GB2420071A - Infusing device - Google Patents

Infusing device Download PDF

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Publication number
GB2420071A
GB2420071A GB0508038A GB0508038A GB2420071A GB 2420071 A GB2420071 A GB 2420071A GB 0508038 A GB0508038 A GB 0508038A GB 0508038 A GB0508038 A GB 0508038A GB 2420071 A GB2420071 A GB 2420071A
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Patent type
Prior art keywords
handle
device according
receptacle
infusing device
bag
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Granted
Application number
GB0508038A
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GB0508038D0 (en )
GB2420071B (en )
Inventor
Martin John Almond
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Martin John Almond
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Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47GHOUSEHOLD OR TABLE EQUIPMENT
    • A47G19/00Table service
    • A47G19/12Vessels or pots for table use
    • A47G19/16Tea infusers, e.g. infusing bags, egg-shaped infuses
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47JKITCHEN EQUIPMENT; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; APPARATUS FOR MAKING BEVERAGES
    • A47J31/00Apparatus for making beverages
    • A47J31/18Apparatus in which ground coffee or tea-leaves are immersed in the hot liquid in the beverage container

Abstract

An infusing device has a handle 2, a squeezing head 8 carried by a plunger 3, and a receptacle for holding a bag containing an infusible substance such as tea, coffee or herbs. The receptacle may include a number of elongate cage elements 10 which are pivotally secured to the handle 2 passing through apertures in the periphery of the squeezing head 8. The plunger is internally biased by oppositely-acting spring elements so that movement in one direction opens the cage for insertion and removal of a tea bag or the like, and movement in the opposite direction squeezes the bag between the head 8 and the tips of the elements 10. In another embodiment the cage elements are moved independently of the plunger by means of an internal sleeve within the handle. Devices are also described in which the squeezing head is fixed with the handle and the cage elements are pivotally secured to an internal plunger, and in which the cage is replaced by a receptacle having perforated relatively movable parts.

Description

S

Martin John Almond

INFUSING DEVICE

TECHNICAL FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to a device for use in the infusion of various substances. The device is particularly useful in the preparation of beverages formed from infusions of tea, coffee, herbs etc., although it could also be used for making infusions of any infusible substances which can be contained in a porous bag.

BACKGROUND

When making tea with tea bags for example, people often squeeze and agitate the tea bag by means of a spoon in order to expel the concentrated liquid and obtain a stronger infusion. Some people are also in the habit of squeezing tea bags after use in an attempt to reduce the risk of drips and dribbles as the bags are removed to a waste container.

Numerous devices for squeezing tea bags have been proposed. The most common forms of device act like a pair of tongs, but the parts that grip the bag are generally rigid and often have a large surface area. If the device holds the bag while the contents is infusing it may prevent water from circulating around the bag, but on the other hand, if the device is not used to hold the bag during infusion it then becomes difficult to grip the P1196B bag in order to remove it from the water.

A squeezing device has also been proposed having a cylindrical container provided with an end cap. The container has a perforated wall and contains a reciprocable plunger which can be used to squeeze a tea bag.

Although the container has a handle which enables the bag to be squeezed whilst submerged in the infusing liquid it is still necessary to manually handle the tea bag during insertion and removal from the container. Direct hand contact with the bag and/or the container is considered undesirable since it is both messy and potentially unhygienic, increasing the risk of introducing dirt and microbes into the infused substance.

The present invention seeks to provide a new and inventive form of device for use with bags of an infusible substance, in which: a) the bag can easily be engaged with the device with little or no manual handling; b) the device enables the infusion process to be controlled such that a good strong infusion may be obtained when required, or a weaker one if the user so wishes; c) the bag is firmly held throughout the process; d) the bag can be effectively squeezed to expel excess liquid when infusion is complete; and e) the user can easily remove the bag from the device at the end of the process.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention provides an infusing device having: P1196B - a handle; - a receptacle mounted at one end of the handle, the receptacle being formed by a plurality of relatively moveable parts which, in a closed configuration, define an infusion space for holding a bag containing an infusible substance whilst providing a plurality of openings through which liquid may pass into and out of the receptacle, said parts being so constructed and arranged as to be capable of being placed in an open configuration allowing passage of the bag in and out of the receptacle; - actuating means operable from the handle to move the receptacle between said open and closed configurations; - a squeezing head which projects from said handle to protrude into said infusion space within the receptacle; and - operating means for producing relative movement between the squeezing head and the receptacle, with the receptacle in said closed configuration, to squeeze the bag therein.

The present tool firmly holds the bag whilst at the same time facilitating easy engagement and disengagement with the bag with little or no manual handling of the bag and no manual contact with the receptacle.

The receptacle allows circulation of liquid during infusion, whilst the squeezing head provides very effective squeezing of the bag to expel liquid. In addition, the squeezing head may be used to knead the bag and increase the flow of liquid through the contents during infusion, if desired..

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The following description and the accompanying drawings referred to therein are included by way of non-limiting example in order to illustrate P1196B how the invention may be put into practice. In the drawings: Figure 1 is a general view of a first infusing device in accordance with the invention; Ekiure 2 is an axial section through part of the infusing device showing one possible internal configuration; Figure 3 is another axial section through the infusing device showing an alternative internal configuration; Figure 4 is a general view of a second form of infusing device in accordance with the invention; Figure 5 is a general view of a third form of infusing device in accordance with the invention; Figure 6 is an axial section through part of the third infusing device; Figure 7 is a general view of a fourth form of infusing device in accordance with the invention; Figure 8 is an axial section through the fourth infusing device; Figure 9 is part of the axial section of Fig. 7 showing the cage in an open configuration; Figure 10 is a general view of a fifth form of infusing device P1196B in accordance with the invention; and Ficiure 11 is a general view of a sixth form of infusing device in accordance with the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Referring firstly to Fig. 1, the first form of infusing device I has a generally elongate cylindrical handle 2 which contains an axially movable plunger 3.

The plunger projects from one end of the handle, terminating in an operating knob 4, and the adjacent end of the handle 2 is provided with an annular projecting flange 5. At the opposite end, the handle 2 is provided with a cage 6 forming a receptacle for a tea bag or similar bag- like container filled with an infusible particulate substance. The plunger 3 also projects from this end of the handle 2 to carry a co- axially mounted generally disc-shaped squeezing head 8. The head may be solid or formed with a number of apertures allowing liquid to pass through. The cage 6 is formed by claw-like elements 10 (six in this example) which may be formed of a tough, heat-resistant, substantially rigid plastic such as polyamide, or any other suitable material. The elements 10 have inclined portions 12, which diverge outwardly from the handle, leading into substantially straight and parallel axial portions 13, which in turn join tip portions 14 which are directed radially inwards, substantially meeting at the axis of the handle. The axial portions 13 pass through circumferentially-spaced peripheral apertures 9 in the squeezing head 8.

The sectional view of Fig. 2 shows one internal configuration of the device. In this embodiment the inner ends of the cage elements 10 are inserted into the end of the handle 2, being received within axial grooves P1196B 16 in the plunger 3. Inside the handle, the inclined portions 12 of the elements 10 lead into short generally axial portions 15 which terminate in hook-like out-turned anchoring portions 17 which are pivotally located in a common circumferential recess 18, or separate circumferentially- spaced recesses, formed inside the handle 2. The plunger 3 is provided with an annular abutment 20 within the handle 2, and the handle contains oppositely-acting first and second compression springs 21 and 22, received in an annular space between the handle and the plunger 3. The first spring 21 acts between the abutment 20 and an internal shoulder 23 formed in the handle 3 towards the recess 18, while the second spring 22 acts between the abutment 20 and a further abutment such as an end plug 24 which is screwed or otherwise secured within the end of the handle 3 adjacent to the flange 5.

The alternative internal embodiment which is shown in Fig. 3 only uses a single spring and is somewhat easier to assemble in mass production. In this embodiment the inner ends of the cage elements 10 are held between the end of the handle 2 and a flange-headed tubular insert 102.

The insert may be secured within the end of the handle 2 by friction, snap- engagement, adhesive, etc.. The inclined portions 12 of the elements 10 terminate in pivot heads 110 which are pivotally received in respective recesses formed between the end of the handle 2 and the flanged end of the insert 102. The plunger 3 is provided with spaced annular abutments and 121 within the handle 2, and a compression spring 122 is received in an annular space between the handle and the plunger 3 with * opposite ends of the spring acting against the abutments 120 and 121, either directly or via bearing washers. The ends of the compression spring also act between internal shoulders 123 and 124 formed in the handle 3, one of which may conveniently be provided by the inner end of the insert 102. It will thus be appreciated that when the plunger 3 is P1196B moved in either direction within the handle 2 (towards or away from the cage 6) the spring 122 will be compressed between one of the abutments 120, 121 and the opposing shoulder 123 or 124 at the opposite end of the spring. The plunger 3 will therefore always tend to return to the equilibrium position shown. Assembly is assisted by forming the squeezing head 8 separate from the plunger 3, with which the head is engaged by means of an arrowhead connector 128.

Referring back to Fig. 1, if the handle 2 is held in one hand and the knob 4 is pulled in direction A against the action of the second spring 22, using the other hand for example, the squeezing head 8 will move towards the handle and start to travel along the divergent portions 12 of the elements causing the elements to pivot radially outwards. The tip portions 14 will therefore move apart allowing a tea bag or the like to be inserted into the cage formed by the elements 10. When the knob 4 is released the spring 22 will return the plunger 3 to the equilibrium position causing the elements 10 to return to the position illustrated in Fig. I and thus close around the tea bag. The number and relative spacing of the elements 10 should be sufficient to prevent the bag from dropping out of the cage.

The tea bag can now be inserted into hot water, held within the device.

The cage 6 allows the water to circulate freely around and through the tea bag so that the dried tea leaves contained within the bag infuse through the porous wall of the bag. If a medium to strong beverage is required the infusion process can be assisted by agitating the device within the Water.

Furthermore, by depressing the knob in the direction of the cage 6 against the first spring 21, as indicated by the arrow B, the tea bag can be compressed between the squeezing head 8 and the inwardly-directed tip portions 14 of elements 10, thereby "pumping" water through the contents of the bag. This may conveniently be carried out by placing the first and P1196B second fingers of one hand on opposite sides of the handle 2 bearing against the flange 5 whilst pressing the thumb against the end of the knob 4.

When the infusion process is complete the device can be used to lift the bag from the water. During this final step the knob 4 can again be depressed towards the cage 6 so that the bag is squeezed between the squeezing head 8 and the tip portions 14 of the cage 6, thereby expelling any surplus liquid from the bag. As a result, the tea bag is largely free from drips and can easily be moved to a suitable waste container.

Release of the used tea bag is assisted by pulling the knob 4 away from the cage to open the elements 10, as described. The compressed bag will either drop out of the cage or can be removed with the assistance of a slight shaking action.

The second form of infusing device 10, which is shown in Fig. 4, also has a generally elongate handle 32, but in this case the handle is designed to be held and operated using one hand. The internal arrangement of the handle, plunger 3, and the general arrangement of the squeezing head 8 and cage 6 formed by elements 10, may be substantially as described in relation to Fig.s I to 3 above. The handle 32 has an enlarged and flattened end 33 to sit comfortably in the palm of the hand, and may be formed with a recessed area 34 to ensure that the handle is correctly balanced. The plunger 3 can be moved back and forth by means of a knob 36, which may, for example, be secured to the internal abutment 20 of the plunger 3 to project laterally through an axial slot 37 in the top side of the handle for operation by the user's thumb. Again, the plunger 3 is biased to an equilibrium position between oppositely-acting spring elements so that moving the knob 36 away from the cage 6 will open the elements 10, while moving the knob in the opposite direction enables a P1196B tea bag held in the cage to be squeezed between the squeezing head 8 and the inwardly-directed tips of the cage elements 10.

A further modified form of infusing device described above is illustrated in Fig.s 5 and 6. This device also has a generally elongate cylindrical handle 2 which contains an axially movable plunger 3. The plunger projects from one end of the handle, terminating in an operating knob 4.

At the opposite end, the handle 2 is provided with a cage 6 for receiving a tea bag or similar item. The plunger 3 also projects from this end of the handle 2 to carry a co-axially mounted generally disc-shaped squeezing head 8. The cage 6 is formed by a number of claw-like elements 10 which, although smoothly curved and less angular than the elements 10 of Fig. 1, again have inclined portions 12, which diverge outwardly from the handle, leading into generally parallel axial portions 13, which in turn JOifl inwardly-directed tip portions 14 substantially meeting at the axis of the handle. The elements 10 are spaced about the periphery of the squeezing head 8 without being connected therewith.

Referring particularly to the sectional view of Fig. 6, the inner ends of the cage elements 10 are pivotally mounted within enlarged recesses 18 in the end of the handle 2. Inside the handle, a sleeve 40 is slidably located about the plunger 3, being independently movable by means of a knob 41 which projects laterally through an axial slot 42 in the side of the handle 2 for operation by the user's thumb. The sleeve 40 is operably connected with the inner ends of the elements 10, for example by mealis of circumferential ribs 43 which engage teeth 44 disposed about the pivot axis of each element 10. The handle may contain respective spring elements (not shown) which bias the plunger 3 and the sleeve 40 away from the cage 6. Thus, if the knob is slid towards the cage 6 the elements will move apart allowing a tea bag or the like to be inserted into the P1196B cage formed by the elements 10. When the knob 4 is released the spring will return the sleeve 40 to the starting position causing the elements 10 to return to the closed position illustrated in the drawings. Squeezing of the tea bag is similarly achieved by depressing the plunger 3 by means of the knob 4.

A fourth form of device is illustrated in Fig.s 7 to 9. This form of the device has an elongate bullet-shaped handle 2 which contains an axially movable plunger 3. The plunger projects from one end of the handle, terminating in an operating knob 4. At the opposite end, the handle 2 is provided with a cage 6 for receiving a tea bag or similar item. In this embodiment the handle 2 is formed such that the end of the handle provides a generally disc-shaped squeezing head 48. The cage 6 is formed by a number of claw-like elements 10 having inclined portions 12, which diverge outwardly from the handle, leading into generally parallel axial portions 13, which in turn join inwardly-directed tip portions 14 substantially meeting at the axis of the handle. The elements 10 are spaced about the periphery of the squeezing head 48.

Referring to the sectional view of Fig. 8, the divergent portions 12 pass through axially-extending slot-like apertures 50 in the side of the handle 2 wherein the inner ends 51 of the cage elements 10 extend generally parallel to the axial portions 13 and are pivotally connected within axial recesses 52 in the plunger 3. The handle may contain respective spring elements (not shown) which bias the plunger 3 to the position shcwn in Fig. 7, mid-way between the positions shown in Fig.s 8 and 9. If the knob 4 is pushed towards the cage 6 the divergent portions 12 engage the ends of the slots 50 adjacent to the squeezing head 48 as shown in Fig. 9, causing the cage elements 10 to move apart allowing a tea bag or the like to be inserted into the cage. When the knob 4 is released the -11 - P1196B spring will return the plunger 3 to the starting position causing the elements 10 to return to the intermediate closed position illustrated in Fig. 7. Squeezing of the tea bag is achieved by pulling the knob 4 out of the handle 2 50 that the divergent portions 12 travel rearwards along the slots to squeeze the bag Tbetween the head 48 and the tip portions 14, as shown in Fig. 8. During the squeezing process the cage elements 10 are restrained from moving outwards by reception of their axial inner ends 51 within the handle 2.

In each of the tools described above the number of cage elements may vary, generally between three and ten such elements being preferred.

A fifth form of the infusing device I is shown in Fig. 10. This device also has a generally elongate cylindrical handle 2 which contains an axially movable plunger 3. The plunger projects from one end of the handle, terminating in an operating knob 4, and the adjacent end of the handle 2 is provided with an annular projecting flange 5. At the opposite end, the handle 2 is provided with a receptacle 60 for a tea bag or similar bag-like container filled with an infusible particulate substance. The plunger 3 also projects from this end of the handle 2 to carry a coaxially mounted generally disc-shaped squeezing head 8. The receptacle 60 is formed of two generally hemispherical parts 61 and 62, which may be formed of metal or substantially rigid plastic, containing a multiplicity of holes or mesh-like perforations. The two parts 61 and 62 are secured to the adjacent end of handle 2, on opposite sides of the head 8, by means of spring elements 64 and 65 such that the two parts are biased towards an open angularly divergent position, as shown. An outer sleeve 66 is located about the handle 2, being axially slidable between upper and lower click-stop positions. In the upper position shown, the lower end of the sleeve is clear of the receptacle 60, but if the sleeve is slid towards 12 - P1196B the lower stop position the leading end of the sleeve engages the two parts of the receptacle 60 causing the two parts 61 and 62 to move together to a closed, substantially spherical configuration.

The plunger 3 may be provided with an annular abutment inside the handle 2, and a compression spring located in an annular space between the handle and the plunger 3 acts against the abutment, biasing the head 8 towards the handle.

If the handle 2 is held in one hand the sleeve 66 can be slid axially, using the other hand if necessary, to open and close the receptacle 60. A tea bag or the like can be inserted into the infusing device by closing the two parts of the receptacle around the tea bag without requiring direct hand contact.

The tea bag can now be inserted into hot water or other liquid whilst being held within the receptacle. The holes in the receptacle allow liquid to circulate freely around and through the tea bag so that the dried tea leaves contained within the bag infuse through the porous wall of the bag.

If a medium to strong beverage is required the infusion process can be assisted by agitating the device within the water. Furthermore, by depressing the knob 4 towards the receptacle 60 the tea bag can be compressed between the squeezing head 8 and the remote end of the receptacle, thereby "pumping" water through the contents of the bag.

This can easily be carried out by placing the first and second fingers of one hand on opposite sides of the handle 2 bearing against the flange 5 whilst pressing the thumb against the knob 4.

When the infusion process is complete the device can be used to remove the tea bag from the water. During this final step the knob 4 can again be 13- P1196B depressed towards the receptacle 60 so that the bag is squeezed between the head 8 and the receptacle to expel surplus liquid from the bag. As a result, the tea bag can be moved to a suitable waste container without risk of drips. Release of the used tea bag is achieved by sliding the sleeve 66 back towards the flange 5 to open the two parts of the receptacle. The compressed bag will either drop out of the receptacle or can be removed with the assistance of a slight shaking action.

Other means of opening and closing the two parts of the receptacle could be used. For example, the sleeve 66 could be engaged with the handle 2 via a coarse screw thread, enabling the receptacle to be opened and closed with a twisting action.

Fig. 11 shows a sixth infusing device having a different form of receptacle 70. The device again has a generally elongate cylindrical handle 2 containing an axially movable plunger 3. The plunger projects from one end of the handle, terminating in an operating knob 4, and the adjacent end of the handle 2 is provided with an annular projecting flange 5. The receptacle 70 is mounted at the opposite end of the handle 2 for receiving a tea bag or similar bag-like container filled with an infusible particulate substance. The receptacle is formed of two generally hemi-cylindrical parts 71 and 72, which may be formed of metal or substantially rigid plastic. Adjacent to the handle 2, the receptacle 70 contains a number of axially extending slots 73, while the end remote from the handle contains a larger number of smaller holes 74. One of the parts 72 is of slightly smaller diameter than the other part 71 and is fixed with the handle 2 while the other part 72 is secured to a sleeve 76 located about the handle 2. The sleeve 76 may have a gripping portion 77. By rotating the sleeve, the larger diameter part 71 can be rotated around the outside of the smaller part 72 to open the receptacle, or alternatively, the parts can be - 14 - P1196B rotated to a closed substantially cylindrical configuration.

The plunger 3 projects from the handle 2 to carry a co-axially mounted generally disc-shaped squeezing head 8 located within the receptacle 70.

The plunger may have an annular abutment inside the handle 2, with a compression spring located in an annular space between the handle and the plunger 3 to act against the abutment, biasing the head 8 towards the handle.

If the handle 2 is held in one hand the sleeve 76 can be rotated, using the other hand for example, to open and close the receptacle 70. A tea bag or the like can be inserted into the device by closing the two parts of the receptacle around the tea bag without requiring direct hand contact.

The tea bag can be inserted into hot water or other liquid whilst being held within the receptacle. The slots 73 and holes 74 allow liquid to circulate freely around and through the tea bag so that the dried tea leaves contained within the bag infuse through the porous wall of the bag. If a medium to strong beverage is required the infusion process can be assisted by agitating the device within the water. Furthermore, by depressing the knob 4 towards the receptacle 70 the tea bag can be compressed between the squeezing head 8 and the remote end of the receptacle, thereby "pumping" water through the contents of the bag.

This can be carried out by placing the first and second fingers of one hand on opposite sides of the handle 2 bearing against the flange 5 whilst pressing the thumb against the knob 4.

When the infusion process is complete the device can be used to remove the tea bag from the water. During this final step the knob 4 can again be depressed towards the receptacle 70 so that the bag is squeezed - 15P1196B between the head 8 and the receptacle to expel surplus liquid from the bag. As a result, the tea bag can be moved to a suitable waste container without risk of drips. Release of the used tea bag is achieved by rotating the sleeve 76 to open the two parts of the receptacle. The compressed bag will either drop out of the receptacle or can be removed with the assistance of a slight shaking action.

As noted above, the tools described herein can be used in the preparation of any infusion made from a substance contained within a porous bag. A portion of any infusible substance used in the preparation of beverages may be placed in the bag prior to sealing. In general, this will be a plant material such as leaves, petals or beans, which may be used in a divided form as obtained from the plant, dried or roasted. The most common material used in the preparation of infused beverages is derived from the tea plant came//ia sinensjs, although other plant materials are sometimes used, including matte, chamomile, mint, vervien, linden, hibiscus, orange blossom, lemon grass, blackberry leaves, skullcap, verbena, comfrey and alfalfa. Ground roasted coffee beans may also be used.

It will be appreciated that the features disclosed herein may be present in any feasible combination. Whilst the above description lays emphasis on those areas which, in combination, are believed to be new, protection is claimed for any inventive combination of the features disclosed herein.

* * * * * * * *

Claims (28)

P1196B CLAIMS
1. An infusing device having: - a handle; - a receptacle mounted at one end of the handle, the receptacle being formed by a plurality of relatively moveable parts which, in a closed configuration, define an infusion space for holding a bag containing an infusible substance whilst providing a plurality of openings through which liquid may pass into and out of the receptacle, said parts being so constructed and arranged as to be capable of being placed in an open configuration allowing passage of the bag in and out of the receptacle; - actuating means operable from the handle to move the receptacle between said open and closed configurations; - a squeezing head which projects from said handle to protrude into said infusion space within the receptacle; and - operating means for producing relative movement between the squeezing head and the receptacle, with the receptacle in said closed configuration, to squeeze the bag therein.
2. An infusing device according to Claim I in which the handle is of elongate shape and both the squeezing head and the receptacle are provided at one end of the handle.
3. An infusing device according to Claim I or 2 in which the means for producing relative movement between the squeezing head and the receptacle includes an inner member which is movable within the handle.
P1196B
4. An infusing device according to Claim 3 in which the inner member is movable against spring means to squeeze the bag between the squeezing head and the receptacle.
5. An infusing device according to Claim 4 in which said spring means is contained within the handle.
6. An infusing device according to Claim 5 in which said spring means comprises a coiled spring element which is located about the inner member, acting between the inner member and the handle.
7. An infusing device according to Claim 6 in which opposite ends of the spring element are arranged to act against respective abutments which are fixed with the inner member and respective shoulders which are fixed with the handle so that movement of the inner member in either of two opposite directions compresses the spring element between one of said abutments and one of said shoulders.
8. An infusing device according to any of Claims 3 to 6 in which the inner member is biased to an equilibrium position between oppositely- acting spring elements.
9. An infusing device according to any of Claims 3 to 8 in which the inner member can be moved relative to the handle by means of a knob at the opposite end of the handle from the squeezing head. -
10. An infusing device according to any of Claims 3 to 8 in which the inner member can be moved relative to the handle by means of a knob which is slidable along a longitudinallyextending slot in the handle.
P1196B
11. An infusing device according to any preceding claim in which parts of the receptacle are disposed about the periphery of the squeezing head.
12. An infusing device according to Claim 11 in which the parts of the receptacle comprise a plurality of elongate elements.
13. An infusing device according to Claim 12 in which the elongate elements are disposed at substantially equal intervals about the periphery of the squeezing head.
14. An infusing device according to Claim 12 or 13 in which elongate elements are pivotally connected at the handle.
15. An infusing device according to Claim 14 in which actuating means is arranged to pivotally move the elongate elements relative to each other to place the receptacle in said open configuration.
16. An infusing device according to Claim 15 in which the elongate elements pass through apertures in the periphery of the squeezing head whereby the elements are pivotally moved relative to each other by relative movement between the squeezing head and the elongate elements.
17. An infusing device according to Claim 16 in which the elongate elements include portions which diverge outwardly from the handle whereby the elongate elements are pivotally moved by relative movement between the squeezing head and said outwardly divergent portions. - 19-
P1196B
18. An infusing device according to Claim 16 or 17 in which the elongate elements include substantially parallel portions followed by inwardly- directed portions.
19. An infusing device according to any of Claims I to 11 in which the parts of the receptacle comprise a plurality of relatively-movable perforated sections.
20. An infusing device according to Claim 19 in which the perforated sections are angularly moveable relative to each other.
21. An infusing device according to Claim 20 in which the sections move relative to each other about an axis which extends transverse to the handle.
22. An infusing device according to Claim 20 in which the sections move relative to each other about an axis which extends substantially longitudinally of the handle.
23. An infusing device according to any preceding claim in which squeezing head is movable relative to the handle.
24. An infusing device according to any of Claims I to 22 in which squeezing head is fixed relative to the handle. -
25. An infusing device according to any preceding claim in which the actuating means acts independently of the operating means.
26. An infusing device according to Claim 25 in which the - 20 - P1196B actuating means comprises a sleeve which is disposed within the handle.
27. An infusing device according to Claim 26 in which the sleeve is connected to a knob which is slidable along a longitudinally-extending slot in the handle.
28. An infusing device substantially as described with reference to the drawings.
* * * * * * * *
GB0508038A 2004-11-13 2005-04-21 Infusing device Active GB2420071B (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB0425221A GB0425221D0 (en) 2004-11-13 2004-11-13 Infusing device

Applications Claiming Priority (8)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
CN 200580038560 CN101060801B (en) 2004-11-13 2005-11-11 Infusing device
PCT/GB2005/004371 WO2006051322A1 (en) 2004-11-13 2005-11-11 Infusing device
JP2007540718A JP2008519630A (en) 2004-11-13 2005-11-11 The brewing apparatus
US11667503 US20080028945A1 (en) 2004-11-13 2005-11-11 Infusing Device
KR20077010790A KR20070085329A (en) 2004-11-13 2005-11-11 Infusing device
EP20050810700 EP1827178B1 (en) 2004-11-13 2005-11-11 Infusing device
DE200560018962 DE602005018962D1 (en) 2004-11-13 2005-11-11 An infusion device
ES05810700T ES2339687T3 (en) 2004-11-13 2005-11-11 Infusion device.

Publications (3)

Publication Number Publication Date
GB0508038D0 GB0508038D0 (en) 2005-05-25
GB2420071A true true GB2420071A (en) 2006-05-17
GB2420071B GB2420071B (en) 2009-03-18

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Family Applications (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
GB0425221A Withdrawn GB0425221D0 (en) 2004-11-13 2004-11-13 Infusing device
GB0508038A Active GB2420071B (en) 2004-11-13 2005-04-21 Infusing device

Family Applications Before (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
GB0425221A Withdrawn GB0425221D0 (en) 2004-11-13 2004-11-13 Infusing device

Country Status (4)

Country Link
CN (1) CN101060801B (en)
DE (1) DE602005018962D1 (en)
ES (1) ES2339687T3 (en)
GB (2) GB0425221D0 (en)

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* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
CN102413744B (en) * 2009-03-12 2014-05-07 乔吉塔·古利格利 Multipurpose manual mixer
US9814333B2 (en) * 2012-02-27 2017-11-14 Helen Of Troy Limited Infusion/dispersion device

Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2678000A (en) * 1952-05-22 1954-05-11 Scheidt Joseph Tea bag holder
EP0248124A1 (en) * 1986-05-19 1987-12-09 Dalgleish, James McNair A package for ingredients
GB2214785A (en) * 1988-02-05 1989-09-13 David Gwyer Storey Beverage infusing device

Family Cites Families (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4172610A (en) 1978-07-17 1979-10-30 Johnson Verlene G Ice cube pickup device

Patent Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2678000A (en) * 1952-05-22 1954-05-11 Scheidt Joseph Tea bag holder
EP0248124A1 (en) * 1986-05-19 1987-12-09 Dalgleish, James McNair A package for ingredients
GB2214785A (en) * 1988-02-05 1989-09-13 David Gwyer Storey Beverage infusing device

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
GB2420070A (en) 2006-05-17 application
CN101060801B (en) 2011-07-06 grant
GB0425221D0 (en) 2004-12-15 grant
GB0508038D0 (en) 2005-05-25 grant
ES2339687T3 (en) 2010-05-24 grant
DE602005018962D1 (en) 2010-03-04 grant
GB2420071B (en) 2009-03-18 grant
CN101060801A (en) 2007-10-24 application

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