rewind to the beginning of the current oice message IVR -Replying to a Voice SMS A recipient must have the following reply options: o Reph to A Parts via Voice SMS o Reply to A Pam' via voice call IVR -Saving a Voice SMS A recipient will be given the option to save a Voice SMS 3. Service levels Sign-up requirements The caller should not have to sign up with the Carrier to use this service -all they should have to do is dial a call prefix followed by the recipient number Compatibility The calling party will require the capability to dial a call prefix number e.g. * Pricing Depending upon the Carrier pricing model a Voice SMS can he a premium to a standard SMS. As such the calling party ma have to he greeted with a pre call announcement advising the cost of \Toice SMS delivers'.

The Carrier ma also include a number of free messages prior to charging.

Service Level The service should meet the same availability requirement as the Spin Vox service i.e. 99.99% Recording time The recording time must be limited to 30 seconds duration.

The caller will be notified ia an appropriate voice prompt if the have exceeded the 30 second recording limit.

Number of SMS supported All SMS deliveries should be limited to I SMS 4. Carrier Interoperability The SpinVox Voice SMS service must he interoperable with alternative Voice SMS providers thereby enabling a \!oice SI\IS to be scot to recipients regardless of the Carrier service they are using.

Inter-Carrier Interoperability ycl part Carriers should be able to interconnect to the Spin\'ox \oice SMS service via a SpinVox specified API or through appropriate GSM Association standards SpinVox-SpinVox Interoperabifity lnteroperabihtv will be available between those Carriers that have solel) deployed the Spin Vox Voice SMS service Intra-Carrier Interoperability A single Carrier deploying multiple instances of Voice SMS must he able to interoperate between instances Commercial A commercial framework will be specified supporting inter-operator accounting 5. Platform Requirements The service platform must be capable of delivering the Voice SMS as a managed scrvice offering. Carriers must be able to easily introduce new SpinVox services such as SpinVox Messenger and Voicemail to their user base without major changes to infrastructure.

Record & Playback The Voice SMS platform must hae the ability to record and playback messages deposited by unique callers Voice Prompts The Voice SMS platform must have the ability to play multi- lingual I\TR prompts DTMF Tone Recognition The Voice SMS platform must have the ability to recognize touch tone key presses Platform Availability The \oice SMS platform must support a high availability architecture to ensure a maximum uptime of 99.99% Inter-Carrier Accounting The Voice SMS platform must have the capability to record and report on Inter-Carrier traffic supporting Voice SMS interconnectivitv between Carriers SMS Formats The \Toice SMS platform must have the ability to construct and format an SMS and interconnect to a Carrier's SMSC infrastructure 6. Demo Ibere must be the capability for the Voice SMS product to be demonstrable to the Carrier h Spin Vox. The Carrier should also be able to set up a demo of the product for their customers to market the service.

SpinVox Website -Demo It should he possible to demonstrate the Voice SJ\IS service via the SpinVox website Carrier -Demo SpinVox require a way U) demonstrate the Voice SMS service to a Carrier as part of the sales process Carrier -Demo charging It should be possible for the Carrier Demo to be free of charge to the caller Carrier -Customer Experience The SpinVox Demo should provide the same customer experience as the Carrier product 7. Reporting it will be necessary to report on service activity. The audience for all SpinVox Voice SMS reporting will be both Internal to Spin\'ox and external, Carrier facing. \X here SpinVox is offering an interconnect capability to specific Carriers then detailed inter-Carrier reports must be proided.

Reporting requirements it must be possible to report on all messages on this service Reporting requirements it must be possible to report on the following product metrics.

* Users by Carrier * Traffic by Carrier * Average audio length Reporting requirements It must bc possible to report on the following metrics, where user is defined as the phone number calling the service (i.e. the CLI).

* Frequenc * Traffic * Average audio length 8. Billing Billing Requirements Spin\'ox must have the hilling capabiit to support pa per message/bundled pricing models Invoicing Requirements It must be possible to invoice the Carrier on a monthly basis for the service

D

9. Future phases Future enhancements in a future phase, it must be possible to extend the service to fixed line. The following call scenarios will he supported: o Fixed line to mobile o Fixed line to fixed line o Mobile tO fixed line Note: a fixed line recipient would receive ringing tone, after lifting the receiver they would hear the voice message Future enhancements in a future phase, it must he possible for the called party to receive \oice SMS delivery via email Future enhancements in a future phase, it must be possible for the caller to send a \Toice SMS to multiple recipients (Options include the use of a web portal for setting distrihuthrn lists/address book management or through the use of \Toicc SMS handset application) Future enhancements in a future phase, it must he possible for a caller to send a reserved \oice SMS i.e. at a specified date and time.

APPENDIX VI Acronyms The following is a guide to the normal meaning of the following acronyms.

ACR -anunrnous call rejection Al -artificial intelligence ASR -automated speech recognition CL! -caller line identification CPU central processing unit 1() db -database DDI -direct dial-in DTMF -dual tone multi frequency G728 -This is specified in ITU-T recommendation G.728, "Coding of speech at 16 kbit/s using low-delay code excited linear prediction".

HTTP -byper text transfer protocol TM -instant messaging 1P -internet protocol ISO -international standards organisatlon IVR -interactive voice response MM -multimedia messaging MMS -multimedia messaging service MoBlo -mobile blogging

MSF -mail summary file

MSISDN -mobile station integrated services digital network N /0 -network operator OTA -oer-the-air p -pause RAS -Repeat Audio Submission Q -quality QA -qualit) assurance QC -qualiti control RAP -refer a friend ROM -read-only memory S-links -spoken links, or smart links SAT -speak-a-text SDIC -software development toolkit SiP -simple internet protocol SLA -software licence agreement SMPP -short message peer-to-peer SMS -short message service SMTP -simple mail transfer protocol SOAP -Simple Object Access Protocol SSL -secure sockets 1a er (a communications protocol) SV-SpinVox TAT -turn around time TLP -transaction layer packet Ui -user interface U1D -unique identifier URL -uniform resource locator \AS -value added sen ice VF -\odafone -video game \M2T -voice mail to text Vi'sICS -voice messaging conversion system VMP -variational message passing \oiP -voice over internet protocol WAP-wireless application protocol

Claims (27)

1. A mobile telephone programmed to allow? a user to speak a message which is then automaticall converted to text at a remote conversion system and then delivered to the appropriate recipient as text, in which the telephone displays an option to speak a text message which is selected b' a first touch action, with the user then needing to perform no more than two further touch actions to the mobile telephone.
2. The telephone of Claim 1 in which the two further touch actions are to choose to whom to send a message and then to hang up.
3. The telephone of any Claim 1 or 2 in which messages can he sent in the form of an email, SNIS or MMS message, depending upon the details stored in an Address Book of the mobile telephone. is
4. The telephone of any preceding Claim in which multiple recipients can be sent the same message b using a broadcast' facility.
5. The telephone of any preceding Claim in which messages can be delivered to Blogs or other web-based applications.
6. The telephone of any preceding Claim in which additional functionality is brought to the telephone, by adding new' menu items into the smndard menu tree.
7. The telephone of an' preceding Claim in which a menu option functionally equivalent to "Speak-a-Message" is added to the one or more of the following applications: * Text Messaging Application * MMS Messaging Application * Email Application * Instant Messaging (IM Application * Address Book * Call Logs * Home screen, using a soft ke
8. The telephone of Claim 7 in which the functionality that the "Speak-a-Message" menu option gives changes dvnamicall, depending upon which application the user is in.
9. The telephone of Claim 7 or 8 in which the application is the Text messaging application and selecting the Speak-a-Message option allows the user to do one or more of: (i) Create a new message using a contact's Mobile number as the destination; (ii) Reply to a previous message using the number provided.
10. The telephone of Claim 7 or 8 in which the application is the email application and selecting the Speak-a-Message option allows the user to do one or more of: (i Create a new message using a contact's email address as the destination; (iD Create a new message to multiple recipients using their email addresses as the destination; (iii) Reply to a previous message using thc contacts email addresses as the destination.
11. The telephone of Claim 7 or 8 in which the application is the Address Book application and selecting the Speak-a-Message option allows the user to create a new message.
12. The telephone of Claim 7 or 8 in which the application is the Call Logs application and selecting the Speak-a-Message option allows the user to do one or more of: (i) Create a message for numbers listed in the Missed Call log using SMS as the reply path; (ii) Create a message for numbers listed in the Outgoing Call log using SMS as the reply path; (iii) Create a message for numbers listed in the Incoming Call log using SMS as the reph' path.
D
13. The telephone of an preceding claim which generates and displays an intelligently compiled list of recent contacts, which is produced b understanding the user's previous hehaviour by building a list of the most recent people the user has been in contact with, taking into consideration one or more of the folloving (i) The communicating type (email, text message, phone call, or spoken text); (ii) The frequency of communication with that contact; (iii) How recent the last communication was; (ivy Alphabetical order.
14. A method of enabling a user of a mobile telephone to speak a message which is then automatically converted to text at a remote conversion system and then delivered to the appropriate recipient as text, in which the telephone displas 5 an option to speak a text message and the method comprises the steps of the user selecting the option to speak a text message and then completing its actions in no more than two further touch actions to the mobile telephone.
15. The method of Claim 14 in which the two further touch actions are to choose to whom to send a message and then to hang up.
16. The method of any preceding method Claim in which messages can he sent in the fomi of an email, SMS or MMS message, depending upon the details stored in an Address Book of the mobile telephone, [hr the recipient.
17. The method of an preceding method Claim in which multiple recipients can be sent the same message by using a broadcast' facility.
18. The method of any preceding method Claim in which messages can be delivered to Blogs or other web-based applicath ns.
19. The method of any preceding method Claim in which additional functionality is brought to the telephone, by adding new menu items into the standard menu tree.
20. The method of any preceding method Claim in which a menu option functionally equivalent to "Speak-a-Message" is added to the one or more of the following applications: * Text Messaging Application * MMS Messaging Application * Email Application * Instant Messaging (IM Application * Address Book * Call Logs * Home screen, using a soft key
21. The method of Claim 20 in which thc functionality that the "Speak-a-Message" menu option gives, changes dynamically, depending upon which application the user is in.
22. The method of Claim 20 or 21 in which in which the application is the Text messaging application and selecting the Speak-a-Message option allows the user to do one or more of: (i) Create a new message using a contact's Mobile number as the destination; (ii) Reply to a previous message using the number provided.
23. The method of Claim 20 or 21 in which the application is the email application and selecting the Speak-a-Message option allows the user to do one or more of: (i) Create a new message using a contact's email address as the destination; (ii) Create a new' message to multiple recipients using their email addresses as the destinatkrn; (iii) Reply to a previous message using the contacts email addresses as the destination.
24. The method of Claim 20 or 21 in which the application is the Address Book application and selecting the Speak-a-Message option allows the user to create a new message.
25. The method of Claim 2() or 21 in which the application is the Call Logs application and selecting the Speak-a-Message option allows the user to do one or more of: (I) Create a mcssage for numbers listed in the Missed Call log using SI\IS as the repl) path; (ii) Create a message fur numbers listed in the Outgoing Call log using SMS as the reply path; (iii) Create a message for numbers listed in the Incoming Call log using SMS as the reply path.
26. The method of an preceding method Claim in which an inteffigentlv compiled list of recent contacts is generated and displayed, which is produced by understanding the users previous behaviour by building a list of the most recent people the user has been in contact with, taking into consideration one or more of the ollowing: (i) The communicating type (email, text message, phone call, or spoken text); (ii) The frequency of communication with that contact; ciii) How recent the last communication was; (iv) Alphabetical order.
27. A method of intelligently compiling a list of recent contacts, which is produced by understanding the users previous behaviour by building a list of the most recent people the user has been in contact with, taking into consideration one or more of the following (i) The communicating type (email, text message, phone call, or spoken text); (ii) The frequency of communication with that contact; (iii) Flow recent the last communication was; (iv) Alphabetical order.
GB0800321A 2006-02-10 2008-01-09 Network based speech to text message conversion system Withdrawn GB2445670A (en)

Priority Applications (8)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB0700379A GB0700379D0 (en) 2007-01-09 2007-01-09 SpinX
GB0700376A GB0700376D0 (en) 2007-01-09 2007-01-09 Voice Message Conversion System
GB0702706A GB2435147A (en) 2006-02-10 2007-02-12 Converting voice messages into text for display on a screen.
GB0708658A GB0708658D0 (en) 2007-05-04 2007-05-04 Intellectual property for voice to email delivery
GB0717247A GB0717247D0 (en) 2007-09-05 2007-09-05 Plug-in VM2email
GB0717249A GB0717249D0 (en) 2007-09-05 2007-09-05 Spoken message
GB0717246A GB0717246D0 (en) 2007-09-05 2007-09-05 IP ideas Q2
GB0717250A GB0717250D0 (en) 2007-09-05 2007-09-05 Twitter

Publications (2)

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GB0800321D0 GB0800321D0 (en) 2008-02-20
GB2445670A true GB2445670A (en) 2008-07-16

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ID=39144649

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GB0800320A Withdrawn GB2445669A (en) 2006-02-10 2008-01-09 Recording text messages for unanswered calls
GB0800319A Withdrawn GB2445668A (en) 2006-02-10 2008-01-09 Posting text online
GB0800318A Withdrawn GB2445667A (en) 2006-02-10 2008-01-09 Converting text to hypertext
GB0800321A Withdrawn GB2445670A (en) 2006-02-10 2008-01-09 Network based speech to text message conversion system
GB0800315A Withdrawn GB2445666A (en) 2006-02-10 2008-01-09 Method of replying to an electronically received message

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GB0800320A Withdrawn GB2445669A (en) 2006-02-10 2008-01-09 Recording text messages for unanswered calls
GB0800319A Withdrawn GB2445668A (en) 2006-02-10 2008-01-09 Posting text online
GB0800318A Withdrawn GB2445667A (en) 2006-02-10 2008-01-09 Converting text to hypertext

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GB0800315A Withdrawn GB2445666A (en) 2006-02-10 2008-01-09 Method of replying to an electronically received message

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GB0800320D0 (en) 2008-02-20
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GB2445667A (en) 2008-07-16
GB2445669A (en) 2008-07-16

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WAP Application withdrawn, taken to be withdrawn or refused ** after publication under section 16(1)