CA2785103A1 - Method for treating a stained fabric - Google Patents

Method for treating a stained fabric Download PDF

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Publication number
CA2785103A1
CA2785103A1 CA 2785103 CA2785103A CA2785103A1 CA 2785103 A1 CA2785103 A1 CA 2785103A1 CA 2785103 CA2785103 CA 2785103 CA 2785103 A CA2785103 A CA 2785103A CA 2785103 A1 CA2785103 A1 CA 2785103A1
Authority
CA
Canada
Prior art keywords
contact substrate
treatment fluid
stain treatment
stain
method according
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
CA 2785103
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Janet Sue Littig
Morgan Thomas Leahy
Kuang-Kai Liu
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Procter and Gamble Co
Original Assignee
Procter and Gamble Co
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US29494510P priority Critical
Priority to US61/294,945 priority
Application filed by Procter and Gamble Co filed Critical Procter and Gamble Co
Priority to PCT/US2011/021081 priority patent/WO2011088176A1/en
Publication of CA2785103A1 publication Critical patent/CA2785103A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

Links

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D75/00Packages comprising articles or materials partially or wholly enclosed in strips, sheets, blanks, tubes, or webs of flexible sheet material, e.g. in folded wrappers
    • B65D75/52Details
    • B65D75/58Opening or contents-removing devices added or incorporated during package manufacture
    • B65D75/5827Tear-lines provided in a wall portion
    • B65D75/585Tear-lines provided in a wall portion the tear-lines being broken by deformation or bending
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D75/00Packages comprising articles or materials partially or wholly enclosed in strips, sheets, blanks, tubes, or webs of flexible sheet material, e.g. in folded wrappers
    • B65D75/28Articles or materials wholly enclosed in composite wrappers, i.e. wrappers formed by associating or interconnecting two or more sheets or blanks
    • B65D75/30Articles or materials enclosed between two opposed sheets or blanks having their margins united, e.g. by pressure-sensitive adhesive, crimping, heat-sealing, or welding
    • B65D75/32Articles or materials enclosed between two opposed sheets or blanks having their margins united, e.g. by pressure-sensitive adhesive, crimping, heat-sealing, or welding one or both sheets or blanks being recessed to accommodate contents
    • B65D75/36Articles or materials enclosed between two opposed sheets or blanks having their margins united, e.g. by pressure-sensitive adhesive, crimping, heat-sealing, or welding one or both sheets or blanks being recessed to accommodate contents one sheet or blank being recessed and the other formed of relatively stiff flat sheet material, e.g. blister packages, the recess or recesses being preformed
    • B65D75/366Articles or materials enclosed between two opposed sheets or blanks having their margins united, e.g. by pressure-sensitive adhesive, crimping, heat-sealing, or welding one or both sheets or blanks being recessed to accommodate contents one sheet or blank being recessed and the other formed of relatively stiff flat sheet material, e.g. blister packages, the recess or recesses being preformed and forming one compartment
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C11ANIMAL OR VEGETABLE OILS, FATS, FATTY SUBSTANCES OR WAXES; FATTY ACIDS THEREFROM; DETERGENTS; CANDLES
    • C11DDETERGENT COMPOSITIONS; USE OF SINGLE SUBSTANCES AS DETERGENTS; SOAP OR SOAP-MAKING; RESIN SOAPS; RECOVERY OF GLYCEROL
    • C11D17/00Detergent materials characterised by their shape or physical properties
    • C11D17/04Detergent materials characterised by their shape or physical properties combined with or containing other objects
    • C11D17/041Compositions releasably affixed on a substrate or incorporated into a dispensing means
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C11ANIMAL OR VEGETABLE OILS, FATS, FATTY SUBSTANCES OR WAXES; FATTY ACIDS THEREFROM; DETERGENTS; CANDLES
    • C11DDETERGENT COMPOSITIONS; USE OF SINGLE SUBSTANCES AS DETERGENTS; SOAP OR SOAP-MAKING; RESIN SOAPS; RECOVERY OF GLYCEROL
    • C11D17/00Detergent materials characterised by their shape or physical properties
    • C11D17/04Detergent materials characterised by their shape or physical properties combined with or containing other objects
    • C11D17/049Cleaning or scouring pads; Wipes
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D2575/00Packages comprising articles or materials partially or wholly enclosed in strips, sheets, blanks, tubes or webs of flexible sheet material, e.g. in folded wrappers
    • B65D2575/28Articles or materials wholly enclosed in composite wrappers, i.e. wrappers formed by associationg or interconnecting two or more sheets or blankes
    • B65D2575/30Articles or materials enclosed between two opposed sheets or blanks having their margins united, e.g. by pressure-sensitive adhesive, crimping, heat-sealing, or welding
    • B65D2575/36One sheet or blank being recessed and the other formed or relatively stiff flat sheet material, e.g. blister packages
    • B65D2575/361Details
    • B65D2575/362Details with special means for gaining access to the contents
    • B65D2575/367Details with special means for gaining access to the contents through a preformed opening in the flat sheet, e.g. the opening being defined by weakened lines

Abstract

A method for treating stained fabric. The method includes the step of providing a contact substrate containing a stain treatment fluid. The contact substrate comprising micro fibers having a diameter less than about 5 micrometers. The stain treatment fluid including a surfactant.

Description

METHOD FOR TREATING A STAINED FABRIC

FIELD OF THE INVENTION
Treating stains in clothing.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
Many consumers experience a stain on their clothing when they are away from home, such as might occur when dining out before a theater engagement. Appearing in public with a clothing stain can be embarrassing to the wearer. If such a stain were to occur at home, the wearer could choose another garment or might be able to effectively treat the stain with a stain treatment system. When away from her house, her options may be limited.
There are presently stain treatment systems, such as pens and wipes, that release a stain treatment fluid and can be used to scrub a stain. The pens tend to be shaped like ordinary drawing markers, the bulkiness of which might drive some consumers to only carry such a pen when they are carrying a purse. However, if the consumer does not often carry a purse, they are vulnerable to a stain occurring when they are without a stain treatment system.
If the consumer carries a wipe for treating stains, the consumer can grasp the wipe and scrub the stain. The wipes can contain a formulation of color safe bleaches and surfactants.
Some of these formulations can have an odor that the consumer might not like.
By handling the wipe, such odor may be imparted to the consumer's skin, which might conflict with a perfume the wearer has donned. Further, some consumers might not like the feeling of grasping a wet wipe that might have a soapy feel.
One approach to stain treatment is to consider the discrete characteristics of the stain and identify and effective treatment strategy for each element. For example, one approach is to remove what can be removed and bleach what cannot be removed. Removing stains, particularly greasy stains, from fabrics can be challenging. Applying a surfactant to the stain can help with treating greasy stains. A surfactant that is stored in the interstitial spaces between fibers of a fibrous web can be delivered to a fabric when the consumer applies pressure to the fibrous web while scrubbing the stain. Alternatively, a surfactant can be delivered to the fabric through a pen type arrangement in which the head of the pen is pushed into the pen to release a stain treatment fluid. To help the stain be released from the fabric, a scraper, fibrous web, or brush can be used to dislodge the stain. Developers of this approach have sought to improve efficacy by optimizing the stain treatment fluid.
With these limitations in mind, there is a continuing unaddressed need for a compact, convenient to carry, stain treatment apparatus.
Further, there is a continuing unaddressed need for a stain treatment system that allows the consumer to use the stain treatment apparatus without having the stain treatment fluid contact her hand.
Further, there is a continuing unaddressed need for a stain treatment system in which the portion of the implement that helps to deliver a stain treatment fluid to a stain can also help with moving the stain from the fabric to at least a portion of the stain treatment system.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
A method for treating a stained fabric comprising the steps of: providing a contact substrate containing a stain treatment fluid, the contact substrate comprising micro fibers having a diameter less than about 5 micrometers; contacting the contact substrate with the stained fabric thereby transferring the stain treatment fluid to the stained fabric; and rubbing the stained fabric with the contact substrate. The stain treatment fluid can comprise from 0.001%
to about 99.99%, by weight of the stain treatment fluid, of a surfactant.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
FIG. 1 is a schematic of a cut-away perspective view of a package for treating a stained fabric, the package being in the first position.
FIG. 2 is a schematic of a cross section view of the package for treating a stained fabric, as indicated in FIG. 1.
FIG. 3 is a schematic of a bottom perspective view of the package for treating a stained fabric illustrated in FIG. 1, first side 40 being presented to the viewer.
FIG. 4 is a schematic of a package for treating a stained fabric, the package being in the second position.
FIG. 5 is a schematic of a package for treating a stained fabric, the package being in the second position.
FIG. 6 is a schematic of a side view of a package for treating a stained fabric.
FIG. 7 is a package for treating a stained fabric, the package being illustrated in a second position.

FIG. 8 is a package for treating a stained fabric, the package being illustrated in a second position.
FIG. 9 is a schematic of a side view of a package for treating a stained fabric.
FIG. 10 is a schematic of a side view of a package for treating a stained fabric.
FIG. 11 is an embodiment of the package in which the package is devoid of a contact substrate.
FIG. 12 is a cutaway perspective of an alternate embodiment of the package that provides for a package that can dispense a first stain treatment fluid and a second stain treatment fluid.
FIG. 13 is a schematic of a package covered by a removable protectant.
FIG. 14 is a schematic of another embodiment of a package covered by a removable protectant.
FIG. 15 is an illustration of the part of a Hansen space spherical volume having Hansen solubility parameters that are positive, with 8H and 8p presented to the viewer.
FIG. 16 is an illustration of the part of a Hansen space spherical volume having Hansen solubility parameters that are positive, with 8D and 8p presented to the viewer.

FIG. 17 is graph of taco grease absorption (g/g) versus relative energy difference between each contact substrate tested and the taco grease tested.
FIG. 18 is a graph illustrating the locations of the Hansen solubility parameters for the contact substrates tested in Hansen space On and 8p axes presented).

FIG. 19 is a graph illustrating the locations of the Hansen solubility parameters for the contact substrates tested in Hansen space (8D and 8p axes presented).

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
As used herein the term "joined" refers to the condition where a first member is attached, or connected, to a second member either directly; or indirectly, where the first member is attached, or connected, to an intermediate member which in turn is attached, or connected, to the second member either directly; or indirectly.
A cutaway view of a package 10 for treating a stain in a fabric is shown in FIG. 1. The package 10 may have any generally planar shape including a rectangle, a square, a circle, an oval, a triangle, a pentagon, a hexagon, a trapezoid, or any other ergonomically preferred shape. A
planar shape of the package 10 can provide for a package 10 that is convenient to store and is easy to securely grip prior to and during use. The package 10 can have a length direction L and a width direction W in plane with the backing layer 20 and a Z direction orthogonal to the length direction L and width direction W. The dimensions of the package 10 can be such that in the length direction L and width direction W, the package has the planar dimensions of, or smaller than, a common wallet sized credit card or wallet sized photograph.
The package 10 can have a backing layer 20. Backing layer 20 can be made of any suitably stiff material including thin plastic materials such as polystyrene, polyethylene, polypropylene, or other polymeric material. Backing layer 20 can be sufficiently stiff to maintain package 10 in a substantially flat configuration during storage and transport.
In some embodiments, the package 10 is sized and dimensioned to fit conveniently in a person's wallet, purse, diaper bag, or pocket.
The backing layer 20 has a first side 40 opposing a second side 30, the first side being towards the bottom of the package 10. The backing layer 20 can have a line of weakness 130.
The first side 40 of the backing layer 20 can have a line of weakness 130. The line of weakness 130 can permit the backing layer 20 to break along the line of weakness 130 when the backing layer 20 is subjected to a sufficient bending moment. The backing layer 20 can have a first elastic limit.
The line of weakness 130 can be any number of structures that provide for a controlled break in the backing layer 20 when a sufficient bending moment is applied about the line of weakness 130. The line of weakness 130 can be selected from the group consisting of a score, a frangible portion, perforations, a slit, an aperture, and combination thereof.
When the package 10 is in a pre-use condition, the structure of the backing layer 20 can have structural integrity across the line of weakness 130. A score can be a scratch, groove, compressed portion, or other structure that structurally weakens the backing layer 20. A frangible portion can be a series of scratches or compressed portions that structurally weaken the backing layer 20 to make a line of weakness 130 that is controllably rupturable when strained. The line of weakness 130 can be a perforation or series of perforations in the backing layer 20. The perforation or series of perforations can be formed by puncturing the backing layer 20 to form the perforation or series of perforations. The line of weakness 130 can be an aperture formed by selectively removing material from the backing layer 20. The line of weakness 130 can be a slit that is formed by cutting the backing layer 20. In use, as the backing layer 20 is folded upon itself about the line of weakness 130, the line of weakness 130 can rupture.
The magnitude of the bending moment needed to rupture the line of weakness can be controlled, for instance, by the depth of the score, spacing of the perforations, dimension of the aperture, dimension of the slit, whichever such structure, or other structure, is employed if such structures are employed. If a score is employed, the score can penetrate into the backing layer 20 by about 8% to about 10% of the thickness of the backing layer 20, the thickness being measured in the Z direction. A score, if employed, can penetrate into the backing layer 20 by less than about 15% of the thickness of the backing layer 20.
The line of weakness 130 can extend between the edges of the backing layer 20, as shown in FIG. 1. The line of weakness 130 can partially extend between the edges of the backing layer 20.
The backing layer 20 can be a material selected from the group consisting of rigid styrene, foil, BAREX (available from BP Chemicals Inc., Naperville, IL, USA), polyethylene, nylon, polypropylene, and coextrudants and laminates of any of the preceding substances, and combinations thereof. The thickness of the backing layer 20 can be less than about 2 mm, can possibly be less than about 1 mm, and possibly be about 0.1 mm to about 0.5 mm. The backing layer can have a length between about 3 cm to about 10 cm and a width between about 2 cm to about 6 cm. A larger backing layer 20 might be employed for package 10 designed for use at home. The backing layer 20 can be a laminate of a 0.381 mm thick layer of high impact styrene, 0.019 mm thick layer low density polyethylene and 0.0122 thick layer of coated polyester film.
available from Glenroy, Inc., Menomonee Falls, WI, USA, with the coated polyester film oriented towards the outside of the package 10.
The package 10 can have a contact substrate 200 joined to the first side 40 of the backing layer 20 proximal the line of weakness 130. The contact substrate 200 can be forced into contact with the fabric to be treated during use of the package 10. The bottom of the package 10 is considered to be the side of the package 10 oriented, in use, towards the fabric to be treated.
A coating layer 50 can be joined to and facing the second side 30. The coating layer 50 can be polymer film and have a second elastic limit. The second elastic limit can be greater than the first elastic limit. In other words, the strain to break of the backing layer 20 can be less than the strain to break of the coating layer 50. The coating layer 50 can be a coextruded film, one layer being a barrier layer, such as ethanol vinyl alcohol film, oriented towards the backing layer 20 and the other layer being a linear low density polyethylene film. The coating layer 50 can be a coextruded film, one layer being a barrier layer, such as polyvinyl alcohol film (possibly EVA
film which is a copolymer of ethylene and vinyl acetate), oriented towards the backing layer 20 and the other layer being a linear low density polyethylene film. The coating layer 50 can be a 0.0508 mm thick layer of high strength polyethylene film available from Glenroy, Inc., Menomonee Falls, WI, USA. The coating layer 50 can be a laminate of a 0.0508 mm thick layer of high strength polyethylene film and a 0.019 mm thick layer of medium density polyethylene film available from Glenroy, Inc., Menomonee Falls, WI, USA, the coating layer 50 oriented such that the medium density polyethylene layer is oriented towards the backing layer 20.
The coating layer 50 can have a transmitting portion 60. The transmitting portion 60 can be substantially aligned with the line of weakness 130 in backing layer 20.
The transmitting portion 60 can be any number of structures that provide for a metering opening through the coating layer 50 when the package 20 is in use. The transmitting portion 60 can be selected from the group consisting of a score, a frangible portion, perforations, a slit, an aperture, and combination thereof. When the package 10 is in a pre-use condition, the transmitting portion 60 can be liquid impervious. A score can be a scratch, groove, or compressed portion that structurally weakens the coating layer 50. A frangible portion can be a series of scratches or compressed portions that structurally weaken the coating layer to make the transmitting portion 60 rupturable when strained. The transmitting portion 60 can be a perforation or series of perforations wherein the coating layer 50 is punctured to create the perforation or series of perforations. The transmitting portion 60 can be an aperture formed by selectively removing material from the coating layer 50. The transmitting portion 60 can be a slit that is formed by cutting or tearing the coating layer 50. The coating layer can have one or more transmitting portions 60. For instance, there can be at least one, at least two, at least three, or more, transmitting portions 60 in the coating layer 50. A plurality of transmitting portions 60 can be practical for providing wider distribution of the stain treatment fluid 300 to the contact substrate 200. A line of weakness 130 can be provided on the first side 40 of backing layer 20, second side 30 of backing layer 20, on both the first side 40 and second side 30 of backing layer 20. A line of weakness 130 can be a physical and/or chemical discontinuity internal to the structure of the backing layer 20 or on a surface of the backing layer 20.

The peripheral edges of the coating layer 50 can be joined to the backing layer 20. The coating layer 50 can be substantially continuously joined to the backing layer 20 in that more than about 75% of the surface of the portion of coating layer 50 facing the second side 30 of backing layer 20 is joined to the second side 30 of backing layer 20. The entire surface of the portion of the coating layer 50 facing the second side 30 of backing layer 20 can be joined to the second side of the backing layer 20.
The package 10 can comprise a pouch layer 70 joined with the coating layer 50 to form a pouch 80 there between, the pouch 80 being defined by the enclosed volume between the pouch layer 70 and the coating layer 50. The pouch layer 70 can be joined directly to the backing layer 20 to forma a pouch there between. The pouch 80 can contain a stain treatment fluid 300. The pouch layer 70 can be heat sealed to the coating layer 50. The pouch layer 70 can be joined to the coating layer 50 using any known approach for attaching two materials including, but not limited to, adhesive, glue, ultrasonic bonding, chemical bonding, thermal bonding, and fusion bonding.
The pouch layer 70 can be a blown film or cast film. The pouch layer 70 can be liquid impervious and can be durable enough to prevent penetration or rupture of the pouch layer 70.
The pouch layer 70 and coating layer 50 can also be chemically compatible with the stain treatment fluid 300 contained within the pouch 80. That is, the coating layer 50 and pouch layer 70 can be substantially inert to the stain treatment fluid 300 contained therein and the external environment for a duration sufficiently long to provide for chemical and mechanical stability from the time when the package is manufactured to the time when the package 10 is used to treat a stain. The pouch 80 can contain a volume of stain treatment fluid 300.
The pouch layer 70 can be a single layer or a laminate of multiple layers. The pouch layer 70 can comprise foil. The pouch layer 70 can be a layer of 12 m thick sheet material, an adhesive layer, and a layer of 0.06 mm thick linear low density polyethylene.
The pouch layer 70 can be white. The pouch layer 70 can be printed or otherwise labeled with a design, instruction on use, or decorative feature. The pouch layer 70 can be clear. The pouch layer 70 can be a layer of 12 m thick metalized polyethylene terephthalate sheet material, an adhesive layer, and a layer of linear low density polyethylene. The pouch layer 70 can be a layer of 12 m thick silver or aluminum foil, an adhesive, a 0.009 mm thick silver or aluminum foil, and a 0.05 mm linear low density polyethylene sheet material. The pouch layer 70 can be a laminate of a 0.058 mm thick layer of high strength polyethylene film, a 0.0191 mm thick layer of chemically resistant film (CRC-1), a 0.007 mm thick layer of foil, a 0.0191 mm thick layer of low density polyethylene film, and a 0.0122 mm thick layer of coated polyester available from Glenroy, Inc., Menomonee Falls, WI, USA, the pouch layer 70 oriented such that the layer of coated polyester is oriented away from said backing layer 20.
In one embodiment, the pouch layer 70 can be joined with the backing layer 20 to form a pouch 80 there between. The pouch layer 70 can be joined to the backing layer 20 by using any known approach for attaching two materials including, but not limited to, adhesive, glue, ultrasonic bonding, chemical bonding, thermal bonding, and fusion bonding.
A cross section of the package 10 illustrated in FIG. 1 is shown in FIG. 2. As shown in FIG. 2, the second side 30 of backing layer 20 has a first planar region 22 and a second planar region 24 on opposing sides of the line of weakness 130. As shown in FIG. 2, the transmitting portion 60 can be substantially aligned with the line of weakness 130. When the backing layer 20 is broken, pouch 80 is in fluid communication with the contact substrate 200, the stain treatment fluid 300 flowing through the transmitting portion 60 and break in the backing layer 20 proximal the line of weakness 130 into the contact substrate 200. The coating layer 50 can be coextensive with the backing layer 20 or within the periphery of the backing layer 20. The coating layer 50 can be at least coextensive with the periphery of the backing layer 20.
A bottom view of a package 10 is illustrated in FIG. 3. As shown in FIG. 3, the line of weakness 130 can be at least partially spatially aligned with the contact substrate 200 so that when the backing layer 20 is broken, stain treatment fluid 300 from within the pouch 80 can be transported through the break in the backing layer 20 into the contact substrate 200. As shown in FIG. 3, the line of weakness can partially extend between edges of the backing layer 20.
The package 10 can have a first position in which the first planar region 22 and second planar region 24 of the backing layer 20 are substantially in plane with one another. As shown in FIG. 4, the package 10 can be transitioned into a second position in which the first planar region 22 and second planar region 24 are in a substantially angularly facing relationship. By substantially angularly facing relationship it is meant that the first planar region 22 and the second planar region 24 are disposed with respect to one another at an interior angle (3 of less than about 90 degrees, the interior angle (3 being measured between the first planar region 22 and the second planar region 24 on the second side 30 of the backing layer 20.
In the first position, at least a portion of the first planar region 22 and the second planar region 24 can be integral with one another. The backing layer 20 can be at least partially intact across the line of weakness 130. In the second position at least a portion of the backing layer 20 can be discontinuous across the line of weakness 130. In the second position, the backing layer 20 can be broken at, proximal to, or along the line of weakness 130 so that the pouch 80 is in fluid communication with the contact substrate 200.
When the package 10 is in the first position, the package 10 can conveniently be carried in a pocket, a pocket of a wallet, pocket of a purse, or an auto glove compartment. The generally flat nature of the package 10 provides for a profile that is not bulky and can be stored conveniently.
As shown in FIG. 4, in the second position, the transmitting portion 60 can be fluid pervious. The transmitting portion 60 can be fluid pervious, for instance, as a result of a slit in the coating layer 50. As shown in FIG. 4, the transmitting portion 60 can be a slit that can be slightly stretched open. In the second position, the first planar region 22 and the second planar region 24 can be disposed at an interior angle (3 of less than about 45 degrees, measured between the first planer region 22 and the second planar region 24. The transmitting portion 60 can have a variety of embodiments that provide for fluid communication through the coating layer 50. In the second position, the first planar region 22 and the second planar region 24 can be disposed at an interior angle (3 of less than about 10 degrees, alternatively at an interior angle (3 of less than about 5 degrees, alternatively at an interior angle (3 of less than about 1 degree. In the second position, the first planar region 22 and the second planar region 24 can be disposed at an interior angle (3 between about zero degrees and about 5 degrees.

In the second position, the pouch 80 can be folded upon itself and pressure applied through the first planar region 22 and the second planar region 24 can extrude out the stain treatment fluid 300 contained within the pouch 80. As the first planar region 22 and second planar region 24 are brought in closer angular facing relationship, more of the stain treatment fluid 300 contained within the pouch 80 can be expressed or extruded. Once a significant squeezing force is applied by the user, the first planar region 22 and second planar region 24 can be pressed towards one another driving out stain treatment fluid 300 from the pouch 80, through the transmitting portion 60 and into the contact substrate 200. The backing layer 20 folded upon itself can provide for a convenient gripping structure for the user of the package 10 to grasp as she rubs the contact substrate 200, if present, back and forth across the stain on the fabric being treated.
In the second position, the gripping structure provided by the backing layer 20 folded upon itself can allow the consumer to effectively use the package 10 to treat a stain, without having her hand contact the stain treatment fluid 300 or contact substrate 200. Further, such gripping structure can provide for a sturdy structure that the consumer can rub back and forth vigorously, thereby rubbing the contact substrate 200 or edges of the broken backing layer 20, if a contact substrate is not present, against the stain.

The second elastic limit of the coating layer 50 can be greater than the first elastic limit of the backing layer 20. Such a design can provide for a mechanical arrangement in which when the coating layer 50 and backing layer 20 joined together are strained, the backing layer 20 can break before the coating layer 50. Such an arrangement can be desirable because once the backing layer breaks, the coating layer 50 can provide for maintaining the structural integrity of the package 10 and the transmitting portion 60 of the coating layer 50 can be remain bounded by coating layer 50 such that stain treatment fluid 300 can be metered through the transmitting portion 60. The transmitting portion 60 can have a shape that provides for controlled fluid flow there through.
A stained fabric employing the package 10 can be treated by bending the backing layer 20 about the line of weakness 130 to move the first planar region 22 and the second planar region 24 into a substantially facing relationship, thereby making a portion of the backing layer to be discontinuous across the line of weakness 130. As the first planar region 22 and the second planar region 24 are pressed towards one another by the user, the stain treatment fluid 300 is dispensed to the contact substrate 200 through the portion of the backing layer 20 that is discontinuous across the line of weakness 130. The backing layer 20 is gripped, for instance in a manner similar to that shown in FIG. 5, and the user rubs the stained fabric with the contact substrate 200.
To allow more of the contact substrate 200 to contact the stained fabric, the contact substrate 200 can be joined to the backing layer 20 by one or more hinges 100, as shown in FIG.
6. By employing a hinged arrangement, the contact substrate can remain relatively flat even as the backing layer 20 is bent or folded about the line of weakness 130. Each hinge 100 can be formed from a flexible material that allows a variable distance to be defined between the backing layer 20 and the contact substrate 200. Each hinge 100 can be joined in part to the first side 40 and joined in part to the contact substrate 200. When the backing layer 20 is in a planar condition prior to being used to treat a stain, each hinge 100 can be closed, for example by a single bend or multiple folds in the relevant hinge 100. When each hinge 100 is closed, the contact substrate 200 can be in facing relationship with the backing layer 20, which can provide for a compact package 10. Each hinge 100 can be constructed from a piece of flexible material that is folded upon itself to have a nearly planar shape before the package is transitioned from the first position to the second position.
When the backing layer 20 is broken and package 10 is transitioned from the first position to the second position by bringing the first planar region 22 and the second planar region 24 into a substantially angularly facing relationship, each hinge 100 can open to provide for a portion the contact substrate 200 to be spaced apart from the backing layer, as shown in FIG. 7. When the package is in the second position, each hinge 100 can have a generally "U" or "V" shape in cross-section, as shown in FIG. 7. Such an arrangement can provide for a conduit to direct stain treatment fluid 300 from the pouch 80 to the contact substrate 200 with limited accumulation of the stain treatment fluid 300 in other components of the package 10. Each hinge 100 can be considered to have two legs, one of which is joined to the backing layer 20 and one of which is joined to the contact substrate 200. The legs of each hinge 100 joined to the contact substrate 200 can be substantially coextensive with contact substrate 200 in that more than about 90% of the side of the contact substrate 200 facing the backing layer is joined to a hinge 100. A leg of each hinge 100 can be joined to the contact substrate 200 or the backing layer 20 using any known approach for attaching two materials including, but not limited to, adhesive, glue, ultrasonic bonding, thermal bonding, and fusion bonding. To provide for a more durable package 10, the approach for joining each hinge 100 can be chemically compatible with the stain treatment fluid 300. Each hinge 100 can be a polypropylene based tape such as 3M 3560, available from 3M.
Each hinge 100 can be an integral extension of the contact substrate 200 and comprise the same constitutive material as the contact substrate 200, as illustrated in FIG. 8. Such arrangement might provide for ease of manufacture by reducing the number parts that must be assembled to form the package 10.
A foundation layer 110 can be joined to the contact substrate 200 and the backing layer 20, as shown in FIG. 9, such that the foundation layer 110 is between the contact substrate 200 and the backing layer 20 and the hinges 100, if present, are joined to the foundation layer 110.
The foundation layer 110 can provide for enhanced structural stability of the package 10 when the contact substrate 200 is vigorously rubbed against a stained fabric. The foundation layer 110 can be, for example, a web of fluid permeable material, or material rendered to be selectively fluid permeable proximal the line of weakness 130, that is about coextensive with or laterally within the contact substrate 200 in the length direction L and width direction W. The foundation layer 110 can be a web of fluid permeable material that is coextensive with the contact substrate 200 in the length direction L and width direction W.
The foundation layer 110 can be joined to the backing layer 20 through each hinge 100 using any known approaches for joining two materials, including, but not limited to, adhesive, glue, ultrasonic bonding, thermal bonding, chemical bonding, and fusion bonding. Similarly, the foundation layer 110 can be directly joined to the contact substrate 200 using any known approaches for joining two materials, including, but not limited to, adhesive, glue, ultrasonic bonding, thermal bonding, chemical bonding, and fusion bonding. The foundation layer 110 can be joined to the contact substrate 200 through one or more intermediate layers. The foundation layer 110 can be a web of material selected from the group consisting of a porous film, a slit film, an apertured film, a nonwoven, a woven, and combinations thereof. The foundation layer 110 can be a polyethylene based material such as DELNET AC 530-NAT-E, high density polyethylene based substrate, having a basis weight of 18 g/m2, and 0.12 mm thick, available from DelStar Technologies, Inc.
In some embodiments, a distribution layer 120 can be disposed in facing relationship with the contact substrate 200 and between the backing layer 20 and the contact substrate 200, for example, as shown in FIG. 10. The distribution layer 120 can provide for extensive distribution in the length direction L and width direction W of the stain treatment fluid 300 into and/or through the contact substrate 200. To promote delivery of the stain treatment fluid 300 to the fabric being treated, the distribution layer 120 can have a free absorbent capacity that is less than the volume of stain treatment fluid 300 contained in the pouch 80. The distribution layer 120 can comprise a hydrocarbon based fibrous material. The distribution layer 120 can comprise a fibrous material selected from the group consisting of polyethylene, polypropylene, nylon, polyethylene terephthalate, rayon, and combinations thereof. The distribution layer 120 can be joined to the contact substrate 200, for instance by any known approaches for attaching two materials, including, but not limited to, adhesive, glue, ultrasonic bonding, thermal bonding, chemical bonding, and fusion bonding. The distribution layer 120 can be a needle punched fibrous material. The distribution layer 120 can be a polypropylene needle punched nonwoven having a basis weight of 150 g/m2. The basis weight can be determined following EDANA
Standard Test: WSP 130.1 (05), Standard Test Method for Mass per Unit Area, on a 1 cm x 1 cm sample and using a balance accurate to 0.0001 g. The basis weight is determined based upon 5 samples combined and calculating an average from the combined weight/area. The distribution layer 120 and foundation layer 110 can be a composite material. STRATEX 5.ONP5-E, a composite substrate made by DelStar Technologies, Inc., can provide for a single product that includes both the distribution layer 120 and foundation layer 110. This distribution layer 120 can be 1.5 mm thick. The thickness of the distribution layer can be determined following EDANA
Recommended Test Method: Nonwovens Thickness (30.5-99).

The free absorbent capacity of the distribution layer 120 is measured as follows. The apparatus required includes a stainless steel test sieve of 2 mm nominal mesh size according to ISO 565, that is about 120 mm x 120 mm and a dish for containing the wire gauze with the test sample. The dish must be of sufficient volume to allow a test liquid depth of 20 mm. The test liquid is 10% Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate solution in distilled water. A suitable weighing glass and cover are used. A balance having an accuracy of plus or minus 0.01 g and a stop watch are also needed.
The test is conducted in a laboratory with an ambient temperature of 25.0 0.2 C and relative humidity 50 5%. All apparatus and samples are equilibrated in the testing environment for two hours. The test dish is covered to prevent excessive evaporation. A
representative rectilinear sample of the distribution layer 120 with a weight of 1.00 0.05 grams is cut from the distribution layer material taking care not to compress or otherwise perturb the structure. The length divided by the width of the sample must be less than 2, with the length being the longer side of the sample. If an individual distribution layer 120 is not of sufficient dimensions to prepare such test pieces, more than one distribution layer 120 from more than one package 10 can be combined to provide a stack of rectilinear test pieces with the required weight and aspect ratio.
Each test piece, or stack of pieces, is weighed on a balance having an accuracy of 0.01 g. A test piece (or stack) is placed on the wire gauze and is fastened thereto by a suitable clip along the width edge (i.e. within 1 mm of the edge of the material along the shorter dimension in the plane of the material). The wire mesh and attached sample are introduced to the test liquid at an oblique angle with the sample facing upwards. Once submerged, the gauze is placed horizontally 20 mm below the surface of the test liquid. This is conveniently achieved if the dish has a flat bottom and the test fluid is 20 mm deep. After sixty seconds, plus or minus one second, the gauze and test piece (or stack) are removed from the test liquid and hung freely to drain for one hundred and twenty seconds, plus or minus three seconds. The sample is oriented so that the clip is at the top horizontal edge of the sample during the draining step. After draining, the test piece (or stack) is separated from the gauze without squeezing fluid from the test piece or stack. The mass of test piece (or stack) is then determined to within 0.1 gram. The difference between the mass of the test piece or stack prior to wetting, and the mass of the test piece or stack after wetting is the free absorbent capacity of the material in grams of fluid absorbed per gram of material. This is converted to volume of fluid absorbed per gram of material by using 1 g/cm3 as the test liquid density. The free absorbent capacity is taken to be the mean of five measurements made following this procedure. Freshly conditioned test liquid is used for each set of five measurements.
Embodiments of the package 10 in which the package 10 is devoid of a contact substrate 200, as shown in FIG. 11, are also contemplated. When the package 10 is positioned in the second position by breaking the backing layer 20 along the line of weakness 130, stain treatment fluid 300 can flow through the discontinuity created in the backing layer 20.
In other words, in the second position, the pouch 80 can be in fluid communication with the first side 40 of the backing layer. In the second position, the stain treatment fluid 300 can be expelled through the portion of the backing layer 20 that is discontinuous across the line of weakness 130. In such an embodiment, the stain treatment fluid 300 could be a gel to provide for improved control of application of the stain treatment fluid 300. As or after the fluid is applied to the fabric being treated, the broken edge of the backing layer 20 can be scraped back and forth against the fabric being treated, thereby applying and distributing the stain treatment fluid 300 to the stain and potentially dislodging agglomerations/globules of the stain, bleaching the stain, and/or brightening the fabric.
A stained fabric can be treated by employing the package 10 illustrated in FIG. 11 by bending the backing layer 20 about the line of weakness 130 to move the first planar region 22 and the second planar region 24 into a substantially facing relationship, thereby making a portion of the backing layer to be discontinuous across the line of weakness 130. As the first planar region 22 and the second planar region 24 are pressed towards one another by the user, the stain treatment fluid 300 is dispensed to the first side 40 of the backing layer 20 through the portion of the backing layer 20 that is discontinuous across the line of weakness 130.
The backing layer 20 is gripped, for instance in a manner similar to that shown in FIG. 5, and the user rubs the stained fabric with the portion of the backing layer 20 that is discontinuous across the line of weakness 130.
FIG. 12 is a cutaway perspective of an alternate embodiment of the package 10 that provides for a package that can dispense a first stain treatment fluid 301 and a second stain treatment fluid 302. This arrangement might be practical in that two materials that interact favorably or provide for treatment efficacy for different types of stains can be dispensed. For instance, the first stain treatment fluid 301 might provide for effective treatment of hydrophobic grease stains and the second stain treatment fluid 302 might provide for effective treatment of hydrophilic wine stains, for instance by bleaching. The first stain treatment fluid 301 might be a detergent and the second stain treatment fluid 302 might be a bleach compound.
Such an arrangement might be beneficial for stain treatment fluid components are not stable or lose efficacy when stored together for prolong periods of time. Such an arrangement might be beneficial for stain treatment fluid components that have optimum efficacy under different local conditions (e.g. pH). The pouch layer 70 can be joined with the backing layer 20, or to the coating layer 50 if present, thereby forming a first pouch 81 and a second pouch 82. The first pouch 81 and the second pouch 82 can be separated by a separating portion 83.
The separating portion 83 can be generally aligned parallel with the line of weakness 130, generally orthogonal to the line of weakness 130, or otherwise generally aligned with the line of weakness 130. The first pouch 81 can contain the first stain treatment fluid 301 and the second pouch 82 can contain the second stain treatment composition 302. A portion of the separating portion 83 can intersect a portion of the line of weakness 130.
The package 10 can be covered by a removable protectant 400, for instance as shown in FIGS. 13 and 14. The first side 40 of backing layer 20 can be at least partially covered by a removable protectant 400. The removable protectant 400 can be selected from the group consisting of a wrap wrapped around the backing layer 20 and substantially covering the contact substrate 200, a slip liner at least partially enclosing the package 10, an envelope enclosing the package 10, a sealed packet enclosing the package 10, and a release strip releaseably joined to the backing layer 20. The contact substrate 200 is considered to be substantially covered when more than about 75% of the surface of the contact substrate 200 oriented away from the first side 40 of the backing layer 20 is covered. The protectant 400 can be comprised of, for example, film, paper, fibrous nonwoven, foil, or any other suitably durable material that can withstand the wear and tear that might occur to such protectant 400 containing the package 10 prior to use. The protectant 400 might limit damage to the package 10 due to the package 10 being carried in a wallet, purse, pocket, diaper bag, auto glove compartment, or other such location that package 10 might be in prior to use. The protectant 400 might be releasably joined to the first side 40 of the backing layer 20 by an adhesive. The protectant 400 might be releasably joined to the backing layer 20 using any known approach for attaching two materials including, but not limited to, adhesive, glue, ultrasonic bonding, chemical bonding, thermal bonding, and fusion bonding.
The package 10 can be a dispensing package such as that disclosed in U.S.
Patent No.
7,506,762 B2. The package 10 can be a dispensing package such as that disclosed in U.S. Patent Pub. No. 2009/0074502 Al.

In one embodiment, the contact substrate 200 can be a polypropylene/polyethylene 70/30 hollow 16 segmented pie microfiber from ES Fibervisions/Chisso, referred to as code 020 having a fiber diameter of 2.2 denier, fiber length of 51 mm, and a basis weight of 60 g/m2. In one embodiment, the contact substrate can be selected from the group consisting of a foam, a fibrous material, a film, a brush, and combinations thereof. Without being bound by theory, it is thought that a contact substrate 200 that presents a rough surface to the fabric being treated can improve stain treatment because the rough surface can aid with dislodging the stain from the fabric. The contact substrate 200 can be Product ID: MF-60PEP available from Kinsei Seishi Co., Ltd., Kochi-shi, Japan.
A contact substrate 200 comprising micro fibers can provide for effective stain removal.
Without being bound by theory, it is thought that the micro fibers provide for smaller interstitial spaces between the fibers making up the contact substrate, such smaller spaces being able to hold greasy materials more effectively than a contact substrate 200 consisting of larger fibers. In one embodiment, the contact substrate 200 can comprise micro fibers having a diameter between about 0.1 micrometers and about 5 micrometers. In one embodiment, the contact substrate 200 can comprise microfibers having a diameter less than about 5 micrometers. The micro fibers can be notched-pie micro fibers, which have sharp fiber edges that are generated during formation of such micro fibers. The micro fibers can be staple fibers or continuous splitted fibers. The micro fibers can be split polypropylene-polyethylene micro fibers.
The contact substrate 200 can be selected from the group consisting of polyethylene, polypropylene, nylon, polyethylene terephthalate, rayon, and combinations thereof. Such fiber types are thought to possibly provide for stain lifting due to their molecular makeup. The contact substrate can be selected from the group consisting of a nonwoven comprising microfibers, a woven comprising microfibers, a looped woven comprising microfibers, and combinations thereof, with micro fibers being practical as discussed above.
Without being bound by theory, it is thought that for fabric stains comprising grease or oil the Hansen solubility parameters of the contact substrate 200 can be indicative of the ability of the contact substrate 200 to lift such stains from the fabric being treated.
The book titled Hansen Solubility Parameters A User's Handbook, Second Edition, 2007, by Charles M.
Hansen, published by CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group LLC, Boca Raton, Florida, United States of America, is a treatise on Hansen solubility parameters. For a particular molecule, there are three Hansen solubility parameters: 8D, 8P, and 8H, where 8D is the dispersion component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume, 8p is the polar component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume, and 8H is the bonding energy component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume. The three parameters can be thought of as coordinates of a point in three dimensional space referred to as the Hansen space.
In the context of treatment of a stain, it is believed that the ability for a contact substrate 200 to lift a grease or oil stain from a fabric depends on the Hansen solubility parameters of the grease or oil stain to be removed from the fabric and the contact substrate 200. Stain lifting is thought to be provided for when the Hansen solubility parameters of the contact substrate 200 are proximal in Hansen space to the Hansen solubility parameters of the grease or oil stain being treated. When the Hansen solubility parameters of the contact substrate 200 and stain being treated are related as such, it is thought that the stain and the contact substrate 200 can be molecularly similar enough to one another such that the stain can be transferred from the stained fabric to the contact substrate 200.
The Hansen solubility parameters for a contact substrate 200 are determined using HSPiP
Version 2.0 software available, as of January 7, 2010, from http://www.hansen-solubility.com/.
The Hansen solubility parameters for each constituent polymer molecule of the contact substrate 200 are determined using the polymer HSP prediction tool in HSPiP by specifying the monomeric unit and attachment points using a modified SMILES notation. A
repeat unit of 1 is used. If any of the Hansen solubility parameters are predicted by HSPiP
Version 2.0 to be less than zero, such parameter is determined to have a value of zero.
For a contact substrate 200 that comprises two or more different molecules, the Hansen solubility parameters are computed based on a weighted mass fraction of the constituent molecules as follows:

n 6x Y oi6x,i i=1 where x is D, P, or H, depending on the specific Hansen Solubility Parameter being computed, i is the numerical identifier of the constituent molecule, and 0 is the mass fraction of the constituent molecule. Such an approach for determining the Hansen solubility parameters of a contact substrate 200 comprising two or more different molecules may not factor in how the spatial relationship of different molecules to the stain to be lifted might affect stain removal, for instance as might be the case for a fiber having a core/sheath arrangement.

A contact substrate 200 having Hansen solubility parameters that lie in or near the same general region of Hansen space as lard and olive oil, as reported by Hansen Solubility Parameters A User's Handbook, Second Edition, 2007, or taco grease, can be employed as the contact substrate 200. Such a contact substrate 200 might be able to provide for improved stain lifting, as compared to contact substrates 200 having Hansen solubility parameters that are distant from greases and oils in Hansen space.
FIGS. 15 and 16 can be interpreted together to provide for a three-dimensional illustration of the Hansen space that can be of interest. The solid circular arc illustrated in FIGS. 16 and 17 represents the part of the edge of a Hansen space spherical volume for which 8D, 8P, and 8H are positive. For instance FIG. 15 can be thought of as a side view of Hansen space in which 8H and 8P are presented to the viewer and FIG. 16 can be though of as a top view of Hansen space in which 8D and 8p are presented to the viewer. FIGS. 15 and 16 can be interpreted together to provide for a three-dimensional illustration of the Hansen space that can be of interest. The solid circular arcs illustrated in FIGS. 15 and 16 represents the part of the edge of a Hansen space spherical volume for which 8D, 8p, and 8H are positive.

In one embodiment, the contact substrate 200 can comprise a fibrous material having Hansen solubility parameters that are positive falling within a Hansen space spherical volume of about 10000 MPa 3/2, the Hansen space spherical volume being centered at a dispersion component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume 8D of about 18 MPa1/2, a polar component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume 8p of about 1 MPa1/2, and a bonding energy component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume 8H of about 3 MPa1/2. As used herein, the Hansen space spherical volume is considered to include negative Hansen solubility parameters such that the Hansen space spherical volume extends outside of what is described as the Hansen space in Hansen Solubility Parameters A
User's Handbook, Second Edition, 2007. That is, the Hansen space spherical volume includes negative values of 8D, 8P, or 8H that are outside of the Hansen space which is limited to values of 8D, 8P, or 8H that are positive. As such, for example, it can be understood that a contact substrate 200 having values of 8D, 8P, or 8H that are positive that fall within part of a Hansen space spherical volume can be of interest.
In one embodiment, the contact substrate 200 can comprise a fibrous material having Hansen solubility parameters that are positive falling within a Hansen space spherical volume of about 34000 MPa 9 the Hansen space spherical volume being centered at a dispersion component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume 8D of about 18 MPa1/2, a polar component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume 8p of about 1 MPa1/2, and a bonding energy component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume 8H of about 3 MPa1/2.

In one embodiment, the contact substrate 200 can comprise a fibrous material having Hansen solubility parameters that are positive falling within a Hansen space spherical volume of about 34000 MPa 3/2, the Hansen space spherical volume being centered at a dispersion component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume 8D of about 18 MPa1/2, a polar component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume 8p of about 1 MPa1/2, and a bonding energy component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume 8H of about 3 MPa1/2, and 8D is between about 15 MPav2 and about 20 MPa1/2.

In one embodiment, the contact substrate 200 can comprise a fibrous material having Hansen solubility parameters that are positive falling within a Hansen space spherical volume of about 34000 MPa 3/2 but outside a Hansen space spherical volume of about 10000 MPa 3/29 the Hansen space spherical volumes being centered at a dispersion component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume 8D of about 18 MPa1/2, a polar component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume 8p of about 1 MPa1/2, and a bonding energy component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume 8H of about 3 MPa1/2.

In one embodiment, the contact substrate 200 can comprise a fibrous material having Hansen solubility parameters that are positive falling within a Hansen space spherical volume of about 34000 MPa 3/2 but outside a Hansen space spherical volume of about 10000 MPa 3/2, the Hansen space spherical volumes being centered at a dispersion component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume 8D of about 18 MPa1/2, a polar component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume 8p of about 1 MPa1/2, and a bonding energy component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume 8H of about 3 MPa1/2, and 8D is between about 15 MPav2 and about 20 MPa1/2.

In one embodiment, the contact substrate 200 can comprise a fibrous material having Hansen solubility parameters that are positive falling within a Hansen space spherical volume of about 25000 MPa 3/2, or of about 20000 MPa 3/2, or of about 15000 MPa 3/29 the Hansen space spherical volume being centered at a dispersion component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume 8D of about 18 MPa1/2, a polar component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume 8p of about 1 MPa, and a bonding energy component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume 8H of about 3 MPa1/2.

In one embodiment, the contact substrate 200 can comprise a fibrous material having Hansen solubility parameters that are positive falling within a Hansen space spherical volume of about 25000 MPa 3/2, or of about 20000 MPa 3/2, or of about 15000 MPa 3/2, the Hansen space spherical volume being centered at a dispersion component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume 8D of about 18 MPa1/2, a polar component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume 8p of about 1 MPa1/2, and a bonding energy component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume 8H of about 3 MPa1/2, and 8D is between about 15 MPai/2 and about 20 MPa1/2.

In one embodiment, the contact substrate 200 can comprise a fibrous material having Hansen solubility parameters that are positive falling within a Hansen space spherical volume of about 25000 MPa 3/2, or of about 20000 MPa 3/2, or of about 15000 MPa 3/2, but outside a Hansen space spherical volume of about 10000 MPa 3/29 the Hansen space spherical volumes being centered at a dispersion component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume 8D
of about 18 MPa1/2, a polar component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume 8p of about 1 MPa1/2, and a bonding energy component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume 8H of about 3 MPa1/2.

In one embodiment, the contact substrate 200 can comprise a fibrous material having Hansen solubility parameters that are positive falling within a Hansen space spherical volume of about 25000 MPa 3/2, or of about 20000 MPa 3/2, or of about 15000 MPa 3/2, but outside a Hansen space spherical volume of about 10000 MPa 3/29 the Hansen space spherical volumes being centered at a dispersion component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume 8D
of about 18 MPa1/2, a polar component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume 8p of about 1 MPa1/2, and a bonding energy component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume 8H of about 3 MPa1/2, and 8D is between about 15 MPa1/2 and about 20 MPai/2.

In one embodiment, the contact substrate 200 can comprise a fibrous material having Hansen solubility parameters that are positive falling within a Hansen space spherical volume of about 10000 MPa 3/2 the Hansen space spherical volume being centered at a dispersion component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume 8D of about 18 MPa1/2, a polar component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume 8p of about 1 MPa1/2, and a bonding energy component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume 8H of about 3 MPa1/2, and 8D is between about 15 MPav2 and about 20 MPa1/2.

In other embodiments, the contact substrate 200 can comprise a fibrous material having Hansen solubility parameters that are positive falling within a Hansen space spherical volume of about 9000 MPa 3/2, alternatively about 8500 MPa 3/2, alternatively about 8000 MPa 3/2, alternatively about 6000 MPa 3/2, alternatively about 4000 MPa 3/2, alternatively about 3000 MPa the Hansen space spherical volume being centered at a dispersion component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume 8D of about 18 MPa1/2, a polar component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume 8p of about 1 MPa1/2, and a bonding energy component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume 8H
of about 3 MPav2 In other embodiments, the contact substrate 200 can comprise a fibrous material having Hansen solubility parameters that are positive falling within a Hansen space spherical volume of about 9000 MPa 3/2, alternatively about 8500 MPa 3/2, alternatively about 8000 MPa 3/2 alternatively about 6000 MPa 3/2, alternatively about 4000 MPa 3/2, alternatively about 3000 MPa the Hansen space spherical volume being centered at a dispersion component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume 8D of about 18 MPa1/2, a polar component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume 8p of about 1 MPa1/2, and a bonding energy component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume 8H
of about 3 MPa1/2, and 8D is between about 15 MPav2 and about 20 MPav2 for each of these defined Hansen space spherical volumes.
In other embodiments, the contact substrate 200 can comprise a fibrous material having Hansen solubility parameters 8D, 8p, and 8H that are positive wherein OD-18 MPa1/2)2+(8P-1 MPa1/2)2+(8H-3 MPa1/2)2]v2 is less than about 13 MPa1/2. In an another embodiment, the contact substrate 200 can comprise a fibrous substrate having Hansen solubility parameters 8D, 8P, and 8H
that are positive wherein OD-18 MPa1/2)2+(8P-1 MPav2)2+(8H-3 MPav2)2]v2 is less than about 11 /2, alternatively less than about 9 MPa1~2, alternatively less than about 7 MPa1~2 MPa1 , alternatively less than about 5 MPa1/2.

In an another embodiment, the contact substrate 200 can comprise a fibrous material having Hansen solubility parameters 8D, 8p, and 8H that are positive wherein 8D is the dispersion component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume, 8p is the polar component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume, and 8H is the bonding energy component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume, wherein OD-MPav2)2+(8p-1 MPav2)2+(8H-3 MPav2)2]v2 is less than about 13 MPav2 and 8D is between about 15 MPa1/2 and about 20 MPa1/2.

In other embodiments, the contact substrate 200 can comprise a fibrous material having Hansen solubility parameters 8D, 8p, and 8H that are positive wherein OD-18 MPa1/2)2+(8p-1 MPav2)2+(8H-3 MPav2)2]v2 is less than about 11 MPa1/2, alternatively less than about 9 MPa1/2, alternatively less than about 7 MPa1/2, alternatively less than about 5 MPa1/29 and 8D is between about 15 MPav2 and about 20 MPav2 for each of these embodiments.

Without being bound by theory, it is believed that contact substrates 200 as described can not only function to deliver the stain treatment fluid 300 to the stained fabric and possibly acquire components of the strain by happenstance, but the contact substrate 200 itself can provide for improved removal of a stain having Hansen solubility parameters that lie in Hansen space proximal to the Hansen solubility parameters of the contact substrate 200, as compared to contact substrates 200 having Hansen solubility parameters that are distant from the stain being treated.
The composition of stain treatment fluid 300 may be one known in the art for stain treatment such as compositions containing a chelating agent, radical scavenger and preferably a bleach disclosed in U.S. Patent 6,846,332.
The composition of stain treatment fluid 300 can be aqueous or non-aqueous. In one embodiment the composition comprises from 0% to about 99.99%, alternatively from about 70%
to about 99.99%, alternatively from about 90% to about 99.9%, alternatively from about 94.0% to about 99.0%, by weight, of water and therefore be aqueous solutions.
The composition of stain treatment fluid 300 can comprise additional components such as bleach, surfactant, solvent, chelating agents, radical scavengers, and mixtures thereof.
The composition of stain treatment fluid 300 can comprise from about 0.001% to about 99.99%, alternatively from about 0% to about 15%, still alternatively from about 0.001% to about 7%, by weight of the composition, of bleach. In one embodiment, the bleach can be selected from the group consisting of peroxide bleach (such as N, N -Phthaloylaminoperoxycaproic acid or other peroxy-oic acid), hydrogen peroxide, and mixtures thereof. In one embodiment, the composition of stain treatment fluid 300 can comprise from about 0.5% to about 3%, by weight of the composition, of hydrogen peroxide. Peroxide sources other than hydrogen peroxide can be used herein. The comparative per-acids, per-salts, per-bleaches, metal catalysts, and the like known from the detergency art can be used.

The composition of stain treatment fluid 300 can comprise from about 0.001% to about 99.99%, alternatively from about 0.05% to about 5%, still alternatively from about 0.05% to about 2%, by weight of the composition, of surfactant. Surfactants can be selected from the group consisting of nonionic, anionic, cationic, zwitterionic surfactants, and mixtures thereof. Specific examples include ethoxylated alcohols or propoxylated, ethoxylated alcohols and sulfates of these, or alkyl phenols, alkyl carboxylates, alkyl sulfates, alkyl sulfonates, NaAES, NH4AES, alkyl quats, amine oxides, and mixtures thereof.
Nonionic surfactants such as the ethoxylated C10-C16 alcohols, e.g., NEODOL 23-6.5, low molecular weight alkyl/aryl amines, alkyl/aryl polyamines, or combinations there of may be used in the compositions. Alkyl sulfate surfactants which may be used herein as cleaners and to stabilize aqueous compositions are the C8-C18 primary ("AS"; preferred C10-C14, sodium salts), as well as branched-chain and random C10-C20 alkyl sulfates, and C10-C18 secondary (2,3) alkyl sulfates of the formula CH3(CH2)x(CHOSO3-M+) CH3 and CH3 (CH2)y(CHOSO3-M+) CH2CH3 where x and (y + 1) are integers of at least 7, preferably at least 9, and M is a water-solubilizing cation, especially sodium, potassium, and magnesium as well as unsaturated sulfates such as oleoyl sulfate. Alkyl ethoxy sulfate (AES) surfactants used herein are conventionally depicted as having the formula R(EO)xSO3Z, wherein R is C10-C16 alkyl, EO is -CH2CH2-O-, x is 1-10 and can include mixtures which are conventionally reported as averages, e.g., (EO)2.5, (EO)6.5 and the like, and Z is a cation such as sodium, ammonium, potassium, or magnesium (MgAES). In addition, surfactants such as quaternary alkyl ammonium compounds where suitable counter-ions could include but are not limited to chloride and alkyl sulfate. C8-C16 alkyl amine oxide surfactants can also be used.
The composition of stain treatment fluid 300 may comprise from 0% to about 99.99%, alternatively from about 0% to about 20%, still alternatively from 0% to about 10%, by weight of the composition, of a non-aqueous solvent. Solvents useful herein include butoxy propoxy propanol (BPP), benzyl alcohol, cyclohexanedimethylamine, glycol ethers such as diethylene glycol, dipropylene glycol and propylene glycol phenyl ether, or other solvents as described herein. In one embodiment, the solvent is an organic solvent. In one embodiment, the composition will comprise from about 1% to about 4% of BPP which is available in commercial quantities as a mixture of isomers in about equal amounts.
Other useful solvents are hydrotropes such as sodium toluene sulfonate and sodium cumene sulfonate, short-chain alcohols such as ethanol and isopropanol, and the like. They can be present in the compositions as only solvents or in combination with other solvents.
The weight ratio of solvent:surfactant(s) can be in the range of from about 10:1 to about 1:1. In one embodiment, the composition comprises 2% of a mixture of glycol ether and diethylene glycol solvent and 0.3% sodium lauryl sulfate.
The composition of stain treatment fluid 300 may include a chelating agent.
The compositions can comprise up to about 5%, by weight of the total composition, of a chelating agent, or mixtures thereof. In one embodiment, the composition comprises from about 0.001% to about 1.5%, alternatively from about 0.001% to about 0.5%, and alternatively from about 0.001%
to about 5%, of chelating agent, by weight of the stain treatment fluid.
Chelants that can include any of those known to those skilled in the art such as phosphonate chelating agents, amino carboxylate chelating agents, other carboxylate chelating agents, ethylenediamine N,N'- disuccinic acids, polyfunctionally-substituted aromatic chelating agents, citric acids, and mixtures thereof.
In one embodiment, the chelating agents can be amino aminotri(methylene phosphonic acid), di-ethylene-triamino-pentaacetic acid, diethylene triamine penta methylene phosphonate, 1,2-dihydroxy-3,5-benzenedisulfonic acid, 1-hydroxy ethane diphosphonate, ethylenediamine N, N'-disuccinic acid, and mixtures thereof.
The compositions herein may also contain organic stabilizers for improving the chemical stability of the composition, provided that such materials are compatible or suitably formulated.
When incorporated, organic stabilizers can be used at levels from about 0.001%
to about 5.0%, alternatively from about 0.001% to about 0.5%, by weight of the composition.
The composition of stain treatment fluid 300 may comprise a radical scavenger or a mixture thereof. Radical scavengers can be present herein in amounts ranging from up to about 10% by weight of the composition. In one embodiment, the composition comprises from about 0.001% to about 0.5%, by weight of the composition, of the radical scavenger.
Radical scavengers useful herein can comprise the well-known substituted mono and dihydroxy benzenes and their analogs, alkyl and aryl carboxylates and mixtures thereof. Specific examples include 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoic acid (TMBA) and tetrabutyl ethylidinebisphenol.
The composition of stain treatment fluid 300 may comprise minor amounts of various optional ingredients, including enzymes, preservatives, anti-static agents, antioxidants/stabilizers,fragrance perfumes, odor absorbing components (such as cyclodextrins), bleach activators, builders, polymeric soil release agents, dispersant polymers, oil absorbing polymers; anti-tarnish and/or anti-corrosion agents, dyes, fillers, germicides, hydrotropes, solvotropes, enzyme stabilizing agents, solubilizing agents, clay soil removal/anti-redeposition agents, fabric softeners, dye transfer inhibiting agents, brightners, bleach catalysts, static control agents, thickeners, and the like. If used, such optional ingredients can comprise from 0.0001% to 10%, alternatively from 0.01% to 2%, by weight, of the composition.
The pH of this formula can be chosen to maximize the cleaning efficacy of the specific formulation. When hydrogen peroxide is present in the formula, pH must be maintained between 3 and 6. When hydrogen peroxide is not present, pH can be higher. A buffer may be used to maintain the desired pH, for example, citric acid.
In one embodiment, the composition of stain treatment fluid 300 can be formulated so as to leave little visible residue on fabric surfaces after a stain on such fabric surface is treated.
Accordingly, the composition of stain treatment fluid 300 may be substantially free of various polyacrylate-based emulsifiers, polymeric anti-static agents, inorganic builder salts and other residue-forming materials, except at low levels of from about 0.1% to about 0.3%, by weight of the composition, and preferably includes 0% of such materials (%, as used herein, denotes % by weight of 100% active). Similarly, water used in the compositions of stain treatment fluid 300 can be distilled, deionized or otherwise rendered free of residue-forming materials.
In one embodiment, compositions of stain treatment fluid 300 can be formulated as liquid fabric treatment compositions. In one alternative they may be provided as a gel.

Prophetic Examples of the Composition of Stain Treatment Fluid 300 Stain Treatment Fluid 300 - Example 1 % (wt) of 100% active component formula range Glycol Ether 1.0-2.0 Hydrogen peroxide 1.0-3.0 Alkyl sulfate surfactant 0.3-1.0 Perfume 0.005-0.01 Ethanol 0.3-1.0 BHT 0.01-0.05 Citric Acid 0.03-0.1 Water Balance Stain Treatment Fluid 300 - Example 2 % (wt) of 100% active component formula range Diethylene Glycol 1.0-2.0 Hydrogen peroxide 1.5-3.0 LIPOLASE 0.3-0.5 Alkyl sulfate surfactant 0.3-1.0 Perfume 0.005-0.01 Ethanol 0.3-1.0 Trimethoxy benzoic acid 0.01-.05 Ethylene diamine-N-N'-dissuccinic acid chelating agent 0.03-0.1 Water Balance Stain Treatment Fluid 300 - Examples 3 & 4 % (wt) of 100% active component formula range Ex. 3 Ex. 4 Glycol Ether 1.50 .50 Diethylene Glycol 1.00 1.50 Hydrogen peroxide 1.00 1.50 Amine Oxide 0.25 0.35 Sodium Lauryl Sulfate 1.00 0.80 Perfume 0.02 0.03 Citric Acid 1.0 0.07 Magnesium Sulfate 0.10 0.18 Ethylene diamine-N-N'-dissuccinic acid 0.0025 0.0015 Water Balance Balance Stain Treatment Fluid 300-Example 5 % (wt) of 100% active component formula range Ex. 5 Glycol Ether 0-2%
Diethylene Glycol 0-2%

Propyleneglycol phenyl ether 0-3%

Hydrogen peroxide 0-3%
Amine Oxide 0-1.5%
C 12 trimethyl ammonium chloride 0-1.5%
Sodium Lauryl Sulfate 0-3%
Alkyl benzene sulfonic acid 0-3%
Perfume 0-0.1 Citric Acid 0-0.3 Magnesium Sulfate 0-0.3 Ethylene diamine-N-N'-dissuccinic acid 0-0.3 Water Balance Ph 3-9 Stain Treatment Fluid 300-Examples 6-12 % (wt) of 100% active component formula range Ex. 6 Ex. 7 Ex.8 Ex. 9 Ex. 10 Ex. 11 Ex. 12 Glycol Ether 0 0 0 0 0.5 1 1 Diethylene 0 0 1 0 0.5 0 1 Glycol Propyleneglycol 0 1.5 2 0 1.5 2 1.5 Phenyl Ether Hydrogen 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 Peroxide Amine Oxide 0.3 0.3 1 0 0 0 0.3 C12 Trimethyl 0 0 0 0.3 0.3 1 0 Ammonium Chloride Sodium Lauryl 0 0.9 0.9 0 0.9 1.2 0.9 Sulfate Alkyl Benzene 0.9 0 0 0.9 0 0 0 Sulfonic Acid Perfume 0.025 0.02 0.05 0.05 0.02 0.05 0.02 Citric Acid 0.15 0.08 0.3 0.2 0.08 0.3 0.15 Magnesium 0.15 0 0 0.15 0 0 0.15 Sulfate Ethylene 0 0.0025 0.3 0 0.0025 0.3 0.0025 Diamine-N-N' -Dissuccinic Acid Water Balance Balance Balance Balance Balance Balance Balance pH 3 6 8 3 6 8 6 In one embodiment, the stain treatment fluid 300 can comprise 95.05 % by weight distilled water, 0.34 % by weight sodium lauryl sulfate, 1.68 % by weight amine oxide, 1.5 % by weight glycol ether PPh, 0.2 % by weight EDDS, 0.21 % by weight citric acid, 1.00 % by weight hydrogen peroxide, 0.02 % by weight perfume. In one embodiment, the stain treatment fluid 300 can comprise 96.04750 % by weight distilled water, 0.90 % by weight sodium lauryl sulfate, 0.15 % by weight magnesium sulfate solution, 0.30 % by weight amine oxide, 1.5 % by weight glycol ether PPh, 0.0025 % by weight EDDS, 0.08 % by weight citric acid, 1.00 % by weight hydrogen peroxide, 0.02 % by weight perfume.
The contact substrate 200 can have at least one side that is light colored. A
light colored contact substrate 200 can function as an indicator that the stain being treated is being effectively lifted from the fabric being treated and being transferred to the contact substrate 200. As the contact substrate 200 acquires the stain, the color of the contact substrate may tend to darken.
For stains on patterned fabrics, which may be hard to see in low lighting situations, such as a restaurant, where stains are likely to occur, having a light colored contact substrate 200 that darkens when used can help the user of the contact substrate monitor that the stain is being removed.
A contact substrate 200 can have a L* value greater than about 80. A contact substrate 200 can have an L* value greater than about 85. A contact substrate 200 can have an L* value greater than about 90. A contact substrate 200 can have an L* value greater than about 95. A
contact substrate 200 can have an L* value of greater than about 90 and an a*
value between about -5 and about 5 and a b* value between about -5 and about 5.
The color of a contact substrate 200 is measured by the reflectance spectrophotometer according to the colors L*, a*, and b* values. If the contact substrate 200 is joined to a backing layer 20, the L*, a*, and b* values of the contact substrate 200 are measured on the side of the contact substrate 200 that is oriented away from the backing layer 20.
Reflectance color is measured using the Hunter Lab LabScan XE reflectance spectrophotometer obtained from Hunter Associates Laboratory of Reston, Va. A
contact substrate 200 is tested at an ambient temperature between 65 F and 75 F and a relative humidity between 50% and 80%.
The spectrophotometer is set to the CIELab color scale and with a D65 illumination. The Observer is set at 10 and the Mode is set at 45/0 . Area View is set to 0.125" and Port Size is set to 0.20". The spectrophotometer is calibrated prior to sample analysis utilizing the black glass and white reference tiles supplied from the vendor with the instrument.
Calibration is done according to the manufacturer's instructions as set forth in LabScan XE User's Manual, Manual Version 1.1, August 2001, A60-1010-862. If cleaning is required of the reference tiles or samples, only tissues that do not contain embossing, lotion, or brighteners should be used (e.g., PUFFS tissue). Any sample point on the contact substrate 200 facing away from the first side 40 of the backing layer 20 can be selected.
The contact substrate 200 is placed over the sample port of the spectrophotometer with a white clamp disk placed behind the contact substrate 200. The contact substrate is to be in a substantially flat condition and free of wrinkles.
The contact substrate is removed and repositioned so that a minimum of three readings of color of the contact substrate are conducted. Each of the readings is to be performed at a different region of the contact substrate so that no two sample points overlap. The readings are averaged to yield the reported L*, a*, and b* values.
The package 10, as described herein, can be used in a method for treating a stained fabric. The steps of the method can include bending the backing layer 20 about the line of weakness 130 to move the first planar region 22 and the second planar region 24 into a substantially facing relationship, thereby making a portion of the backing layer 20 to be discontinuous across the line of weakness 130. The stain treatment fluid 300 can be dispensed to the first side 40 of the backing layer 20 through the portion of the backing layer 20 that is discontinuous across the line of weakness 130. The backing layer can then gripped by the user and the stained fabric is rubbed with the portion of the backing layer 20 that is discontinuous across the line of weakness 130. If a contact substrate 200 is part of the package 10, the stain treatment fluid 300 is dispensed to the fluid pervious contact substrate 200 joined to the first side of the backing layer 20 proximal the line of weakness 130, as part of the method. If a distribution layer 120 is present, the stain treatment fluid 300 can be transported through the distribution layer 120 to the contact substrate 200.
A stained fabric can be treated by a method for treating a stained fabric comprising the steps of: providing a contact substrate 200 containing a stain treatment fluid 300, the contact substrate 200 comprising micro fibers having a diameter less than about 5 micrometers;
contacting the contact substrate 200 with the stained fabric thereby transferring the stain treatment fluid 300 to the stained fabric; and rubbing the stained fabric with the contact substrate 200; wherein the stain treatment fluid 300 comprises from about 0.001% to about 99.99%, by weight of the stain treatment fluid 300, of a surfactant. The contact substrate 200 can be any of the embodiments of the contact substrate 200 described herein. A stain wiping implement can be used to practice the method, wherein the contact substrate 200 is joined to the backing layer 20. The backing layer 20 can provide a grip for the user as she wipes the stain with the contact substrate 200. The step of rubbing the stained fabric with the contact substrate can be assisted by a backing layer 20 joined to the contact substrate 200. The stain wiping implement can be a backing layer 20. The stain wiping implement can be a rigid body sized and dimensioned for gripping by a human hand, the rigid body being operably engaged with the contact substrate 200.
The method can be performed on a garment while the user of the package 10 is wearing the garment. The stained fabric can be a fibrous woven or nonwoven web. For example, the stained fabric can be part of a garment. In one embodiment, the method can be employed to treat a grease or oil stain on a fabric.
A test to measure taco grease stain removal for a variety of contact substrates, listed in Table 1, was performed.
Table 1. Contact Substrates Tested.

Contact Substrate Basis WeightA
Reference Number Contact Substrate Manufacturer g/m2 1 Spun Viscose Challis P&G 138 (ISO 105/F02), style 266 (Woven Viscose) 2 5 m fiber 70/30 Evolon 80 PET/Nylon; EVO80S0 3 20 m fiber PP P&G 60 4 20 m fiber PET P&G 60 5 18 m fiber PE (PET P&G 50 core with PE sheath) 6 19 m fiber PE (PP core P&G 18 with PE sheath) 7 22 m fiber Nylon 6/6 P&G 30 8 5 m fiber 50%150% P&G 60 PP/PE

9 5 m fiber P&G 60 30%/30%/40%
PP/PE/Rayon 15 m fiber, 100% Split P&G 90 Fibers Viscose (Rayon) A. Basis weight computed based on the mass of a single 10 cm square specimen Stain removal testing was performed using a six position Nu-Martindale abrasion tester.
The stained fabrics tested were 140 mm diameter specimens of bleached, mercerized, combed cotton broadcloth available from Testfabrics, Inc., West Pittiston, PA, USA. A
stain treatment fluid was prepared by adding 3.1 g of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SLS) solution and 0.94 g amine oxide (AO) solution to 96.37 g deionized water to make 0.9% AO, 0.3% SLS
solution for the purposes of testing stain removal and the contact substrates were wetted with the stain treatment fluid. The contact substrates tested each had a diameter of 38 mm.
The contact substrates and cotton broadcloth specimens tested were equilibrated in a constant temperature (70 2 F) and humidity (65% 2% relative humidity) (CTCH) room for at least 8 hours prior to testing. After the equilibration period, the initial mass of each contact substrate tested was measured.
Standard taco grease, obtained from Empirical Manufacturing Company, Cincinnati, OH, USA, heated in a water bath to between 113 F to 122 F and aspirated into a pipette was applied to the cotton broad cloth specimens in the CTCH room using the pipette. One milliliter of the standard taco grease was then applied to each of the contact substrates using a pipette. The mass of taco grease applied to each cotton broad cloth specimen was 0.2850 +/-0.0250 g. After applying the taco grease to the cotton broad cloth specimen, the cotton broad cloth specimen stained with taco grease was allowed to cool for ten minutes.
The cotton broad cloth specimens and contact substrates were affixed in the individual abrasion positions of the Nu-Martindale abrasion tester. Each position of the Nu-Martindale abrasion tester provides for a single cotton broad cloth specimen to be abraded with a single contact substrate. A 12 kPa (1.4 pound) weight was used to apply normal force (perpendicular to treatment surface) to the substrate to apply stress during abrasion. The number of abrading cycles employed in the testing was 500.

After abrasion, the cotton broad cloth specimens and contact substrates were removed from the abrasion tester and equilibrated in the CTCH room for at least eight hours. After the equilibration period, the mass of the cotton broad cloth specimens and contact substrates were individually measured. The mass of taco grease acquired by the contact substrate was determined by subtracting the initial mass of the contact substrate from the final mass of the contact substrate after abrasion. The mass of any component of the stain treatment fluid remaining on the contact substrate after abrasion testing and the equilibration period after abrasion testing was assumed to be negligible because the mass of non-water components in the stain treatment fluid was small and some of the stain treatment fluid initially applied to the contact substrate was possibly transferred to the cotton broad cloth specimens. The stain treatment ability of the contact substrates was quantified in terms of taco grease absorption, defined as the mass of taco grease acquired per mass of contact substrate.
The Hansen solubility parameters of the taco grease were measured experimentally using a multiple solvents method, the method based in part on the methods described in Hansen Solubility Parameters A User's Handbook, Second Edition, 2007, by Charles M.
Hansen, published by CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group LLC, Boca Raton, Florida, United States of America. The Hansen solubility parameters for the taco grease were determined to be 8D=17.62 MPa1/2, 8p=1.06 MPa1/2, 8H=3.06 MPa1/2. The radius of the sphere, R, for taco grease in Hansen space was determined to be R=5.9 MPav2.

The degree of taco grease visual dissolution was scored by adding by glass pipette 5 mL
of the given solvent to 0.5 g of the taco grease in a test tube and vortexing for 10 seconds. A
result described as clear-no separation-total dissolution was assigned a score of 1. A result of cloudy-no separation was assigned a score of 2. A result of cloudy-separation was assigned a score of 3. A result of slightly cloudy-separation was assigned a score of 4.
A result of slightly hazy-separation was assigned a score of 5. A result of clear-separation was assigned a score of 6.
These characterizations were selected to generally correspond with the scale set forth in Appendix A, Table A.3 of Hansen Solubility Parameters A User's Handbook, Second Edition, the scale set forth therein being for a different solvent-solute system.
Table 2 is a list of the observed taco grease visual dissolution score for solvents acting on taco grease.

Solvent Taco Grease Visual Dissolution Score Propylene Glycol 6 Diethylene Glycol 6 Di ro lene Glycol 5 Glycerol 6 Methanol 6 Acetonitrile 6 Ethanol 6 n-Hexane 1 Ethylene Glycol 2 Monobutyl Ether Cyclohexane 1 Chlorobenzene 1 1,2-Dichloroethane 1 Acetone 2 Ethylene Glycol 6 Chloroform 1 Formic Acid 90% 4 Ethanolamine 6 C clohex lamine 1 Acetic Acid 3 A score of 1 was considered to indicate that the taco grease was soluble in the solvent scored. Scores 2-6 were considered to indicate that the taco grease was insoluble in the solvent scored. The Hansen solubility parameters for the solvents used was entered into the HSPiP
software.
The HSPiP software best fitting method was used to identify solutions for the Hansen solubility parameters for taco grease such that the solvents in which the taco grease was soluble were separated from the solvents in which the taco grease was insoluble, the solutions being spheres in Hansen space inclusive of solvents in which the taco grease was soluble and exclusive of solvents in which the taco grease was insoluble. The best fitting method does not produce a unique solution since there are potentially an infinite number of spheres that can meet the constraint of dividing solvents based on whether taco grease is soluble or insoluble therein and a random process is used in the software to identify the solution. Multiple runs of the best fitting method were performed to identify a potential minimum radius for the sphere of taco grease in Hansen space.
The potential minimum radius of the sphere identified after multiple runs of the best fitting method was then selected as a starting estimate for the radius to better define the radius of the sphere in Hansen space inclusive of solvents in which the taco grease was soluble and exclusive of solvents in which the taco grease was insoluble.
The starting estimate for the radius was then iterated upon to determine the minimum radius for which a solution for the Hansen solubility parameters was possible that still allowed for the solvents in which the taco grease was soluble to be separated from the solvents in which the taco grease was insoluble. Five runs of the iterative process starting with the starting estimate for the radius were conducted to determine the minimum radius were done to identify the minimum radius. The Hansen solubility parameters and radii generated from iterations starting with the starting estimate for the radius were recorded as being the smallest spheres containing the solvents in which the taco grease was soluble.
The fitting process described above was repeated for the condition in which the solvent in which the taco grease was insoluble closest to a solvent in which the taco grease was soluble was considered to be a solvent in which the taco grease was soluble. Such analysis identified the largest spheres containing the solvents in which the taco grease was soluble plus the solvent in which the taco grease was insoluble that was closest to a solvent in which the taco grease was soluble. These Hansen solubility parameters and radii were recorded as being the largest spheres containing the solvents in which the taco grease was soluble.
The Hansen solubility parameters for the smallest spheres and the largest spheres were averaged and these averaged parameters were recorded as being descriptive of the Hansen solubility parameters for taco grease. The Hansen solubility parameters and radius determined by this approach are descriptive of a sphere having a periphery beyond the periphery of the average of the smallest spheres and within the average of the largest spheres.
The Hansen solubility parameters listed in Table 2 for the contact substrates tested were determined using HSPiP Version 2.0 software as described above. Relative energy difference between each contact substrate tested and taco grease was computed using relative energy difference formula provided in Hansen Solubility Parameters A User's Handbook, Second Edition, 2007, by Charles M. Hansen, published by CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group LLC, Boca Raton, Florida, United States of America:

RED (4(6D -17.62MPa"2)2 +(b. -1.06MPa"2)2 +(b -3.06MPah/2)2Y'2 =
R

the values of 17.62, 1.06, and 3.06 in the equation being experimentally determined 8D MPa1/2, 8p MPa1/2, and 8H MPa1/2, respectively. R was set to have a value of 1 MPa1~2 such that the relative energy difference was computed based only on 8D, 8p, and 8H for the taco grease tested.

Table 2. Hansen Solubility Parameters for Contact Substrates tested and Results of Grease Absorption Testing using a Nu-Martindale Abrasion Tester.

Contact 8D 8P 8H Relative NA Grease Standard Substrate (MPa1/2) (MPa1/2) (MPa1/2) Energy Absorption Deviation Reference Difference (g/g) of Grease Number from Taco Absorption Grease (/ ) 1 18.00 14.40 19.00 19.694 3 0.115 0.021 2 18.84 8.64 8.67 8.968 5 0.650 0.034 3 16.20 8.00 5.60 6.546 4 0.764 0.028 4 19.50 4.50 8.40 7.113 5 0.609 0.112 5 17.40 8.00 7.50 7.098 3 0.726 0.040 6 17.40 8.00 7.50 7.098 4 0.813 0.052 7 17.10 10.80 6.60 9.274 4 0.504 0.078 8 16.80 8.00 6.55 6.654 5 0.822 0.070 9 17.28 10.56 11.53 11.545 3 0.807 0.102 10 18.00 14.40 19.00 19.694 3 0.230 0.012 A. Number of specimens tested.

A graph of taco grease absorption versus relative energy difference, RED, between the each contact substrate tested and the taco grease is shown in FIG. 17. As shown in FIG. 17, taco grease absorption tends to increase as the relative energy difference between the contact substrate and taco grease decreases. The error bars in FIG. 17 represent plus and minus one standard deviation of the measured values of grease absorption. Such response is thought to occur because of the fundamental behavior with respect to solubility that like materials dissolve like materials might also be at least partially descriptive of the affinity for the molecules comprising the stain for the fibers comprising the contact substrate. Contact substrates having relatively high taco grease absorption are thought to be effective for transferring a grease or oil stain from a fabric to the contact substrate.
FIGURES 18 and 19 illustrate the locations of the Hansen solubility parameters for contact substrates listed in Table 2 in Hansen space and the location of 8D, 8p, and 8H for the taco grease tested (labeled as TG in FIGS. 18 and 19). FIGURES 18 and 19, together, provide for a three-dimensional illustration of a portion of Hansen space that can be of interest. FIGURE 18 is a side view of Hansen space in which 8H and 8p are presented to the viewer and FIG. 19 is a top view of Hansen space in which 8D and 8p are presented to the viewer. The solid circular arcs illustrated in each of FIGS. 18 and 19 is part of the edge of a Hansen space spherical volume for which 8D, 8p, and 8H are positive and the center of the Hansen space spherical volume is located at 8D of 18 MPa1/2, a 8p of 1 MPa1/2, and a 8H of 3 MPa1/2, and the Hansen space spherical volume is 10000 MPa312 or 34000 MPa312, as noted in the figures. As illustrated in FIGS. 18 and 19, contact substrates tested having a relative energy difference less than 13 between the contact substrate and the Hansen solubility parameters for the taco grease tested (8D=17.62 MPa1/2, 8p=1.08 MPa1/29 8H=3.06 MPa1/2), with R set equal to 1 MPa1/2, are within the Hansen space spherical volume of 10000 MPa312 centered at 8D of 18 MPa1/2, a 8p of 1 MPa1/2, and a 8H of 3 MPa1/2 illustrated in FIGS. 18 and 19. Further, as illustrated in FIGS. 18 and 19, contact substrates tested having a relative energy difference less than 20 between the contact substrate and the Hansen solubility parameters for the taco grease tested, with R set equal to 1 MPa1/2, are within the Hansen space spherical volume of 34000 MPa312 centered at 8D of 18 MPa1/2, a 8p of 1 MPa1/2, and a 8H of 3 MPav2 illustrated in FIGS. 18 and 19.

All percentages and ratios used herein are by weight of the total composition and all measurements made are at 25 C, unless otherwise designated. An angular degree is a planar unit of angular measure equal in magnitude to 1/360 of a complete revolution.
While particular embodiments of the present invention have been illustrated and described, it would be obvious to those skilled in the art that various other changes and modifications can be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. It is therefore intended to cover in the appended claims all such changes and modifications that are within the scope of this invention.
All documents cited are, in relevant part, incorporated herein by reference;
the citation of any document is not to be construed as an admission that it is prior art with respect to the present invention.

Claims (15)

1. A method for treating a stained fabric comprising the steps of:
providing a contact substrate (200) containing a stain treatment fluid (300), said contact substrate comprising micro fibers having a diameter less than 5 micrometers;
contacting the contact substrate with said stained fabric thereby transferring said stain treatment fluid to said stained fabric; and rubbing said stained fabric with said contact substrate;
wherein said stain treatment fluid comprises from 0.001% to 99.99%, by weight of said stain treatment fluid, of a surfactant.
2. The method according to Claim 1, wherein said contact substrate comprises fibers selected from the group consisting of polyethylene, polypropylene, nylon, polyethylene terephthalate, rayon, and combinations thereof.
3. The method according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein said contact substrate is selected from the group consisting of a nonwoven comprising microfibers, a woven comprising microfibers, a looped woven comprising microfibers, and combinations thereof.
4. The method according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein said micro fibers are notched-pie microfibers.
5. The method according to any one of Claims 1 to 3, wherein said micro fibers are staple fibers or continuous splitted fibers.
6. The method according to any one of claims 1 to 3, wherein said micro fibers are split polypropylene-polyethylene fibers.
7. The method according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein said contact substrate is a fibrous material having Hansen solubility parameters that are positive falling within a Hansen space spherical volume of 34000 MPa 3/2, the Hansen space spherical volume being centered at a dispersion component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume .delta.D of 18 MPa1/2, a polar component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume .delta.P
of 1 MPa1/2, and a bonding energy component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume .delta.H of 3 MPa1/2.
8. The method according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein said contact substrate is a fibrous material having Hansen solubility parameters falling within a Hansen space spherical volume of 10000 MPa 3/2.
9. The method according to Claim 7, wherein said contact substrate is a fibrous material having Hansen solubility parameters outside a Hansen space spherical volume of 10000 MPa 3/2.
10. The method according to any one of Claims 7 to 9, wherein the dispersion component of interaction energy between molecules per molar volume .delta.D is between 15MPa1/2 and 20MPa1/2.
11. The method according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein the step of rubbing said stained fabric with said contact substrate is assisted by a backing layer (20) joined to said contact substrate.
12. The method according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein said contact substrate has an L* value measured by a reflectance meter greater than 80.
13. The method according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein said stain treatment fluid comprises from 0.05% to 5%, by weight of said stain treatment fluid, of said surfactant.
14. The method according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein the stain treatment fluid comprises from 0.001% to 7%, by weight of said stain treatment fluid, of a bleach.
15. The method according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein said stain treatment fluid comprises:
a) from 0.05% to 5%, by weight of said stain treatment fluid, of said surfactant;
b) from 0.001% to 7%, by weight of said stain treatment fluid, of a bleach;
c) from 0.001% to 5%, by weight of said stain treatment fluid, of a chelant;
and d) a perfume.
CA 2785103 2010-01-14 2011-01-13 Method for treating a stained fabric Abandoned CA2785103A1 (en)

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MX2012008263A (en) 2012-08-03
US20110167569A1 (en) 2011-07-14
EP2523869A1 (en) 2012-11-21
CN102712402A (en) 2012-10-03
WO2011088176A1 (en) 2011-07-21

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