GB2214617A - Rocket motors and igniters - Google Patents

Rocket motors and igniters Download PDF

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Publication number
GB2214617A
GB2214617A GB8801575A GB8801575A GB2214617A GB 2214617 A GB2214617 A GB 2214617A GB 8801575 A GB8801575 A GB 8801575A GB 8801575 A GB8801575 A GB 8801575A GB 2214617 A GB2214617 A GB 2214617A
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United Kingdom
Prior art keywords
propellant
rocket motor
case
material
reticulated
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Withdrawn
Application number
GB8801575A
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GB8801575D0 (en
Inventor
Jr James O Hightower
Tomio Sato
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
ATK Launch Systems Inc
Original Assignee
Morton Thiokol Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Morton Thiokol Inc filed Critical Morton Thiokol Inc
Priority to GB8801575A priority Critical patent/GB2214617A/en
Publication of GB8801575D0 publication Critical patent/GB8801575D0/en
Publication of GB2214617A publication Critical patent/GB2214617A/en
Withdrawn legal-status Critical Current

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Classifications

    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C06EXPLOSIVES; MATCHES
    • C06BEXPLOSIVES OR THERMIC COMPOSITIONS; MANUFACTURE THEREOF; USE OF SINGLE SUBSTANCES AS EXPLOSIVES
    • C06B45/00Compositions or products which are defined by structure or arrangement of component of product
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C06EXPLOSIVES; MATCHES
    • C06CDETONATING OR PRIMING DEVICES; FUSES; CHEMICAL LIGHTERS; PYROPHORIC COMPOSITIONS
    • C06C9/00Chemical contact igniters; Chemical lighters
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02KJET-PROPULSION PLANTS
    • F02K9/00Rocket- engine plants, i.e. plants carrying both fuel and oxidant therefor; Control thereof
    • F02K9/08Rocket- engine plants, i.e. plants carrying both fuel and oxidant therefor; Control thereof using solid propellants
    • F02K9/10Shape or structure of solid propellant charges

Abstract

In a linerless rocket motor 20 a reticulated support structure 28 is bonded to the case wall (at 29) and is embedded in a homogeneous mass of propellant material 24 to render the material resistant to high acceleration and rigid enough not to deform during long term storage and during field handling, and to resist aging conditions which would otherwise cause it to become brittle. Bonding may be achieved by spinning the case with adhesive and the structure 28 therein; by crushing the structure 28 into rigid contact with the case; or by winding the case around the propellant grain. The reticulated structure 28 can also be incorporated into igniters (e.g. boron into potassium nitrate propellant), silvers of inert material in rocket motor casings and blocks of solid propellant material attached to outer surfaces of rocket motors to burn a hole therein to relieve pressure in the event of fire. <IMAGE>

Description

SOLID ROCKET MOTOR PROPELLANTS WITH RETICULATED STRUCTURES EMBEDDED THEREIN AND METHODS OF MANUFACTURE THEREOF The present invention relates to solid rocket motor propellants with reticulated structures embedded therein.

It has been suggested in U.S. Patent 3,191,535 to Mulloy to prepare a solid propellant which consists essentially of a cellular fuel element having uniform interconnecting spherical voids of a metal or metal alloy, and a propellant material filling the voids.

It has also been suggested in U.S. Patents 3,616,841 and 3,946,039 to Walz that form retaining reticulated structures of metal or the like may be used as solid propellant reinforcement and burning rate modifiers. These Walz patents, which are hereby incorporated herein by reference and made a part of this specification, describe methods for producing such a reticulated structure by using as a pattern a selfsupporting reticulated polyurethane or organic foam formed of ligaments to provide a substantially homogeneous reticulated structure which rnay have a wide range of pore sizes, varying from 3 to 125 pores per linear inch, and the finished foam material is characterized as having laments which are continuous, gas-free or of low porosity, and of integral construction.

For high web fraction motors, those having a web fraction greater than about 0.75, commonly used solid propellants do not normally bond sufficiently to rocket cases. Liners of thicknesses normally in the range of 0.01 to 0.04 in., which adhere to both rocket cases and propellants, have been used between the propellant and rocket case to provide such bonds. However, not only do liners require an extra step in the manufacturing process and thus increase the expense of building a rocket motor, but liners also decrease the volume which would otherwise be available for propellant in rocket motor cases. Therefore, it is an object of the present invention to provide a linerless rocket motor.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a method of.constructing a rocket motor with a reticulated structure embedded in the propellant grain.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a method for constructing a linerless solid propellant rocket motor by using the grain as a mandrel.

The construction of igniters by the pelletizing of a mixture of potassium nitrate and boron powders is an expensive process and includes the hazards associated with the handling of small particle fuel (metal) powders.

It is therefore still another object of the present invention to provide an igniter which is easier and less expensive to manufacture.

It is yet another object of the present invention to provide an igniter wherein the process for manufacture thereof is safer and eliminates the hazards involved in the handling of small particle fuel (metal) powders.

It is yet another object of the present invention to provide an igniter wherein the igniter material can be preshaped to any shape desired.

It is another object of the present invention to provide greater flexibility in choice of fuel and oxidizing additives for an igniter.

Jet fuel spillage on the landing decks of aircraft carriers may result in fires. Tactical air-launched rocket motors are often located on the decks in position where they may be subject to accidental ignition from stitch fuel fires. It is desirable that a rocket motor be non-propulsive if accidental ignition thereby results.

It is therefore another object of the present invention to provide a method for protecting a rocket motor from propulsion during an accidental fire.

Silvers are portions of inert material which are placed alongside the case walls of solid propellant rocket motors at predetermined positions to control pressure and thrust time traces during rocket motor buronout (tail off). Slivers composed of rubber gumstocks have high density (high inert weight). Slivers composed of epoxide binders filled phenolic microballons have low crush strength (less than 2000 psi) characteristics and low strain (less than 38) capability. High performance rocket motors which employ lightweight composite cases and which operate at high pressures, i.e., greater than 2000 psi require low density, high strength, and high strain capability slivers.

It is therefore still another object of the present invention to provide for a rocket motor a low density sliver which also has high crush strength for withstanding high operating pressures in the motor.

It is yet another object of the present invention to provide such a low density high strength sliver which has high strain capability, i.e., in excess of 10%.

The above and other objects, features, and advantages of this invention will be apparent in the following detailed description of the preferred embodiments thereof which is to be read in coection with the accompanying drawings.

In The Drawings: Figure 1 is a perspective view of a propellant grain portion with a reticulated structure embedded therein but with a portion of the reticulated structure left unfilled with propellant mass to better illustrate the reticulated structure of the present invention; Figure 2 is a sectional view of a portion of a solid propellant rocket motor embodying an aspect of the present invention; Figure 3 is a schematic view illustrating a method of constructing a case about a propellant grain in accordance with a method of the present invention; Figure 4 is a stress-strain diagram for propellants reinforced with reticulated structures and one which is unreinforced; Figure 5 is a sectional view of an igniter embodying an aspect of the present invention; Figure 6 is a perspective view of a rocket motor case portion including slivers embodying an aspect of the present invention;; Figure 7 is an enlarged perspective view of a sliver of Figure 6; Figure 8 is a plan view illustrating a method embodying an aspect of the present invention of protecting a rocket motor from propulsion during a fire; Figure 9 is side elevation view thereof; Figure 10 is an end elevation view thereof; and Figure 11 is a perspective view illustrating the protecting of rocket motor from propulsion during a fire, utilizing method of the present invention.

Referring to Figure 1, there is illustrated at 10 a solid propellant grain portion which includes an homogeneous mass 12 of propellant material including a suitable oxidant in which is embedded a reticulated structure 14 of combustible or non-combustible material to provide structural support to the mass 12 to hold the propellant mass together during high acceleration forces which may be developed. If it is not necessary that the propellant be smokeless, it is preferred that the reticulated structure 14 be composed of a combustible material such as, for example, aluminum, boron, beryllium, or copper so that it will also burn as the homogeneous mass of propellant burns to provide increased energy.

However, if it is desired that the propellant be smokeless, it is preferred that the reticulated structure 14 be composed of carbon, graphite, or a non-combustible material such as, for example, boron nitride, silicon carbide, alumina, or a high melting point metal such as titanium or a zirconium-titanium alloy. Although carbon and graphite may be combustible under some conditions such as if the propellant mass is oxygen rich, carbon and graphite produce non-smoke producing carbon dioxide when they burn. For the purposes of this specification and the claims, the term "homogeneous mass of propellant material" refers to a propellant material of uniform structure or composition and is meant to include propellant mixtures commonly known as composite propellants as well as homogeneous propellant compounds commonly known as homogeneous propellants.A portion of the grain 10 has been left unfilled with propellant material in order to better illustrate the reticulated structure 14 which is an isotropic structure similar to the structures described in the Walz patents previously referred to. Such a structure is composed of a multitude of ~ligaments which are of generally uniform dimension and iterconnecte with each other to form voids which are open to each other so that they may be filled with propellant or other material.For the purposes of this specification and the claims, the term "reticulated structure" is meant to refer to a structure which is composed of a multitude of ligaments interconnected wit each other to form voids whch are open to each other and includes such a structure as described in the Walz patents.

Grains containing such reticulated or framed structures may be utilized in tactical and strategic motors, strap-on boosters, hypervelocity applications, rocket associated projectiles, and other applications and are especially desired for supporting the grains during the high accelerations of rockets which are expected to be developed in the future.

Since for high web fraction motors, i.e., those motors having a web fraction greater than 0.75, commonly used solid propellants do not normally bond sufficiently to rocket cases, liners which adhere to both rocket cases and propellants have been used between the rocket cases and propellants to provide such bonds. By "web fraction" is meant the difference between the outside radius and bore radius of a grain which difference is divided by the outside radius thereof.The use of a liner for bonding of the propellant material to the case wall in a rocket motor not only adds an additional manufacturing step to the rocket motor manufacturing process and thus increases the expense of building a rocket motor, but the liner, which normally has a thickness in the range of 0.01 to 0.04 inches, also takes up space in the rocket motor which could otherwise be utilized to provide additional propellant for greater energy. Referring to Figure 2, there is shown a rocket motor portion 20 including a case 22 and a propellant grain 24. A layer of insulation 26 may be provided over all or a portion of the case as necessary to prevent overexposure of the case to the heat of combustion of the propellant. Some rocket motors do not require insulation between the case and grain.In order to eliminate the liner from the rocket motor 20 in accordance with the present invention, the grain 24, which is composed of an homogeneous mass of propellant material including an oxidant, is caused to engage the inner wall 27 of the case 22, and a reticulated structure 28, similar to reticulated structure 14 in Figure 1, of combustible or non-combustible material is embedded in the grain 24 and bonded such es, for example, by welding, by brazing, by adhesion, or by rigid contact to the inner wall 27 of the case 22. By "bonding of the reticulated structure to the inner wall of the case" is meant, for the purposes of this specification and the claims, bonding of the reticulated structure to the inner wall of the case and/or insulation, if any, applied to the inner wall of the case.Bonding of the reticulated structure 28 to layer of insulation 26 may be achieved by a mechanical lock occuring when ligaments of the reticulated structure are embedded in the insulation material.

In accordance with a preferred method of bonding the reticulated structure 28 to a motor case 22, the reticulated structure 28 is caused to adhere to the case 22 by use of a suitable adhesive, illustrated at 29 in Figure 2, such as, for example, a liquid curable rubber afterwhich the propellant material is poured into the case 22 and in and around the ligaments of the reticulated structure 28 and is cast therein, i.e., allowed to harden to form a grain. The adhesive material 29 is applied preferably by pouring it into the case 22 and spinning the case with the reticulated structure contained therein, as illustrated at 25 in Figure 2, and in engagement with the inner Wall 27 like a centrifuge to sling the adhesive material against the case wall 27 and form a uniform layer thereon.Such spinning should be continued until the adhesive material 29 has set up and bonded the reticulated structure 28 to the wall 27. If the adhesive material 29 is a good thermal insulator such as, for example, a hydrocarbon rubber, it may also be used to provide some or all of the insulation 26.

In accordance with an alternative method of bonding the reticulated structure 28 to a motor case 22, the reticulated structure 28 is embedded in the case 22 and suitable crush forces, which can be determined by application of engineering principles commonly known to those of ordinary skill in the art to which this invention pertains, are applied to the reticulated structure 28 to cause rigid adhering contact thereof with the case wall 27.

Figure 3 is a schematic view illustrating another preferred method of bonding a reticulated structure to a rocket motor case to construct a linerless solid propellant rocket motor. In accordance with this method, a solid propellant grain 30 with a reticulated support structure embedded therein is prepared. Then, in accordance with an aspect of the present invention, a case 32 is constructed about the grain by, for example, winding with a suitable composite/fiber such as epoxy coated tapes 34 of, for example, graphite, aramid, glass, or metal fiber. Thus, the grain 30 is used as a mandrel supported by a suitable member 36 for constructing the case 32. For clarity, it should be noted that the grain 30 of Figure 3 is shown as having a case 32 only partially constructed thereon. In order to provide a bond between the propellant grain 30 and the case 32 being constructed thereon, a suitable compressive stress, which may be determined by applying engineering principles of common knowledge to those of ordinary skill in the art to which this invention pertains, is applied between the case and the grain during the winding process. In order to provide adequate strength to the case 32 in both the circumferential and longitudinal directions, the tape 34 is wound first in the polar direction, as illustrated at 38, and then in the cylindrical direction, as illustrated at 40, to overlay the polar winding in the cylindrical portion thereof.

Figure 4 shows a stress-strain diagram for an unreinforced propellant at 42 and the propellant reinforced with 10 pores per linear inch and 20 pores per linear inch respectively reticulated aluminum similar to that described in the aforesaid patents to Walz at 44 and 46 respectively. The propellant is composed of the following by weight percent: Hydroxy terminated Polybutadiene (binder) 9.990 Catocene (burning rate catalyst) 4.000 Aluminum powder (fuel) 18.000 Ammonium perchlorate (oxidizer) 68.000 Triphenyl bismuth (cure catalyst) 0.010 The reinforced grains 44 and 46 were composed of the aforementioned propellant with a portion of the aluminum powder replaced by reticulated aluminum so that the reinforced grains contained 13.491 percent aluminum powder and 4.509 percent reticulated aluminum.The tests resulting in the stress-strain diagram were conducted at a temperature of 77do., a cross head speed of 2 inch/minute, ad a specimen gage length of 1.25 inch. Figure 4 shows the ability of the reinforce propellant to withstand greater stresses at respectively lesser strains, and also shows the capability of the reinforced propellant to be strained by more than about 15% before reaching its yield point. Thus, it has been discovered and Figure 4 shows that when the reticulatea or foamed aluminum is bonded to the case wall, the propellant grain in which it is embedded is capable of with-standing greater stress, i.e., almost twice as much stress as can normally be withstood by the propellant when unreinforced.The ability of propellant grains to withstand high accelerations is related to the modulus of elasticity thereof, i.e., the greater the modulus of elasticity, the better a propellant grain is able to withstand high accelerations. As figure 4 also indicates, the modulus of elasticity of a propellant grain as well as the stress it can withstand may be increased greatly by embedding therein a reticulated structure. Such an increase in modulus of elasticity may be on the order of 4 times or more.

Referring to Figure 5, there is shown generally at 50 an igniter for a rocket motor. The igniter 50 includes a typical elongated cylindrical phenolic case 52, a suitable squib 54 internally of the plug 56 at one end with lead wires 58 extending thereto, and an igniter plug 60 at the other end with a gasket 62 for sealingly mounting the igniter. A plurality of apertures 66 provide communication of the hot gases generated therein to the propellant grain.

Igniter propellant material has typically been prepared by pelletizing a mixture of potassium nitrate and boron powders. However, this is an expensive process and the pelletized material cannot be shaped to a desired monolithic shape. In order to allow pre-shaping of the igniter material and thus, if desired, allow elimination of the phenolic case 52 for added simplicity and cost effectiveness and in order to provide reduced construction costs of the igniter, greater safety to the manufacturing process, and greater flexibility in choice of fuel and oxidizing additives in accordance with the present invention, the igniter 50 is provided with an homogenous mass 68 of propellant material including an oxidant and a reticulated structure 70, similar to reticulated structure 14 of Figure 1, embedded therein.

If the phenolic case 52 is not provided, then burnable protective tape (not shown), such as tape composed of a synthetic resin polymer sold under the trademark "Teflon", should be applied about the outside of the igniter to serve as an aging protective device. Except for smokeless applications in which case it is composed of carbon, graphite, or a non-combustible material, the reticulated structure 70 is preferably composed of a combustible material, and the igniter 50 is preferably provided with a propellant material composed of potassium nitrate and a reticulated structure 70 of boron embedded therein.

There are positions alongside the interior walls of rocket motor cases of those rocket motors having certain propellant grain configurations such as those that are star-shaped where, due to the grain configuration, propellant material at such positions would continue to burn after completion of burning of the surrounding propellant material. A sliver, illustrated in position in a rocket motor case 72 at 74 in Figure 6, is a portion of inert material which is placed alongside the interior wall 76 of a case at such a position to accordingly control pressure and thrust time traces during rocket motor burnout and thus cause a sharp tail-off in pressure at the end of the motor run.

Slivers for rocket motors and in particular those which employ light weight composite cases and operate at pressures in excess of 2000 psi should be of light weight, have sufficient crush strength to withstand the motor operating pressures, and have a high strain capability (in excess of 10E). In order to provide such qualities in sliver 74 in accordance with the present invention, the sliver 74 is composed of an inert material 78, preferably of low density, such as, for example, rubber, epoxides, cork, hollow glass spheres, and phenolic microballoons bound together with an epoxide binder, and a reticulated support structure, a portion of which is schematically illustrated at 80, of carbon, graphite, or a non-combustible material similar to reticulated structure 14 of Figure 1, embedded therein.

A high crush strength and low density reticulated support structure such as, for example, one composed of cork and aluminum bound together with an epoxide binder is preferred.

A common concern aboard rocket carrying ships is that a shipboard fire may cause propulsion of one or more of the rockets. Propulsion of a rocket may be prevented by providing a pressure relieving hole in the rocket motor case, and it is desired that such a hole be provided automatically and reliably in case of a fire which would otherwise cause rocket propulsion.Referring to Figures 8 to 11, in order to accordingly protect a rocket motor illustrated at 90 from propulsion during such a fire in accordance with the present invention, a block 92 of propellant is cast and attached to the rocket motor case 94 with the surfaces illustrated at 96 not contacting the case being insulated and the surface 98 contacting the case remaining uninsulated to thus cause ignition and burning with the production of intense heat on the case exterior along the uninsulated surface 98 for the purpose of thereby weakening the rocket motor case in the area of the uninsulated surface 98.The tpe and amount of propellant and size of uninsulated surface 98 are chosen by applying engineering principles of common knowledge to those of ordinary sill in the art to which this invention pertains to provide sufficient weakening of the rocket motor case to cause pressure inside the case from burning of rocket propellant therein to burst a hole, illustrated at 100 in Figure 11, in the side of the case at the weaned site 102 to thus relieve the pressure and make the rocket non-propulsive.

The surfaces 96 are preferably insulated with a suitable insulating material illustrated at 108, such as, for example, paper impregnated phenolic material or a rubber based insulation impregnated with a low thermal conductivity filler. It is also desirable that these surfaces 96 be protected against atmospheric conditions and rough handling. Straps 104 are provided to securely hold the propellant block 92 in place. These straps 104 are preferably of a quick-release type so that the block 92 may be quickly removed to fire the missile and are preferably heat resistant to maintain the block 92 in place during burning thereof.

In order to render the block 92 of propellant rigid enough not to deform during long term storage and during field handling and to resist aging conditions which would otherwise cause it to become brittle, a reticulated support structure, illustrated at 106, of preferably combustible material similar to reticulated structure 14 of Figure 1 is embedded in the propellant block 92.

It is to be understood that the invention is by no means limited to the specific embodiments which have been illustrated and described herein, and that various modifications thereof may indeed be made which come within the scope of the present invention as defined by the appended claims.

Claims (20)

1. A linerless solid propellant rocket motor comprising a case (22) which has an inner wall (27), a homogeneous mass (12,24) of propellant material including an oxidant within said case and which engages the inner wall of the case, and a reticulated support structure (14,28) embedded in said propellant mass and bonded to said inner wall.
2. A rocket motor according to claim 1 comprising a plurality of adhesive connections (29) for bonding said reticulated structure to the inner wall of the case.
3. A rocket motor according to claim 1 or claim 2 wherein said reticulated structure (14,28) is composed of a combustible material.
4. A method of constructing a linerless solid propellant rocket motor comprises the steps of: preparing an homogeneous rass (30) of propellant material including an oxidant with a reticulated support structure embedded therein; and, while using the propellant mass as a mandrel, winding under compressive stress a fiber material (34) about the propellant mass to construct case (32) about the propellant mass.
5. A method according to claim 4, wherein the reticulated structure is made from a combustible material.
6. A method according to claim 4 or claim 5 wherein said winding step includes winding fiber material t34) about the propellant mass in both circumferential (40) and longitudinal (36) directions thereof.
7. A method of constructing a linerless solid propellant rocket motor comprising the steps of: a) inserting a reticulated support structure (28) into a rocket motor case (22); b) bonding the reticulated structure to an inner wall (27) of the rocket motor case; and c. pouring propellant material into the rocket motor case and in and around ligaments of said reticulated structure and allowing the propellant material to harden therein.
8. A method according to claim 7 wherein the reticulated structure (28) is formed from a combustible material.
9. A method according to claim 7 or claim 8 wherein the step of bonding the reticulated structure (28) to an inner wall (27) of the rocket motor includes adhesively bonding the reticulated structure to the inner wall.
10. A method according to claim 9 wherein said adhesive bonding step includes spinning the rocket motor case with liquid adhesive material and the reticulated structure contained therein to distribute the adhesive material over the inner wall thereof and continuing spinning of the case until the reticulated structure is bonded to the inner wall thereof.
11. An igniter (50) comprising an homogeneous mass of propellant material t68) including an oxidant and a reticulated support structure (70) embedded therein.
12. An igniter according to claim 11 wherein said reticulated structure (70) is composed of combustible material.
13. An igniter according to claim 11 wherein said propellant material (68) is composed of potassium nitrate and said reticulated structure t70) is composed of boron.
14. A rocket motor wherein a sliver (74) comprising a block of inert material positioned at a pre-determined location in the rocket motor and a reticulated support structure (80) composed of a material selected from carbon, graphite, and non-combustible material embedded in the inert material.
15. A method for preventing accidental propulsion of a rocket motor during a fire comprises the steps of: preparing a block of solid propellant material (92); and attaching the propellant block to the outer side of the rocket motor case (94) to burn and produce heat during the fire to weaken the rocket motor case so that pressure resulting from burning of propellant in the rocket motor will burst a hole (100) in the rocket motor case to relieve the pressure.
16. A method according to claim 15 wherein the surfaces (96) of the propellant block not in contact with the rocket motor case are insulated and the surface (98) of the propellant block which engages the rocket motor case is left uninsulated.
17. A method according to claim 15 or claim 16 wherein a reticulated support structure (106) is embedded in said block of propellant material.
18. A method according to claim 17 wherein the reticulated structure (106) is formed from a combustible material.
19. A rocket motor (90) including a case (94) having an outer surface, a block of solid propellant material t96) engaged to said outer surface of the rocket motor case to burn and produce heat during a fire to weaken the rocket motor case so that pressure resulting from burning of propellant in the rocket motor case will burst a hole t100) in the rocket motor case to thereby relieve the pressure and prevent accidental propulsion of the rocket motor during the fire.
20. A rocket motor according to claim 19 wherein said block of solid propellant material (96) comprises a reticulated support structure (106) embedded therein.
GB8801575A 1988-01-25 1988-01-25 Rocket motors and igniters Withdrawn GB2214617A (en)

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Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB8801575A GB2214617A (en) 1988-01-25 1988-01-25 Rocket motors and igniters

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Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB8801575A GB2214617A (en) 1988-01-25 1988-01-25 Rocket motors and igniters

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GB8801575D0 GB8801575D0 (en) 1988-06-02
GB2214617A true GB2214617A (en) 1989-09-06

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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB2301421A (en) * 1992-02-10 1996-12-04 Aerojet General Co Rocket motor manufacture
GB2313653A (en) * 1994-03-02 1997-12-03 Israel State Safety device for munitions
GB2488964A (en) * 1994-09-19 2012-09-19 Nexter Munitions Devices for deconfining a reactive charge inside a munition envelope
US10035174B2 (en) 2015-02-09 2018-07-31 United Technologies Corporation Open-cell reticulated foam

Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB876992A (en) * 1958-04-21 1961-09-13 Bristol Aerojet Ltd Improvements in pressure vessels
GB885409A (en) * 1958-04-14 1961-12-28 Hexcel Products Inc Fuel grains for rocket engines
US3316718A (en) * 1965-01-13 1967-05-02 Lockheed Aircraft Corp Honeycomb structured propellant for rocket motors
US3499283A (en) * 1965-12-23 1970-03-10 Thiokol Chemical Corp Rocket charge design
US3616841A (en) * 1967-10-30 1971-11-02 Energy Research And Generation Method of making an inorganic reticulated foam structure
US3946039A (en) * 1967-10-30 1976-03-23 Energy Research & Generation, Inc. Reticulated foam structure

Patent Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB885409A (en) * 1958-04-14 1961-12-28 Hexcel Products Inc Fuel grains for rocket engines
GB876992A (en) * 1958-04-21 1961-09-13 Bristol Aerojet Ltd Improvements in pressure vessels
US3316718A (en) * 1965-01-13 1967-05-02 Lockheed Aircraft Corp Honeycomb structured propellant for rocket motors
US3499283A (en) * 1965-12-23 1970-03-10 Thiokol Chemical Corp Rocket charge design
US3616841A (en) * 1967-10-30 1971-11-02 Energy Research And Generation Method of making an inorganic reticulated foam structure
US3946039A (en) * 1967-10-30 1976-03-23 Energy Research & Generation, Inc. Reticulated foam structure

Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB2301421A (en) * 1992-02-10 1996-12-04 Aerojet General Co Rocket motor manufacture
GB2301421B (en) * 1992-02-10 1997-08-27 Aerojet General Co Rocket motor construction from porous binder core
GB2313653A (en) * 1994-03-02 1997-12-03 Israel State Safety device for munitions
GB2313653B (en) * 1994-03-02 2000-12-20 Israel State Munition components protection device during slow cook-off test
GB2488964A (en) * 1994-09-19 2012-09-19 Nexter Munitions Devices for deconfining a reactive charge inside a munition envelope
GB2488964B (en) * 1994-09-19 2013-03-06 Nexter Munitions Devices for deconfining a reactive charge inside a munition envelope
US10035174B2 (en) 2015-02-09 2018-07-31 United Technologies Corporation Open-cell reticulated foam

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GB8801575D0 (en) 1988-06-02

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