GB2242794A - Apparatus for charging two batteries according to a priority sequence - Google Patents

Apparatus for charging two batteries according to a priority sequence Download PDF

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Publication number
GB2242794A
GB2242794A GB9007684A GB9007684A GB2242794A GB 2242794 A GB2242794 A GB 2242794A GB 9007684 A GB9007684 A GB 9007684A GB 9007684 A GB9007684 A GB 9007684A GB 2242794 A GB2242794 A GB 2242794A
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Prior art keywords
battery
lt
rti
charging
unit
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Granted
Application number
GB9007684A
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GB2242794B (en )
GB9007684D0 (en )
Inventor
Ian Ashworth
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Technophone Ltd
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Technophone Ltd
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Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02JCIRCUIT ARRANGEMENTS OR SYSTEMS FOR SUPPLYING OR DISTRIBUTING ELECTRIC POWER; SYSTEMS FOR STORING ELECTRIC ENERGY
    • H02J7/00Circuit arrangements for charging or depolarising batteries or for supplying loads from batteries
    • H02J7/0013Circuit arrangements for charging or depolarising batteries or for supplying loads from batteries for charging several batteries simultaneously or sequentially
    • H02J7/0024Parallel/serial switching of connection of batteries to charge or load circuit

Abstract

Apparatus for charging a main NiCd battery B1 in a portable electronic apparatus, specifically a cellular radio telephone 1, and also a spare NiCd battery B2 first fast charges battery B1 until a predetermined charge state is reached, whereafter battery B2 is fast charged until it reaches the predetermined charge state. Battery B1 is then trickle charged until the telephone 1 is removed from the apparatus, whereupon battery B2 is trickle charged. The apparatus may have a base unit 5 into which the telephone 1 and battery B2 can be plugged, and a charging current supply 15 separably coupled to base 5 by connectors 29, 30 so that the supply 15 can also be used on its own. <IMAGE>

Description

BATTERY CHARGING APPARATUS This invention relates to apparatus for charging batteries.

Nowadays, rechargeable batteries,. e.g. comprising NiCd cells1 are commonplace for powering a large variety of portable electronic apparatus.

By way of example, rechargeable batteries can be used in hand-held cellular radio telephones, so that the subscriber equipment is truly portable. However, particularly because of their transmission capability, portable cellular telephones consume a significant amount of power, necessitating relatively frequent recharging of the batteries. Also, it will often be advantageous for the user to have two batteries, one in use on the telephone and a spare.

In this case it is desirable to be able to charge both batteries rapidly using the same charging apparatus without having to disconnect or interchange the batteries during the charging process.

According to the present invention there is provided battery charging apparatus, comprising a first unit adapted to have two batteries removably connected thereto, and a second unit comprising means for supplying a charging current to the first unit, wherein the first unit comprises means conditioned to selectively connect the batteries to the current supply means in accordance with a predetermined priority sequence.

Battery charging apparatus in accordance with the invention allows two batteries in tandem to be charged rapidly and fully automatically in accordance with the predetermined priority sequence.

Furthermore, because the first and second units are separate, the present apparatus has the advantage that the second unit can also be used independently of the first unit for charging a single battery. To this end the second unit may be removably connected to the first unit.

In a preferred embodiment the current supply means are selectably operable in two different modes namely a rapid charging mode and a slower (trickle) charging mode. In this case the first unit comprises means for generating a control signal indicative of the required charging mode, and the current supply means responds to the control signal to provide the appropriate charge rate.

The predetermined priority sequence preferable involves the following steps in the order stated: a) supplying a rapid charging current to a first one of the batteries, b) supplying a rapid charging current to the second one of the batteries, and c) supplying a trickle charging current to said first battery.

Means may be provided in the first unit for sensing the charge state of the two batteries. In this case step (b) is commenced when the sensing means determines that the charge state of the first battery exceeds a predetermined level, and step (c) is commenced when the sensing means determines that the charge state of the second battery exceeds a predetermined level.

Furthermore, it may be arranged that the steps (a) and (c) are by-passed in the absence of a first battery1 while step (b) may be by-passed in the absence of a second battery. Additionally, slow trickle charging of the second battery may be initiated if the first battery is disconnected during step (c).

Suitably the first unit is adapted physically to hold the two batteries, e.g. in side-by-side relationship.

Preferably, the first unit is capable of holding a complete portable electronic apparatus, specifically a hand-held radio telephone, including one of the two batteries. The first unit may be arranged as a desk stand in which the telephone is held in an upstanding attitude so that it can easily be removed.

An embodiment of the invention will now be described by way of example, with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which: Figure 1 is a schematic diagram illustrating a battery charging apparatus in accordance with the present invention for charging a battery in a portable cellular telephone in tandem with a spare battery.

Figure 2 is a perspective view of a desk stand unit forming part of the apparatus in Figure 1, showing a cellular telephone and a spare battery, Figure 3 is a plan view from below of the telephone in Figure 2, Figure 4 is a perspective view of the desk stand in Figure 2 showing the spare battery separated therefrom, and Figure 5 is a flow chart of the charging sequence in accordance with the invention.

The charging apparatus shown in Figures 1, 2 and 4 is intended for charging a first rechargeable battery pack <RTI>B1</RTI> included in a portable cellular telephone 1, and a second, spare, rechargeable battery pack B2. The two battery packs <RTI>B1</RTI> and B2 are essentially identical and may, for example, each contain six series connected NiCd cells each having a nominal voltage of <RTI>1.2V.</RTI> The battery packs, therefore, each have a nominal voltage of 7.2V. The capacity of the individual cells is typically 700mAh.

The telephone 1 includes a transceiver and all the other circuits and features conventionally found in a cellular telephone, but which for the sake of clarity are not shown in the Figures. Also, since these aspects of the telephone are not relevant to the instant invention no further details will be given here, except to say that the circuitry in the telephone 1 is powered by the <RTI>battery B1.</RTI> The positive and negative terminals la, 2a and <RTI>ib,</RTI> 2b of the batteries <RTI>B1</RTI> and B2 are connected to the positive and negative terminals 3a, 4a and 3b, 4b respectively of a desk stand unit 5.

Referring to Figure 2, the deskstand 5 comprises an upstanding block 6 having a substantially u-shaped recess in the form of an open-fronted pocket, receiving the lower portion of the telephone 1 so that the telephone 1 is held in a generally upstanding altitude.

In Figure 2 the telephone is shown with a greater angle of perspective that the desk stand simply in order that the battery pack <RTI>B1</RTI> at the back of the telephone can be seen more clearly. As shown, the telephone would therefore have to be twisted slightly about its axis towards the reader as indicated by the arrow before it can be located in the pocket 7.

As shown in Figures 2 and 3, the terminals la, lb and 3a, 3b are provided in complementary connectors (40, 3) on the underside of the telephone (see Figure 3) and on the base of the desk stand 5 within the pocket 7 (see Figure 2). The terminals la, lb on the telephone and the terminals 3a, 3b on the base of the desk stand 5 are arranged to engage when the telephone is fully inserted into pocket 7. To this end the terminals 3a, 3b may be in the form of protruding pin-like connectors and the terminals la, lb may be in the form of female connectors.

As shown in Figure 2, a spare battery pack B2 can also be accommodated on the desk stand 5 next to the telephone pocket 7. This portion of the desk stand 5 comprises a generally flat platform 8 having two lateral rails 9 having recesses 10 for receiving complementary flanges 11 on the side walls of the battery B2. The desk stand 5 also comprises an upstanding back stop wall 12 having a central lip 13.

The battery pack B2 can thus be slidably inserted onto the desk stand 5 in the direction of the arrow until the leading edge of the battery pack abuts the back wall 12 of the desk stand at which point the pin-like terminals 4a, 4b in the back wall fo the desk stand engage complementary socket like terminals 3a, 3b (not shown) in the adjacent (leading) wall of the battery pack B2. Also the central lip 13 locates in a complementary recess 14 in the top face of the battery pack B2.

Returning to Figure 1, the battery charging apparatus also comprises a charger unit 15 having its own separate housing unit and connected to the desk unit by a three-core kink-resistant cable 16. The cable 16 comprises a positive and negative current carrying wire 17 and 18 respectively and a control line 19, the function of which will be described in more detail below.

The charger 3, which may be connected to a 220/240V AC mains supply 20, comprises a trickle charge circuit 21 for delivering a relatively low direct current, suitably of approximately lOOmA. This current is supplied to the external conductors 17 and 18 of cable 16 via internal conductors 22 and 23 respectively. The charger 15 also includes a fast charge circuit 24 capable of delivering a substantially higher direct current, suitably of approximately 700mA. This current is supplied to the external conductors 17 and 18 of cable 16 via internal conductors 25 and 26 respectively. A switch 27 enables either the trickle charge circuit 21 or the fast charge circuit 24. The switch 27 operates in response to a control voltage <RTI>V</RTI> applied thereto on conductor 28 connected to the control line 19 of cable 16.The switch is arranged to enable the trickle charge circuit 21 when a low control voltage, e.g. <RTI>OV</RTI> is applied on conductor 28, and to enable the fast charge circuit 24 when a high control voltage, e.g. +5V, appears on conductor 28. As shown, a low voltage is applied on conductor 28 and therefore the trickle charge circuit is enabled.

The cable 16 of the charger 15 terminates in a three-pin plug 29, the three pins thereof being connected to the respective conductors 17, 18 and 19.

The plug 17 is connected into a complementary socket 30 provided at a convenient location on a wall, e.g. a side wall, of the desk stand 5. The socket terminals 30a and 30b coupled to the positive and negative conductors 17 and 18 are connected internally to the positive and negative terminals 31 and 32 respectively of a voltage controlled switch 33. The socket terminal 30c is connected to a control voltage generator 34.

The control voltage generator 34 is capable of applying a voltage of <RTI>OV</RTI> or 5V to terminal 18c of desk stand connector 30 and hence to the control line 19 under the control of a microprocessor 35 to which the control voltage generator 34 is coupled.

The desk stand 5 also comprises a voltage sensor 36 connected across the terminals 3a and 3b of battery <RTI>B1</RTI> and across the terminals 4a and 4b of battery B2 for monitoring the charge state of the respective batteries. The voltage sensor 36 is also coupled to the microprocessor 35.

The switch 33 in the desk stand 5 operates in response to a control voltage <RTI>vc2</RTI> applied thereto from a further control voltage generator 39. For example, the switch 33 is arranged to connect battery <RTI>B1</RTI> to the charger unit 15 when the control voltage Vc2 is low (e.g. <RTI>OV),</RTI> as shown but to disconnect the battery B1 and connect spare battery B2 when the control voltage Vc2 is high (e.g. +5V).

Additionally, a pair of lamp indicators, 37, 38 (suitably LEDs) may be included on the desk stand adjacent the respective battery <RTI>B1</RTI> and B2 locations, (see also Figure 4) and the appropriate lamp is energized when the associated battery is being charged as a visual indicator to the user.

The sequence of charging the two battery packs is prioritised and fully automated under the control of the microprocessor 35. The priority sequence will now be described with reference to the flow chart shown in Figure 5.

Firstly, if the main battery B1 is connected, i.e. the telephone 1 together with its battery are correctly located in the pocket 7 of the deskstand 5, the voltage sensor 36 monitors the charge state of the battery B1.

If the sensed charge state is below a threshold value, e.g. 80% of the maximum charge capacity, the control voltage generator 37 generates a control signal Vc2 (e.g. OV) under the control of the microprocessor 35 which causes the voltage controlled switch 33 to connect the battery B1. Also, the microprocessor 35 causes the control voltage <RTI>Vcl</RTI> from voltage generator 34 to be high, e.g. +5V. The signal <RTI>Vcl</RTI> is applied on conductor 28 to switch 27 within the charge unit, which enables the fast charge circuit 24. Hence the battery <RTI>B1</RTI> is subject to a rapid charging phase, An LED 37 connected across the terminals 3a, 3b is illuminated to indicate that charging of battery <RTI>B1</RTI> is taking place.

Rapid charging continues until the charge state of the battery <RTI>B1,</RTI> as sensed by the voltage sensor 36, attains the predetermined threshold value, e.g. 80% fully charged. At this point the microprocessor 35 causes the control voltage Vc2 generated by the control voltage generator 39 to change (e.g. to +5V) in such manner that the switch 33 disconnects the main battery <RTI>B1</RTI> and instead connects the spare battery B2 to the charger unit 15. However, the microprocessor causes the voltage generator 34 to maintain a high signal output, e.g. of +5 V, so that the fast charge circuit 24 of the charging unit 15 remains enabled. Hence, the battery B2 is now subjected to a rapid charging phase.

An LED 38 connected across the terminals 4a, 4b is energised to indicate that charging of the battery B2 is taking place. Rapid charging of the spare battery B2 continues until the charge state thereof, as sensed by the voltage sensor 39, attains the predetermined threshold value, e.g. 80% fully charged. At this point the microprocessor 35 causes the control voltage <RTI>Vc2</RTI> from voltage generator 39, to change back to its former level (e.g. <RTI>OV)</RTI> so that the switch 33 disconnects the spare battery B2 and reconnects the main battery <RTI>B1</RTI> to the charging unit. Also, the microprocessor causes the control voltage <RTI>Vcl</RTI> from voltage generator to go low, e.g. OV, whereby the fast charge circuit 24 is disabled by switch 27 within the charging unit, and the trickle charge circuit 21 is enabled instead. The main battery B1 is thus subject to a continuous trickle charge phase. Again charging of the battery <RTI>B1</RTI> is indicated by the illumination of the associated LED 37.

If the telephone 1 (and hence the main battery <RTI>B1)</RTI> is removed from the desk stand 5, in which case the voltage sensor detects an open circuit, the microprocessor 35 responds by causing the control signal Vc2 from control voltage generator 39 to change to the value (e.g. +5V) which causes the voltage controlled switch 33 to reconnect the spare battery B2 in favour of the main battery B1. The control voltage <RTI>Vcl</RTI> from control voltage generator 34 is unaltered, i.e. remains low, so that the trickle charge circuit 21 remains connected. Hence the spare battery B2 is now subject to a continuous trickle charge phase. As before, charging of the spare battery B2 is indicated by the illumination of the associated LED 38.

Trickle charging of the spare battery pack B2 may continue ad infinitum unless and until the spare battery is removed, in which case the charger unit may be disabled, e.g. by appropriate activation of switch 27 to a neutral position, by the application of an appropriate control voltage <RTI>Vcl</RTI> from generator 34 under control of microprocessor 35.

If during the charging sequence either a main battery <RTI>B1</RTI> or a spare battery B2 is connected or reconnected the operating sequence is interrupted and the whole charging sequence begins again from the start, as shown in the flowchart of Figure 5.

On the other hand if the desk stand 5 is used for charging a spare battery B2 alone the voltage sensor 36 will detect an open circuit when the switch 33 attempts to connect the main battery. In this case the microprocessor 35 responds by omitting the charging steps relating to the main battery (i.e. the battery connected to terminals (3a, 3b).

Likewise, in the <RTI>hence</RTI> of a spare battery B2, the voltage sensor 36 will detct an open circuit when the switch 33 attempts to connect the spare battery and the microprocessor 35 responds by omitting the charging steps relating to the spare battery. Hence the desk stand can also be used for charging a main battery alone.

Since the charging apparatus in accordance with the present invention comprises a discrete charging unit, it is possible to disconnect the cable 19 from the deskstand 5 and to re-connect it directly to the telephone or via a suitable adaptor (not shown) to a spare battery pack, thus permitting the telephone or battery to be charged directly from the charging unit 15 if it is not required to charge two batteries together.

In this case the telephone itself may be provided with means for generating a control signal <RTI>Vcl</RTI> enabling selection of either the fast or trickle charge modes in accordance with our co-pending British patent <img class="EMIRef" id="027095961-00110001" />

application No. L (Our Ref: PAT 90005).

In view of the foregoing description it will be evident to a person skilled in the art that various modifications may be made within the scope of the invention. For example, rather that employing two distinct circuits 21 and 24 for slow and fast charging as depicted herein, a common circuit may be employed wherein the current output is varied in accordance with the control voltage <RTI>Vcl.</RTI>

Moreover, instead of using a constant low current, the trickle charge mode may be effected by pulsing a higher current. Thus, for example, a 700 mA source may be pulsed on for <RTI>O.lt</RTI> and off for 0.9t (where t is the period of the pulse) in order to achieve a trickle charge effect similar to the 100 mA constant source mentioned above.

Claims (15)

1. Battery charging apparatus, comprising a first unit adapted to have two batteries removably connected thereto, and a second unit comprising means for supplying a charging current to the first unit, wherein the first unit comprises means conditioned to selectively connect the batteries to the current supply means in accordance with a predetermined priority sequence.
2. Battery charging apparatus as claimed in claim 1, wherein the second unit is removably connected to the first unit.
3. Battery charging apparatus as claimed in either of the preceding claims, wherein the current supply means are selectably operable in two different modes, and the first unit comprises means for generating a control signal, the current supply means being responsive to said control signal to operate in a mode in accordance with said control signal.
4. Battery charging apparatus as claimed in claim 3, wherein a first charging mode involves supplying a rapid charging current, and a second charging mode involves supplying a trickle charging current.
5. Battery charging apparatus as claimed in any of the preceding claims, wherein the predetermined priority sequence, involves in the following order, the steps of a) supplying a rapid charging current to a first one of the batteries, b) supplying a rapid charging current to the second one of the batteries, and c) supplying a trickle charging current to said first battery.
6. Battery charging apparatus as claimed in claim 5, wherein the first unit includes means for sensing the charge state of the two batteries, wherein step (b) is commenced in response to the charge state of the first battery exceeding a pre-determined level, and step (c) is commenced in response to the charge state of the second battery exceeding a pre-determined level.
7. Battery charging apparatus as claimed in claim 5 and 6, wherein the first unit includes means for sensing the presence of the two batteries, and means responsive to said battery presence sensing means for omitting steps (a) and (c) in the absence of the first battery and omitting step (b) in the absence of the second battery.
8. Battery charging apparatus as claimed in claim 7, including means responsive to the battery presence sensing means conditioned to supply a trickle charge current to the second battery when the first battery is disconnected during step (c).
9. Battery charging <RTI>appa</RTI> <RTI>us</RTI> as claimed in any of the preceding claims wherein the first unit is adapted to hold the two batteries.
10. Battery charging apparatus as claimed in claim 9, wherein the first unit is adapted to hold the two batteries in side-by-side relationship.
11. Battery charging apparatus as claimed in claim 9 or claim 10, wherein the first unit is adapted to hold a portable electronic apparatus including one of the two batteries.
12. Battery charging apparatus as claimed in claim 11, wherein the portable electronic apparatus is a radio telephone.
13. Battery charging apparatus as claimed in claim 12, wherein the portable electronic apparatus is a cellular telephone.
14. Battery charging apparatus as claimed in claim 12 or claim 13 wherein the first unit is adapted to hold the telephone in an upstanding attitude.
15. Battery charging apparatus for charging two batteries in accordance with a pre-determined priority sequence substantially as herein described with reference to and illustrated in Figures 1 to 5 of the accompanying drawings.
GB9007684A 1990-04-05 1990-04-05 Battery charging apparatus Expired - Lifetime GB2242794B (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB9007684A GB2242794B (en) 1990-04-05 1990-04-05 Battery charging apparatus

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB9007684A GB2242794B (en) 1990-04-05 1990-04-05 Battery charging apparatus

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GB9007684D0 GB9007684D0 (en) 1990-06-06
GB2242794A true true GB2242794A (en) 1991-10-09
GB2242794B GB2242794B (en) 1994-08-03

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Cited By (20)

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EP0588727A1 (en) * 1992-09-18 1994-03-23 Sony Corporation Charging battery system for video camera
EP0607041A2 (en) * 1993-01-13 1994-07-20 Fujitsu Limited Power supplies for portable electrical devices
GB2279827A (en) * 1993-06-02 1995-01-11 Vtech Communications Ltd Alternative power supply apparatus; cordless telephones
WO1995006994A1 (en) * 1993-09-02 1995-03-09 Motorola Inc. Tracking external power supply
WO1995008238A1 (en) * 1993-09-13 1995-03-23 Motorola, Inc. Charge regulator for electronic device and associated method
GB2285901A (en) * 1994-01-25 1995-07-26 Comtronics Mfg Group Ltd Mobile telephone power supply
EP0665627A2 (en) * 1994-01-26 1995-08-02 Spacelabs Medical, Inc. Method and apparatus for automatically switching and charging multiple batteries
US5656917A (en) * 1995-12-14 1997-08-12 Motorola, Inc. Battery identification apparatus and associated method
WO1998019379A2 (en) * 1996-10-29 1998-05-07 Ericsson Inc. Auxiliary battery sensor switch
EP0842551A1 (en) * 1995-07-25 1998-05-20 Motorola, Inc. Battery charging system
US5757163A (en) * 1995-09-29 1998-05-26 Black & Decker Inc. Battery Charger and method for simultaneously charging multiple batteries from a single power supply
WO2000002299A1 (en) * 1998-07-06 2000-01-13 Qualcomm Incorporated Improved power supply assembly for hand-held communications device
GB2346274A (en) * 1995-10-31 2000-08-02 Motorola Inc Two batteries charged in sequence
DE19946747A1 (en) * 1999-09-29 2001-05-23 Siemens Ag Desk-top battery charger for mobile radio transceiver
WO2003010871A1 (en) * 2001-07-26 2003-02-06 Qualcomm Incorporated Battery charger with sequential charging
GB2387067A (en) * 2001-11-28 2003-10-01 Wen-Hsu Wang A standby battery for an electric, portable device which can be easily transported with the device and supplies uninterrupted power when a main cell exhausts
US6956353B1 (en) 2002-10-11 2005-10-18 Orrin Edward Klitzner Universal battery charger for cellular telephones and other battery operated devices
EP1630925A3 (en) * 2004-08-28 2007-02-14 Jungheinrich Aktiengesellschaft Device for charging at least two batteries
CN102403548A (en) * 2010-09-08 2012-04-04 西门子公司 Method and device for the efficient charging of a vehicle battery
EP2466718A1 (en) 2010-12-16 2012-06-20 Dialog Semiconductor GmbH Multiple battery charger with automatic charge current adjustment

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Cited By (40)

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP0588727A1 (en) * 1992-09-18 1994-03-23 Sony Corporation Charging battery system for video camera
US5689172A (en) * 1992-09-18 1997-11-18 Sony Corporation Charging battery system for video camera
EP0607041A3 (en) * 1993-01-13 1995-09-06 Fujitsu Ltd Power supplies for portable electrical devices.
EP0607041A2 (en) * 1993-01-13 1994-07-20 Fujitsu Limited Power supplies for portable electrical devices
EP0881740A3 (en) * 1993-01-13 2000-12-27 Fujitsu Limited Power supplies for portable electrical devices
US5563493A (en) * 1993-01-13 1996-10-08 Fujitsu Limited Power source system of portable information processing system using battery
EP0881740A2 (en) * 1993-01-13 1998-12-02 Fujitsu Limited Power supplies for portable electrical devices
US5578875A (en) * 1993-06-02 1996-11-26 Vtech Communications, Ltd. Dual battery recharger with backup power feature for use in systems having a base unit and battery-powered portable unit
GB2279827A (en) * 1993-06-02 1995-01-11 Vtech Communications Ltd Alternative power supply apparatus; cordless telephones
GB2279827B (en) * 1993-06-02 1998-01-07 Vtech Communications Ltd Alternative power supply apparatus
GB2288292A (en) * 1993-09-02 1995-10-11 Motorola Inc Tracking external power supply
GB2288292B (en) * 1993-09-02 1998-03-25 Motorola Inc Tracking external power supply
FR2709886A1 (en) * 1993-09-02 1995-03-17 Motorola Inc Tracing the external power supply.
WO1995006994A1 (en) * 1993-09-02 1995-03-09 Motorola Inc. Tracking external power supply
GB2288700B (en) * 1993-09-13 1998-04-08 Motorola Inc Charge regulator for electronic device
WO1995008238A1 (en) * 1993-09-13 1995-03-23 Motorola, Inc. Charge regulator for electronic device and associated method
GB2288700A (en) * 1993-09-13 1995-10-25 Motorola Inc Charge regulator for electronic device and associated method
GB2285901A (en) * 1994-01-25 1995-07-26 Comtronics Mfg Group Ltd Mobile telephone power supply
EP0665627A2 (en) * 1994-01-26 1995-08-02 Spacelabs Medical, Inc. Method and apparatus for automatically switching and charging multiple batteries
US5640078A (en) * 1994-01-26 1997-06-17 Physio-Control Corporation Method and apparatus for automatically switching and charging multiple batteries
EP0665627A3 (en) * 1994-01-26 1995-09-20 Spacelabs Medical, Inc. Method and apparatus for automatically switching and charging multiple batteries
EP0842551A1 (en) * 1995-07-25 1998-05-20 Motorola, Inc. Battery charging system
EP0842551A4 (en) * 1995-07-25 1999-05-19 Motorola Inc Battery charging system
US5757163A (en) * 1995-09-29 1998-05-26 Black & Decker Inc. Battery Charger and method for simultaneously charging multiple batteries from a single power supply
GB2346274B (en) * 1995-10-31 2000-09-20 Motorola Inc Apparatus and method for discharging and charging a multiple battery arrangement
GB2346274A (en) * 1995-10-31 2000-08-02 Motorola Inc Two batteries charged in sequence
US5656917A (en) * 1995-12-14 1997-08-12 Motorola, Inc. Battery identification apparatus and associated method
WO1998019379A3 (en) * 1996-10-29 1998-07-09 Ericsson Ge Mobile Inc Auxiliary battery sensor switch
WO1998019379A2 (en) * 1996-10-29 1998-05-07 Ericsson Inc. Auxiliary battery sensor switch
WO2000002299A1 (en) * 1998-07-06 2000-01-13 Qualcomm Incorporated Improved power supply assembly for hand-held communications device
DE19946747A1 (en) * 1999-09-29 2001-05-23 Siemens Ag Desk-top battery charger for mobile radio transceiver
DE19946747B4 (en) * 1999-09-29 2004-05-06 Siemens Ag Desktop Charger for Mobile Devices
WO2003010871A1 (en) * 2001-07-26 2003-02-06 Qualcomm Incorporated Battery charger with sequential charging
US6617827B2 (en) 2001-07-26 2003-09-09 Qualcomm, Incorporated Battery charger with sequential charging
GB2387067A (en) * 2001-11-28 2003-10-01 Wen-Hsu Wang A standby battery for an electric, portable device which can be easily transported with the device and supplies uninterrupted power when a main cell exhausts
US6956353B1 (en) 2002-10-11 2005-10-18 Orrin Edward Klitzner Universal battery charger for cellular telephones and other battery operated devices
EP1630925A3 (en) * 2004-08-28 2007-02-14 Jungheinrich Aktiengesellschaft Device for charging at least two batteries
CN102403548A (en) * 2010-09-08 2012-04-04 西门子公司 Method and device for the efficient charging of a vehicle battery
CN102403548B (en) * 2010-09-08 2015-09-09 西门子公司 A method and apparatus for effectively charging a vehicle battery
EP2466718A1 (en) 2010-12-16 2012-06-20 Dialog Semiconductor GmbH Multiple battery charger with automatic charge current adjustment

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GB2242794B (en) 1994-08-03 grant
GB9007684D0 (en) 1990-06-06 grant

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