GB2445669A - Recording text messages for unanswered calls - Google Patents

Recording text messages for unanswered calls Download PDF

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Publication number
GB2445669A
GB2445669A GB0800320A GB0800320A GB2445669A GB 2445669 A GB2445669 A GB 2445669A GB 0800320 A GB0800320 A GB 0800320A GB 0800320 A GB0800320 A GB 0800320A GB 2445669 A GB2445669 A GB 2445669A
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United Kingdom
Prior art keywords
message
text
call
sms
user
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Withdrawn
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GB0800320A
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GB0800320D0 (en
Inventor
Daniel Doulton
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SpinVox Ltd
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SpinVox Ltd
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Publication date
Priority to GB0700379A priority Critical patent/GB0700379D0/en
Priority to GB0700376A priority patent/GB0700376D0/en
Priority to GB0702706A priority patent/GB2435147A/en
Priority to GB0708658A priority patent/GB0708658D0/en
Priority to GB0717246A priority patent/GB0717246D0/en
Priority to GB0717247A priority patent/GB0717247D0/en
Priority to GB0717249A priority patent/GB0717249D0/en
Priority to GB0717250A priority patent/GB0717250D0/en
Application filed by SpinVox Ltd filed Critical SpinVox Ltd
Publication of GB0800320D0 publication Critical patent/GB0800320D0/en
Publication of GB2445669A publication Critical patent/GB2445669A/en
Application status is Withdrawn legal-status Critical

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Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L51/00Arrangements for user-to-user messaging in packet-switching networks, e.g. e-mail or instant messages
    • H04L51/06Message adaptation based on network or terminal capabilities
    • H04L51/066Message adaptation based on network or terminal capabilities with adaptation of format
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q10/00Administration; Management
    • G06Q10/10Office automation, e.g. computer aided management of electronic mail or groupware; Time management, e.g. calendars, reminders, meetings or time accounting
    • G06Q10/107Computer aided management of electronic mail
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M3/00Automatic or semi-automatic exchanges
    • H04M3/42Systems providing special services or facilities to subscribers
    • H04M3/50Centralised arrangements for answering calls; Centralised arrangements for recording messages for absent or busy subscribers ; Centralised arrangements for recording messages
    • H04M3/53Centralised arrangements for recording incoming messages, i.e. mailbox systems
    • H04M3/5322Centralised arrangements for recording incoming messages, i.e. mailbox systems for recording text messages
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M3/00Automatic or semi-automatic exchanges
    • H04M3/42Systems providing special services or facilities to subscribers
    • H04M3/50Centralised arrangements for answering calls; Centralised arrangements for recording messages for absent or busy subscribers ; Centralised arrangements for recording messages
    • H04M3/53Centralised arrangements for recording incoming messages, i.e. mailbox systems
    • H04M3/533Voice mail systems
    • H04M3/53366Message disposing or creating aspects
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L51/00Arrangements for user-to-user messaging in packet-switching networks, e.g. e-mail or instant messages
    • H04L51/04Real-time or near real-time messaging, e.g. instant messaging [IM]
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L51/00Arrangements for user-to-user messaging in packet-switching networks, e.g. e-mail or instant messages
    • H04L51/38Arrangements for user-to-user messaging in packet-switching networks, e.g. e-mail or instant messages in combination with wireless systems
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M2201/00Electronic components, circuits, software, systems or apparatus used in telephone systems
    • H04M2201/60Medium conversion

Abstract

A network based service manages unanswered calls to telephone numbers. The network picks up the call before it 'fails' (e.g. hits a busy tone, rings out, phone is off, phone cannot connect); this can be before or upon or shortly after the network decides to terminate ringtone or to not offer any ringtone. The network then plays back an IVR recording giving the option of speaking a text (SMS, MMS, email, IM etc) to the person they were trying to call. Consequently the caller always gets through to something useful, which may also be seen as less formal than ordinary voicemail, and hence more likely to be used. The caller may force the network to offer the option of speaking a text by pressing the "*" key during the ringtone.

Description

InteUectua D perty (,1ICC L. Fc. Ci.ni 1i;:c. tio: Applicalioii Nn.

GBO8(X)320.4 RTM Dale.20 Mardi 2(X)8 The following terms are registered trademarks and should he read as such wherever they occur in this document: Nokia. T-Mobile, Blackberry, Spinvox UK Intellectual Property Office is an operating name of the Patent Office A)1 ER VICE

A METHOD OF MANAGING UNANSWERED CALLS USING A NETWORK-

BASED SERVICE

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the invention

rhis invention relates to a method of managing unanswered calls using a network-based service. An unanswered call is one that is not completed (e.g. the line rings out, is busy, is directed to a deuce which is turned off etc). It is a missed call.

2. Description of the Prior rt

The pn thlem of unanswered or missed calls has traditionally been addressed h providing a voicemail sen-ice. But many markets see less than 50% voicemail penetration, such as southern Europe (Spain, Italy, Greece, etc...). The reasons are mainly two-fold: 1. \Toicemail is a chargeable service and in high pre-paid mobile phone markets, users tend to turn it off to save on costs as calls to deposit and retrieve a voice message are in the 20 cent per event range.

2. Culturalk, voicemail is perceived as too formal and business-like and often seen as a rude way for daily messaging. So even here an unanswered call diverts to voicemail the caller ma be reluctant to use it.

In fact, what callers often do in the unanswered calls scenario is to not leave a voice message -where voicemail exists, or hit a dead- end (e.g. ring out, buss, off) where none exists -but instead hang-up. In some 30% of cases, they then type a text message (e.g. SMS) to the person they tried to call. So actually, in these cases their chosen form of messaging is to send a text when the can't reach the person the re caffing. For carriers, missed calls (non-completed) of this npe account for several billion events per year.

It is known to convert voicemail for a mobile telephone user into text, with that text then sent as an SMS or email to the user. This is described in more detail in \X'O 2004/095821 A2, to SpinVox, the contents of which are incorporated b reference.

The present inerition takes the idea of conerting oicemail to text and builds a new mechanism for handling unanswered calls around it.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The invention is a method of a method of managing unanswered calls using a network-based service, the method including the steps ot (a) identifying on the network that a call has not been answered, or cannot he answered; (b) providing the callcr with the selectable option of speaking a text message to the electronic address the) were tn nig to call; (c) the caller sclecting the option of speaking a text message to the electronic address they were trying to call; It) (d) the caller then speaking a message which is converted into a text message and sent to the electronic address the were trying to call.

In an implementation, there is a network based service that manages unanswered calls to telephone numbers. The network picks up the call before it fails' (e.g. hits a bus) tone, rings out, phone is oft, phone cannot connect); this can he before or upon or shortl) after the network decides to terminate ringtone or to not offer any ringnrne. The network then plays back an l\TR recording giving the option of speaking a text (SMS, MMS, email, IM etc to the person the were trying to call. SC) the caller always gets through to something useful and which may also he seen as les formal than ordinary voicemail, and hence more likely to he used.

it is especialk useful where the called party has no conventional voice mail (e.g. some prepaid users). Sending the text message as an email is also good in that context because it is zero cost.

The converted text is sent as though from the caller (e.g. as an SMS with the from' field using the caller's CLI; as an email with the from field using the caller's email address).

Missed calls can now generate extra revenue from the converted oicemail message and callers are less frustrated h either a completely failed call or the need to leave a voicemail.

(:al] continuity rises too.

User can also be allowed to go immediate]y to speaking a text -e.g. hitting * could take the user straight to this option, without needing to hear a full 1VR explanation.

This approach also makes missed calls an A party sen-icc -it is the calling parry that decides to use and pa fbr this. Pas menr ma he h sirnpl sta ing on the line and speaking -i.e., there is no explicit and separate message charge, so the sen ice seems free to the caller and the recipient. This is possible because the networks attribute significant value to being able to charge even normal voice call tariffs to a call that w)ukl otherwise not be hilled at all, vet still use infrastructure resources. 11)

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Figure 1 shows a Spoken text message from Dan Mobile'. It includes the N-Link 84004p I23 in the message.

Figure 2 shows how using N-Link's address book, anbodv who receies a spoken message as text can now call in and listen to the original voice message that was left for them.

Figure 3 shows a ts pica] sequence of messages and the recurring use of the Speak a Reply' X-E.ink.

II) Figure 4 shows that message sender Zac Sandier leases a voice mail which has been automatically conerted to text using the Spin Vox voice conversion system.

Figure 5 shows another variant, in which the links are incorporated into the message, with the address 20E & 9r11 St' in the bod' of the message being selectable to call up the map browser, showing that address.

Figure 6 schematically illustrates the business model transformation and 1)0w' Spin'ox positions itself as the intermedian-between the cust mer and the search-engine based advertising aregator, such as Google.

Figure 7 shows the end-to-end experience from when a calling party leaves a message and to how' the recipient (called party) views the message.

Figure 8 shows a photograph taken on a camera phone.

Figure 9 shows the Speak a Comment option from the Options menu, which may be used to annotate the photograph in Figure 8.

Figure 10 shows MCM with SpinVox Voicemail to Text also deployed.

Figure 11 shows how various conventional messaging products (voicemail, email, SMS, INI and voice) are distributed on a Time v Dialogue axes.

Figure 12 shows how various Spin Vox products alter the landscape of Figure 11.

Figure 13 shows an example of a deployment of Spoken email and Spoken SMS/MMS with a mobile sen-ice provider -SiP telephon connectivit.

Figure 14 shows an example of a deplo ment of Spoken email with a French mobile service provider -standard teiephon and svnchronised data.

Figure 15 shows the npical user experience of speaking a message from within the Text Messaging or Email Application.

Figure 16 shows a typical user experience of speaking a message from within the Address Book.

Figure 17 shows the typical user experience of speaking a message using the Call Log.

Figure 18 shows a i-pica1 uscr experience of speaking a message from within Speak a Message application.

Figure 19 shows a typical user experience for Speaking a Blog.

Figure 20 shows a n pical user experience of speaking a reply in a Mobile PsI client.

Figure 21 shows the 3 clicks' user experience.

Figure 22 sho s the Fire & Forget' s stem employed b' Speak a Message.

Figure 23 shos i-he Fast Address List -showing recent contacts that hase Called, been Called, Texted (SMS or i'sIMS) or Emailed (or any other messaging/communications process used).

Figure 24 shows screen shots which demonstrate the ideal user experience: the Fast Address list of recent contacts (people that have called, been called, texted, emailed etc) is selected, the one individual (David Wood) is selected to automaticall initiate a connection to the Spin\'ox voice conversion s stem so that the user can speak a message.

Figure 25 shows the end-to-end experience from the A & B party perspective.

Figure 26 shows the typical behaviour of the Speak-a-Message application in the home screen of the phone.

Figure 27 shows the application being accessed using a short cut displayed as the Spin\'ox logo, after pressing the Multimedia Key' on a Nolcia N95.

Figure 28 shows the Fast Address list, which on an N95 device is limited to the last 5 people which you spoke to, emailed, sent or received a text from or spoke a message to.

Figure 29 shoss that an-contact can have a message spoken to them b moving from the tecent' view to the Contacts' view.

Figure 30 shows that if a contact is selected in the Contacts' view that contains more than one phone number, then both numbers are shown and the user is given a choice of using either.

Figure 31 shows when the customer connects to i-lie SpinVox service the name of the contact being sent the text is displayed.

Figure 32 shows the User Experience schematically for the Speak-a-Text product.

Figure 33 shows the typical behaviour of an etiail centric device prior to the SpinVox plug-in soft arc being installed.

Figure 34 shows how the Inbox looks after the SpinVox plug-in has been installed.

Figure 35 shows how a SpinVox toicemail message dll look once the recipient has opened it.

Figure 36 shows hat happens when a customer clicks on the real name that has now

becn put into the "brom:' field.

Figure 37 shows what happens when a customer clicks on the real name that has now been put into the message text in the sectli)n which starts You received a new 1(1 voicemail from'.

Figure 38 shows an example of a QuickLink, which has been inserted at the bottom of the converted email message.

Figure 39 shows how additional functionalit has been added to the deice with the inclusion of new menu items.

Figure 40 shows how SpinVox unifies various communications types and channels.

Figure 41 sh)ws the end-to-end experience of Spin\Tox Voice SMS service.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

SpinVox has developed a simpler more natural user interface for messaging -\oice.

Messaging and communications in genera! is, in the prior art, s mmetric -namely ou either exchange text (SMS, email, Fax, letter, etc...) or ou talk to another person. B converting speaker independent-free-f rni speech Spin\' x transf( rms and enables asymmetric communication which now changes the rules of the game. It enables lull voice messaging and is creating the Voice_to_ScreenTM messaging categor that simpl enables existing pmducts/ser ices and markets/users with a spoken input and a text output from any phone or speech input device to any screen.

In doing so, it let erages the increasing asymmetric ability at' phones: phone screens for reading (thich today are becoming good text displas de'.ices) and human speech, which is one of the most natural forms of communicating and virtualJ a!l humans on the planet can !5 use, and is alter al! what phones are best at. Or put the other way, phones are poor text input devices, but great at voice input and decent at text display.

This transformation also enables new, deeper sen-ices, such as unifying all sources of voice messages into easil accessible text on screen and solves many of the complex system issues of getting two disparate worlds to appear to he one (te!ephony and email/web pages). But excitingh, h3 having voice messages of any source as text, they can be indexed and intelligent search results embedded into the message. The value is that the majority of searches are triggered by int'ormation communicated between parties, and voicemail and voice messages have a high percentage of such data points. This solves many of the limitations of phone ke -based or pen based input methods to do search in traditional forms via search engines and several stages to find the result. And because this is sen-er-side, it will become intelligent to your context -Intelligent-to-meTM.

1'his Detailed Description will describe a wide variety of Spin\'ox innovations and product features, in addition to the specific invention defined by the Claims.

Key Elements of Spin\-'ox products includes the following * X_JJnksTM which enables communities to effortlessl share use of Spin\'ox allows non-Spin\'ox subscribers/users to reply ia speaking a text allows users to speak text across products, nor just within * XLinlcsTM implicit address hook makes links seamless * Network based spoken text messaging * Call Return via spoken text messaging * Speaking an SMS/MISIS or email * Speaking an Instant Message * Mobile bhing * Mobile photo messaging * Push to message' -application for push to talk * Al] sen-ices/products arc based on Tire and forget' principle * The' all turn existing voicemail into a full two-was' push messaging service and off of existing technology, create new products and markets * They use the fact that we -ust people in our communities to message us, rather than cal] us: 80% of messages come from a limited number of people O \oicemail -8 people 0 SMS -4-6 people 0 Instant Messaging -2-3 people * Missed Call Messenger (No Answer -Speak-a-TextTM) -On-net + Off-net behaviour, l' use of X-I.inks, and new reenue sources as an evolution and deployment with carrier in Spain * Unified Communications for \oice Messaging -disconnected sen-ices, unified by conversion, distributed to any screen creates a new mode of multi-point voice messaging * S-Links detailing embedded nature of context based smart links within text messages converted from voice messages -a new approach to mobile search and Advertising Search markets Intelligent-to-MeTM embedded intelligent passive search abilit driven out of many-to-one communications, as opposed to one-to-one pull methods typically found in search today * Spoken communit messaging via web and SMS -Twitter, Facebook, MvSpace, etc...

* Voice blastslM: concept of being able to speak a message ant] have it instantl sent as text in an form to our web-based communit\ as a broadcast message directly from flu.

The [bliowing sections will consider these (and other features) in more detail: Section A: X-Links Section B: S-Links Section C: \eb 2.0 Section D: Missed Call Messenger Section E: An oerview of the main Spin Vox products Appendix I: Speak-a-Text Appendix II: \oicemail to email Appendix Ill: \Tirah/link marketing campaigns Appendix I\T: Unified Comm unicati,ns Appendix V: Voice SMS Appendix VI: Acronyms :11 SECTiON A: XLinksTM This extends the original feature SpinVox deph wed within Voicemail-to-Text1 whereby a link in the message enabled the recipient to directly access and hear that message -QuickLinksTM (see GB2420942B, the contents of which are incorporated by reference).

X-links allows any recipient of any message converted l)\' SpinVox to speak the sender a reply. By selecting the link, the user is connect directl to a Spin\'ox conversion service, prompted to speak their message and it is then sent directl back to the person rhe' received the original message from.

X-Links are placed in even' message, so two parties can endlessly communicate via spoken messages sent as text whenever the) like.

For example, a user might receive a voicemail message as text and it will now contain an Link so that they simply select it and they can speak the person who originally left them a voicemail, a text reply. Likewise, if you're the recipient of a Spoken text message, you will be offered an X-Link to speak them a reply by text.

For example, Figure 1 shows a Spoken text message from Dan Mobile'. It includes the X-Link 3400-1pl23 in the message <To speak a text reply call 844p123> X-Link works across different messaging products, so if for example you receive a spoken message as SN1S with an X-Link in it, you could be speaking the person a reply by email, or vsa versa.

Technology A link is formed by a sen-ice number and a unique identifier shown as: <service number> + <unique identifier> e.g. Links in the UK could look like: O2O79652000p 123 (Jr 84004p I23 Service number -phone number which acts as access point to the conversion system, e.g. o full standard phone number (e.g. a DDT such as 02079652000) o nce short code (e.g. 84004) o \ToIP or network number if used within IP based telecommunication or messaging * Unique identifier -identifies who the sender is for the reph, e.g. o Over-dial digits used in standard teleph)nY 0 Often uses a p' (pause) or equivalent network symbol when using I)TNIF dri'en 5) stems 0 May use a special digit to further denote service type -e.g. "K' or a digit I' o Can be either the full phone number (e.g. MSISDN), or a code that links this on the systcm 0 84.00'lplZ3 or 0 84004pO78I2IO1742 in next generation systems, the link would be an embedded link to click to call' as found in \XAP pages and used extensively by operators such as Hutchison 3G in the UK. The benefit is that these links would he simple words, rather than phone numbers, Sc) that it would read "Speak Text Repl3" rather than "Speak Text Reply: 84004pl 23".

X-List Implicit Address Book In the above examples, the unique identifier is shown as a 3-digit code (e.g. 123). The length is arbitrary and becomes the full phone number if it reaches the same number of digits as the mapped phone number (e.g. p12345678910 is no longer a useful code in the UK as all phone numbers are 11 digits).

X-Links rely on the service creating a list of people who ou've received a message from and want to repls to. The reason this works as a limited list is because the number of people who call you 80% of the time is on average just 10-12.

Example

1. David spcaks Jim a text message. Jim is not a SpinVox subscriber.

2. Jim receives the text with an N-Link to speak David a rep]v. He clicks on it.

3. When Jim's call connects, the s stern uses his CLI to identify who has messaged him -David's number is one of these.

4. The unique identifier then tells the s stem which of these Spin Vox people spoke Jim a message. In this case it finds David's CLI (MSISDN) 5. Jim speaks his text message.

6. David now receies a spoken text message from Jim with an X-Link in so that he can reph.

7. The loop goes on ad infinitum.

Key elements of this implicit X-Link address book are: * A list of i\ISISDNs (or equivalent phone numbers) is built up of all callers who left a message for each Spin \ox user on the X-Link service.

* This list is unique to each SpinVox user, identified h their MSISDN (or equialent phone numher. Each user has their own X-Link list keyed from their MSISDN.

* Even-new person that leaves a message for the Spin\'ox user has a new entn created in this list, and a corresponding unique identifier allocated.

* The list grows to the allowable limit, which with just 3 numhers is 1000. It can he longer, or shorter depending on the needs of the user and service provider.

* Each time the Spin\Tox user calls in using the X-Link, the system knows which list is theirs (b use of their MSISDN), and can then decode the unique identifier digits into the person's MS1SDN the want to speak a message to.

* SpinVox users can save these X-Links straight into thcir address books for future reference and know that calling it-will always allow them to speak the associated person a text message.

* Optional: the system recycles the users' X-Link list SO that as soon as it's full, it goes hack and replaces the least used entry with the ne one. This keeps the unique identifier short (e.g. 3 numl)ers) and uses the basis that ou're most likely to use the X-Link in the message you rcccntl received to reply and therefore correctly connect to that person. It is possible to dig out a er old message with an X-Link that now points at a new person.

Note: Users of this service don't have to he SpinVox subscribers. The only have to have received a message with an X-Link in to start benefiting from this.

X-List mechanism Unique X-Lists are created for each person (A-F in this example) and list elements generated h using the caller/speaker's CLI and an associated unk1ue identifier (hiD), in this case, the UID is *+3_dits' List owners ListeesA B C D E F A -00I *fl79 *022 *333 *010 B *003 -*012 *fl25 *334 *099 C *011 *007 -*003 *351 *015 D *002 *1)1 1 *01) 1 -*02 * 101 E *139 *fl99 *006 *011 -*069 F 00l *010 *589 *287 *006 -The address book is built up simply by creating a list for each person who is either a recipient or a sender of a SpinVox message. The list contains links (shown as *xyz) which map to the actual phone number (CLI/MSISDN). An time a new person messages another via this system, tbe are added to their list. So both SpinVux subscribers and non-subscribers both have lists created for them.

For example: A's unk1ue address book is shown b the vertical list under A. A was called by F first (*001), D second (*002), B third (003), then after 7 others, by C (*011) and h E 1391h (*139).

So if A uses the X-Link at the end ot' a message tbe receive (e.g. Phone_no.*002), the s stem knows that it's A calling from their network CLI (1\1SIS1)N), and that the3 want number 2 in the list to speak a text to. The system has keyed A's list number 2 to D's phone number.

X-Lists are built up through the calling/messaging patterns heRvcen communities of people.

Bi-directional messaging Using the above list example, here's how A and B are linked in each other's Address List: 1. A is a SpinVox user. B is not.

2. B called and left A a voice message which was converted and sent to A as text.

a. When B's first left \ a message, B was added to the list and happened to be the third, hence *003 is given to B's number.

3. A now speaks B a text reply using the message X-Link.

a. This is the first time B has had a spoken message sent to them via Spin Vox, so B's list is now created and A is added as the first entry (*001) in B's list 4. The s stem send A's message to B with an X-Link IJID as *001 5. B receives the messa and 1)3 using the X-Link calls the Spin\'ox service, is identified as B (CLI/MSISDN) and presents *001 as the destination -namely A. 6. A now receives a message back with B's UID (*003) and the loop can continue ad infinitum.

Saving X-Links: reliable for local address book use Because the X-Link service reliabl links people to each other, users can safel save the X-Link in say their mobile phone's address/contact list for future use. So, A in this example could reiabl sac 84OO4-pOO3 in their phone's address list as the entr for speaking B a text message. Likewise, in this example, B can also save an entry for speaking A a text message as 84004p*OOl.

This method allows communities to reliably connect using X-Links. On average, we receive 80i of our calls from just 12 people, 80% of our voicemails from just 8 people, 80% of our SMS messages from just 6 people and KO'tu of our instant Messages from just 4 people.

Naturally, X-Lists have a finite limit, so in the example shown, 3 digit unique identifiers limits to 100() other people. Changing the number of digits in the unique identifier changes the possible number of people sou can be connected to through your X-List.

Note: 84004 is an example service number, but could be any other number/address depending on network and numbering plans.

X-List: Any Address or Identifier Although the method of X-Lists is explained using phone numbers, in fact any type of address can he used -email, IP address, Instant Message, \ToIP no., etc... -as long as it is a reliable identifier with which to address a message. So X-Lists can be used for any messaging community, not just phone number based communities.

This further means that a user may choose to receive messages as email, hut always speak messages back as SMS.

X-Link: Launch messaging application The concept of the X-Link reaches to another level when applied with an communication application. The link is not only a phone number or address, hut also a link to launch the relevant application.

For example, the X-Link sent inside a standard spoken SNIS or voicemail-to-text could be a link to call them hack via a Vo1P application rather than standard voice call.

The link might just show: VoIP Call hack? Clicking on this (or selecting this inside the applications menu, typically use detail') would: I. Launch the phone's VoIP application -e.g. Skvpe 2. Place the call automatically back to the caller, using the \olP application.

3. If there was no \olP application, it might actually connect to the \olP provider's web service anti either download the application, or request a call hack' so that they could connect via this niethod.

Note: this could be a en powerful of acquiring subscribers to a \olP service as each link is a call to connect and/or download their client and use their sen-ice.

X-Link as public QuickLink Q uickLinks are used for SpinVox subscribers to be able to dial in and listen (retrieve) to an 11) voice message b simpl entering the QuickLink digits (e.g. *12) found at the bottom of each message.

Using X-Link's address book, anvbod who receives a spoken message as text can now call in and listen to the original voice message that was left fi r them, as shown in Figure 2 ("To listen to the original call 84007Pl23").

For example:

* You aren't a Spin Vox subscriber, but receive a spoken message from a friend * Either the message is amhiguous, or it wasn't converted, hut you've a public QuickLink at the end of the message (see picture helow) to call in and listen to it.

* You select the link (or dial the lull numher and the original voice message is played hack for you.

Technical Because the X-Link service has a list of numbers of both senders and recipients, it is able to match any caller's CLI MS1S1)N) to a histon list of numbers that are linked. Then, the unique identifier allows the service to match which exact Cll from this list the message you want to hear relates to.

Quicklinks and X-I.inks requests to the Spin\'ox sen-ice can he distinguished by: * Different characters/commands being inserted into the start of the Unique identifier to denote which n-pc of call this is o Using an o Always starting with a 1 o Use 1)1 the p' command to mark the start of unique identifier * Using different service numbers o Calls to speak a message by text are on one service number range (e.g. 841)04, 8401)7, 84009, etc...) o CaUs to retrieve/listen to a message received as text are on a separate service number range (e.g. 94004, 94007, 94009) Using the same number, hut then prompting the caller/speaker to select which option they want.

o E.g.: "Please select I if ou want to hear this message, or 2 to speak the sender a reply" Dedicated service numbers allow users to automatically retrieve, rather than call a number and enter a unique identifier manually. The are simply selecting a number to call from within the message.

X-Link across messaging products The above show how X-Links can be used within a gien messaging product. 1-lowever, if a user sets their preference, SpinVox or the service provider can actually send the converted message back in an message format/application the user desires.

For example

* James is not registered with SpinVox (or Spin Vox sen-ice provider). He receives a spoken SMS from Adam who is registered with SpinVox.

* James receives a spoken SMS from Adam.

* James uses the X-Link to repl and speaks his message.

* SpinVox know that in fact Adam has opted to have spoken messages sent to him b email, not SMS. So, the s stem converts James' message into text and emails this to Adam.

* Adam sees James' reply in email, and uses the X-Link to speak him an SMS back.

This could work with an text based messaging application -SMS, MMS, instant Messaging, email, etc...

X-Links User Experience As noted above, X-L.inks is a new product linefor SpinVox designed to increase the value of ever converted voice message sent by a SpinVox product. It achieves this through the inclusion of a billable rep1 path, which allows anyone to speak a reply to a message the receive.

For the first time, a spoken reply path will he available, creating opportunities. In addition to offering an enhanced subscriber experience, this unique integration provides a means of monetizing every message sent to or from a SpinVox customer. X-Unks will provide a huge, sustainable incremental revenue for Carriers.

The solution will primarily consist of: * SMS, MJ'sIS or email message with a highlighted reply path; either a phone number or HTML style link.

* New capahilit to identify the calling parts and link their number with a unique number that allows a spoken * Integration with a premium billing solution to monetize every message sent.

The following sections are covered in this document: General requirements -ke features and benefits of the product User experience -customer experience for calling and called party Product requirements -end to end lifecvcle experience General Requirements The product must meet the following criteria: End User Benefit Provide an ultra fast reply path, for situations where the customer Can't or doesn't want to stop bar the are doing or does not have the dexterir or technical savvy to use a kc board.

Ease of Use Must be obvious to user that the highlighted word or number can be clicked'. Should be simple way to activate and have a number automatically dialed. ideally, only one click would he required to initiate the cal] to the IVR.

Simple, Fast, Intuitive it must be obvious that clicking on the highlighted link will. Assumption is that MMS support is available on majorir\ of targeted devices and that these devices support User Experience Figure 3 illustrates a typical sequence of messages and the recurring use of the Speak a Reply' X-Link.

Demo Definitions in order to rapidly demonstrate the capabilities and potential of X-Links, there will be 2 separate demo scenarios and milestones: SMS based Demo The purpose of the canned demo is to show X-Links proof of concept.

SMS / /MMS Field Trial

The purpose of the field trial version will be to demonstrate X-Links capabilities to customers, partner and key industry intluencers. The field trial is a working version of the pr)dUct.

1. User interaction considerations Although the recipient of an X-links message ma be reading the message as an email on a PC or a high-end smartphonc, the expectation is that must users will he using a more typical mobile phone. Therefore, interactions with an X-Iinks message should be designed with that user in mind. Access to the data that the user is requesting b clicking on a link should he immediate and require the smallest number of clicks to reach the desired information.

Caffing Party The experience for the calling pam-would he consistent with current SpinVox voice to text products. Callers would hear an IVR greeting to leave a message with pronipts that incorporate Spin\'ox branding.

Called Party The called pam would receive either an SN1S message, NIMS message or email of the converted voice message. When the message is displayed, a link at the bottom of the message would he highlighted and give the option to reply by clicking on a number or link.

One they have initiated the reply, callers would hear an IVR greeting to leave a message with prompts that inìcorporate Spin\'ox branding.

2. Implementation considerations There will be 2 types of X-Links service offerings -X-Links for SMS and X-Links for MMS and email.

SMS

While SMS has the broadest reach in terms of subscribers and device support. there are limitations on the number of available characters in each message. This limit impacts the number and type of link that can be incorporated in an SJ\IS message. A second consideration is the ability for the device to automaticall dial a phone number. If the link contorms to a common number +44207772222 some hut not all devices will a1!o the link to be clicked and make a phone call.

The approach for SMS will be to include a phrase at the end of the message such as To Speak a reply call <+44211777222>'.

MMS and Email MMS and email messages will provide a much richer X-Einks experience for the end user in terms of message display and usability. Although usage is not as widespread when compared to SMS, MMS usage has recently experienced significant market growth.

For MMS, the X-Links message would contain a link at the end of the message which states: Click here to speak a reph' 21) -spoken through SpinVox When the link is selected a call to a number (hidden from the end-user) will be made. This could be a geographic or non-geographic fixed line number or Voice shortcode.

X-Links Product Requirements 1. Service Level Requirement The calling parts should nut have to sign up ith SpinVox or the Carrier to use this service.

Customers can opt-out of the service b calling customer care or b sending an SMS message to a shortcode.

The sericc should meet the same aailabilitv requirement as the prevailing Spin Vox service.

on initial launch the service must support the following languages: UK English US English Canadian English Canadian French German French Spanish Australian English South African English The SpinVox SMS server must hold a profile for the Carrier DD1 to determine whether to deliver the message to the Carrier SMSC or deliver to an agregator to send to the customer In that profile, there must be a reference to the injection and ejection validation rules for that carrier 2. IVR Once connccted to the SpinVux IVR, the customer simply needs to record their message then hang up in order for i-he message to be sent. There will be no option to review the message, nor will there he any option to receive a cops of the message.

Requirement The voice talent used to rec)rd an new V( )Ice pr rnpts must bc the same as currently used on the Spin Vox l\'R platfirm.

I\'R prompts must be recorded in all languages supported by the Spin\'ox 1\'R The destination party will l)e automaticall known and no additional number entry is required.

The duration for a spoken repl will be set to 3() seconds The option to re-record the message will be available by pressing (the star key) at any time during recording.

The first (3) three times a customer initiates a cal] to reph by using an X-Link they will be prompted to contirm the charge thr using the service.

Subsequent times a customer connects to the I\TR. the will not be prompted to confirm the cost.

X-Link Confirm prompt: (played first 3 times) "\Velcome. This service cost 25 pence per message. Please Press I to continue." Pressing I will confirm the action and the customer will then hear the following pr)mpt X-Lirik normal prompt: "Speak your reply Now!" Once the message has l)een deposited a billing trigger vill be activated and if appropriate the customer i] bc charged tor rhc message.

3. Delivery to recipient \\hcn a voice message is successfull conerted to text, an SMS, MMS, will be sent to the intended recipient.

Requirement The text message must be sent as from the original caller's phone number (i.e. the A part.

The hod of the message must use the appropriate Spin\'ox SMS boilerplate, as defined in 1\lcssage Classification.

This includes the definition of the branded signature and the use ofciuotarion marks.

ILL I)IFFER DEPENDiNG ON DELIVERY METHOD The delivered message must automaticaIl contain an X-Link, linking the sender (uniquely) with the recipient.

4. X-Link There are no pre-requisites to using an X-Link. It is nor necessary to have a Spin\Tox account, in fact, many recipients will nor know who or what Spin'ox are, until the click on the link.

Requirement It must he possible to link two people's numbers uniquely using a single geographic or non-ge( graphic number that can he dialled directly from an' handset. C)

5. Reporting Requirement It must be possible to report on all messages on this service.

Further X-Link Concepts 11) * Original sender has a setting which can specify that the voice-to-text reply should go to more than one destination eg. to SMS and to distinct e-mail address (office), and to a further e-mail address (1u)me). This setting can also be altered on a message-b -message basis. This setting could be hand' as it could lead to an automatic "backup" of SMS messages received on a mobile phone to an e-mail aco)unt at the workplace, or to support staff at the workplace who can provide cover for a bus)' individual.

* Each user has their own list of X-links, each X-link being associated with the unique L'SLSISDN of a person that has sent a text to that user. Individual X-Links can he deleted, if desired.

21) * Include option thr spoken text message to he saved to an intermediary, for sending on later at a specific time. Eg. in union-dominated environments, might not want to send such a message outside of working hours. Hence select it to he sent at exactly 9 am, which could be the exact start time of the working day. Option could be called "Speak delayed text message", with the future time (and possibly date) at which it is to be sent inputted using the number keys.

insertion of X-Link in the message is dc-selectable using an option eg. if the recipient speaks with a strong accent or dialect that cannot be converted to text reliably using existing technoiog, and you do not want to waste time trying to decipher an such text message.

* \Vhen te\t message is sent to a non-Spino customer, include a link so that the non-Spinvox customer can click it to sign up to Spinvox eg. using an internet page, or speaking to an operator.

* X-Link in a blog, or in a closed user group.

SECTION B: Content Based Links -SLinksTM Spoken Links (or smart links) (inc of the most useful features of receiving a spoken message as text is that if the speaker gave specific data relating to a place, time, address, name or other keywords it's in text and as the user, you can quickis refer to that at any time when sou next need it.

Parsing of phone numbers, email addresses and websites into hvperlinked objects is common in messaging applications (SMS, MMS, email, IM, etc...). in spoken messages, users often give reference to locations that aren't as obviously structured, but equally important to the recipient.

The concept of S-Links is to parse the text of a spoken message and use keywords to generate a set of useful, related links. The relevant links are inserted in the message and would take the user to a website or web resource that expands on the content linked.

For example, in Figure 4, message sender Zac Sandier leaves a v)ice mall which has been automat-icallv converted to text using the SpinVox voice conversion system (see \V() 2004/095821 and \V() 2007/091(196, the contents of which are incorporated by reference).

At the footer of the converted message are two separate links, one for directions and another for the drink cava'. Clicking on the Directions' link opens a map browser on the phone (in this Figure, a PC based Google Maps image is shown for clarity), showing the address mentioned in the voice message, now converted to SI\IS.

In another variant, shown in Figure 5, the links are incorporated into the message, with the address 20E & 911 Sf in the body of the message being selectable to call up the map browser, showing that address. Likewise, the word tava' in the body of the message is selectable, to call up a browser with places where this wine can be bought and which (optionally) are near the parsed destination address. in this example, the user can be presented with options for buying a bottle of Cava that are on the planned route, rather than anywhere in their localit, optimising the relevance and therefore value of the implicit search result. Further more, these can be added to the map presented to show where on route these items are.

So in this case, the message contained two clear opportunities from which to create a relevant link: an address and a pmduct tipe.

rm sstem first looks for ke words or phrases that contain Iikeh words 11w links. It then takes these and automaticall looks up likely resources for each and then presents what it estimates is the best result.

The value of this is that relevant links are inserted which the user will accept as they are useful, relevant and generally unobtrusi',e. This is a vers taluable wa of marketing below the line' using (User Generated Content to find and create valuable links for the recipient.

SC) S-Links increases the value of converted voice messages through the inclusion of relevant contextual elements. B incorporating links to external information, such as maps, directions, advertisements or offers, S-Link-enabled messages can deliver an enhanced experience -evolving from the current explicit search paradigm to the significantly more valuable implicit search, i.e. s( )mething that was actually said in conversation.

For the first time, the massive volume of P2P messaging in the mobile sector will he harmonized with search. In addition to offering an enhanced subscriber experience, this unique integration provides a highly targeted platform for mobile monetization. S-Links will provide a huge, sustainable incremental revenue for Carriers and service providers.

Technical The way to create this links is by processing the converted text first, finding relevant key words, creating the links then adding them into the message, before sending to the recipient.

Spin Vox's Voice Message Conversion System post-processes all messages and is capable of making a call to a routine to parse text and create an) relevant S-Links. \MCS is defined in more detail in \X'02007/091096, the contents of which are incorporated by reference.

Alternatively, the message can be first sent to an intcrmediar who can perfiirm this link creation stage.

Link types The links can either be the full URL where the application reading the text is unable to create fulls aliased hper1inks, or just the hvperlink itself from the key word. E.g.

L! RL onk: http://maps.google.com/ I li perlinked: 20E 9QtE St if the links are fulls hvperlinked, the can be placed within the text of the message: From: Zac Sandier Hi. The pam's (in at 20 east 9th street at 9pm. Don't forget to buy a bottle of caxa for Mand s Spanish silter bullet game. See ya.

Implicit Search with Intelligent-to-MeTM The s stein can be enhanced to provide trLlh smart links that are relevant not just to the message, but the user and their habits, histors of use and preferences. The concept is that the S-Links ser ice learns and uses other resources to make ans' links presented intelligent to the specific user, or "Intelligent-to-I\IeTM". Issue

The issue of mobile search is today predicated on the fact that users will behave the same was' and have the same needs when they're mobile as when they're at their PC. Three basic issues exist when translating search from PC to mobile: 1. \\ hen people get up and go somehere, thes nearly always know where they're going, whs and kes information about that trip, even if local, so their requirements for search are normalis contextually constrained to the task at hand.

2. In the event that people want to search whilst mobile, it's well known that todas s solutions require input on a small alpha-numeric keypad or even a touch screen that is not eas and requires the user to tvpicaU stop somewhere to perthrm the search.

3. Even if the person does achieve input of a search term, the still need to click through several pages and scroll to find the releant outcome. 1'his can equate to some 30-lce press sequences including switching to their browser, tping in the search string or query (often more than once to find the right one, scrolling and then selecting pages/links to view.

11) Key insight The source of many of our searches is actuall driven h messages we receive from others, such as names of something we didn't know about, locations, brands, etc... On a PC, these sources are wide as thes' can come from more than just our community or colleagues. But fortunatek, large keyboards, rich screens and connectivity make our task of explicitly transposing the idea to some key words, invoking our browser and typing in a couple of search queries and then browsing through many options, an acceptable task. This is Explicit' search, because the user has to consciously think about what they need to find, how and then filter clown results to their target.

Messages we receive from our community or voice messages contain a high proportion of kes task information for our dails lives -e.g. a time for a meeting, an address, items to bring/buy, things to do/see and even reminders.

SpinVox research into converted voicemail-to-text results shows a surprisingly high number of appointments; locations, tasks and items are received by voice messages, some 25%. And people use this to navigate and successfull) work through their day.

What this means is that a significant part of anyone's trir to undertake search comes from oice messages. Coupled ith the fact that people often rely on text messages (SMS, MMS, email, etc...) once they're on their task or thp, to look up details en-route (e.g. check address, time or name of items to get, the solution becomes apparent.

By linking ke words in an message the use!-has directly to the destination (search answer), the user's life becomes much simpler and effective. NC) need to explicitly think about searching and which way to do it, just click on the link and be taken straight to an answer.

All the middle steps that explicit search relies on are removed. Used the highlighted word or reference in the message and get straight to the answer: Implicit Search.

Implicit Search By first converting all voice messages into text, SpinVox has all the ke words that a)uld he used to perform an intelligent search. Further, it also has the abilit to build up a history of user messages, who they were from, which source and the response to such links to continually optimise how they're presented in future and therefhre fit with what the recipient/user actually needs. So the system learns what a user is likely to he searching for through its entire histor of messages sent and received -not just the specific search.

Keys to optimising implied search include: o Calling/sending parts (A-parts) o Key words used and their relative meanings 0 Message type -voicemail, SMS, email, social network, broadcast/blast, etc...

o Location of 1)0th called pam-(B-party) and calling/sending pam (A-parts) 0 Location based services (LBS) to improve the context of key words (e.g. addresses, or locations for certain items en-route) o 1 listory of clicks and actions of recipient o 1 listory of response to messages to better know what was say ambiguous or likely to he done next in a typical sequence hetween these two parties 0 Time of day, date and place that actions xere taken to optimise what things are relevant vs. not 0 Preferences for brand, place, method or mode based on purchase history or message histon-and link usage \MCS related patent filing XXi) 21)07/091096 describes the system used to implement the indexing of ke-words/terms needed to generate a full index that can form the basis of an advertising supported search system -i.e. that is sufticienth reliable, robust and scalable to provide advertisers that hid for a particular index term to he reliably and appropriatel referenced or linked to in a message when that index term appears.

B looking at all a user's messages, whether the receied them or sent them, a significant amount of personal context can be derived to learn and thereby better provide a user with intelligent options or links to dehering what the' want. This constant learning helps provide a network-based service that is with you and is: Intelligent-to-Metm1.

Many-to-one widens scope and relevance This also changes traditional search which is in essence a one-to-one relationship, nameR that as a user it is only my input to sa Google or Yahoo! that generates results and the onl thing they know about me is my IP address, which changes as I move awund. With S-Links, search input is widened to become from many-to-one. It is also reliably for one user, as your phone number rarely changes. Therefore, the search is far more relevant to the user as it's using a fuller set of ke words that a user depends on, rather than the few that are remembered or transposed froni one applicatkm to another. It can also be specific to the demographic of the user, because that information is either explicitly provided to the system by the user, or can be inferred by the system b looking (with the consent of the user) at the content and profile of messages.

We believe that a significant amount of mobile search will come from implicit search options embedded in messages and probably be larger than traditional explicit forms of search in mobile.

Permission based One of the ke issues that this idea solves is that in mobile, there's a large resistance to any advertising that is explicit or cIearl what is know as above the line' and effectiel occupies parts of the user's screen. in mobile, screen real estate is at a premium.

By embedding the links as the words, it will immediateI remove this problem and the service and any adverts associated with it will only appear when the user acnvel selects they want to use this option. This will likely transform user experience and acceptance of c( )mmercial services and advertising in mobile.

Gesture based Search Because the system is providing single click answers to typical search task, the user only needs undertake the simplest of actions, a click which is a common gesture and which takes the user straight to their destination, rather than work their keboard and navigation keys through some 20-30 or more inputs (keystrokes and clicks) to achieve the same result. it's well known that every step loses some 30% of users and this is even more accentuated in mobile. S-Links minimise this to just I step.

Location Based Search A simple feature is the option to nor onh displa the Address someone has given ou, hut to then use intelligence in the network (typically Location Based Services) to give you: o The actual route to take to get ou from wherever you are to the address given in the message 0 If vou' e other items to visit or collect (bu) on the was, the mapping function can now populate sour route with options to find these items, rather than just in a uni-directional radius ar( )und you o Use our history to know which places, routes and features you prefer to improve the relevance of the results presented 0 Use A-part location to also optimise local references and instructions or information to improve relevance of results presented -e.g. meet me at m Starhucks' would he ahle to automatically map the nearest to the caller's phone that made the call.

Business Model Transformer 1sing implied links will drive mobile users to online resources, mans of which are paid for by online adverts that appear. Implicit search v.vill do sevcral key things fr players in the alue-chains that provide both the mobilc service and web-based searches: j 0 Increase traditional Advertising Search (online advertisin revenues such as those derived by Googic, Yahoo!, MSN, etc...

0 Increase mobile reenues from data traftic and (lata products purchased 0 increase online transactions from mobile II) 0 Provide sources of revenue for the networks to subsidise the SpinVox service that enables this capacity. Users may no longer have to pa, but instead get a higher (lua1it service instead.

O Drive use of ncx messaging products or modes, such as MMS and \XAP, both of which are under-utilised but very capable multi-media resources that networks are keen to see a return on.

Business Business Rationale Upside SpinVox incremental Reinthrce SpinVox position as ncome from rn innovator and as the market share of click eader revenue Carrier incremental)rive new sales of data plans ncome from Lfld uplift take-rate of data/X AP:ompatible handsets session Search incremental Monetize SMS -not previously ngine ncome from ossible due to routing and lick-through olume Figure 6 schematically illustrates the business model transformation anti how' SpinVox positions itself as the intermediar l,etween the customer and the search-engine based ad'ertising a.regator, such as Google.

Single Search Result Premiums Due to the nature of the single link and its design to take you straight to the right outcome (destination), this service will further heighten the value of these search results to advertisers and commercial service proiders as there wifl onl be one or a couple other search results shown, rather than the pas of results provided in PC based explicit search which tends to dilute the alue of the slot bought.

This will offset the industry's concerns about mobile advertising in general being less valuable as web content and resources are generall less available to mobile users.

Summary of S-Link features

Now' voice is in text, it can he massivel indexed * \oicemail is the 2nd largest form of mail after email * \oice messages have rich personal context -ke task intbrmation * Search can be very targeted and relevant * Permission based: Intelligent-to-MeTM * Smart-links learns from history and use from all messages to me from m communities, not just m individual searches (e.g. Google) * Implicit vs. Explicit search * Current search is PC-centric -Explicit search * Requires user to think of search term, switch apps, type in via fiddly ke pad, surf to find results = 20click exercise (30 /u loss at ever step) * Naturally limited market -in mobile! * S-Links provide result in context (message) -implicit Search * Voicemail (and SMS) contains over 70% of key info for day's tasks -addresses, times, names, sequences, products, ideas, etc... -i.e. kewords that drive tpical search * Take you straight to destination, not the iong ride -I gesture = result! * implicit recurring behaviour -voice messages are received ever da * Link is discreeth in message and takes ou straight to the result * Links are smart -the' can give local context to ensure results shown is right for the user first time -e.g. providing local options for maps, products, places and services.

* implicit navigation -it knows where you are and where ou are going. it uses network LBS (locatkrn based services) to find you and then map services to provide you with a route to where you are going. It dynamically updates depending on where and when you clink on a link.

* I click simple to reach destination -the link is persistent and is there in the message after you close and then re-open the message man days alter; there is no need to re-type anything.

* Preferences enabie different commercial resources to be displayed * Drives much higher value single search result.

S-Links User Experience This document details the user experience and highlights specific requirements and considerations for Spin Vox S-Links. The solution will primarily consist of: 1. SMS, MNIS or email message with highlighted keywords 2. New capability to identify and highlight keywords in voice to text processing 3. Integration with 31(1 parts-ad and content servers to support business model The following sections are covered in this document: 1. General requirements -key features and benefits of the product 2. User experience -customer experience fbr calling and called parts Product requirements -end to end lifecvcle experience General Requirements Ihe product must meet the fol1odng criteria: End User Benefit highlighted words must be relevant to niessage content and have perceived value for the user. Consensus that 2 or 3 links per message is the maximum threshold.

Ease of Use Must be obvious to user that highlighted words can be clicked'. Should be simple way to activate links to render associatedresults. 1deal1, only one click would be required to retrieve and display the requested information.

Simple, Fast Display Results Clicking on highlighted words should require the smallest possible number of additional clicks to display results. Assumption is that \VAP support is available on majority of targeted devices Performance Turn around time (TAT) for message delivery should not be impacted. The message TAT should remain within the current SI.A parameters.

Figure 7 shows the end-to-end experience from when a calling part) leaves a message and to how the recipient (called part)) views the message. The message content, display and interaction will differ depending on message sent and display type.

1. Calling party initiates call to a called part). Alternativeh the caller could be replying to an email, creating a memo, preparing a blog or social network posting or responding to an instant message. Calling party is prompted to speak their message using normal product 1VR prompts.

2. The voice message is recorded in the audio capture s' steni uit-hin a carrier, serb ice operator or Spin\'ox. The \\ A\' tile is then sent to \MCS for conversion.

3. SpinVox VMCS converts voice \X'AV tile into text message.

4. Spin\'ox intern)gates message to determine if any relevant keywords are present.

5. Spin\'ox highlights relevant ke words and inserts one or more of the following associated links: a. Ad click b. Map c. Ad tag in message d. Ad tag at bottom of the message 6. Message goes back to carrier for deliver to called part) destination via SMS-C, MMS-C, or email teway 107. Called parts receives message on device. Message display and linking capabilities will be depcndant on message type sent (SiMS, J\lMS).

8. Called party clicks on highlighted words with embedded links to display more information.

9. Link goes to 3 parts service proiders for maps, ads or search results.

10. link results are displa ed to the user. Display results and speed we he dependant on the VAP/weh capabilities of the called parts's device.

Demo Definitions In order to rapidly demonstrate the capabilities and potential of S-Links, thcre will he 2 separate demo scenarios and milestones: Canned Demo The purpose of the canned demo is to show S-Links proof of concept. The demo will be limited to a predefined set of keywords and displa results.

Field Trial

The purpose of the field trial version will be to demonstrate S-Links capabilities to customers, partner and key industry intluencers. The field trial is a working version of the product though there likely still be limitations on available keywords and search results.

1. User interaction considerations Although the recipient of an S-Links message ma be reading the message as an email on a PC or a high-end smartpbone, the expectation is that most users will be using a more typical mobile phonc. Therefore, interactions with an S-Links message should he designed with that user in mind. Access to the data that the user is i-ecuesting h clicking on a link should be immediate and require the smallest number of clicks to reach the desired information.

Calling Party The experience for the calling part-v would be consistent with current Spin\'ox voice to text products. Callers would hear an IVR greeting to leave a message with prompts that incorporate Spin Vox branding.

Called Party The called parts ould receive either an SMS message, MMS message or email of the con*ei-tcd voice message. \hen the message is displayed, certain keywords would be highlighted, ideally those that are most relevant to the message content. Message should contain a minimum of I and maximum of 2 or 3 keyword links. The type of content displayed and the user interaction with that content will vary depending on the message type and the device capabilities. (see Implementation Considerations section below) For capable devices, selecting a highlighted keyword will initiate a \VAP or web session and displa ad, map or search results associated with the k-es words.

Canned Demo Field Trial

Keyword Minimal pre defined list of List developed in conjunction with strategy keywords ad server or search partner.

Link Type Ke words link directly to set Based on kenvord selected and of pre-detined results related links.

a. Ad click a. Hotel -> WAP site b. Map b. Map -> static map c. Ad tag in c. Audio clip message d. Nloie clip d. Ad tag at bottom of the message Device N/A 3rd party fhr adaptation/transcoding adaptation for mobile devices Location N/A Simple user profiles for containing based most frequent locations services N/A Default is opt out Opt-in/Out 2. Implementation considerations There will be 2 types of S-Links service offerings -S-Links for Si\1S and S-Links thr MMS and email.

SMS

While SMS has the broadest reach in terms of subscribers and device support, there are limitations on the number of available characters in each message. This limit impacts the number and type of link that can be incorporated in an SMS message. A second consideration is the ahilit for the device to render the link, If the link conforms to common URL form http://www.anysite.com some but not all devices will allow the link to he clicked and launch a WAP browser.

The approach for SMS will be to embed a single link or advertising tagline in the message.

The link should be relevant to at-least one of the words in the message. Alternatively there could also he a CSOflS option e.g. -Rcplv M for more info -that could be sponsored.

Another approach will he to auction specific kewords to the highest bidder -e.g. hotels = I-hilton, Coffee = Starhucks. This approach will not be taken initially since keywords will have low value until the ad inventors increases as more ad-supported messages arc implemented.

Canned Demo Field Trial

Keyword Coffee List developed in conjunction with ad server or search partner.

Display Taglines TBI) based on partner list results Option 1: "To find a local Starhucks, go to http: / /mobile.starhucks.com" Option 2: "Looldng for Starbucks? Reply S to find the closest OflC to you" ii) MMS and Email MMS and email messages will provide a much richer S-Links experience for the end user in terms of message display and usability. Although usage is not as widespread when compared to SMS, MMS usage has rcccntls experienced significant market growth. MMS has the ability to support rich data types such as images, audio and video, and does lint have the same character limitations as SMS. Handsets that support MMS are also more likely to have some t-vpe of web access hui]t into the device. Additionally S-Links can he a niajor driver for increasing traffic of higher priced MMS messaging services (hr carriers.

For \lNlS, the S-links message would contain between 1 and 3 highlighted kevords. \XThien a Lenvord is selected, a \X'AP or web browser ill open and the relevant information will 1e displayed. If the inforniation is an address, the browser should open up a map with the address highlighted and standard options for receiving directions if possible. If a like word "coffee" or "Starbucks" is highlighted, clicking the link would bring up list of coffee shops or Starhucks that are local to that users. These may or may not he relevant at the time the user is viewing the message. Clicking on a highlighted item could also bring up an ad, either separatels or as part of the other results. A future option would also he to consider integrating an ad as part of the actual message.

Email and 1 NI messages would function similarl to NIMS.

Product requirements 1. Customer interaction with IVR There will he no change to the calling party experience.

2. Delivery to recipient When a voice message is successfull converted to text, an SMS, MNIS, email or IM ill be sent to the intended recipient.

SMS/MMS B Party The text message must be sent as from the original caller's phone number (i.e. the A party).

Message body The bod of the message must use tlic appropriate SpinVox SMS boilerplate, as defined in Message ClassihcatR)n.

rhis includes the definition of the branded signature and the uSe of c1uotatiofl marks.

Wil A. DIFFER DEPENDING ON DELIVERY METI OD Message Delivery Canned demo -3Id part\-aggregator

Field Trial -Carrier MMSC

3. S-Link Highlighted Keywords A minimum of I and a maximum of 3 kevwcirds will be highlighted in the body of the message.

User actions when clicking -see table below fot demo and trial requirements Impact on message loads (see 2.2) Choice of words I. Carrier specific 2. Auction 3. Ad-search partner defined inclusion of location click through?

Canned Demo Field Trial

Keyword Minimal pre defined list of List deehiped in conjunction with strategy keywords ad server or search partner.

Display Keywords link directly to set of Based Ofl ke) word selected and results pre-defined results related links.

a. Hotel -> I lilton \\AP sire Eg.

a. Ad click b. Map -> static map a. I Intel -> Hilton -show list of h. Map c. Audio -> Foo Fighters -1-lilton 1-lotels, preferably those that c. Ad tag in flash page arc rc1eant to user location message d. Mo ie -> "1 Am Legend" h. Map -> Dynamic map (like d. Ad tag at flash page Google Maps) showing local bottom of business and options for directions the message c. TBD based on partner d. TBD based on partner Content Spin\'ox built demo site 3Id party serviced content Sources 4. Service level -Trial Only Sign-up requirements The calling parts should not have to sign up with SpinVox or the Carrier to use this service.

Customers can opt-our of the service Service Level The serice should meet the same availability requirement as the prevailing Spin Vox service.

VMCS Language support On initial launch the service must support the following languages: * UK English * US English * Canadian English * Canadian French * German * French * Spanish * Australian English * South African English Carrier Profile The SpinVox SNIS server must hold a profile for the Carrier DDI to determine whether to deliver the message to the Carrier SMSC or deliver to an aggregator to send to the customer in that profile, there must he a reference to the injection and ejection validation rules for that carrier 7. Reporting -Trial Only It ill he necessan to report on the activity on for S-Links. The audience for all reporting will be b)th internal and external, Carrier facing and for advertisers or ad networks.

Reporting requirements It must be possible to report on all messages on this service Reporting requirements it must be possthle to report on the following product metrics.

* Usage * Traffic Reporting requirements \ ord impressions per da /week/rnonrh Click through on each word per day/week/month Links clicked vs. links displayed on each work pcr day/week/month.

Filter b Carrier, service pros ider etc SECTION C: WEB 2.0 Mobile Blogging -M0BI0TM Blogs have become a er popular method of people sharing thoughts, facts, photographs, images and other information freels across the internet. Blogs are large1 based around the Concept that you're sharing something with a community to whom your blog is relevant, often highl personal.

11) Blogs now exist for sharing information on films, concerts/gigs, shows and all sorts of entertainment, and more recently, a large rise in their use for Citizen journalism where any member of the public can post news or intormation about a current issue. The BBC has recently introduced such services along ith other leading news proiders.

The issue is that often people want to post something to a blog site when they're not at their computer (PC), but actually as it's happening or when it's relevant. For instance, having just left a cinema you'd be more likely to want to post a comment up about the film OU just saw than waiting till later when you're back home. Likewise, if you've seen or heard a news story that suddenly affects i-our or you have an interest, you want to post an entry then and there.

In many cases, you'll he out an about, not necessarily at your PC.

Current solutions are to use the micro-browsers available on high-end mobile phones to iog in and use either the alpha-numeric keypads or micro keyboards to type in your entry. That's fine if you're patient, technicaib competent and dexterous enough to t pe more than a sentence or two. 1or the rest of us, it's still highl impractical.

SpinVox Mobile Blogging is simple. just call the blog site phone number, speak your blog message and it's converted to text and posted up as an entry.

Imagine seeing a film on new release you love and being the first to blog aI)out it: "I saw the new X-Men film last night and MoBlo'd it to v)ur site with a five star rating!". Or being able to blog a news item: "just seen a major crash on the M4 at junction 111 involving a petrol tanker. i\void this route. Pc)Iice are on their way." How it works * The owner of a hiog site decides either they want to enable spoken biog entries on their biog site * The contact Spin\'ox and sign up for an account and provide standard information, including their blog site host * They register the location (1'RL) and email address * SpinVox gives the blog owner a phone number DDI) * SpiiìVox will convert an voice messages left on their DDT into text and either o Email to the hlog site email address o Post it via 1-ITTP or similar IP protocol directl to their hlog site If the owner then decides to publish this number, for instance b putting up on their blog site or emailing it to select people, an one can use this number to speak them a hiog entr.

The can simpl save this phone number in their contacts/address 1)00k so that speaking this blog and entn is always to hand.

Registering your name or handle X1en people hiog, they often want to say who they are. SpinVox Mobile Bloing gives users the following options: 1. X'hen ou call the blogs phone number for the first time, the SpinVox sen-ice will prompt you to speak sour name or our handle.

For example:

a. "Welcome to SpinVox m( )bile blog. Please first speak our name or handle as ou want it to appear each time you speak a blog, or press # to remain anonymous" h. User either speaks their name or handle ("Fred Flinstone'D, or hits # c. "Thank you. Please speak sour blog message after the tone. This will be converted to text and posted on this blog site".

2. You can go to a SpinVox website and register that shen you call a given hlog site (e.g. blog URL: www.filmmaxhlog.com) from a phone number you provide (e.g. y( )Ut mobile: 07812101742), it should disp1a our name (e.g. Fred Flinstone or enter a default, such as Anonymous'.

3. You can optionally chose to display any other details with your entries such as: a. \our email address b. \our Instant Message ID c. Your VoIP ID (e.g. Skpe name) d. Your phone number e. A web address f. Etc...

Technical solution The major blog site providers (e.g. blogspot, hloer.com, Yahoo!, Google, etc...) provide an interface so that blog sites they host can receive an email hich is then automatically posted to the intended blog site. They also provide standard HTTP post interfaces which allow applications to post entries via the internet.

Spin\'ox determines which of the blog providers a user is on, and then automaticall provisions the right type of interface to use to be able to post the text on to a blog hosted with the provider, either via email or an I-ITFP post method.

The converted text is then formatted and relevant fields populated to ensure the text posted is displayed correctl on the blog site and has the right information showing. E.g.: * Time and date * Text is optionall in quotes (e.g. "Pust seen Madonnas confessions and it stank!') * User name dispIaed o BIog spoken hy: <user name or handle> (e.g. Fred Flinstone) o Anonymous blog eny * Any other chosen data the user registered and chose to displa) o E.g. email address, Psi ID, phone number, \7olP ID, web address, etc...

X-Links in Blog Blog providers are able to automaticall) alert users when a new item has been added, including via email, SMS or Psi.

& simple adding in the blog's spoken message phone numher (Spin\'ox Mobile Blog phone number) to the text message or email, all recipients can chose to respond to this entn in calling this number (clicking on it in the SNIS).

In addition, Spin Vox helps direct people's to respond to a particular blog entn h putting an X-lJnk into the text message so that it is posted with a particular reference.

For example:

* Albert speaks a blog entr ia Spin\'ox b calling the blogs Spin\'ox number * SpinVox posts his entr with an X-lJnk in (e.g. O2O796S2000p1O1) * rue i)log site automatically alerts signed-up readers with a message that contains this X-Link * Readers who call this X-Link will have their reply associated with Albert's original entn and thereby create a thread under his entry.

Mobile Photo Messaging -MoPhoTM The market fi)r taking pictures on a mobile device that's connected to the Internet, tvpicalh a mobile phone with a camera, is evolving from trying to send other phone users a picture message (typically MMS) or download the picture from the device to a computer and then save it, email it or burn it to CD.

A new genre of mobile photography has emerged whereby a photograph taken on your mobile device can he automatically uploaded to a wehsite for private or shared use. It solves several problems with copying or moving photographs off the device, sharing them and on larger screens where the quality of the photograph can he best appreciated.

I lowever, users often want to post a comment with their photograph as it is being uploaded onto a website for them. Much of the impact (fun or seriousness) of a photograph is best expressed at the moment it was taken, not hours, days or weeks later when ou're next at a PC to ie' and add comments. Using the device's small alpha-numeric keypads to do this when mobile is tiddI at hest.

Spin\'ox enables todays standard mobile photographs services (e.g. Cognima's Shozu) with a simple means of also adding a comment as it happens. The user simpl now speaks their comment which is converted to text and automatically posted along with the photograph.

Example:

11) * Max takes a photograph on his mobile phone whilst on holida of two friends in front of a famous building * They decide to add a comment to the photograph before posting it * "usr humped into Bill and Ben in front oNes, you guessed it, Big Ben!" * Their message is converted and posted along with their photograph on their photograph sharing website * Max's two young children are at home in Scotland. They see that a new photograph has just been added to their father's photograph sharing website.

* They laugh and call their father to see if can take another photograph of Bill and Ben with Sherlock Holmes.

The mobile photographs service pros ider would update their application to provision the user with a phone number that is auromaticall) called when the select Speak a Photo Comment'. This number is mapped to Spin Vox's conversion service which then converts their message and sends it back to a designated location for posting with the user's photograph.

1. Photograph taken on camera phone -Figure 8 2. Llser then selects from Options menu: Speak a Comment -Figure 9 3. Application connects to a SpinVox service, sends over a unique identifier to link the speaker, photograph and message.

4. User then prompted to speak their message: "please speak your photo comment atter the tone" 5. Converted message is sent Ii) mobile pbotograph service provider's s stem which adds the comment to the photograph Spoken Mobile Messaging in an online Community Spin Vo has launched several products in the SpinX family which includes users being able 11) to speak a message and have it converted and automatically posted to a blog site, or speak a message and have it converted and sent to multiple recipients as either an SMS, email, MMS, 1fl or other messaging format.

Twitter SpinVox is launching a service whereby users of the increasingl popular Twitter service can simply use their phone to call a local number, speak their message and have it automaticall posted to their Twitter account for them as a text. Naturally, users no longer have to be at a PC and online to use Twitter.

Echo message -live post confirm And eer time rhe post, they'll get an SMS reph (or an echo) confirming their posting went live, or not to allow them to retn. This idea applies to all types of web l)ased service ou'd post to as you need to know that you're entry/post as success1ull conertecl and posted live to the web, simply because you're not online, but on a phone instead. Echos can be returned as email or TM or other form of messaging and shared wider to keep a group informed tOc).

This echo behaviour complements the service that Twitter has whereby users can elect to receive an SMS ever time someone in their group p)sts an entr. So with Spin Vox, all users can truly stay in touch with their Twitter communit\ by phone wherever they are. If OflC of the group posts b Spin\'ox, the rest will automaticalh get an SMS with what the said, and naturally the option to call in a repl or update. So there's no longer a dependenc that anyone is actually online for the group to stay in touch.

This is a significant step forward in removing the existing dependency o1 Twitter and in fact all other web (PC based) messaging service providers.

Social Network Messaging in fact, any social network, communit forum or other type of online communit can benefit from Spin Vox prn iding them with a simple nieans of staying in touch with their communit just by calling in their message, letting SpinVox convert it and post it to their account and then leveraging existing messaging services to let others see sour new post. They ma be mobile too.

X-Links open up the ability for these communities to use Spin Vox without complex sign-ups and decisions. Once the) get a converted message, thes ma also be offered a link which will allow them to speak a reply and have it also posted online, thereby enabling the whole group to stay in touch wherever they are just In a simple phone call.

For example, Yahoo! offers messenger services to its users and as groups, they can now broadcast messages via Yahoo! online to each other, but onh when online and they're all loed in. With SpinVox, they'll he able to shout out' a message to members of their group and know it'll reach them all whether they're online or not.

Voice Blast The idea is a Voice hlast' that reaches users either online or off-line as a text message of one form or another (SiMS, email, IM, etc...). A form of group broadcasting via voice to text where the group is defined by their online connections, but messaged anywhere, particularly mobile.

Dial-tone = web-tone In short, this expands upon the idea that with SpinVox as a network service, ans one can now use phone networks of an t) pe to speak a message that will appear as text online in an account or place of their choice.

\Xliat this also means is that no user, in fact the whole group, actually needs to be li)gd into their online service/account (e.g. Twitter, Yahoo!, etc...) to stay in touch with each other. This means these services can be used by the whole group fu1l off-line and via a simple phone call.

Reducing the Usemarne/PIN barrier to a phone call What this also means is that a user's phone number (i.e. their CLI or MSISDN in mobile networks) becomes their identit for posting to online sen-ices. The elegance of this is that to post to an account or blog or other online service, ou don't have to remember VRLs, user names or passwords -just make a phone call and you're in! Twitter Micro-blog implementation This section co ers the requirements for launching a new product speciIicall for use with www.Twitter.com. Twitter is a micro-blogging environment, where users (tweeters) sign-up and then post in short updates (tweets) about what they're doing, using IM, SNIS or web.

These bulletins appear on nvw.twitter.com in their personal page and arc sent out to their friends as web updates or b SMS. Tweets are limited to 140 characters. Twitter proide an API which lets 3rd pam-developers integrate applicatkrns and services.

2(1 There are two strands to the product strateg. First is the demo: A user can try out the Spin Vox 1\itter demo hs calling a country-local DD1, and seeing the resulting conersion on the Spin Vox demo twitter account. This doesn't require an sign-up: just call the number and check the web site. It's analogous to the Spin-mv-Blog demo on our web site. The other strand is a more typical Spin-mv-Tweet style service: Users sign up fin a Spin-mi -Tweet style account. ThQ can then call a country local DDI to leave a short message, which is converted and sent to Twitter.

Product Overview

DEMO

* Customer can tr the demo out on www.spinvox.com by calling the country local CbSpinti,Iox for twitter" demo number. Their tweets will show up on the Spin\1ox fin twitter page within www.spinvox.com and on the SpinVox demo page within rwitter.c( m. No account created.

* SMS delivered back on succcsstu]/ unconvertible conversion * NC) SMS sent for hangups.

* Entries vill he moderated, hut this will be aftcr submission to Twitter.

D

LIVE

* Customer opens SpinVox fir Twitter account on www.spinvox.com and enters their Twitter uscrname arid password. User is encouraged to sign up with, and use, a mobile number.

11) * User is sent initial PiN via SMS and asked to login to create account.

* On login, customer is sent 2nd SMS welcoming them to SpinVox and asking them to save DDI to phone-in their Tweets.

* Customer calls countr -local Spin Vox for Twitter number and leaves message * If deposit is converted, the text is sent to Twitter.

* Optional notification SMS on converted and unconvertible.

* lor hangups, no notification SMS vi1l be sent.

* All SpinVox for Twitter accounts are automaticalh added to friends list of Spin\Tox Corporate on www.twitter.com (through API) Twitter implementation requirements 1. Service Level 1.1 The end-user will sign-up at www.spinvox.com to use the full SpinVox for Twitter service.

1.2 The service should meet the same availability requirement as the Spin-mv-\'mail service.

1.3 Recordings should be limited to 3() seconds.

This will he reviewed periodically after launch, to decide whether the limit should he lowered (e.g. to 21) or 15 seconds).

1.4 All SMS delieries should he limited to a single SMS.

There should be a configuration parameter to specify the number of characters, which will initial1 be set to 160.

1.5 TAT should be 98% of messages within 10 minutes, measured across a calendar month, where the daily average is 18 seconds or]ess. I.e. should meet the same TAT requirements as Spin-ms -\fmail 1.8 On initial launch the service (demo and live) must support the following languages: * UK English * US English * Canadian English * Canadian French * German * French * Spanish * Australian English * South African English 1.9 On initial launch country-local DDIs must he provisioned for the folloing countries for both demo and live (i.e. two 1)Dls tbr each entr in the list below).

* UK (language: en-GB) * US (language: en-LS) * US (language: es-ES initially es-US when available) * Canada (language: en-CA) * Canada (language: fr-CA) * Germany (language: de-DE) * France (language: fr-FR) * Spain (language: es-ES) * Australia (language: en-AU) * South Africa (language: en-ZA) 1.10 Countrv-li)cal DDIs need to be "golden" memorable numbers e.g. in US -415 TWITTER or similar. Priority should be given to live numbers over demo numbers, and to the US and UK numbers.

1.11 After initial launch, the LI\7E service numbers need to be capable of handling high volumes of concurrent calls 2. Customer interaction with IYR It is enisaged there will be minimal interaction between a customer depositing a message and the IVR s stem. Live service CLI withheld 2.1 For the live service, if the caller has

withheld their CLI, the caller should be told to turn off number withholding and call back.

Language selection 2.2 LIVE service -If the caller has a SpinVox account, and the account's language is one of those listed in requirement 1.9, i-hen we should use that language. Othen; ise the language should be whatever is associated with the number dialed. Note for the DEMo service -customer does not need a SpinVox or Twitter account to call the Demo DDI's. If the caller does have a SpinVox account though, we should take their language preference, rather than using the language associated with the country-local DDI.

11) Use from unregistered phone 2.3 If the caller's number does not have a SpinVox for Twitter account associated with it, the caller should he directed to the SpinVox website.

Demo greeting 2.4 \X1en a user calls a Spin Vox fir Twitter demo DDI, the) should hear the greeting Welcome to SpinVox fhr Twitter, please speak your message and it will appear on screen at web address-the" If the caller has withheld their CLI, they should also be told: "You will not receive any confirmation SMS. as you withheld your number".

Live service greeting 2.5 When a customer calls a regular Twitter DDI, (s)he will hear the following message: 2(1 "Please speak our Twitter message after the tone." Voice to he used for all IVR will he female and the same as other current Spin Vox products.

2.6 When recording the oice message, the caller should he able to hit the # key to re-record the message. The caller should be informed of this feature, the first three (3) times they use the service. In this case the prompt from requirement 2.5 should become: "Please speak your Twitter message after the tone. To re-record your message press the hash key (# at an) time" 2.7 If a customer es over the recording limit specified in requirement 1.3, they will he prompted to re-record the message or leave the message as is. This mirrors current behaiour of other SpinVox products.

2.8 There will be no DPA prompt.

3. Provisioning/Account management Sign-up information 3.1 To create a SpinVux for rwittci-account on::c:\, a uscr has to cntcr: * mobile phone number * Twitter usernamc and password * email address language preference * countf if the couni-rv is the 1_S. then the user should also have to provide * state A DDI should nut he assigned to the user, but rather the arc told which of the countr - 1() local DD1s (sec requirement 1.9) rhe' should use. Use of the SpinVox Twitter demo does not require an account to he set up.

SpinVox tweet-out 3.2 B default, when a user signs up for a SpinVox for Twin-er account, a tweet should be posted to their Twitter account: i've just signed up for Spin\'ox for Twitter at www.spinvox.com/twitter The sign-up page should have a checkbox which controls whether this announcement is posted. It should he on by default.

Twitter account validation 3.3 When a user is registering for a SpinVox for Twitter account, we should validate whether the Twitter account details are valid. If the account isn't valid, then the user should he given a link to the account creation page at www.twitter.com.

PIN notification by SMS 3.4 When an account is created as per 3.1, an SNIS should be sent to the user with an initial PIN, which the need to log in to the web site.

Welcome SMS 3.5 \Xelconie SMS is sent to customer as they successfulh log-in for the first time only.

Welcome SMS copy TBC.

SMS notification 3.6 Customer can control whether the get SMS notitication for the two cases: * message converted and sent to Twitter * message was unconvernble These can he controlled independently via self-care, So a user can turn off the converted notitication, but leave on notification of unconverubles, for example. For new accounts, SMS nonhcation should he turned ott for successful conversions, and turned on for uncon eruble. These options should not be given on the sign-up pagc.

Friends of SpinVox 3.7 B default all new SpinVo. for Twirtcr accounts should be added to the friends list of the Spin Vox Corporate Twitter page (Marketing owned page). A user should be able to opt out of this Via a control in self-care. This C( ntrol should not be pros ided on sign-up. This must be covered in the T&C's, which will linked on the sign-up page and in self-care.

Self-care 3.8 The customer can change the foUowing via self-care: 11) * Titter username * Twitter password The user will he able to change all other fields given during signup as part of regular self-care usage.

Access control via PIN 3.9 Customer can enable PIN access to deposit message on their account. If enabled, then the caller should be asked for the accountts PIN bcfore getting the regular prompt (requirement 2.5).

4. SMS message to caller When a voice message is successfulh or unsuccessfully converted to text, an SMS will he sent to the caller if the have selected this option (see req. 3.6 above).

4.1 For the demo service, if the calleres CIA was withheld, no attempt should be made to send any confirmation SMS's.

4.2 The text message will come from the called number -either the DEMO or the LIVE country local DDI.

4.3 on successful conversion the both of the message shall be shown in Quotation marks e.g. DI-E() = From: <S\T Twitter Demo DDI> Your tweet "<tweet extract>" is posted on www.spinvox.com/twitter (tbc) LIVE = From: <SV Twitter Local DDI> Your tweet "<tweet extract>" was posted to Twitter -powered by Spin Vux The lull SMS text must not exceed the limit specified in req. 1.4. lIthe lull tweet cannot he included, then the extract should finished with "..." (ellipsis).

4.4 11 unsuccessful, the mobile caller will be sent an SMS as below:-Sons, the "tweet" you left could lint he converted to text. Please call <dialled-number> and tn again. [hank VOIL -wwv, .spinvox.com 4.5 There will be no QuickLinkTM at the end of the message.

4.6 No contirmation S\IS should be sent to the caller \ hen a call is a hang-tip.

5. Conversion It) If the message is successfulis conerted the tweet shall be sent to the customer's twitter page. The message should he tagged with the Spin\'ox hvperlink.

5.1 LI\'E = Converted messages should be sent to the customer's twitter page with the Spin Vox source link sending users to ww.spinvox.corn/twitter product page.

Moderation of Demo tweets 5.2 All tweets to the Spin Vox m-itter demo can he removed by a moderator after posting to Twitter.

5.3 Tdtti messages to begin with the word says and followed by the conversion in double quotation marks to indicate spoken message i.e. says "hi I am here speaking to twitter" The total post must not exceed 140 characters. lIthe converted text is too long, it should he truncated, and the extract should he ended with "..." (effipsis).

6. Reporting It will be necessar to report on the activit on the SpinVox for Twitter service. The audience for all reporting is internal to SpinVox, there is no external reporting.

6.1 It must be possible to report on all messages on this service * Split by language * Conversion breakdown by product and h customer (conversions, unconverted and hang-ups) * No. of dail3 sign-ups and successfully created accounts (sign ups = not logged into website to open account) * flail) actie users * Aerage message duration * Conversion length (in characters) * ASg. fl() ot msgs/uscr per period (br/day/week) * Traftk profile by rime of day/week/month 7. Future requirements * Option to bill for this service in future using C/card.

* Option to switch 1-erniinating number to rated number to generate call time revenue from deposit calls.

* Ahilit to track call durations for per minute/second billing * Review private messages/commands and how use * Abiir\ to block callers from calling certain number ranges/rates.

8. Web experience Customers arrive at www.spinvox.com home page and see Twitter-branded logo or button on home page. They can also access the Spin Vox for Twitter page through the products link on home page.

\1en customers click through they see a Spin Vox for Twitter page -containing - 1) A Twitter logo 2) instructions about the product and how it works with Twitter 3) Instructions about how to set-up Twitter to work with SpinVox and how to tell their friends to get SMS updates.

4 FAQ's button about Spin Vox tor Twitter (tweets posted using existing pris.acs settings etc) A Spin\'ox for Twitter demo and demo button (showing page www.Twitter.com/spinvox OR www.spinvox.com/tsvitter) No account created during detm process as all entries posted as SpinVox 6) Click here button to invite them to set-up an account 7) User needs to input twitter username and password, along with mobile number and email.

Encourage user to input mobile phone no. as primary choice 8) Ahilit) to manage the service within Mv Account. 3()

SECTION D: MISSED CALL MESSENGER Missed Call MessengerTM Missed Call Messenger (NICM) solves the problem that faces mans' callers and carriers -namely, in markets where voicemail isn't enabled, callers now have the option of speaking the person they tried to call a text message of sonic form and so stas in touch.

Mans markets see less than 51I9/ v ucemail penetratü n, such as southern Europe (Spain, Italy, Greece, etc...). The reasons are mainly two-fold: 3. Voicemail is a chargeable service and in high pre-paid mobile phone markets, users tend to turn it off to save on costs as calls to deposit and retrieve a oice message are in the cent per event range.

4. Culturally, voicemail is perceived as too formal and business-like and often seen as a rude wa for daily messaging.

Insight The insight here is that what callers dci in this scenario is to not leave a toice message -where voicemail exists, or hit a dead-end (e.g. ring out, busy, off) where none exists -hut instead hang- up and in some 30% of cases type a text message to the person they tried to call. So actuall), in these cases their chosen form of messaging is to send a text when the' can't reach the person they're calling.

For carriers, missed calls (non-completed) of this type account fir several billion events per year. In Spain, the second largest network (\odafbne) has some 2.3bn missed calls a year.

I\ICTsI solves this neatly thr all parties. It is a network based service, so no handset dependency at all and works as follows: U \Vhen a call is being placed to a subscriber/customer who hasn't got voicemail services, the network knows to catch the call before it fails -hits busy tone, rings out, phone is off or unavailable/out of range.

o The network then picks up the call and piavs back an I\'R recording to the caller of the form: "It you wouki llke to speak a text message to the person you are calling, press 1".

o if the user selects this option (e.g. I), then they're simpis offered a prompt to speak their message -e.g. "speak your text message after the tone".

O The system then records the audio, sends it to the Spin\'ox \NiCS for conversion, and the converted text then sent on to the called parts and sent as if the message had originated from the calling party, n( it a system number or name. Typically this is )ne b using the callers CLI and putting it in the from' field of the sent message.

Toda, this is being rolled out with SMS, hut MMS, email, \\AP/HTML pages and any other form of text messaging can he used depending on the networks capability and user requirements.

The benefits are simple, but very large: O Callers get through first time when they need to O Recipients see immediately who needs them and can read the actual message O The role of message choice and charging is reversed. T picall, voicemail is a B-party service (recipient) because they pay and opt to have it. With i\ICM, it's actuall an A-parts (caller/sender) service as the opt-in every time the use it (no subscription) and they can also be billed for the use of the service.

O Carriers can generate new reenue from missed calls as now the caller A-partv) can be charged for the option of speaking a text either by call termination charges, premium rate SMS or inter-network charging m deis -all of which exist today.

o Likewise, a more classic B-party charging model is possible two, just like oicemail is todas.

O Call continuity (the number of additional calls or text messages or data traffic generated as a consequence) rises. This is expected to he more than existing missed call alert products which are known to be some 2-3%, and Spin\'ox \ICM is expected to be more similar to SpinVox Voicemail-to-Text which has an impressive 7% voice uplift and 17% text uplift.

U This sen-ice serves callers from an network, not just those on tile home network.

E.g. callers may cali from netork x to a person on network y. Network y has enabled N1CM and can offer this sen ice to callers from network x and generate additkrnal revenues from any missed call, not just on-net. Likewise, this can be reversed so that callers from tile host netork (network) may he offered this service when unable to reach users on other net-orks (network x). These combinations provide the ahihtv for the host network for \iCM to capture all missed calls relating to their subscribers/customers regardless whether they're the A or B party. See table below.

o Some networks can deplo this as a recipient (B-party) sen ice instead and bill them for use of sen-ice, much as voicemail is today, so MCI'sl can fit existing business models.

How MCM is being deployed: Figure 10 shows N'lCM with Spin\'ox \Toicemail to Text also deployed.

MCM allows the host network to serve A party callers regardless of whether they are on the honie (host) network or not, providing 100% reach for serving missed calls relating to their subscribers/customers: A party (caller) B party (recipient) MCM available On net On net Yes On net Off net Yes Off net on net Yes Off net Off net No Ciearh, missed calls that occur between other networks are beyond reach.

Billing Options \Xlere reciuircd, MCM can be charged for in different ways: U Call termination charges to the A-parts (caller) based on minimum and/or per second/per minute charges. This is similar to the voicemail deposits al-c charged.

U Premium rate contirmation SMS sent to the A-party to charge them for each rime the opt to use \LCM U Cross net charges!or the service, Sc) networks x & would agree that they'd charge each other and therefore their users a certain amount for each event which would appear on their bill. The difference here is that this could he done via premium product hilling API's or protocols to put the product/service into a different billing class, not standard oice call charge.

U Free -the call-continuity and call completion impacts can be bighl favourable and offset any need to generate revenue explicitly from each event.

Again, this can be reversed so that it's a B-part scrice and the pa for it as shown in an of these methods, or it is a standard feature as voicemail currently is today.

Product Options Given that not all networks can manage calls as shown in the above designs, there are other ways of pros iding MCM: Option 1: Call hack tor message * Call is attempted to B-parts, fails and clears * A-party is called from network and offered ser ice * If accepted, message recorded and processed * A-party is charged only if message is converted * if not convert-ed, B-parts-receives standard missed call alert Option 2: Text hack for message * Similar to Opth)n I, but service offered via SMS * A-party responds to SNIS if they wish to invoke sen-ice * A-party calls IVR via embedded link in SMS (free call) -see X-Links above * Charged fir sen'ice onh if message successfully converted * If not converted, B-part receives a standard missed call alert (NICA) Retrieval options in all tile above options for MCNI, the B-parts (recipient) may want to hear the voice message. In this case the can be offered a number to call and have that message played back to them.

This is either as an extension to Spinvox's existing QuickLinkTM technologs whereb the converted text message for the B-pam-contains a link that either places a call to a network sen-ice (tvpicall IVR) that then automatically plays back this message. The link itself can either be a real phone number and then a set of digits that when the user t-pes them in tells the system which exact message to play back.

Alternatively, this can he a virtual numher that the network can create which means that in one call the network knows both the n-pc of call and which exact message this relates to.

Attached or embedded audio Alternatively, the audio is hosted on a web site and streamed back over a data channel, or it's sent as an attachment/embedded tile which is possible with MMS, email and other multimedia capable forms of messaging.

Naturall, retrieving the audio can create new incremental revenue thr the carrier which didn't exist before.

SECTION E: OVERVIEW OF SPINVOX PRODUCTS The preceding Section D described a specific innovation, Missed Call Messenger. This Section E provides an overview of the array of Spin\' )X prod ucts.

Fwo generic types of' product are available: * Sender: where ou choose to speak a text message * Recipient: where you choose that people speak you a text message 11) All of these share the ability of one person to speak another a text message of some format.

Figure 11 shows how various conventional messaging products (voicemail, email, SMS, 1M and voice) are distributed on a Time v Dialogue axes. Figure 12 shows how various Spin\Tox products alter this landscape.

Recipient products extend a dialogue; reduce inherent dela s in receiving message; give real-time voicemail (push); use a seamless interface; are ubiquitous, and work on an device, any technology, any network.

* Sender products initiate new dialogues; use a simpler interface to make mobile messaging more intuitive; allow ordinary users to Say it, Not Thumb Type It!; require nothing ne to learn; allow existing applications to be enhanced; generate new' modes for messaging to provide real mobility' -such as safe and fast use even whilst driving, walking, etc.; allow new revenues from existing products.

We will now look at each category in more depth.

Recipient Products These are all products where ou actively decide to enable others to message you by speaking you a text message.

E.1 VoicemailtoTextTM When people leave a user a oicemail message, it is converted and sent to the user as an SMS message.

QuickLinkTM allows users to listen to the original message the text relates to.

E.2 VoicemailtoEmaj1TM When peop]e leave a user a oicemail message, it is conerted and sent to the user as an email.

\Xlien the message was not converted, thes can optionally be sent the original audio message as an email attachment.

QuickLinkTM allows users to listen to the original message the text relates to.

E.3 Ca11toMai1TM Designed fi,r call centres, direct marketing response and other customer facing functions, callers can either: * opt out of the queue in favour of speaking a message that's converted and sent as email * always be asked to speak a message that will be converted and sent as email E.4 No answer -Speak a Text -(Missed Call Messenger -see also Section D) 1)esigned for users who don't have oicemail, or want voicemail, typically high amongst the prepaid mobile phone market, or non-associated voicemail box market.

This is a network based sen-ice that manages unanswered calls and offers callers the option of speaking a text to the person they were trying to call. This applies to calls that are unanswered, buss' or rejected (send buss' tone).

A network operator simply deploys this to all accounts where there user has no voicemail or equivalent oice messaging sen'ice.

1. When a subscriber doesn't answer their call, the caller is offered a new option: "I'm sorry, this person is unavailable. To speak them a text, press 1 now." a. Optiona]lv, the caller is billed either b time on the line, or per event, e.g. "Calls cost 50p per minute, minimum charge 20p" 2. Caller now records their message.

3. Suhscrihcr who missed the call gets a text message from the caller with what the) said as text.

a. Optionall, subscriber given a number to call in to listen to the original message.

11) \\ hat's unique about this is that subscribers w;n't have to sign-tip or pay for the benefit.

Callers are given this choice as it might-be important to get a message to the person they're trying to reach.

Subscrihers can choose how the) want messages delivered to theni: SMS/NINIS, email, etc...

Sender Products -Network based These are all products where ou decide to speak someone a message that is then converted and sent to them as text.

21) E.5 Call Return -by Speak a Text Service providers ha e been offering subscrihers a wa of returning a call within voicemail - call back -hich the suhscriher initiates l selecting an option hethre or after message play-back. This adds a new option to return the call, hut instead hy speaking them a text message reply: 1. User calls into listen to voicemail messages. At the beginning or end of ever) message pla' ed hack, they are offered the option to speak the caller a text hack.

"To speak this person a text, press I now" 2. The press 1, then speak their message; it's converted and sent straight to the caller's number.

a. The voicemail system has both the caller's CLI and the subscribers, so can correctly fiwm a converted message that is sent as if directly from the subscriber, directl to the original caller. The recipient (original caller) is offered a link to listen to original message.

E.6 IVR -Speak a Text (see also Appendix I) On an IVR sst-em, an option can be offered to any caller wherein rhe can speak an one a message and have it conerted and sent as text.

1. LTscr calls either a dedicated number, or calls their voicemail and is offered this option to speak someone a text: "To speak someone a text, press I" 2. User then prompted to enter the phone number of the recipient. They either enter the numbers on their phone keypad and the system detects the l)TMF or equivalent signalling tones, or they select them from an address book.

3. Sstem checks phone number is valid.

4. User then pn)mpted to speak their message: "Please speak your message after the tone" 5. They speak their message, it's converted and sent straight to the caller's number.

a. The voicemail system has both the caller's CLI and the subscribers, so can correctly form a converted message that is sent as if directly from the subscriber, directly to the original caller.

E.7 Network Service -Speak a Text This is typically for landline networks where people are still accustomed to dialling phone numbers, hut is technically possible on an network type -fixed, mobile, wireless, \olP.

1fou want to speak someone a message, simply put a call modiher' (prefix or suffix) with the number of the person you want to message. Then the user hears "tX elcome to Speak-a-Text. Speak your message after the tone." The user speaks the message and hangs up. The message is cons erted and then sent to the correct recipient. The recipient is offered a link to listen to the original message.

Sender Products -Handset Based This applies for users who want to speak someone a text message rather than call them, much like opting to send someone an email or an SMS. More derails on this are given in Section E.10 below-.

E.8 Spoken SMS Uour options to Speak-a-Text on a handset: 1. Application on home' screen 2. Menu option in Address Book/Contacts 3. Menu option in Messaging apps 4. Menu option in Call/Missed call list a. Natural extension of existing native applications h. New option: SpeakTxt' Note: Although Spoken SMS is shown, the concept is the same for speaking an MMS, an email, an Instant Message or an other messaging product type.

E.9 Spoken Mail An application on the handset allows a user to select who they want to email, SMS or MMS.

The are then offered a Speak mail function. The user is connected to a SpinVox spoken message service where the are prompted to record their message. The application sends through who the mail is for -the destination email addresses or list of addresses, subject, and an other message parameters.

Figure 13 shows an example of a deployment of Spoken email and Spoken SMS/MMS with a m()hile serice provider -SIP telephony connectivity.

Figure 14 shows an example of a deplo ment of Spoken email with a French mobile service provider -standard telephony and synchronised data.

Fire & Forget Principle In an of the methods shown, i-here is a simple principle that makes the user experience unique: * minimum effbrt -just speak ur message * nothing to learn -just like leaving a voice niessage on standard voicemail * reliable -fe; steps as possible to avoid confusion or technical failures * robust -onl if the message isn't converted do you need to do anything, othenvise you know it's been done The following section will focus on handset based sender products.

E.1O Speaking a message from a mobile device Speaking a message SpinVox has created a software application; Speak-a-message (also called SpinMvText, which when loaded onto a device, such as a Nokia mobile phone, allows a user to speak a message, which is then delivered to the recipient as text.

The purpose of this service is to give a user the ability to speak a message rather than type it out on their phone ke pad. This will make it more convenient, easier and faster than typing it on their phone ke)pad.

Messages can be sent in the fhrni of an email, SMS or MMS message, depending upon the details stored in the Address Book of the device, for the recipient. Multiple recipients can be sent the same message b using the broadcast' facility of the application and messages can also he delivered to customers Blogs or other web-based applications.

Embedded menu items Additional functionality is brought to the device, by adding new menu items into the standard menu tree. The menu option "Speak-a-Message" is added to the following applications: * Text Messaging Application * MMS i\lessaging Application * Email Application * Instant Messaging (INI) Application * Address Book * Call Logs * 1-lome screen, using a soft ke The functionality that the menu option gives, changes dynamically, depending upon which application the user is in, as detailed below.

Text messaging application Selecting the Speak-a-message option allows the user to: * Create a new message using the contacts Mobile number as the destination * Reply to a previous message using the number provided * Applies to an of SMS, NINIS, 1M or other messaging application on the device Email Application Selecting the Speak-a-message option allows the user to: * Create a new message using the contacts email address as the destination * Create a new message to multiple recipients using their email addresses as the destination * Reph to a previous message using the contacts email addresses as the destination Below are the generic actions a user will take in either the text messaging or email application to send a message.

1. Caller selects Messaging/S MS applicath n and selects Speak a message' option from menu and is directed to Contacts.

2. When the Contact has been selected a connection to the Spin\Tox platform is established 3. An announcement requesting the user to speak their text message will then be plaed 4. The caller will leave an audio message.

5. The B Parts information is passed to SpinVox (Selected in Step 2).

6. The Spin Vox platform will convert the audio to a text message tbr onward delierv.

7. The message is then sent from the A Party to the B Party as if they had typed it.

8. The B Pam-receives the message and it appears to have come from the A Party. No special s stem numbers are used or substituted. Figure 15 shows the typical user experience of speaking a message from

within the Text Messaging or Email Application Address Book Selecting the Speak-a-message option allows the user to: Create a new message (intelligent addressing decides the message path). Below are the steps taken by a user accessing Speak a message from within the address book application: 1. Caller selects a contact from the Address Book.

2. Caller is presented with a menu option to Speak a message 3. When the Speak a message option has been selected the intelligent addressing function looks at the available methods fin delivering a message and then makes a connection to the Spin'ox platform 4. An announcement requesting the user to speak their text message will then be played 5. The caller will speak a message.

6. The B Party email address or phone number is passed to Spin Vox sen-ice (Selected in Step I) 7. The Spin\'ox platfom will convert the audio to a text message for onward delien.

8. The message is then sent from the A Party to the B Party as if they had typed it.

9. The B Parry receives the message and it appears to have come from the A Party. No special system numbers are used or substituted.

Figure 16 shows a tpical user experience of speaking a message from within the Address Book Call Logs Selecting the Speak-a-message option allows the user to: * Create a message for numbers listed in the Missed Cal] log using SMS as the reply path * Create a message thr numbers listed in the Outgoing Call log using SMS as the rep1 path * Create a message for numbers listed in the Incoming Cal] log using SMS as the reply path The above methods are easil accessed using the main navigation buttons on the device, such as Call, or Menu. There is no need to use lesser accessible alphanumeric ke hoard to type in intbrmation.

The steps below are the generic actions a user will take to reply to someone whose phone 21) call the missed, or to whom they have recently spoken.

1. Caller selects a contact from the Call Log 2. Caller is presented with a menu option to Speak a message 3. When the Speak a message option has been selected a connection is made to the Spin \1 x platf rm 4. An announcement requesting the user to speak their text message will then be played 5. The caller ill leave an audio message 6. The B Path number is passed to the Spin Vox platform (Selected in Step I) 7. The Spin\'ox platform;-lll convert the audio to a text message fir onward delivery 8. The message is then sent from the A Party to the B Parts as if the had typed it 9. The B Pam-receives the message and it appears to have come from the A Parts'. No special system numbers are used or substituted.

Figure 17 shows the typical user experience of speaking a message using the Call Log.

Soft key access It is possible to activate the Speak a message application from the Home Screen of a mobile phone, by using one of the soft key shortcuts, rather than having to navigate to a particular application, such as the Address Book, first.

Caller Access -Soft Key Below are the steps a user will take to speak a message from the 1-lome Screen of a device.

1. Caller selects the Speak a message soft ke and is directed to a list of Contacts they can speak a message to where the then choose a contact.

2. When the Speak a message option has heen selected a connection to the SpinVox platfirm is estahlished 3. An announcement requesting the user to speak their text message will then be played 4. The caller will leas.e an audio message.

5. The B Pam-number should be passed to Spin\'ox (Selected in Step 1) 6. The Spin\Tox platform will conert the audio to a text message for onward delivery 7. The message is then sent from the A Parts to the B Party as if they had typed it.

11) 8. The B Pam receives the message and it appears to have come from the A Party. NC) special system numbers are used or suhstituted.

Figure 18 shows a typical user experience of speaking a message from within Speak a Message application Extend able application The Speak a message application can be easih extended to offer additional functionality for mans different types of Spoken Messaging. Additional message types include Social Networking applications such as Blogging and peer to peer communication, such as Instant 21) Messaging.

Figure 19 shows a typical user experience fin Speaking a Blog Figure 20 shows a typical user experience of speaking a reply in a Mobile 111 client.

User experience Fire & Forget' in 3 clicks The Speak a message application uses a unique Fire & Forget' system fin creating and delivering messages. This differs from other systems that require the user to speak, review 31) (on screen) and confirm hethre final.h sending the message. Fire & Forget means: minimum effirt -just speak your message * nothing to learn -just like leaving a voice message on standard voicemail * reliable -few steps as possible to aoid confusion or technical failures * robust -onI if the message isn't converted do you need to do anything, otherwise you know it's been done

D

ruie Speak a message application takes control of the mobile device, providing a means of a]ways being able to speak a message within 3 clicks. Typically these 3 clicks are translated into the fbllowing actions: 1. Select speak a text' 2. (:hoose whom to send a message to... speak a message 3. Hang-up Figure 21 shows the 3 clicks' user experience The Fire and Forget s stem combined with the no more than 3 clicks' approach means that the user can send messages in situations where other systems could not be used, such as walking along a street, or in a situation where it's not possible to look at the screen for any length of time.

The Speak-a-message application is also designed for one-handed use, with all the functions easily accessible using a single key click and the menu navigation device of the handset.

Figure 22 shows the Fire & Forget' s stem employed h Speak a Message.

Intelligent message addressing and delivery When a user elects to speak a message to someone from his or her Address Book, the type of message that is to be sent is decided bs the contact details available in the address book.

* If only an email address is available the message is sent via email.

* it only a mobile phone number is available, the message is sent via SMS or MMS * If an online account name is present for ltd or other, the message is sent here * If multiple are available, the message can be sent to a selection of destinations, however In defliult the message will be delivered to the mobile number Fast address list The fast address list is an intelligentl compiled list of recent contacts, which is produced by understanding the users previous behaviour.

The algorithm builds a list of the most recent people the user has been in contact with, taking into consideration the following: * The communicating type (email, text message, phone call, or spoken text) * The frequenc of communication with that contact * I low recent the last communication was * Alphabetical order This is then presented in a single, eas to read list; which still offers eas access to any contact in the customers Address Book. This differs from the existing Call Lists', such as the SNIS Sent folder, as there is significant intelligence applied in creating the Fast Address list.

Figure 23 shows the Fast Address List -showing recent contacts that have Called, been Called, Texted (SMS or MMS or Emailed (or an other messaging/communications process used). Because the Fast Address List is comprehensive, it becomes the central resource fbr all unified communications tasks the user needs to perform.

Unified messaging breaks down the barriers between various forms of communication, such as voice, email, and voice mail. 31)

The Speak a message application effectively provides the user with a single orination point for all these tpes of messages, rhereb providing the user with a unified message centrc on their mobile device.

I Ia'ing the capabth to respond to oicc messages using text or text messages using oicc may sccni trivial, however, it is a means for end users to enhance or even impro\ e upon their prod ucti ir\ , especially if it saves them time in communicating with one another.

For rn bile users, access to and use of the phone is essential, especia]l while they are in I() transit. \X'irh the Speak a message application offering a uniHed messaging experience, mobile users can receive and respond to voice messages, e-mail messages, and fax messages, by speaking a rcph, and can maintain a higher level of pr)ductivit\ while the are out of the office.

Automated message transport selection IIcssages are sent to the SpinVox platform using the most appropriate transport method aailahle. For example, a spoken email will be captured on the device, tpicalJv as a \X AV file, but can l)e nn form of audio file, and forwarded to the \TMCS as an email, using a 3G or GPRS data channel, if it is available. Once conversion of the message is complete the result will be emailed to the recipient.

The routing of messages from the mobile device to the Spin\Tox platform is carried out Ofl an intelligent basis depending upon the available transport methods. The choice is made from the following list: * GPRS data connection * 3G data connection * SMTP interface * HTTP interface * l'R (tixed line) * MMS If the optimum method of transp rt is unavailable, the application automatically checks tbr the availability of the next most appr( priate method and uses it.

Asymmetric messaging This software creates a unique new set of options fir the user and recipient to continue in contact using a range of connected messaging options.

Outgoing call becomes a text message What makes this service unique is that the original message starts life as a spoken message and when it is finall delivered to the end customer's device it not onl appears in their inbox, but it has been transposed into an email or SMS.

Incoming call replied to by an email or text message By creating this service Spin Vox allows the recipient of the original voice message (or missed call) to choose to reply by speaking a text message or email, rather than by traditionally having to call the sender of the message using the telephone or type a message using the keypad of the device. This is unique in that once the recipient replies to the original message via an email or text the end-to-end communication method has mos.ed from being voice driven to text driven and once the reply is sent to the originator the too can then reply via a text message, email or by speaking a message.

Product requirements for SpinMyText (SMT) The ke to the success of this application is in its' simplicity of activation. It must he possible to invoke it through a single ke press, which is available on an' handset, and complete the process from start to finish in no more than 3 key presses. The SMT product offering will ideally he positioned at iMohile Operators and Enterprise Customers, enabling a user to select an option on their handset that affi ws them to speak a text message (The same functionalit can also be applied to speaking an email message). This audio file is captured by the Spin'ox platform and convened to a text message for delivery.

The product must meet the following criteria: One hand, one thumb accessible -The application must be so simple to start and use that it almost feels like it could be a handsiree' application. The Acid test fir the success of this application is whether it can be used in the tist lane of the motorwa safel and legally.

Nothing new to learn -it must he as simple as making a nce call, with no more than 3 ke strokes to initiate, use and complete the service.

Fire & forget -it must be as trustworth as any other service e.g. voice-mail or text messaging, there should he no need to check the contents of the message.

Customer Touch points -must be a simple single click to initiate SMT addressing.

Familiar interaction & metaphors emplo ed b the current UI must he used.

Called Party (B') information automatically sent -No additional interaction, e.g. speaking or typing in a number, should be required by the customer to use the service.

Simple Deployment-An application to enable the new functionality must he available to download using a simple L'Rl, X'AP link or short-range wireless connection e.g. Bluetooth.

The application should also he updateable b the same method.

Upgradeable -It must he possible to upgrade the product to add new features, with minimal customer intervention and without having to terminate the application manually Non-Intrusive -The application should not prevent another application on the handset from running and consideration should be given to events that may impact the application e.g. how d)C5 the application react to an incoming call during SMT call set up.

Customer Insight There are mans situations when someone would choose to speak a text message, as opposed to typing one or making a voice call. The common theme is that the user needs a fast, simple way of getting some information to someone and they either can't or don't want to stop what the' are doing. The ke insight here is that acCess/Jig //)eJ;mc/mmi///y and.cinip/i/i'iiig I/ic addre.ccm of the message is as important (if not more important) than the voice to text element (which s/oii/dbc taken for granted).

NB. The customer experience needs to be one burton press to start the process (across an device) one click to select the addressee and the final click should be to end the phone call/recording process.

The user experience should also exploit the fact that the mobile users' text messang and caller log ecu-system are tvpical] limited to a handful of numbers.

Contact Number Storage The fi.rmat of how mobile phone numbers arc stored on a mobile handset is key to delivering a text message successfully from the SpinVox system.

Certain assumptions must be made in order to determine the destination Country of a text message, if the number submitted to SpinVox is in non-International format.

The following behaviours shape the assumptions that must be made, in order to resolve the destination delivery Counri-v of a text message.

The International Business traveler Anyone that travels internationally regularly is likely to have at least 80% of their contact list populated with International format numbers.

The remaining 20% are likel to he stored iii the local format of the countn the traveller resides in. It is ver unlikely they will have a number stored in local format for a countn the are not a resident of.

The infrequent Business traveler * Is IikeI to have a mixture of International and non-international format numbers * Any noninternational format numbers stored on the handset will he from the country of residence.

The non-traveler The non-tra eLlers contact list iIl be populated with numbers in local format from the countn they reside.

There may be the odd nuniber that is stored in international format, which has been updated when going abroad on holiday, in case they need to call home.

From this we can conclude that when a customer uses SJ'SIT and the B partv number arrives, as a local number the most likely country of origin is the users home Country.

The develipment team faces similar issues today, with our current products, and the above assumption is used for prefixing the outgoing SMS.

It is therefore essential that the Home Country' of the user is captured somehow and associated with their MSISDN.

SMT Application The SMT application sits in the background of the handset, waiting to be activated by a single special' button click, in order to keep the user experience the same across any de ice or platform the same button must he available on any device, on any mobile platform.

Clearh this limits the choice of keys available to the following: Numeric (0-9) Special keys (S #) Call keys (Si trr & terminate 31) This limit is actuall something Spin\'ox can exploit; with a specific key e.g. SpeedDial #2 becoming the Spin\1ox kes', much in the same way that SpeedDial #1 is the Voicemail key.

An application working in this manner requires far less integration into each handsets functionality and thr the customer it means no Ih ik-ij,, no seoir/ g. no/inii/ilin,t.

For proton-ping purposes reprogramming the right hand soft key' often used h carriers to access tile \X'AP Portals, should he reprogrammed to ghe one button access to the SMT application.

User Interface Using a single k-e to get access to the functionality of SMT has the effect of simplifying the user experience and vastly reducing the amount integration into numerous menu options, in each of the possible places that someone might want to send a message from.

A user could still interact with their handset to initiate a SMT message in the following scenarios, however, the single button approach means they would be moved into the SMT app.

Call Logs Contacts ?slessaging/SMS Application Through an SMT on-screen Icon Navigation It should be possible to start a SMT message ll pressing a single button For each of the above scenarios the user must kww where in the application they arc and what options are available to them The user should be able to use tile application through recognisable controls on the handset Entering Information The user should not have to physically enter a recipient's number as part of the I\'R process; 31) it should he automatically sent from the handset to the 1\'R platform.

Information Presentation * Text used in menus should he familiar to the user * Consideration should he given to the icon used for the SJ\IT application (if one is required).

* Consideration should he given to colour or sound requirements that may affect the handset * Consideration should be gnen to the possible error conditions and how these will be displayed or announced e.g. audio not captured, conversion not possible, text message not sent.

Caller Access -Contacts I. Caller selects a contact from the contacts menu 2. Caller is presented with a menu option to SMT 3. When the SMT option has been selected a connection to a voicemail platform needs to be established 4. An announcement requesting the user to speak their text message will then be played 5. The caller will leave an audio message.

6. The B Part number should be passed to Spin\'ox (Selected in Step 1) 7. The Spin Vox platform will convert the audio to a text message for onward deliven.

Caller Access -Call Log 1. Caller selects a contact from the Call Log.

2. Caller is presented with a menu optkm to SMT 3. When the SMT option has been selected a connection to a voicemail platthrm needs to be established 4. An announcement requesting the user to speak their text message wili then be played 5. The caller will leave an audio rnessate.

6. The B Parts nurnher should he passed to Spin Vox (Selected in Step I) 7. The Spin\'ox platform will corner the audio to a text message for onward delier Caller Access -Soft Key 1. Caller selects a SMT soft key and is directed to Contacts where a c)ntact is selected.

2. Caller is presented with a menu option to SMT 3. \\ hen the SMT option has been selected a connection to a voicemail platform needs to be established 4. An announcement requesting the user to speak their text message will then he played 5. The caller will leave an audio message.

6. The B Party number should he passed to SpinVox (Selected in Step 1) 7. The SpinVox platform will convert the audio to a text message for onward delixerv Caller Access -Messaging Application 1. Caller selects Messaging/SMS application and selects SMT option from menu and is directed to Contacts.

2. When the Contact has been selected a connection to a voicemail platform needs to he established 3. An ann uncemenr requesting the user to speak their text message will then be played 4. The caller will leave an audio message.

5. The B Party number should he passed to Spin Vox (Selected in Step 2) 6. The SpinVox platform will convert the audio to a text message f r onward delivery Handset user experience The Figure 24 screen shots demonstrate the ideal user experience: the Fast Address list of recent contacts (pe ple that hae called, been called, texted, emailed etc is selected, the one individual (David Wood) is selected to automatically initiate a connection to the SpinVox voice conversion system so that the user can speak a message. This is eas to replicate across all chosen devices, to provide a consistent user experience.

End-to-end user experience The Figure 25 diagram heli w sh vs the end-to-end experience from the A & B pam perspective.

1. Sun holds down the 5MM soft-key on her handset and is presented with the last 5 contacts that she contacted, either h text message, email, MMS or voice, in her Recent' list. She also has the option to select an other Contact if the person she wants to contact is not presented in the list.

2. She selects the contact she wants to send a message to and a message on the screen of her device tells her that the SmT service is being contacted and to listen for an audio prompt.

3. The SpinVox Service is contacted and A party information is sent to the SMM service.

4. B party info is convened for transfer to the SpinVox Service.

5. Once the connection is established with the SMM service the DTMF B party info is sent.

6. The voice to text conversion takes place and the B party receives the text message.

7. The B pam-replies to the original message.

8. The A party can choose to speak another reply or use a keyboard based method to reply.

Handset Support / Target Platforms The following platforms will be supported in subsequent versions.

* Windows Mobile 5 * \indows Mobile 6 * RIM OS 4. 1 and above (Rr/en'mii Blackberry device models and OS versions) * Symbian Series 60 (2uld Edition) * Ssmbian Series 60 (31(1 Edition) * Java MIDP 2.0 capable devices Application Provisioning Tbe option to pre-provision handsets with the application prior to issue/despatch is possible, as is a simple mechanism for downloading the application for users with existing handsets, options include: * Bluetooth * WAP link * Memor Card Consideration should also be given for removal of the application from the handset.

The Figure 26 to 31 screenshots demonstrate only a small part of the Speak-a-Message application. It shows the functionality of a customer choosing to speak a text message to an individual. It does not cover, sending to more than one person, or sending messages directly to a web application, such as a blog.

All the screenshots below arc taken from a Nokia N95 mobile phone, however the service is not restricted to an particular device.

Figure 26 shows the typical behaviour of the application in the home screen of the phone.

The application automaticall) takes control of a soft button in the I lome screen ("Speak a Text" on the screen bottom right), allowing one button access to the Speak-a-Message functionalit.

The application can also he programmed to present itself using other short cut keys, if they arc available on the de.ice. Fur example in Figure 27, the application is accessed using a short cut displayed as the SpinVox]o, after pressing the Multimedia Ke' on a Nokia N95.

Figure 28 shows the Fast rddrcss list, which on an N95 device is limited to the last 5 people which ou spoke to, emailed, sent or received a text from or spoke a message to.

These are presented in using chronological then alphabetical order.

Speaking a message is not conhned to this group of five people, any contact can have a message spoken to them b moving from the Recent' view to the Contacts' view as seen in Figure 29.

If a contact is selected in the Contacts' view that contains more than one phone number, then both numbers are shown and the user is given a choice of using either, as shown in Figure 30.

Once the number has been selected the Spin\'ox service is contacted and the customer prompted to leave a message. The destination information is automatically sent to the Spin\'ox Service and when the user hangs up the message is sent to the recipient.

Figure 31 shows when the customer connects to the Spin\Tox service the name of the contact being sent the text is displayed. 31)

APPENDIX I

SPEAK A TEXT (IVR BASED) ic features: * Messaging ou can use hen ou can't or d( nt ant to sU p liat \ ou are (l( )Jng.

* No special application is needed on the handset.

* No need to remember someone's number.

* It is so intuitive to use, it requires no explanation.

* You can send both email and SMS messages to recipients.

* You can easily update the numbers of the people you want to contact.

Introduction

This appendix details the user experience and highlights specific requirement fin the Speak-a-Text product. The solution will consist of: * A dedicated phone number, voice shortcode or network access code * A V ice recognition s stem, connected to the IVR platform This solution provides the ability to: Speak a Message & have it delivered as Text (SiMS or Email).

Listen to previousl saved Voicemail messages.

The User Experience is shown schematically in Figure 32 Product Requirements 1. Service Level In order to use the Speak a text (IVR) product the customer must have signed up fbr an account with Spin\'ox.

Requirement The end-user will alread) have a oiceniaiI account.

The service will have an aailahilitv the same as that ofSpinVox Voicemail.

Only the first 30 seconds of any message will be converted.

TX -must be the same as that defined for Spin\'ox Voicemail or Spin\'ox Blast.

Language support. On the initial launch the sen ice must support the following languages: UK English US English Canadian English Canadian French German French Spanish Australian English South African English On initial launch the service will be limited to retail customers onl',.

2. IVR

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An access number, voice shortcode or network access code will connect the caller directl to the Spin\Tox I\TR.

The l\'R tree will be changed in order to include an option to speak a message to someone.

It will also contain options to have previously receicd voicemail read out' to the customer, using a text to Voice system.

The caller can then access their list of alread registered contacts. This list wiJi be limited to people.

Requirement The voice talent used to record any new voice prompts must be the same as currently used on the SpinVox l\'R platform.

The languages the IVR is recorded in must mirror the languages available for current products.

Access to the service will be b determined by recognising the CLI of the incoming caller.

If the customers CLI is withheld tbe wi]l hear the fillowing voice prompt: "I'm sorry your phone number was withheld, please call back without withholding it".

The call il then be terminated.

The IVR system must be capable of receiving \oice based commands, as well as DTMF commands.

The I\TR system must be able to concatenate commands and names, in order to create a simple voice based user interface.

E.g. [Emaill Pan Doulton] Where [Email] is the desired delivers method and [Dan Doultoni is the recipient.

The following \oice Commands must be recognised for creating and sending messages: Email Mall Text

SMS

The following Voice Commands must he recognised for listening to alread saved messages: Play Listen The following Voice Commands must be recognised for managing messages that are already saved: Play Listen Delete Sae 3. Billing The Speak a text service is billed per event. Meaning that each time a message is sent the customer will hae their account decremented and either a billing event will be triered resulting in a Premium SMS being sent to them or in the case of' Credit Card hilling one credit will be deducted from their bundle. Requirement it must he possible to biJJ customers per conersion event

using whicheer payment system thcir account uses.

it must be possible to excludc customers who are defined as UVFAs from being billed.

It must bc possible to exclude customers who have been placed onto No conversion status, due to bad debt. z)

4. Provisioning in order to use the speak a text (IVR service it is necessary to sign up and register the details of the people you wish to be able to contact.

This will he done using a web browser on a PC or Mac, it will not be possible to do this from a Mobile dcicc.

z\ maximum of ten people can be registered at an' one time. It will be possible to add or amend any of the Contacts that are stored in the customer's profile.

Requirement The provisioning system must work with all popular browsers, such as; internet Explorer, Firefox, Safari and Netscape (PC & Mac versions).

It must be possible to add up to ten peoples contact details.

The iolloving information is mandatory when adding a contact: First Name I ast Name Mobile Phone number Email Address It must be possible to choose and provision a payment plan from thc web interface.

Payment plan options must include credit card and Premium SMS pa mcnt types.

5. Voice Recognition Once connected to the Spin Vox IVR it must be possible top navigate the menu system in a handsitce' mode, where it is not necessary to press a key in order to select the recipient or the type of message being sent.

Requirement The voice recognition system must integrate seam]cssly with the SpinVox 1'R platform.

It will be possible to concatenate names and commands, such as; "Email David Ponsfrd" and have them understood by the Voice Recognition system, without having to leave unnatural pauses.

The voice recognition system must be able to recognise the names (First name and Last name) when spoken using the IVR platform.

6. Reporting Requirement It must he possible to report on all messages generatcd b this product.

APPENDIX II VOICEMAIL TO EMAIL CONTACT PLUGIN

Mobile Plug-In: Voicemail to Email Contact Resolution Voicemail convened to email The Spin\1ox Spin-mv-\'mail service replaces a customer's voicemail service, by using call fonvarding to a new voicemail system hosted by SpinVox. SpinVox converts the incoming spoken voicemail messages into text and then sends that text to the recipient as either an SMS text message of as an email message.

In addition to this Spin Vox has created software, which when loaded onto a mobile device, such as a RIM BlackBerry, recognises the incoming email message from the SpthVox system and performs a number of actions on it prior to the email being replaced in the inbox of the customer's device.

The senders phone numher is included in the email that is sent and the Spin\'ox software, on the device, reads this number and then searches the Address Book on the recipient's device for a match of that number. It not only checks for an exact match, it also checks fort a match against the number stored in a local format. 21)

For example, the number +442079232854 sent h the Spin\'ox system will be matched on the recipients device to a real name and their contact details as found in the recipient's address book (contacts) b the following numbers: +442079232854 -An exact match +44 (0) 20 79232854 -The same number in another International format 7923 2854 -The local' portion of the number The number matching is independent of the type of phone number the sender is using.

Matched numbers can include mobile numbers (O7x), fixed line geographic numbers (01 x, O2x) and non-fixed line geographic numbers (05x), often used with Voice over IP (VioIP) services, such as Skype. In fact, any allowed type of phone number passed to the serb ice can be matched.

If a match is found in the recipients Address 1)00k the following actions occur.

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I. The email will be marked with a special icon, or the standard icon will he modified to signal to the recipient that this is a different type of email -voicemail converted into email. This is er important in sorting and managing a busy email inhox and being able to find ke messages by type as well as content. 1(1

2. The Name of the contact in the address hook is noted and displayed in the Pn)nl: field of the email. This way the user knows who it's from and the name is displayed in the format that they're familiar with and have recorded in their address book.

e.g. call froni +4478 12101742 would be resoled to Daniel Doulton with the associated email address being DANJEL.DO1JLTON )SPINVOX.COM 3. The from Field of the email now contains the caller's actual email address too enahling the recipient to also reply h email, not just a phone call or SMS (if the senders mobile number is also stored in the Address Book).

In the body of the email the phrase You have just received a new voicemail from' is appended with the name of the contact, enabling the recipient to reply by a call or SMS if the senders mohiie number is stored in the Address Book).

4. \X'hether the phone number is resolved or not against a contact in the Address Book, the subject line is replaced with the first 30 characters of the converted message, prefixed with Spin\Tox:" e.g. Spin\Tox: "Hi Dave. We're on fhr 7.30 at..." 5. A Quicklink (see GB2420942B, the contents of which is incorporated by reference) is inserted at the end of the body of the email, which will enable a simple, one click method thr the recipient to listen to just that voicemail message. The link calls the Spin\To voicemail service, then unicjueI tinds that specific message and immediatel pla s it back.

For Example. Click here to listen" is shown. The user selects this within the message and the) are taken to the Spin\'ox voicemail service and that precise message is played back, without the user having to do an thing else.

Embedded menu items Additional functionality is brought to the device, by adding new menu items into the standard menu tree.

listen'; offers the ability to hear the original voicemail message, simply by clicking on the menu item, when reading a converted voicemail message.

Call Support'; will instanth connect the customer to the Spin\'ox Customer Care team, allowing them to discuss their account status These menu items are embedded d namically. They become available when a customer is viewing a con'. erted voicemail. This is to ensure the3 are only available when it makes sense for a customer to use them and not when it might cause confusion.

Asymmetric messaging This plug-in creates a unique new' set of options for the user and recipient to continue in contact using a range of connected messaging options: Incoming call ends in an email.

\1at makes this service unique is that the original message originall started life as a spoken message and when it is finally delivered to the end customer's device it not only appears in the Inbox of their devices message application, it has been transposed iflto an email and it contains a valid From: tieki, which, depending upon the contents of the recipients Address Book, will provide a reply path via email.

Incoming call replied to by an email By creating this service Spin Vox allows the recipient of the original voice message to choose to repli hi email, rathci-than h traditionally having to call the sender of the message using the telephone. This is unique in that once the recipient replies to the original message via an email the end-to-end communication method has moved from being oice dri en to email driven and OflCC the reply is sent to the originator they too can then reply via an email.

Summary of key features

* Conversion of an incoming phone call to an email.

* Resolution of senders telephone number against contact name and email address stored on recipient's m)bLle device.

* Email Reply path available to originally spoken message.

* Listen to specific oicemaiJ messages using a single button press.

* New functionality embedded in the standard menu tree.

* Communication moved from voice to email.

Voicemail-to-email Business Requirements

Introduction

This section presents the business requirements that will enable users of email centric de ices, such as RiM's BlackBerry with a simple variation of the standard \oicemail-to-Text service.

The BlackBerry is primarily used as an Enterprise business tool for PIN! snchronisation and reading and responding to emails, this will be reflected in the business requirements detailed in this document.

An Enterprise customer can deplo) the BlackBerr solution through any one of the following deployment models: BlackBerr Nnterprise Solution -on premise implementation of a BES (BlackBerry Enterprise Server BlackBerr internet Solution -internet based service offering can he used with web-based email providers such as Gmail, Yahoo as well as proiding access to the corporate email.

Hosted BlackBerr Solution -where a hosted sen-ice provider has deployed the BlackBerry platform in a data centre environment. An enterprise would purchase this solution on a per user per month basis.

This product enhancement wiil enable Spinvox to target both BlackBerrs and mobile phone users within the Enterprise driving increased user activations as a result of more text or email messages being generated, as opposed to voice. It further enhances SpiriVox positioning as a device independent sen ice provider.

This service will also enable SpinVox to switch off' text delivery, In default, to Blackberr users, so that duel messages are not received on the device, making significant savings to the business.

The service will enable an Enterprise to have all voice message conversions delivered as emails only (default setting for it's BlackBerry or other email centric device users. The user will be given the option to enable SMS delivers' if required.

U)nverted Messages A converted voice message will he issued as an email with NO WA\' file attached. The option to use the message Quick- I ink to locate and listen to the voicemail will also be available..

Unconverted Messages A user will he notified via email when a voice message cannot be converted. The option to use the message Quick-Link to locate and listen to the voicemail will also he available.

l'he service will be available across both GSM and CDMA networks and to Enterprises located in the US, Europe and Australia For email delivers it-is required that the sender CU he resolved against the Local Address Book (LAB), so that the From: field is populated with the Senders real name as stored in the device's address 1)00k.

It is also required that in the email body the first Ithe would read You received a new voicemail from John Smith'; where John Smith is the real name of the contact The user will have the capability to click on the caller's name to email -a response. send a text or initiate a call.

If the number is not able to resolved against the contents of the LAB, the Cl l of the incoming number should be shown The subject line of the email will be contain the first 32 characters (If the converted message prefixed with SpinVox: The service will he tested against the following deplo ment models with: BlackBerr Enterprise Solution (BES Ver 4.0) BlackBerry Internet S)Iun( )n Il sred BlackBerry Solution The service will he rested against the following devices as a minimum: Pearl 8100 BlackBern 8700 BlackBerry 7130 BlackBerry 8707 The application must be compatible with RIM oS version 4.1 and above.

Moditicatlirns will be required to the following business support systems: Spin\'ox \Vebsite -A user should he given the option to identif themselves as a user of an email centric device, such as a B1ackBerr and sh uld then be provisioned against a specific service pn)filC i.e. Email only delivery as default, Converted messages sent without audio attachment, Unconverted messages sent with audio tile attached A link to a downloadahle application will he available from the SpinVox.com wehsite Customer Care Interface -Modified to include a BlackBerr service profile Enterprise \X eb Self Service Tool -Will be modified to captLlre device type as BlackBerry and provisioning against a BlackBerry service profile.

Screen shots The following screenshots show how the service will actually vc)rk, once a voicemail has been left for a customer and i-he message converted to text and the email sent to them.

All the screenshots below are taken from a BlackBerry device, however the service is not restricted to an particular de ice n PC.

Figure 33 shows the n pica] hehaiour of an email centric device prior to the SpinVox plug-in software being installed. The From Field and Subject give no indication of wither who the message is from or what the message is about. It is also impossible to distinguish between a standard email and a converted voicemail message, as the message indicator icons are identical.

IS Figure 34 shows how the inhox looks after the SpinVox plug-in has been installed. The default email icon has been replaced b-a special icon, hich shows that the message is a Spin Vox voicemail message. The From: field has been replaced b the real name of the sender, as stored in the recipients Address Book on the device and the subject line has been changed to include the first part of the converted voicemail message, prefixed with SpinVox:" which enables the message to he sorted and gn) uped with other SpinVox email messages.

Figure 35 displays ho a Spin Vox voicemail message will look once the recipient has opened it. The Sender's phone number has been compared with all the numbers stored in the recipients Address Book and as a match has been found the real name of the sender is displayed in the From field. ln the example below the real name is Vadiraj Patel.

The subject line has been changed to display the first part of the converted message prefixed with Spin\Tox:" Figure 36 shns wI)at-happens when a customer clicks on the real name that has now been put into the From: field. It is fl( w possible to repl directl via email to the sender of the message, by clicking on Email \adiraj in the menu. it is important to remember that the original message was a spoken message that has been replied to via email, moving the communication met-h)d from \( )ICC to screen.

Figure 37 sh s what happens when a customer clicks on the real name that has now been put into the message text in the section which starts You received a new oicemail from' It is no possible to repl directly via SNIS, MS or voice to the sender of the message, b cLicking on the appropriate menu item. It is important to remember that the original message was a spoken message that is being replied to via SMS or MMS, moving the communication method from voice to screen.

Figure 38 shows an example of a Quicldink, which has been inserted at the bottom of the conerted email message. The QuickLink gives a simple and easy one-click method of listening to the original voicemail message thc customer is currently reading. It dials the SpinVox oicemaij service and automaticall repla s the correct message.

Figure 39 shows how additional functionality has been added to the device with the inclusion of new menu items. These new menu items have been embedded into specific places, to ensure their functionaliii is onl shown to the user, when it is of use to them. if it were presented all the time, it would lead to a lot of confusion.

Appendix III VIRAL/LINK CAMPAIGNS rhis section describes viral or link marketing methods used to spread and market Spinvox products.

Refer a friend (R.Fit) 0 SpinKev: U Call sour own mobile from sour nl()bile * We then know you're attempting a special call * "Please enter sour friend's mobile number" o Ts pe it in, or if a power user, look it up in contacts and hit Call/Send -DTMF to us o "Thank you. Activation codes have been sent to you and your friend" o This means you have their activation code on screen and can help them through this fuv process or...

U Call sour voicemail box -new 1\'R option U Call 84004 (we're going to get the voice enabled) 0 Text your friend's mobile to 84004 * Call your own voicemail box/84004 and leave a message: "Sign up 07812101742" * SpinDemo: o Call your own mobile from your mobile * Sv I\TR hut this time enter then friend's number, now sou speak them a text APPENDIX IV Unified Communications This market, and its derivate Unified Messaging, has tried to uni1 all of a users' communications into a single in-box for them to manage, t\ picall in email format and accessed from your PC.

The issue is that: o It's onl accessible from one point -your email inbox or a web page meaning you need to be at a particular point in such as your desk, to access sour communications. This (loesn't help the ever increasing mobile workforce that is estimated to be away from a desk over 50% of their working day.

o Any audio (voice messages) which ma) now appear as attachments to an email or other format, still require you to listen to them, write down key notes and in effect do the work. in short, it's not transformed into a medium that is synonymous with the task -keyboard, screen, IP based messaging that it came in as. So the user has to be at their PC, listen to messages and do the work of transforming this into say an email reply or notes for a colleague.

O To deplo' tiC services requires dedicated hardware and software and typically are an expensive iT upgrade cost to deliver and then need maintaining.

Spin\'ox soRes these issues very neatly by converting all voice messages into text and distributing them to an) device immediatek: O SpinVox uses existing network services and call management features to unit\ our voice messages, typically voicemail messages, by either diverting calls to a single voice mail box, or collecting the voicemails from different voicemail boxes. These voice messages are then sent to the SpinVox \TMCS for conversu)n into text. There is no need for any new IT hardware or software or complex systems management.

O For users, there's no need to work through what can be complex decisions on call management or messaging configurations, typically based on time of day and day of week in order to ensure that the caller gets a message to you. By converting any voice message to text, users can instantly receive and see all their messages reirdless of where they are and where the message came from -e.g. desk phone, cell phone, switchboard, home phone, etc...

O Once the messages arc in text, they are in a format that is now synonymous with the medium in hich they are intended to be managed -nameR SMS, MMS, email, 1P, Web formats. SpinVox can deliver the output text to sour email inhox, a web page/senice or as a mobile text message in an form. Now the user can choose whether to call or text/mail bath or manage this infbrmation tbr colleagues or friends in the format most suited. And because it's in text li rmat, it's immediatch indexable and searchable Rich le erages the p nver of o mputers to improe information management and retrieval.

O B undertaking this transthrm (conersion), Spin\'o\ remo'.es all the existing limitations of [C services and allows the message to not onl be delivered to a single point (\our inhox/PC), but also as text to an device annhere solving the land-lock' problem of most UC design. This means users can now undertake the key tasks that [C promises, but from wherever they are and at any time.

The reason that unifying voice messages from different sources (mail hoxes) makes sense and creates real value is because it the most disparate and difficult for users to access and manage.

Email is a1read largely unified and in a good format for indexing, storage and management, and increasingl accessible fr m mobile (Blackbern).

Figure 40 shows how Spinvox unifies various communications types and channels. 21)

The power of using SpinVox is that ou can seamlessly connect for the user (i.e. the L1I level) what are traditionall disconnected ssstems' (e.g. voice, blog, SMS, email, etc...) b both standard call management features (diverts/forwards) and by converting the voice message into text, thereby overcoming the technical barriers that would otherwise exist between different communications s stems.

Appendix V Voice SMS Spin\'ox Voice SMS allows people to speak a vOICe message and has.e the recipient notified by SMS, requesting them to then call a number and listen to the message.

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The sen-ice overcomes issues of language and literac around text messaging, opening up new' re-enue streams for wireless Carriers without any additional investment in either infrastructlLre or handset features. It is more cost-effective and discreet than tradithmal.oicemail, and more expressie than traditional SMS. It)

Spin Vox Voice SMS provides the thilowing end user benefits: * New, highl personal way to communicate * (1's picallv) costs less than a voice conversation * Easy to use * Overcomes text usability issues * Available in all languages * Does not require literacy * Less hassle than typing an SMS * Works with current handsets * No end user training required As there is no barrier to entr, and making a phone call is natural behavior for a wireless user, this product has mass appeal to the entire Carrier user base.

Product Overview Product name SpinVox Voice SMS Description Allows a spoken voice message to be deposited from an mobile handset and a notification sent to the recipient b SMS. The recipient can then dial a QuickLink short code to listen to the caller message.

Originating Network GSM and CDMA Terminating Network GSNI and CDMA Voice SMS works much like SMS, instead of sending text, callers can easil send voice messages, using expression to convey more information than text alone. I'or the called party the service is easy to use and adds an emotional dimension to messaging.

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A caller simpl prefixes a standard mobile number with a short code e.g. , the sen-ice records the voice message and sends an Si\IS notification to the called part) ho can then repla) the voice message by simpl) clicking on a QuickLink short code e.g. *3 Spin\ox \Toice SiMS will generate an incremental sustainable revenue stream for \X'ireless Carriers without cannibalizing existing sen-ices. The availability of \oice SMS creates new situations where people can use messaging, where they would not have thought to use it previously. Subscribers are using Voice SMS to convey more emotional messages in a way that text-based messaging cann)t achieve.

The user experience will he natural and straightforward -the calling party makes a normal voice call, prefixing the mobile number with a short code to initiate a session with the Spin\'ox Voice SMS platform. The calling party vil] reach an IYR, which will prompt them to speak their message and then simply select the send option from the IVR. 21)

A typical oice message is expected to he a short duration intentional message. The maximum recording duration will he limited to 30 seconds.

The product must meet the following criteria: 1. No behaviour change ln man) developing countries literacy levels may be low' as well as the inability of the SMS interface to handle local languages -in these cases sending voice instead of text is a more relevant sen-ice proposition. Sending and retrieving a Voice SMS must he as simple as making or receiving a normal oice call.

2. Easy & inexpensive to deploy The appeal to Carriers is that sen ice deplo ment should not require any infrastructure upgrades to their network. The sen-ice should be capable of being dcpk)\ed within 8 weeks.

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3. Universal scrvice offering Any customer should be able to use the service on an handset, without the need for any pre-provisioning or handset configuration. This will help drive mass-market penetration across the Carrier's user base.

End-to-end user experience Figure 41 shows the end-to-end experience of SpinVox \oice SiMS service: 1. Calling Party interaction with IVR It is envisaged there will be minimal interaction between depositing a message and the Voice SMS plai-thrm. The calling pam-will be presented with options to send, re-record or cancel their \oice SNIS.

Language to use \oicc SMS is a standalone integration; it will not require integration with the Carrier voicemail platform.

The \oice SMS platform will support multi-lingual prompts in the following languages: o Arabic o French o English o Persian o Hebrew o Standard Chinese o Bahasa indonesia o japanese o Korean o Filipino o Sinhala o Thai o \ietnamese o Spanish o Portuguese Initial voice prompt The calling parts will hear the following intro after the Voice SMS service has dialled and C)flflectCd to the IVR: Pleasc record your message after the tone" Press I to send this Voice SMS Press 2 to re-record this \Toice SNIS Press 3 to cancel this Voice SMS Message too long prompt If a caller goes over the time alh)wed to dep sit a message they will be prompted to re-record the message or leave the message as is.

End of message warning \Vhcn the caller is approaching the end of the recording time, a series of beeps shall be pla ed, getting closer together as the get closer to the end of the message prior to Req 1.4 prompting the customer Forecast The Carrier will provide a volume forecast for SpinVox Voice SIIS service Support Technical support for the Spin\'ox Voice SMS service will be covered b the support arecrncni-, as outlined in the Carrier contract.

Storage The \Toice SMS platform will provide storage of the voice message audio. As standard the audio tile will he retained tr a peri( d of 5 days. Audio

The sent voice message audio will not he accessible to the calling parts SMS delivery to recipient When a voice message has been successfully deposited an SMS will be send to the intended recipient. The following requirements cover only this SMS.

SMS to the B Party The text message must he sent from the original calling part\ phone number. If this CU is withheld then Withheld' will be presented to the called parts.

Message body The body of the message wil] he specified as part ot a new Message Classificati n template tor that Carrier.

Note this will include a SpinVox message tag ol-'Spuken through SpinVox' Message Retrieval -QuickLink Message retrieval will be via a QuickLink short code e.g. *3* will retrieve the 3rd message 2. Recipient interaction with IVR Once the recipient has listened to the voice message thes will he presented with a number of additional options to manage their Voice SMS experience. These are outlined below: Mailbox Configuration Each Voice SMS recipient will be allocated a virtual mailbox. The Carrier will specit\ the capacirs of this mailbox however it is recommended this is no more than enough for 5 messages for a given time period e.g. 5 days.

IVR -Retrieval of old messages A recipient must be able to listen to old messages stored in their mailbox. JAR) message playback will be used.

IVR -Share the voice SMS A recipient must have the option to forward their Vojcc SMS to another user.

This option will be available from the IVR e.g. Press 4 to share this Voice SMS Enter the recipients number followed by the hash ke IYR -Deleting voice messages A recipient must have the option to delete a Voice message IVR -Skip to next message A recipient must have the option to skip to the next voice message IVR -Repeat voice message A recipient must have the option tO) rewind to the beginning of the current voice message IVR -Replying to a Voice SMS A recipient mlLst have the following reply options: o RepI to A Party via Voice SMS o Repl to A Parts via oice call IVR -Saving a Voice SMS A recipient will be given the option to save a Voice SMS 3. Service levels Sign-up requirements The caller should not have to sign up with the Carrier to use this service -all they should base to do is dial a call prefix followed b the recipient number Compatibility The calling party will require the capability to dial a call prefix numbere.g. * Pricing 1)epending upon the Carrier pricing model a \oice SMS can he a premium to a standard SMS. As such the calling part ma have to be greeted with a pre call announcement advising the cost of \toice SMS deliver.

The Carrier ma also include a numhcr of free messages prior to charging.

Service Level The service shou]d meet i-be same availability requirement as the Spin Vox service i.e. 99.99% Recording time The recording time must he limited to 3() seconds duration.

The caller will be notified ia an appropriate oice prompt if the ba-e ecceded the 30 second rccording limit.

Number of SMS supported All SMS deliveries should be limited to 1 SMS 4. Carrier Interopcrability The Spin\'ox Voice SMS serice must he interoperable with alternative \oice SMS proiders thereby enabling a \-oicc SMS to be sent to recipients regardless of the Carrier service they are using.

Inter-Carrier Interoperability 3"' pam Carriers should be able to interconnect to i-be SpinVox Voice SMS service via a SpinVox specified API or through appropriate GSM Association standards SpinVox-SpinVox Intcroperabiity Intcroperabihtv will be available between those Carriers that have solely deployed the SpinVox \Joice S\1S service Intra-Carrier Interoperability A single Cairicr deploying multiple instances of Voice SMS must he able to interoperate between instances Commercial A commercial framework will be specified supporting inter-operator accounting 5. Platform Requirements The service platform must be capable of delivering the \oice SMS as a managed serice offering. Carriers must be al)lc to easil introduce ne SpinVox services such as Spin\'ox Messenger. and Voicemail to their user base without malor changes ti> infrastructure.

Record & Playback The \Toicc SMS platform must have the abi]irv to record and playback messages deposited b unique callers Voice Prompts The Voice SMS platform must have the ability to play multi-lingua] IVR prompts DTMF Tone Recognition The \oice SMS platform must have the ability to recognize touch tone key presses Platform Availability The Voice SMS platform must support a high availability architecture to ensure a maximum uptime of 99.99% Inter-Carrier Accounting The Voice SMS platform must have the capability to record and report on Inter-Carrier traffic supporting Voice SMS interconnectivitv between Carriers SMS Formats The \Toice SMS platform must have the ability to construct and format an SMS and interconnect to a Carrier's SMSC infrastructure 6. Demo Tbere must he the capability for the Voice SMS product to be demonstrable to the Carrier b 1() SpinVox. The Carrier should also be able to set up a demo of the product for their customers to marker the service.

SpinVox Website -Demo It should be possible to demonstratc the \oice SMS service via the Spin'ox website Carrier -Demo SpinVox require a way to derrn)nstratc the Voice Si\IS service to a Carrier as part of the sales process Carrier -Demo charging It should be possible fr the Carrier l)emo to be free of charge to the caller Carrier -Customer Experience The Spin\'ox Demo should provide the same customer experience as the Carrier pr)d uct 7. Reporting it will be necessary to report on service activin. The audience li r all SpinVox Voice SMS reporting will he both internal to Spin\'ox and external, Carrier facing. \X here SpinVox is offering an interconnect capability to specific Carriers then detailed inter-Carrier reports must be provided.

Reporting requirements it must be possible to report on all messages on this service Reporting requirements it must be possible to report on the following product metrics.

* Users by Carrier * Traffic b Carrier * veragc audio length Reporting requirements It must bc possible to report on the tollowing metrics, where user is defined as the phone number calling the service (i.e. the CLI).

* Prequenc * Traffic * Average aUdio length 8. Billing Billing Requirements Spin\'ox must have the hilling capahilit to support pa per message/bundled pricing models Invoicing Requirements it must be possible to invoice the Carrier Ofl a monthly basis for the service 9. Future phases Future enhancements In a future phase, it must be possible to extend the service to fixed line. The f( )llo; ing call scenarios will be supported: o Fixed line to mobile o Fixed line to fixed line o Mobile to fixed line Note: a fixed line recipient would receive ringing tone, after lifting the receiver they would hear the voice message Future enhancements in a future phase, it must he possible for the called party to receive Voice SJ\IS delivery via email Future enhancements in a future phase, it must he possible for the caller to send a Voice SMS to multiple recipients (Options include the use of a web portal for setting distribution lists/address book management or through the use of Voice SiMS handset applicatli)n) Future enhancements in a future phase, it must he possible for a caller to send a reserved Voice SMS i.e. at a specified date and time.

APPENDIX VI Acronyms The following is a guide to the nc)rmal meaning of the following acronyms.

Ac:R -anonymous call rejection Al -artiticial intelligence ASR -automated speech recognition CLI -caller line identification CPU central processing unit db -database DDI -direct dial-in DTTIF -dual tone multi frequency G728 -This is specified in ITU-T recommendation G.728, "Coding of speech at 16 kbit/s using low-delay code excited linear prediction".

HTTP -hper text transfer protocol IM -instant messaging lP -internet protocol iSo -international standards organisation IVR -interactive voice response MM -multimedia messaging MMS -multimedia messaging service MoBlo -mobile biogging

MSP -mail summary file

NISISDN -mobile station integrated services digital network N/() -network operator (Jl'A -oer-the-air p -pause RAS -Repeat Audio Submission Q -quality QA -quality assurance QC -quality control RAP -refer a friend R( )M -read-only memor S-Links -spoken links, or smart links SAT -speak-a-text SDK -software development toolkit SIP -simple internet protocol SLA -software licence agreement SMPP -short message peer-to-peer SMS -short message service s1rr -simple mail transfer protocol S( )AP -Simple Object Access Protocol SSL -secure sockets layer (a communications protocol) SV-Spin Vox TAT -turn around time TLP -transaction layer packet III -user interface U1D -unique identifier URL -uniform resource locator \AS -alue added sericc -\odafone -ideo game \TM2T -voice mail to text \T4CS -voice messaging conversion system \NIP -variational message passing \olP -voice over internet protocol WAP-wireless application protocol

Claims (17)

1. A method of managing unanswered calls using a network-based senice, the method including the steps of (a) identifying on the network that a call has not been answered, or cannot he answered; (b) providing the caller with the selectable option of speaking a text message to the electronic address the were trying to call; (c) the caller selecting the option of speaking a text message to the electronic address the were tring to call; (d) the caller then speaking a message which is cc nverted into a text message and sent to the electronic address they were trying to call.
2. The method of claim 1, in which the electronic address is a telephone number.
3. The method of any previous claim, in which the text message is one or more of the formats SMS, MMS, email, 1M.
4. The method of an previous claim, in;hich the text message is sent to a party which does not have conventional voice mail.
5. The method of an) previous claim, in which the network manages the unanswered call before, or immediately upon, or shorth after the network decides to terminate ringtone or not to offer ringtonc.
6. The method of an previous claim, in hicb the network plays back an 1VR recording giving the option of speaking a text.
7. The method of any previous claim, in which the converted text message is sent so as to appear to have come from the caller.
8. The method of claim 7, in which a "From" field displays the caller's CLI.
9. The method of any previous claim, in which missed calls generate extra revenue from the converted oicemaiI message.
10. The method of ans previous claim, in which call continuity on the network rises.
D
11. The method of any previous claim, in which the user may tbrce the network to (-)ffer the opti( n of speaking a text, such as by pressing the * key during ringtc)TW.
12. The method of any previous claim, in which the calling parts may decide to use and pay for the speak a text message service.
13. The method of claim 12, in which payment occurs through the off-hook connection charge.
14. The method of any previous claim, in which the caller uses a mobile phone as calling electrical hardware.
15. A system for managing unanswered cal]s using a network-based service, the system adapted to: 21) (a) identify on the network that a call has not been answered, or cannot be answered; (b) provide the caller with the selectable option of speaking a text message to the electronic address they were trying to call; (c) permit the caller to select the option of speaking a text message to the electronic address they were trying to call; (d) cons ert the caller's spoken message into a text message which is sent to the electronic address they were Irving to call.
16. The system of claim IS adapted to enable the method of any preceding claim 1 -14 to be performed.
17. A mobile telephone when used as calling electrical hardware by the caller in Claim 16.
GB0800320A 2006-02-10 2008-01-09 Recording text messages for unanswered calls Withdrawn GB2445669A (en)

Priority Applications (8)

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GB0700379A GB0700379D0 (en) 2007-01-09 2007-01-09 SpinX
GB0700376A GB0700376D0 (en) 2007-01-09 2007-01-09 Voice Message Conversion System
GB0702706A GB2435147A (en) 2006-02-10 2007-02-12 Converting voice messages into text for display on a screen.
GB0708658A GB0708658D0 (en) 2007-05-04 2007-05-04 Intellectual property for voice to email delivery
GB0717247A GB0717247D0 (en) 2007-09-05 2007-09-05 Plug-in VM2email
GB0717246A GB0717246D0 (en) 2007-09-05 2007-09-05 IP ideas Q2
GB0717249A GB0717249D0 (en) 2007-09-05 2007-09-05 Spoken message
GB0717250A GB0717250D0 (en) 2007-09-05 2007-09-05 Twitter

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GB0800321A Withdrawn GB2445670A (en) 2006-02-10 2008-01-09 Network based speech to text message conversion system
GB0800319A Withdrawn GB2445668A (en) 2006-02-10 2008-01-09 Posting text online
GB0800318A Withdrawn GB2445667A (en) 2006-02-10 2008-01-09 Converting text to hypertext
GB0800315A Withdrawn GB2445666A (en) 2006-02-10 2008-01-09 Method of replying to an electronically received message
GB0800320A Withdrawn GB2445669A (en) 2006-02-10 2008-01-09 Recording text messages for unanswered calls

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GB0800318A Withdrawn GB2445667A (en) 2006-02-10 2008-01-09 Converting text to hypertext
GB0800315A Withdrawn GB2445666A (en) 2006-02-10 2008-01-09 Method of replying to an electronically received message

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GB2445670A (en) 2008-07-16

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