GB2103717A - A rotary fuel pump - Google Patents

A rotary fuel pump Download PDF

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Publication number
GB2103717A
GB2103717A GB08221220A GB8221220A GB2103717A GB 2103717 A GB2103717 A GB 2103717A GB 08221220 A GB08221220 A GB 08221220A GB 8221220 A GB8221220 A GB 8221220A GB 2103717 A GB2103717 A GB 2103717A
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GB
United Kingdom
Prior art keywords
pump
annular
fluid
fluid pump
adjacent
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Granted
Application number
GB08221220A
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GB2103717B (en
Inventor
Michael Vincent Wiernicki
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Purolator Products Co
Original Assignee
Purolator Products Co
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Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US28590881A priority Critical
Application filed by Purolator Products Co filed Critical Purolator Products Co
Publication of GB2103717A publication Critical patent/GB2103717A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of GB2103717B publication Critical patent/GB2103717B/en
Expired legal-status Critical Current

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Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F04POSITIVE - DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; PUMPS FOR LIQUIDS OR ELASTIC FLUIDS
    • F04CROTARY-PISTON, OR OSCILLATING-PISTON, POSITIVE-DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; ROTARY-PISTON, OR OSCILLATING-PISTON, POSITIVE-DISPLACEMENT PUMPS
    • F04C15/00Component parts, details or accessories of machines, pumps or pumping installations, not provided for in groups F04C2/00 - F04C14/00
    • F04C15/0057Driving elements, brakes, couplings, transmission specially adapted for machines or pumps
    • F04C15/0061Means for transmitting movement from the prime mover to driven parts of the pump, e.g. clutches, couplings, transmissions
    • F04C15/0069Magnetic couplings
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02MSUPPLYING COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL WITH COMBUSTIBLE MIXTURES OR CONSTITUENTS THEREOF
    • F02M37/00Apparatus or systems for feeding liquid fuel from storage containers to carburettors or fuel-injection apparatus; Arrangements for purifying liquid fuel specially adapted for, or arranged on, internal-combustion engines
    • F02M37/04Feeding by means of driven pumps
    • F02M37/08Feeding by means of driven pumps electrically driven

Abstract

The pump has a gerotor pumping mechanism 90 driven by a motor 40 through a magnetic coupling comprising main rotary members furnished with e.g. ceramic permanent magnets 66, 76, and separated bye non-magnetic diaphragm. The motor may be electric (as shown), hydraulic, or pneumatic. <IMAGE>

Description

SPECIFICATION A fuel pump with magnetic drive This invention relates to a fuel pump with magnetic drive.
There are several known pumps of the type having an electric motor and a rotary wheel driven by the motor with a coupling consisting of two groups of permanent magnets to prevent contamination of the fluid being handled. One group of permanent magnets rotates with and is mounted on the shaft of the motor and the other group of magnets is mounted on and rotates with the rotor wheel. In these types of pumps, the interior of the pump is sealed against the environment by means of a diaphragm of nonmagnetic material disposed between the two groups of magnets. The rotary wheel is generally connected to a pump device.
In U.S. Patent 2,970,548 to S. G. Berner, issued February 7, 1961, a magnetically driven centrifugal pump is disclosed. The rotor wheel of the pump is coupled to an electric motor by two concentrically mounted magnets, one on the shaft of the motor and the other on the rotor wheel.
Other examples of centrifugal pumps with concentrically mounted magnetic drives are shown in U.S. Patent 3,205,827 to F. N.
Zimmerman, issued September 14, 1965 and U.S.
Patent 3,238,883 issued to Thomas B. Martin on March 8, 1966. One disadvantage of concentrically mounted magnets is that the diaphragm wall must be made by welding a piece of sheet metal back on itself. However, in welding two thin edges of sheet metal, it is difficult to obtain a satisfactory seam or joint. Furthermore, it is difficult to fabricate the cylindrical wall to such an exact size and shape that the wall everywhere will ba flush against the interface near the stator.
In view of these considerations, the magnetic gap between concentrically mounted magnets must be substantially greater than comparable axially mounted magnets. Because of the increase in magnetic gap for concentrically mounted magnets, there is an undesirable increase in the loss of magnetic fiux through the gap with a corresponding reduction in performance and also requires larger diameter components to handle higher torque transfers.
In U.S. Patent 2,996,994 to G. W. Wright, issued August 1961, a submersible motor driven pump for pumping liquid fuels utilizing axial gap magnets is disclosed. This motor driven pump utilizes a centrifugal type rotor driven by a sealed motor through a magnetic coupling operating between an imperforate wall of the motor housing. The motor pump is adapted to fit within a variety of fuel tanks. The driving and driven members of the magnetic coupling lie on opposite sides of the imperforate wall, which serves as a rigid diaphragm between the two magnets. Thus, the driven and driving memberskare separated by an axial air gap. Another example of an axial air gap magnetic motor with a centrifugal pump is disclosed in U.S. Patent 3,223,043 to Harris Shapiro issued December 1965.
Centrifugal pumps have a number of deficiencies. First, they are inherently high speed devices and are more efficient in handling large flows and low pressure rises. Centrifugal pumps have lower efficiencies for small flows and higher pressure rises. Secondly, the pressure rise developed by a centrifugal pump is directly proportional to the speed squared. Thus, centrifugal pumps do not produce high pressure rises at low speed. Third, centrifugal pumps have a tendency to cavitate and loose their prime. When either of these conditions occurs, the centrifugal pump will not pump which may result in generating heat, noise, vibration and the premature failure of the pump.
A further improvement in pumps having axial air gap magnetic drive motors is shown in U.S.
Patent 3,470,824 to Elton J. O'Connor, issued October 7, 1 969. O'Connor discloses a magnetic drive pump wherein an electrically powered drive motor is sealed from a pump chamber and transmits by electromagnetic forces, a rotary drive to a pump impeller in the pump chamber. The pump has sliding vanes in a fixed casing so that the liquid is directly displaced without requiring the application of centrifugal force.
One major drawback of positive rotary displacement pumps is that their efficiency is dependent on the machining clearances of rotating members. The actual clearance, of course, is a function of the machining and assembly. In addition, with low viscosity liquids, very close tolerances are necessary so as to reduce slippage caused by liquid leaking through the pump clearances. The amount of slip is dependent upon several factors. Generally, increased clearances result in greater slip. Thus, sliding vaned pumps do not find great application in pumping low viscosity liquids since the sliding vanes are prone to excessive tip wear which requires their frequent replacement. In addition, such sliding vane positive rotary displacement pumps are complex, having high friction losses, are expensive to make and do not provide a cut off in case of overpressure of the fluid handled.
Therefore, none of the aforementioned centrifugal or sliding vane pumps, when used with a magnetic drive coupling between the pump and the electric motor, discloses a pump suitable for handling fuels. In addition, none of the aforementioned pumps are simple, inexpensive to make and provides overpressure protection to limit the discharge pressure of the fluid being handled. Finally, none of the aforementioned pumps are suitable for a multitude of fluids, including fuels, provide high pressure at low speed and voltage, have a low tendency to cavitate, can be easily assembled, and further provide high efficiency.
The invention provides a fluid pump comprising a housing having a chamber; a diaphragm member fixedly mounted to the inside of said chamber and dividing the inside of said chamber into a first inside portion adjacent one end of the housing and a second inside portion adjacent an opposite end of the housing; a first shaft rotatably mounted in said first inside portion of said chamber and having motor means fixedly mounted thereon; a second shaft rotatably mounted in said second inside portion of said chamber; magnetic driving means slidably and nonrotatably mounted on said first shaft adjacent to said diaphragm member; magnetic drive means, mounted on said second shaft adjacent to but spaced axially away from said diaphragm member, for rotation with said magnetic driving means in response to a force of attraction which is exerted between said magnetic driving means and said magnetic driven means; and gerotor pump means, mounted on said second shaft, for pumping fluid when said second shaft is rotated.
In a preferred embodiment there is provided a fluid pump having an axial magnetic coupling with a nonmagnetic diaphragm member therebetween which is coupled to a gerotor pump having an overpressurization limiter at the discharge port.
The gerotor pump is designed to safely handle low viscosity fluids with high pump efficiency. The use of increased axial clearance is permitted in assembling the pump without sacrificing pump efficiency or cost and is suitable for pumping multi-viscous fluids. Furthermore, the axial air gap gerotor pump prevents contamination of the fluid being handled and can easily be adapted to limit the discharge pressure of the fluid being handled.
Finally, the gerotor pump provides positive lift at the inlet, is self priming, has multi-fluid capabilities and in which the losses created by fluid friction in the pump are minimized to enhance pump efficiency.
The invention will now be more particularly described with reference to the accompanying drawings, wherein: Figure 1 is a partial sectional view of one embodiment of a magnetic pump according to the invention; Figure 2 is a section view along 2-2 of Figure 1: Figure 3 is a sectional view along 3-3 of Figure 1; Figure 4 is a sectional view along 4-4 of Figure 1; Figure 5 is a perspective view of a gerotor pump arrangement.
Referring to the drawings, there is shown a positive displacement, magnetic drive gerotor pump, generally designated by the numeral 100, which embodies the invention. The pump 100 is provided with a housing 10 with one end 12 and an opposite end 18. The housing 10 has a chamber 20 formed therein. A diaphragm member 50 is secured by suitable means such as welding to the inside diameter 16 of the housing 10 and divides the chamber 20 into a first inside portion 22 and an opposite second inside portion 28. The first inside portion is formed adjacent to the one end 1 2 of the housing 1 0. The second inside portion is formed adjacent to the opposite end 1 8 of the housing 10. A pair of bearings 32, 34 are suitably mounted to the inside diameter of the housing 10 in the first inside portion 22.The one bearing 32 is placed adjacent to the one end 12 and the other bearing 34 is placed adjacent the diaphragm member 50. An electric motor 40, having a drive shaft 48 extending from either side of an armature 42, is rotatably mounted on the bearings 32, 34. Motor magnets 44 and field windings (not shown) are mounted concentrically with the armature 42. The motor magnets 44 and field windings are mounted to the inside diameter 24 of the first inside portion 22 of the chamber 20. The electric motor 40 also has acommutator 46 mounted adjacent the one bearing 32. A plurality of brushes 52 are conventionally connected to electrical contacts 54 which project through the one end 12 and is connected to an electric source (not shown).The brushes 52 are conventionally mounted onto the commutator 46 so as to provide electric current to the commutator and the armature 42. The field windings are also conventionally connected to the electric contacts (not shown) and thence to the electric source (not shown). The electric source may also be D.C. or alternating current with the appropriate modifications to the electrical components of the electric motor. Those skilled in the art will also recognize that the pump herein described need not be driven by electric source means in practicing the invention and that an hydraulic motor or an air motor may also be used with appropriate modifications.
The diaphragm member 50 is formed of a nonmagnetic material for a purpose to be described herein later. The diaphragm member also constitutes a fluid seal to prevent fluid leakage between the first inside portion 22 and the second inside portion 28 of the chamber 20.
A first thrust button or washer 56 is mounted between the one end 49 of the drive shaft 48 and the diaphragm member 50. The washer abuts the diaphragm member 50 so as to prevent the one end 49 of the drive shaft 48 from rubbing against the diaphragm member and wearing through the diaphragm member.
An annular magnetic driving member 60 is mounted on the one end 49 of the drive shaft 48 adjacent to the first thrust washer 56. The magnetic driving member 60 is axially slidable on the shaft 48 by a plurality of flats 62 on the inside diameter of the magnetic driving member 60 and a plurality of cooperating flats 47 on the drive shaft 48. Thus, the magnetic driving member 60 may slide axially along the shaft 48 towards the diaphragm member 50 to compensate for production tolerances and wear of the first thrust washer 56 as required. The magnetic driving member 60 has an annular backing member 64 formed of suitable magnetic permeable material, preferably of steel. A permanent magnet 66, preferably a ceramic permanent magnet, is made into eight (8) poles and suitably mounted to the backing member 64 so as to be adjacent the first thrust washer 56 but spaced away from the diaphragm member 50. Thus, there is an air gap 65 between the diaphragm member and the annular magnetic driving member 60 which varies somewhat as the washer 58 wears away.
In the second inner portion 28 of the chamber 20 is mounted a pair of bearings 36, 38 which are suitably mounted to the housing 10. A driven shaft 78 is mounted in the bearings 36, 38. The first end 82 of the second or driven shaft 78 is mounted adjacent to the diaphragm member 50 on bearing 36 and the second end 84 of the second shaft 78 is mounted on bearing 38 adjacent to the opposite end 1 8 of the housing 10.
A second thrust button or washer 58 is mounted between the first end 82 of the driven shaft 78 and the diaphragm member 50. The second thrust button or washer abuts against the diaphragm member 50 so as to prevent the first end 82 of the second shaft 78 from rubbing through and wearing against the diaphragm member 50.
A magnetic driven member 70 is fixedly mounted on the second shaft 78 for rotation therewith. The magnetic driven member 70 has an annular backing member 74 formed of suitable magnetically permeable material, preferably of steel. A permanent magnet 76, preferably a ceramic permanent magnet, is made to have eight (8) poles and suitably mounted to the backing member 74 so as to be adjacent to the washer 58 but spaced away a predetermined distance to form a fixed air gap 75 from the diaphragm member 50. Those skilled in the art will recognize that any equal number of magnets may be used in the magnets 66, 76 respectively in order to provide a magnetic coupling between the magnetic driven member and the magnetic driving member.It is important, however, that one of the magnets 66 of the driving member 60 be aligned with the corresponding one of the magnets 76 on the driven member 70. This permits the driving member 60 and the driven member 70 to be coupled by the flux path emitted by the magnetic attractions of one of the magnets 66 through the air gap 65, through the diaphragm member 50, through the air gap 75 and then to one of the magnets 76. Thus, the magnets 66 are always aligned with the magnets 76 and thus, no slippage occurs between the driving and driven members when one is rotated relative to the other. Slippage between the magnets 66, 76 respectively occurs if a force overcomes the magnetic force therebetween such as in the event that the pump is prevented from rotation.
On the second shaft 78 adjacent the second end 84 is mounted a gerotor pump 90. The gerotor pump is made of an annular backplate member 86, an inlet annular member 89 and three (3) cooperating positive displacement members, that is, a male rotor gear 92, an annular female member 94 and an outer annular member 96 as is best shown in Figures 3 and 5.
The annular backplate member 86 is connected to the inside diameter of the second inner portion 28. The backplate member 86 has one face mounted adjacent to the driven member 70. The opposite face has two kidney shaped cavities 79, 80 formed one opposite the other therein for a purpose to be described later on herein. The second shaft 84 passes through the inside diameter of the backplate member. The three aforementioned cooperating members 92, 94 and 96 respectively are centrally mounted relative to the axis of the second shaft 84 so as to abut the annular backplate member 86. The male rotor gear 92 is concentrically and axially slidable and nonrotatably mounted on the second shaft. The annular female gear member 94 cooperatively engages the male rotor gear 92. The outer annular member 96 is mounted to the inside diameter 29 of the second inside portion 28 of the chamber 20.The inside diameter 97 of the outer annular member 96 is eccentric a predetermined radial distance D from the longitudinal axis 99 passing through the centre line of the outer diameter 98 of the outer annular member 96 for a purpose to be discussed later on herein.
The annular female gear member 94 has an outer diameter 95 which mounts within the inside diameter 97 of the outer annular member 96. The outer diameter 95 is formed so as to be undersized with the inside diameter 97 to provide a slight diametral clearance between the two members. This diametral clearance, formed between the two members, permits the female tooth member 94 to float in the outer annular member 96. The annular female gear member 94 has an inner annular tooth profile 93. The inner annular tooth profile is made with one more gear tooth than the teeth 91 on the male rotor gear 92.
The male rotor gear 92 rotates concentrically on the second or driven shaft 78. The teeth 91 on the male rotor gear 92 mesh with the inner annular tooth profile 93 of the female gear member so that both the male gear 92 and the female gear member 94 rotate in the same direction. The male gear 92, however, advances one tooth each revolution of rotation. As the female gear member rotates with the male gear member 92, the teeth mesh and demesh because of the eccentric radial distance D of the inner diameter 97 relative to the outer annular member 96.
The gerotor pump 90 is mounted between the annular backplate member 86 and an inlet member 89. The inlet member has two kidney shaped openings 87, 88 respectively serving as inlet and outlet openings to the housing 10. Each of the kidney shaped openings 87, 88 are in axial alignment with each of the kidney shaped cavities 79, 80 in the annular backplate member 86. The inlet member is slidably mounted to the inside diameter of the second inner portion of the housing 10, the inlet member is suitably mounted to the inside diameter of the second inner portion of the housing 10 so that the inlet member is prevented from rotation with the gerotor pump 90. One of the two kidney shaped openings 87 is positioned in the top half portion of the inlet member 89 and the second kidney shaped opening 88 is positioned in the lower half as is shown in Figure 4.In addition, the annular backplate member 86, the outer annular member 96 and the inlet member 89 are connected together by at least two pins 4 as is well known in the art to prevent relative movement therebetween.
As discussed earlier, the outer annular member 96 has an inside diameter 97 which is eccentric a distance D to the horizontal diametral axis 99 passing through the centre line of the diameter 98 as shown in Figure 5. The eccentric D is positioned along the diametral axis 99 which splits the upper half of the inlet member 85 from the lower half 83 of the inlet member 89.
An inlet port 2 is formed in an end plate member 14 mounted on the opposite end 1 8 of the housing 10 so as to connect the inlet kidney shaped opening 88 for flow communication thereto. Simiiarly, an outlet port 6 is formed in the end plate member 14 mounted on the opposite end 1 8 of the housing 10 so as to connect the outlet to kidney shaped opening 87 for flow communication thereto. When the gerotor pump 90 is rotated, the meshing and demeshing of the teeth causes the fluid to be pumped to be drawn into the volume between the rotor gear 92 and the female member 94. The inlet port 2 thus provides an inlet fluid passage which is connected by suitable conduit means to the fluid to be pumped (not shown).The outlet port 6 is connected by suitable conduit means to a receiver (not shown) which receives the pressurized fluid from the pump 100. A one way valve flow device 8, such as a conventional check valve, is provided to ensure one way fluid flow from the gerotor pump through the outlet port 6 and also to prevent bleed down when the pump 100 is deactivated.
The efficiency of any positive displacement pump such as herein described depends on the axial clearances of the members. In order to ensure minimum axial clearance between the three cooperating gerotor pump members 92, 94, and 96 respectively, the inlet member 89 is biased towards the gerotor pump. For this purpose, a pair of spaced apart cavities 72 are formed in the inlet member 89 adjacent to the opposite end 1 8 of the housing 1 0. In each cavity 72 is placed a resilient member 68 which in the preferred embodiment is a spring biasing member, such as a helical spring.
The resilient member 68 thus biases the inlet annular member toward the gerotor pump members 92, 94 and 96 and assures minimum axial clearance between the gerotor pump members 92, 94 and 96 respectively and the inlet annular member 89 and the backing plate member 86.
When the operation of the pump 100 is desired, the electric motor 40 is connected to the electric source (not shown).
When the motor rotates, fluid is drawn through the inlet port 2 which communicates with the inlet kidney shaped opening 88. Fluid is drawn into the female gear member 94 and the kidney shaped cavity 80 when the male rotor 92 meshes against the member 94 and, simultaneously, fluid is expelled from the annuls female gear member 94 and the kidney shaped cavity 79 through the outlet kidney shaped opening 87 and thence into the outlet port 6. The meshing action, which occurs upon rotation of the male rotor gear 92 coacting with the inner annular tooth profile 93 of the female gear member 94, creates a series of alternately expanding and contracting chambers therebetween. This action causes a positive fluid displacement when the pump is in fluid communication with the appropriate inlet and outlet ports.The conjugately generated tooth profiles of the male and female gear members are in continuous fluid contact during operation. Thus, upon one complete revolution of the inner member, the male rotor will have advanced one tooth with respect to the female gear member.
The volume of fluid displaced in one revolution is proportional to the size of the male rotor, the degree of offset D with respect to the female member and the thickness of the pump. Thus, the pump 100 provides good lift characteristics since fluid is drawn into the unmeshed space between members 92, 94 respectively, immediately upon relative rotation of the members 92, 94. The electrical power input through the contacts leading to the motor causes rotation of the magnetic driving member 60 through the cooperating flats 60, 47 on the drive shaft 48. As previously indicated, the magnetic driving member 60 has a sliding fit on the shaft 48 so that changes in axial location of the armature of the motor will not increase or decrease the rubbing pressure of the magnetic driving member 60 against the diaphragm 50.The magnetic forces of the magnetic driving member 60 are transmitted through the air gap 65, through the diaphragm member 50, through the air gap 75 and then to the magnetic driven member 70 which is freely rotatable on the shaft 78. The second thrust washer 58 prevents the driven shaft 78 from rubbing against the diaphragm 50. Thus, the driving member 60 causes the driven member 70 to rotate whenever the driving member is rotated by the rotor.
In the event that pressure develops in the outlet opening 87 of the pump to a greater degree than is desired, the inlet member 89 will move axially away from the gerotor pump members 92, 94 and 96. The member 89 moves axially away from members 92, 94 and 96 by pressing the biasing member 68 towards the opposite end 1 8 of the pump. As this occurs, the fluid being pumped is permitted to pass from the outlet kidney shaped opening 87 to the inlet kidney shaped opening 88 thereby relieving the pressure in the fluid. The degree of biasing member 68 can be varied to match the desired maximum outlet pressure that is to be generated by the pump 100.
Those skilled in the art will recognize that the pump described herein can be used to pump low and high viscosity fluids. Furthermore, the pump will stop pumping in the event that debris or some other foreign matter is drawn into the pump members 92 and 94 to prevent rotation of the gerotor pump 90.
While the invention has been described with the preferred embodiment, it should be understood that it is not intended to limit the invention to that embodiment. On the contrary, it is intended to cover all alternatives, modifications and equivalents which may be included within the scope of the invention as defined by the appended

Claims (14)

claims. CLAIMS
1. A fluid pump comprising a housing having a chamber, a diaphragm member fixedly mounted to the inside of said chamber and dividing the inside of said chamber into a first inside portion adjacent one end of the housing and a second inside portion adjacent an opposite end of the housing; a first shaft rotatably mounted in said first inside portion of said chamber and having motor means fixedly mounted thereon, a second shaft rotatably mounted in said second inside portion of said chamber: magnetic driving means slidably and nonrctatably mounted on said first shaft adjacent to said diaphragm member; magnetic drive means, mounted on said second shaft adjacent to but spaced axially away from said diaphragm member, for rotation with said magnetic driving means in response to a force of attraction which is exerted between said magnetic driving means and said magnetic driven means; and gerotor pump means, mounted on said second shaft, for pumping fluid when said second shaft is rotated
2.A fluid pump as claimed in claim 1, wherein said gerotor pump means comprises an annular backplate member fixedly mounted within said second inside portion of said chamber, said annular backplate member having one face adjacent said-magnetic driven member and an opposite face, an inlet member mounted within said second inside portion of said chamber adjacent said opposite end of said housing; and positive displacement means, interposed between said annular backplate member and said inlet annular member, for positively displacing fluid in response to the rotation of said second shaft to cause fluid flow thereby.
3. A fluid pump as claimed in claim 2, wherein said positive displacement means further comprises a male rotor gear fixedly mounted to said second shaft for rotation therewith, an annular female gear member co-operatively engaging said male rotor gear, and an outer annular member disposed about said annular female gear member.
4. A fluid pump as claimed in claim 3, wherein said outer annular member has an inside diameter and an outside diameter, said inside diameter being eccentric a predetermined radial distance from the longitudinal axis passing through said outer diameter
5. A fluid pump as claimed in any one of claims 2-4, wherein said annular backplate member is pinned to said outer annular member and said inlet annular member to prevent relative angular movement of said annular backplate member to said outer annular member to said inlet annular member.
6. A fluid pump as claimed in any one of the preceding claims, further comprising: an inlet port at said opposite end of said housing, said inlet port being fluidly connected to said gerotor pump means for supplying fluid thereto.
7. A fluid pump as claimed in any one of the preceding claims, further comprising: an outlet port at said opposite end of said housing and adjacent but spaced away from said inlet port, said outlet port being fluidly connected to said gerotor pump means for receiving fluid therefrom.
8. A fluid pump as claimed in claim 2, wherein said opposite face of said annular backplate member has portions defining a pair of oppositely spaced apart kidney shaped cavities.
9. A fluid pump as claimed in claim 2, wherein said inlet annular member has a first face adjacent said opposite end of said housing and a second face opposite said first face, said second face having portions defining a pair of oppositely spaced apart kidney shaped openings therein.
10. A fluid pump as claimed in claim 2, further comprising means, interposed between said opposite end of said housing and said inlet annular member, for biasing said inlet annular member towards said positive displacement means and said annular backing plate member to reduce the axial clearance therebetween.
11. A fluid pump as claimed in claim 7, wherein said outlet port has check valve means mounted therein for preventing fluid flow to said gerotor pump means.
12. A fluid pump as claimed in any one of the preceding claims, wherein each of said magnetic driving and driven means comprises an annular member and a plurality of wedge-shaped magnets mounted on an end portion of said annular member, each of said plurality of wedge-shaped magnets having a north pole portion and a south pole portion, one of each of said magnets further being mounted adjacent but spaced away from another of each of said magnets with a radial air gap therebetween, said north pole portion of one of each of said magnets further being mounted adjacent to said south pole portion of another of each of said magnets.
13. A fluid pump as claimed in any one of the preceding claims, wherein said motor means is electric motor means.
14. A fluid pump substantially as hereinbefore described with reference to and as shown in the accompanying drawings.
GB08221220A 1981-07-23 1982-07-22 A rotary fuel pump Expired GB2103717B (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US28590881A true 1981-07-23 1981-07-23

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
GB2103717A true GB2103717A (en) 1983-02-23
GB2103717B GB2103717B (en) 1985-01-16

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Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
GB08221220A Expired GB2103717B (en) 1981-07-23 1982-07-22 A rotary fuel pump

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JP (1) JPS5827894A (en)
AU (1) AU547523B2 (en)
CA (1) CA1187332A (en)
DE (1) DE3223236A1 (en)
FR (1) FR2510204A1 (en)
GB (1) GB2103717B (en)

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB2158154A (en) * 1984-04-25 1985-11-06 Facet Enterprises Rotary fuel-pump for an I.C. engine
WO1998042985A1 (en) * 1997-03-24 1998-10-01 A/S De Smithske Gear pump with magnetic coupling
CN104074740A (en) * 2014-07-09 2014-10-01 瑞安市奔达汽车配件有限公司 Magnetic coupling driven electric fuel oil pump

Families Citing this family (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB2157766B (en) * 1984-04-25 1988-01-20 Facet Enterprises Rotary fuel-pump for an i.c.engine
AUPN871096A0 (en) * 1996-03-15 1996-04-18 Martin, William Wesley Vane pump magnetic drive
EP1803938A1 (en) 2005-12-27 2007-07-04 Techspace Aero S.A. High integrated pump unit with electric motor
DE102016012252A1 (en) * 2016-07-13 2018-01-18 Schwarzer Precision GmbH & Co. KG Pump assembly for a pump, pump and method for reducing or eliminating noise and / or vibration in pumps

Family Cites Families (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FR1098815A (en) * 1953-07-15 1955-08-22 Hobourn Eaton Mfg Co Ltd Rotary pump with geared toothed rotors and end plate with differentiated zones
US2996994A (en) * 1955-06-09 1961-08-22 Tokheim Corp Motor-pump apparatus
US2909124A (en) * 1956-03-13 1959-10-20 Maisch Oliver Rotary pump
US3034448A (en) * 1959-05-19 1962-05-15 Robert W Brundage Hydraulic pump
US3470824A (en) * 1968-09-12 1969-10-07 Walbro Corp Magnetic drive pump
US3986797A (en) * 1974-05-20 1976-10-19 David Kopf Systems Magnetic pump
US4065235A (en) * 1976-06-01 1977-12-27 Tuthill Pump Company Gear pump
DE2834735A1 (en) * 1978-08-08 1980-02-14 Buehl Volks Raiffeisenbank LIQUID PUMP, ESPECIALLY FOR LIQUIDS OF LOW VISCOSITY, LIKE WATER, ALCOHOLS AND THE LIKE

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB2158154A (en) * 1984-04-25 1985-11-06 Facet Enterprises Rotary fuel-pump for an I.C. engine
WO1998042985A1 (en) * 1997-03-24 1998-10-01 A/S De Smithske Gear pump with magnetic coupling
CN104074740A (en) * 2014-07-09 2014-10-01 瑞安市奔达汽车配件有限公司 Magnetic coupling driven electric fuel oil pump

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
AU8497482A (en) 1983-01-27
DE3223236A1 (en) 1983-02-10
CA1187332A (en) 1985-05-21
JPS5827894A (en) 1983-02-18
AU547523B2 (en) 1985-10-24
GB2103717B (en) 1985-01-16
FR2510204A1 (en) 1983-01-28

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