CA2590366C - Method and system for programming, calibrating and driving a light emitting device display - Google Patents

Method and system for programming, calibrating and driving a light emitting device display Download PDF

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Publication number
CA2590366C
CA2590366C CA002590366A CA2590366A CA2590366C CA 2590366 C CA2590366 C CA 2590366C CA 002590366 A CA002590366 A CA 002590366A CA 2590366 A CA2590366 A CA 2590366A CA 2590366 C CA2590366 C CA 2590366C
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Prior art keywords
voltage
pixel circuit
current
light emitting
programming
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Expired - Fee Related
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CA002590366A
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French (fr)
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CA2590366A1 (en
Inventor
Arokia Nathan
Gholamreza Reza Chaji
Peyman Servati
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Ignis Innovation Inc
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Ignis Innovation Inc
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Priority to CA002490860A priority Critical patent/CA2490860A1/en
Priority to CA2,490,860 priority
Priority to CA 2503237 priority patent/CA2503237A1/en
Priority to CA2,503,237 priority
Priority to CA002509201A priority patent/CA2509201A1/en
Priority to CA2,509,201 priority
Priority to CA002521986A priority patent/CA2521986A1/en
Priority to CA2,521,986 priority
Priority to CA002526782A priority patent/CA2526782C/en
Priority to CA002590366A priority patent/CA2590366C/en
Application filed by Ignis Innovation Inc filed Critical Ignis Innovation Inc
Publication of CA2590366A1 publication Critical patent/CA2590366A1/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of CA2590366C publication Critical patent/CA2590366C/en
Application status is Expired - Fee Related legal-status Critical
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical

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Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G09EDUCATION; CRYPTOGRAPHY; DISPLAY; ADVERTISING; SEALS
    • G09GARRANGEMENTS OR CIRCUITS FOR CONTROL OF INDICATING DEVICES USING STATIC MEANS TO PRESENT VARIABLE INFORMATION
    • G09G3/00Control arrangements or circuits, of interest only in connection with visual indicators other than cathode-ray tubes
    • G09G3/20Control arrangements or circuits, of interest only in connection with visual indicators other than cathode-ray tubes for presentation of an assembly of a number of characters, e.g. a page, by composing the assembly by combination of individual elements arranged in a matrix no fixed position being assigned to or needed to be assigned to the individual characters or partial characters
    • G09G3/22Control arrangements or circuits, of interest only in connection with visual indicators other than cathode-ray tubes for presentation of an assembly of a number of characters, e.g. a page, by composing the assembly by combination of individual elements arranged in a matrix no fixed position being assigned to or needed to be assigned to the individual characters or partial characters using controlled light sources
    • G09G3/30Control arrangements or circuits, of interest only in connection with visual indicators other than cathode-ray tubes for presentation of an assembly of a number of characters, e.g. a page, by composing the assembly by combination of individual elements arranged in a matrix no fixed position being assigned to or needed to be assigned to the individual characters or partial characters using controlled light sources using electroluminescent panels
    • G09G3/32Control arrangements or circuits, of interest only in connection with visual indicators other than cathode-ray tubes for presentation of an assembly of a number of characters, e.g. a page, by composing the assembly by combination of individual elements arranged in a matrix no fixed position being assigned to or needed to be assigned to the individual characters or partial characters using controlled light sources using electroluminescent panels semiconductive, e.g. using light-emitting diodes [LED]
    • G09G3/3208Control arrangements or circuits, of interest only in connection with visual indicators other than cathode-ray tubes for presentation of an assembly of a number of characters, e.g. a page, by composing the assembly by combination of individual elements arranged in a matrix no fixed position being assigned to or needed to be assigned to the individual characters or partial characters using controlled light sources using electroluminescent panels semiconductive, e.g. using light-emitting diodes [LED] organic, e.g. using organic light-emitting diodes [OLED]
    • G09G3/3275Details of drivers for data electrodes
    • G09G3/3283Details of drivers for data electrodes in which the data driver supplies a variable data current for setting the current through, or the voltage across, the light-emitting elements
    • GPHYSICS
    • G09EDUCATION; CRYPTOGRAPHY; DISPLAY; ADVERTISING; SEALS
    • G09GARRANGEMENTS OR CIRCUITS FOR CONTROL OF INDICATING DEVICES USING STATIC MEANS TO PRESENT VARIABLE INFORMATION
    • G09G2300/00Aspects of the constitution of display devices
    • G09G2300/08Active matrix structure, i.e. with use of active elements, inclusive of non-linear two terminal elements, in the pixels together with light emitting or modulating elements
    • G09G2300/0809Several active elements per pixel in active matrix panels
    • G09G2300/0842Several active elements per pixel in active matrix panels forming a memory circuit, e.g. a dynamic memory with one capacitor
    • GPHYSICS
    • G09EDUCATION; CRYPTOGRAPHY; DISPLAY; ADVERTISING; SEALS
    • G09GARRANGEMENTS OR CIRCUITS FOR CONTROL OF INDICATING DEVICES USING STATIC MEANS TO PRESENT VARIABLE INFORMATION
    • G09G2320/00Control of display operating conditions
    • G09G2320/02Improving the quality of display appearance
    • G09G2320/0233Improving the luminance or brightness uniformity across the screen
    • GPHYSICS
    • G09EDUCATION; CRYPTOGRAPHY; DISPLAY; ADVERTISING; SEALS
    • G09GARRANGEMENTS OR CIRCUITS FOR CONTROL OF INDICATING DEVICES USING STATIC MEANS TO PRESENT VARIABLE INFORMATION
    • G09G2320/00Control of display operating conditions
    • G09G2320/02Improving the quality of display appearance
    • G09G2320/0285Improving the quality of display appearance using tables for spatial correction of display data
    • GPHYSICS
    • G09EDUCATION; CRYPTOGRAPHY; DISPLAY; ADVERTISING; SEALS
    • G09GARRANGEMENTS OR CIRCUITS FOR CONTROL OF INDICATING DEVICES USING STATIC MEANS TO PRESENT VARIABLE INFORMATION
    • G09G2320/00Control of display operating conditions
    • G09G2320/02Improving the quality of display appearance
    • G09G2320/029Improving the quality of display appearance by monitoring one or more pixels in the display panel, e.g. by monitoring a fixed reference pixel
    • GPHYSICS
    • G09EDUCATION; CRYPTOGRAPHY; DISPLAY; ADVERTISING; SEALS
    • G09GARRANGEMENTS OR CIRCUITS FOR CONTROL OF INDICATING DEVICES USING STATIC MEANS TO PRESENT VARIABLE INFORMATION
    • G09G2320/00Control of display operating conditions
    • G09G2320/02Improving the quality of display appearance
    • G09G2320/029Improving the quality of display appearance by monitoring one or more pixels in the display panel, e.g. by monitoring a fixed reference pixel
    • G09G2320/0295Improving the quality of display appearance by monitoring one or more pixels in the display panel, e.g. by monitoring a fixed reference pixel by monitoring each display pixel
    • GPHYSICS
    • G09EDUCATION; CRYPTOGRAPHY; DISPLAY; ADVERTISING; SEALS
    • G09GARRANGEMENTS OR CIRCUITS FOR CONTROL OF INDICATING DEVICES USING STATIC MEANS TO PRESENT VARIABLE INFORMATION
    • G09G2320/00Control of display operating conditions
    • G09G2320/04Maintaining the quality of display appearance
    • G09G2320/043Preventing or counteracting the effects of ageing
    • GPHYSICS
    • G09EDUCATION; CRYPTOGRAPHY; DISPLAY; ADVERTISING; SEALS
    • G09GARRANGEMENTS OR CIRCUITS FOR CONTROL OF INDICATING DEVICES USING STATIC MEANS TO PRESENT VARIABLE INFORMATION
    • G09G2320/00Control of display operating conditions
    • G09G2320/04Maintaining the quality of display appearance
    • G09G2320/043Preventing or counteracting the effects of ageing
    • G09G2320/048Preventing or counteracting the effects of ageing using evaluation of the usage time
    • GPHYSICS
    • G09EDUCATION; CRYPTOGRAPHY; DISPLAY; ADVERTISING; SEALS
    • G09GARRANGEMENTS OR CIRCUITS FOR CONTROL OF INDICATING DEVICES USING STATIC MEANS TO PRESENT VARIABLE INFORMATION
    • G09G2320/00Control of display operating conditions
    • G09G2320/06Adjustment of display parameters
    • G09G2320/0693Calibration of display systems
    • GPHYSICS
    • G09EDUCATION; CRYPTOGRAPHY; DISPLAY; ADVERTISING; SEALS
    • G09GARRANGEMENTS OR CIRCUITS FOR CONTROL OF INDICATING DEVICES USING STATIC MEANS TO PRESENT VARIABLE INFORMATION
    • G09G3/00Control arrangements or circuits, of interest only in connection with visual indicators other than cathode-ray tubes
    • G09G3/20Control arrangements or circuits, of interest only in connection with visual indicators other than cathode-ray tubes for presentation of an assembly of a number of characters, e.g. a page, by composing the assembly by combination of individual elements arranged in a matrix no fixed position being assigned to or needed to be assigned to the individual characters or partial characters
    • G09G3/22Control arrangements or circuits, of interest only in connection with visual indicators other than cathode-ray tubes for presentation of an assembly of a number of characters, e.g. a page, by composing the assembly by combination of individual elements arranged in a matrix no fixed position being assigned to or needed to be assigned to the individual characters or partial characters using controlled light sources
    • G09G3/30Control arrangements or circuits, of interest only in connection with visual indicators other than cathode-ray tubes for presentation of an assembly of a number of characters, e.g. a page, by composing the assembly by combination of individual elements arranged in a matrix no fixed position being assigned to or needed to be assigned to the individual characters or partial characters using controlled light sources using electroluminescent panels
    • G09G3/32Control arrangements or circuits, of interest only in connection with visual indicators other than cathode-ray tubes for presentation of an assembly of a number of characters, e.g. a page, by composing the assembly by combination of individual elements arranged in a matrix no fixed position being assigned to or needed to be assigned to the individual characters or partial characters using controlled light sources using electroluminescent panels semiconductive, e.g. using light-emitting diodes [LED]
    • G09G3/3208Control arrangements or circuits, of interest only in connection with visual indicators other than cathode-ray tubes for presentation of an assembly of a number of characters, e.g. a page, by composing the assembly by combination of individual elements arranged in a matrix no fixed position being assigned to or needed to be assigned to the individual characters or partial characters using controlled light sources using electroluminescent panels semiconductive, e.g. using light-emitting diodes [LED] organic, e.g. using organic light-emitting diodes [OLED]
    • G09G3/3225Control arrangements or circuits, of interest only in connection with visual indicators other than cathode-ray tubes for presentation of an assembly of a number of characters, e.g. a page, by composing the assembly by combination of individual elements arranged in a matrix no fixed position being assigned to or needed to be assigned to the individual characters or partial characters using controlled light sources using electroluminescent panels semiconductive, e.g. using light-emitting diodes [LED] organic, e.g. using organic light-emitting diodes [OLED] using an active matrix
    • G09G3/3233Control arrangements or circuits, of interest only in connection with visual indicators other than cathode-ray tubes for presentation of an assembly of a number of characters, e.g. a page, by composing the assembly by combination of individual elements arranged in a matrix no fixed position being assigned to or needed to be assigned to the individual characters or partial characters using controlled light sources using electroluminescent panels semiconductive, e.g. using light-emitting diodes [LED] organic, e.g. using organic light-emitting diodes [OLED] using an active matrix with pixel circuitry controlling the current through the light-emitting element
    • G09G3/3241Control arrangements or circuits, of interest only in connection with visual indicators other than cathode-ray tubes for presentation of an assembly of a number of characters, e.g. a page, by composing the assembly by combination of individual elements arranged in a matrix no fixed position being assigned to or needed to be assigned to the individual characters or partial characters using controlled light sources using electroluminescent panels semiconductive, e.g. using light-emitting diodes [LED] organic, e.g. using organic light-emitting diodes [OLED] using an active matrix with pixel circuitry controlling the current through the light-emitting element the current through the light-emitting element being set using a data current provided by the data driver, e.g. by using a two-transistor current mirror
    • GPHYSICS
    • G09EDUCATION; CRYPTOGRAPHY; DISPLAY; ADVERTISING; SEALS
    • G09GARRANGEMENTS OR CIRCUITS FOR CONTROL OF INDICATING DEVICES USING STATIC MEANS TO PRESENT VARIABLE INFORMATION
    • G09G3/00Control arrangements or circuits, of interest only in connection with visual indicators other than cathode-ray tubes
    • G09G3/20Control arrangements or circuits, of interest only in connection with visual indicators other than cathode-ray tubes for presentation of an assembly of a number of characters, e.g. a page, by composing the assembly by combination of individual elements arranged in a matrix no fixed position being assigned to or needed to be assigned to the individual characters or partial characters
    • G09G3/22Control arrangements or circuits, of interest only in connection with visual indicators other than cathode-ray tubes for presentation of an assembly of a number of characters, e.g. a page, by composing the assembly by combination of individual elements arranged in a matrix no fixed position being assigned to or needed to be assigned to the individual characters or partial characters using controlled light sources
    • G09G3/30Control arrangements or circuits, of interest only in connection with visual indicators other than cathode-ray tubes for presentation of an assembly of a number of characters, e.g. a page, by composing the assembly by combination of individual elements arranged in a matrix no fixed position being assigned to or needed to be assigned to the individual characters or partial characters using controlled light sources using electroluminescent panels
    • G09G3/32Control arrangements or circuits, of interest only in connection with visual indicators other than cathode-ray tubes for presentation of an assembly of a number of characters, e.g. a page, by composing the assembly by combination of individual elements arranged in a matrix no fixed position being assigned to or needed to be assigned to the individual characters or partial characters using controlled light sources using electroluminescent panels semiconductive, e.g. using light-emitting diodes [LED]
    • G09G3/3208Control arrangements or circuits, of interest only in connection with visual indicators other than cathode-ray tubes for presentation of an assembly of a number of characters, e.g. a page, by composing the assembly by combination of individual elements arranged in a matrix no fixed position being assigned to or needed to be assigned to the individual characters or partial characters using controlled light sources using electroluminescent panels semiconductive, e.g. using light-emitting diodes [LED] organic, e.g. using organic light-emitting diodes [OLED]
    • G09G3/3225Control arrangements or circuits, of interest only in connection with visual indicators other than cathode-ray tubes for presentation of an assembly of a number of characters, e.g. a page, by composing the assembly by combination of individual elements arranged in a matrix no fixed position being assigned to or needed to be assigned to the individual characters or partial characters using controlled light sources using electroluminescent panels semiconductive, e.g. using light-emitting diodes [LED] organic, e.g. using organic light-emitting diodes [OLED] using an active matrix
    • G09G3/3233Control arrangements or circuits, of interest only in connection with visual indicators other than cathode-ray tubes for presentation of an assembly of a number of characters, e.g. a page, by composing the assembly by combination of individual elements arranged in a matrix no fixed position being assigned to or needed to be assigned to the individual characters or partial characters using controlled light sources using electroluminescent panels semiconductive, e.g. using light-emitting diodes [LED] organic, e.g. using organic light-emitting diodes [OLED] using an active matrix with pixel circuitry controlling the current through the light-emitting element
    • G09G3/3241Control arrangements or circuits, of interest only in connection with visual indicators other than cathode-ray tubes for presentation of an assembly of a number of characters, e.g. a page, by composing the assembly by combination of individual elements arranged in a matrix no fixed position being assigned to or needed to be assigned to the individual characters or partial characters using controlled light sources using electroluminescent panels semiconductive, e.g. using light-emitting diodes [LED] organic, e.g. using organic light-emitting diodes [OLED] using an active matrix with pixel circuitry controlling the current through the light-emitting element the current through the light-emitting element being set using a data current provided by the data driver, e.g. by using a two-transistor current mirror
    • G09G3/325Control arrangements or circuits, of interest only in connection with visual indicators other than cathode-ray tubes for presentation of an assembly of a number of characters, e.g. a page, by composing the assembly by combination of individual elements arranged in a matrix no fixed position being assigned to or needed to be assigned to the individual characters or partial characters using controlled light sources using electroluminescent panels semiconductive, e.g. using light-emitting diodes [LED] organic, e.g. using organic light-emitting diodes [OLED] using an active matrix with pixel circuitry controlling the current through the light-emitting element the current through the light-emitting element being set using a data current provided by the data driver, e.g. by using a two-transistor current mirror the data current flowing through the driving transistor during a setting phase, e.g. by using a switch for connecting the driving transistor to the data driver

Abstract

A method and system for programming, calibrating and driving a light emitting device display is provided. The system may include extracting a time dependent parameter of a pixel for calibration.

Description

, ,.
~

Method and System for Programming, Calibrating and Driving a Light Emitting Device Display FIELD OF INVENTION

[0001] The present invention relates to display technologies, more specifically a method and system for programming, calibrating and driving a light emitting device display.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0002] Recently active-matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) displays with amorphous silicon (a-Si), poly-silicon, organic, or other driving backplane have become more attractive due to advantages over active matrix liquid crystal displays.
For example, the advantages include: with a-Si besides its low temperature fabrication that broadens the use of different substrates and makes feasible flexible displays, its low cost fabrication, high resolution, and a wide viewing angle.

[0003] An AMOLED display includes an array of rows and columns of pixels, each having an organic light-emitting diode (OLED) and backplane electronics arranged in the array of rows and columns. Since the OLED is a current driven device, the pixel circuit of the AMOLED should be capable of providing an accurate and constant drive current.

[0004] U.S. patent No. 6,594, 606 discloses a method and system for calibrating passive pixels. U.S. patent No. 6,594, 606 measures data line voltage and uses the measurement for pre-charge. However, this technique does not provide the accuracy needed for active matrix, since the active matrix calibration should work for both backplane aging and OLED aging. Further, after pre-charge, current programming must be performed. Current-programming of current driven pixels is slow due to parasitic line capacitances and suffers from non-uniformity for large displays. The speed may be an issue when programming with small currents.

[0005] Other compensation techniques have been introduced. However, there is still a need to provide a method and system which is capable of providing constant brightness, achieving high accuracy and reducing the effect of the aging of the pixel circuit.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0006] It is an object of the invention to provide e method and system that obviates or mitigates at least one of the disadvantages of existing systems.

[0007] In accordance with an aspect of the present invention there is provided a method of real-time calibration for a display array having a plurality of pixel circuits arranged in row and column, including the steps of: generating a priority list of pixels, which is used to prioritize pixels for calibration based on display and previous calibration data, the priority list being used to select one or more (n) pixels which are programmed with currents higher than a threshold current for calibration; selecting n pixels in a selected column of the display array from the linked list; implementing programming to the pixels in the selected column, including: monitoring a pixel current for the n pixels and obtaining calibration data; updating a compensation memory based on the calibration data for calibration; sorting the priority list for the next programming.

[0008] In accordance with a further aspect of the present invention there is provided a system for real-time calibration for a display array having a plurality of pixel circuits arranged in row and column, each pixel circuit having a light emitting device and a driving transistor, the system including: a calibration scheduler for controlling programming and calibration of the display array, including: a priority list for listing one or more pixels for calibration based on display data; module for enabling, during a programming cycle, calibration mode for one or more pixels in the selected column, which are selected from the priority list, and during a programming cycle, enabling normal operation mode for the rest of the pixels in the selected column; a monitor for monitoring a pixel current for the pixels in the calibration mode through the selected column; a generator for generating a calibration data based on the monitoring result; a memory for storing calibration data; and an adjuster for adjusting a programming data applied to the display array based on the calibration data when the pixel on the normal operation mode is programmed.

[0009] In accordance with a further aspect of the present invention there is provided a system for a display array having a pixel circuit, the pixel circuit being programmed through a data line, the system including: a data source for providing a programming data into the pixel circuit; a current-controlled voltage source associated with the voltage source for converting a current on the data line to a voltage associated with the current to extract a time dependent parameter of the pixel circuit.

[0010] In accordance with a further aspect of the present invention there is provided a system for a display array including a plurality of pixel circuits, each pixel circuit including a driving transistor, at least one switch transistor, a storage capacitor and a light emitting device, the system including: a monitor for monitoring a current or voltage on the pixel circuit; a data process unit for controlling the operation of the display array, the data process unit extracting information on an aging of the pixel circuit, based on the monitored current or voltage and determining a state of the pixel circuit; a driver controlled by the data process unit and for providing programming and calibration data to the pixel circuit, based on the state of the pixel circuit.

[0011 ] In accordance with a further aspect of the present invention there is provided a method of driving a display array, the display array including a plurality of pixel circuits, each pixel circuit including a driving transistor, at least one switch transistor, a storage capacitor and a light emitting device, the method including the steps o~
applying a current or voltage to the pixel circuit; monitoring a current or voltage flowing through the pixel circuit; extracting information on an aging of the pixel circuit, based on the monitored current or voltage and determining the state of the pixel circuit;
providing operation voltage to the pixel circuit, including determining programming and calibration data for the pixel circuit based on the state of the pixel circuit.

[0012] In accordance with a further aspect of the present invention there is provided a method of driving a display array, the display array including a plurality of pixel circuits, each pixel circuit including a driving transistor, at least one switch transistor, a storage capacitor and a light emitting device, the method including the steps of:
applying a current or voltage to the light emitting device; monitoring a current or voltage flowing through the light emitting device; predicting a shift in the voltage of the light emitting device, based on the monitored current or voltage and determining the state of the pixel circuit; and providing, to the light emitting device, a bias associated with the shift in the voltage of the light emitting device.

[0013] In accordance with a further aspect of the present invention there is provided a system for driving a display array, the display array including a plurality of pixel circuits, each pixel circuit including a driving transistor, at least one switch transistor, a storage capacitor and a light emitting device, the system including: a monitor for monitoring a current or voltage on the pixel circuit; a data process.unit for predicting a shift in the voltage of the light emitting device, based on the monitored current or voltage and determining the state of the pixel circuit; and a circuit for providing, to the light emitting device, a bias associated with the shift in the voltage of the light emitting device.

[0014] In accordance with an aspect of the present invention there is provided a system for a display array including a plurality of pixel circuits, each pixel circuit having a driving transistor, at least one switch transistor, a storage capacitor and a light emitting device, the light emitting device being located at a programming path for programming the pixel circuit, the system including: a controller for controlling the operation of the display array; a driver for providing operation voltage to the pixel circuit based on the control of the controller; and the driver providing the operation voltage to the pixel circuit during a programming cycle such that the light emitting device being removed from the programming path.

[0015] This summary of the invention does not necessarily describe all features of the invention.

[0016] Other aspects and features of the present invention will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art from a review of the following detailed description of preferred embodiments in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0017] These and other features of the invention will become more apparent from the following description in which reference is made to the appended drawings wherein:
[0018] Figure 1 is a flow chart showing a process for calibration-scheduling in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention;

[0019] Figure 2 is a diagram showing an example of a system structure for implementing the calibration-scheduling of Figure 1;

[0020] Figure 3 is a diagram showing a system architecture for a voltage-extracting, programming and driving in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention;
[0021 ] Figure 4 is a diagram showing an example of the extracting, programming and driving system of Figure 3 and a pixel circuit;

[0022] Figure 5 is a diagram showing a further example of the extracting, programming and driving system of Figure 3 and a pixel circuit;

[0023] Figure 6 is a diagram showing a further example of the extracting, programming and driving system of Figure 3 and a pixel circuit;

[0024] Figure 7 is a diagram showing a further example of the extracting, programming and driving system of Figure 3 and a pixel circuit;

[0025] Figure 8 is a diagram showing a pixel circuit to which a step-calibration driving in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention is applied;

[0026] Figure 9 is a diagram showing an example of a driver and extraction block and the driving transistor of Figure 8;

[0027] Figure 10 is a diagram showing an example of an extraction algorithm implemented by a DPU block of Figure 9;

[0028] Figure 11 is a diagram showing a further example of the extraction algorithm implemented by the DPU block of Figure 9;

[0029] Figure 12 is a timing diagram showing an example of waveforms for the step-calibration driving;

[0030] Figure 13 is a timing diagram showing a further example of waveforms for the step-calibration driving;

[0031] Figure 14 is a diagram showing a pixel circuit to which the step-calibration driving is applicable;

[0032] Figure 15 is a graph showing the results of simulation for the step-calibration driving;

[0033] Figure 16 is a diagram showing an example of a system architecture for the step-calibration driving with a display array;

[0034] Figure 17 is a timing diagram showing an example of waveforms applied to the system architecture of Figure 16;

[0035] Figure 18 is a timing diagram showing an example of waveforms for a voltage/current extraction;

[0036] Figure 19 is a timing diagram showing a further example of waveforms for the voltage/current extraction;

[0037] Figure 20 is a diagram showing a pixel circuit to which the voltage/current extraction of Figure 19 is applicable;

[0038] Figure 21 is a timing diagram showing a further example of waveforms for the voltage/current extraction;

[0039] Figure 22 is a diagram showing a pixel circuit to which the voltage/current extraction of Figure 21 is applicable;

[0040] Figure 23 is a diagram showing a mirror based pixel circuit to which OLED
removing in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention is applied;

[0041 ] Figure 24 is a diagram showing a programming path of Figure 23 when applying the OLED removing;

[0042] Figure 25 is a diagram showing an example of a system architecture for the OLED removing; and [0043] Figure 26 is a graph showing the simulation result for the voltage on IDATA
line for different threshold voltage.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS OF THE
INVENTION

[0044] Embodiments of the present invention are described using a pixel including a light emitting device and a plurality of transistors. The light emitting device may be an organic light emitting diode (OLED). It is noted that "pixel" and "pixel circuit" may be used interchangeably.

[0045] Real-time calibration-scheduling for a display array having a plurality of pixels is described in detail. Figure 1 illustrates a process for a calibration-scheduling in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention. According to this technique, the pixels are calibrated based on their aging and/or usage during the normal operation of the display array.

[0046] A linked list of pixels is generated in step S2. The linked list contains an identification of a pixel with high brightness for calibration. The linked list is used to schedule the priority in calibration.

[0047] In step S4, "n" is chosen based on the display size and expected instability with time (e.g. shift in characteristics of transistors and light emitting device).
"n" represents the number of pixels that are calibrated in each programming cycle. "n" may be one or more than one.

[0048] Then programming cycle starts at step S6. The step S6 includes steps S8-S16.
The steps S8-S16 are implemented on a selected column of the display array.

[0049] In step S8, "n" pixels in the selected column are selected from the beginning of the linked list, hereinafter referred to as "Selected Pixels".

[0050] In step S 10, "Calibration Mode" is enabled for the Selected Pixels, and "Normal Operation Mode" is enabled for the rest of the pixels in the selected column of the display array.

[0051 ] In step S 12, all pixels in the selected column are programmed by a voltage source driver (e.g. 28 of Figure 2) which is connected to a data line of the pixel.
[0052] For the Selected Pixels, current flowing through the data line is monitored during the programming cycle. For the pixels other than the Selected Pixels in the selected column, the corresponding programming voltage is boosted using data stored in a memory (e.g. 34 of Figure 2), hereinafter referred to as "AV compensation memory".

[0053] In step S14, the monitored current is compared with the expected current that must flow through the data line. Then, a calibration data curve for the Selected Pixels is generated. The AV compensation memory is updated based on the calibration data curve.

[0054] The calibration data curve stored in the AV compensation memory for a pixel will be used to boost programming voltage for that pixel in the next programming cycles when that pixel is in the Normal Operation Mode.

[0055] In step S16, the identifications of the Selected Pixels are sent to the end of the linked list. The Selected Pixels have the lowest priority in the linked list for calibration.
[0056] During display operation (S6-S 16), the linked list will provide a sorted priority list of pixels that must be calibrated. It is noted that in the description, the term "linked list" and the term "priority list" may be used interchangeably.

[0057] The operation goes back (S 18) to the step S8. The next programming cycle starts. A new column in the display array is activated (selected), and, new "n" pixels in the new activated column are selected from the top of the linked list. The AV
compensation memory is updated using the calibration data obtained for the new Selected Pixels.

[0058] The number of the Selected Pixels, "n", is now described in detail. As described above, the number "n" is determined based on the display size and expected instability in device characteristics with time. It is assumed that the total number of pixels N is N
= 3xm1xm2, where ml and m2 are the number of rows and columns in the display, respectively.
[0059] The highest rate in characteristics shift is K(=0I/At.I). Each programming cycle takes t=1/f.m2. The maximum expected shift in characteristics after the entire display is calibrated is AI/I = K.t.N/n < e, where e is the allowed error. After this the calibration can be redone from the beginning, and the error is eliminated. This shows that n>
K.t.N/e or n> 3.K.ml/f.e. For instance, if K = 1%/hr, ml = 1024, f= 60 Hz, and e -S-=0.1 %, then n> 0.14, which implies that it is needed to calibrate once in 5 programming cycles. This is achievable with one calibration unit, which operates only one time in 5 programming cycles. Each calibration unit enables calibration of one pixel at a programming cycle. If e= 0.01%, n> 1.4. This means that two calibration units calibrating two pixels in each programming cycle are required. This shows that it is feasible to implement this calibration system with very low cost.

[0060] The frequency of calibration can be reduced automatically as the display ages, since shifts in characteristics will become slower as the time progresses. In addition, the pixels that are selected for calibration can be programmed with different currents depending on display data. The only condition is that their programming current is larger than a reference current. Therefore, the calibration can be performed at multiple brightness levels for one pixel to achieve higher accuracy.

[0061] The linked list is described in detail. In the linked list, the pixels with high brightness for calibration are listed. The display data is used to determine the pixels with high brightness for calibration. Calibration at low currents is slow and often not accurate. In addition, maximum shift in characteristics occurs for pixels with high current. Thus, in order to improve the accuracy and speed of calibration, the pixels, which must be programmed with currents higher than a threshold current ITH, are selected and stored in the linked list.

[0062] ITH is a variable and may be "0". For ITH = 0, all pixels are listed in the linked list, and the calibration is performed for all pixels irrespective of their programming current.

[0063] The calibration-scheduling technique described above is applicable to any current programmed pixels, for example, but not limited to, a current mirror based pixel.

[0064] Figure 2 illustrates an example of a system structure for implementing the calibration-scheduling of Figure 1. A system 30 of Figure 2 for implementing calibration-scheduling algorithm is provided to a display array 10 having a plurality of pixel circuits 12. The pixel circuit 12 is a current programmed pixel circuit, such as, but not limited to a current mirror based pixel. The pixel circuits 12 are arranged in row and column.

[0065] The pixel circuit 12 may include an OLED and a plurality of transistors (e.g.
TFTs). The transistor may be fabricated using amorphous silicon, nano/micro crystalline silicon, poly silicon, organic semiconductors technologies (e.g.
organic TFT), NMOS/PMOS technology or CMOS technology (e.g. MOSFET). The display array 10 may be an AMOLED display array.

[0066] The pixel circuit 12 is operated by a gate line 14 connected to a gate driver 20, a data line 16 connected to a voltage data driver 28, and a power line connected to a power supply 24. In Figure 2, two data lines, two gate lines and two power lines are shown as an example. It is apparent that more than two data lines, two gate lines and two power lines may be provided to the display array 10.

[0067] The system 30 includes a calibration scheduler and memory block 32 for controlling programming and calibration of the display array 10, and a AV

compensation memory 34 for storing AV compensation voltage (value). In each programming cycle, a column of the display array 10 is selected. The calibration scheduler and memory block 32 enables Normal Operation Mode or Calibration Mode for the selected column (i.e., data line) during that programming cycle.

[0068] The system 30 further includes a monitoring system for monitoring and measuring a pixel current. The monitoring system includes switches 36 and 38 and a voltage sensor 40 with an accurate resistor 42. In Figure 2, the switches 36 and 38 are provided for each data line as an example.

[0069] The system 30 further includes a generator for generating AV
compensation voltage based on the monitoring result. The generator includes an analog/digital converter (A/D) 44, a comparator 46, and a translator 48. The A/D 44 converts the analog output of the voltage sensor 40 into a digital output. The comparator compares the digital output to an output from the translator 48. The translator 48 implements function f(V) on a digital data input 52. The translator 48 converts the current data input 52 to the voltage data input through f(v). The result of the comparison by the comparator 46 is stored in the AV compensation memory 34.

[0070] The system 30 further includes an adder 50 for adding the digital data input 52 and the AV compensation voltage stored in the AV compensation memory 34. The voltage data driver 28 drives a data line based on the output of the adder 50.
The programming data for the data line is adjusted by adding the AV compensation voltage.

[0071] When the calibration scheduler and memory block 32 enables the Normal Operation Mode for a selected data line, the switch 36 is activated. The voltage output from the voltage data driver 28 is directly applied to the pixel on that data line.

[0072] When the calibration scheduler and memory block 32 enables the Calibration Mode for that data line, the switch 38 is activated. The voltage is applied to the pixel on that data line through the accurate resistor 42. The voltage drop across the resistor 42 at the final stages of the programming time (i.e. when initial transients are finished) is measured by the voltage sensor 40. The voltage drop monitored by the voltage sensor 40 is converted to digital data by the A/D 44. The resulting value of the voltage drop is proportional to the current flowing through the pixel if the pixel is a current programmed pixel circuit. This value is compared by the comparator 46 to the expected value obtained by the translator 48.

[0073] The difference between the expected value and the measured value is stored in the AV compensation memory 34, and will be used for a subsequent programming cycle. The difference will be used to adjust the data voltage for programming of that pixel in future.

[0074] The calibration scheduler and memory block 32 may include the linked list described above. In the beginning, the linked list is generated automatically.
It may be just a list of pixels. However, during the operation it is modified.

[0075] The calibration of the pixel circuits with high brightness guarantees the high speed and accurate calibration that is needed in large or small area displays.

[0076] Since the display array 10 is driven using a voltage programming technique, it is fast and can be used for high-resolution and large area displays.

[0077] Due to speed, accuracy, and ease of implementation, the applications of the calibration-scheduling technique ranges from electroluminescent devices used for cellphones, personal organizers, monitors, TVs, to large area display boards.
[0078] The system 30 monitors and measures voltage drop which depends on time dependent parameters of the pixel, and generates a desirable programming data.
However, the time dependent parameters of the pixel may be extracted by any mechanisms other than that of Figure 2.

[0079] A further technique for programming, extracting time dependent parameters of a pixel and driving the pixel is described in detail with reference to Figures 3-7. This technique includes voltage-extracting for calibration. Programming data is calibrated with the extracted information, resulting in a stable pixel current over time.
Using this technique, the aging of the pixel is extracted.

[0080] Figure 3 illustrates a system architecture for implementing a voltage-extracting, programming and driving in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.
The system of Figure 3 implements the voltage-extracting and programming to a current mode pixel circuit 60. The pixel circuit 60 includes a light emitting device and a plurality of transistors having a driving transistor (not shown). The transistors may be TFTs.

[0081] The pixel circuit 60 is selected by a select line SEL and is driven by DATA on a data line 61. A voltage source 62 is provided to write a programming voltage VP into the pixel circuit 60. A current-controlled voltage source (CCVS) 63 having a positive node and a negative node is provided to convert the current on the data line 61 to a voltage Vext. A display controller and scheduler 64 operates the pixel circuit 60. The display controller and scheduler 64 monitors an extracted voltage Vext output from the CCVS 63 and then controls the voltage source 62.

[0082] The resistance of CCVS 63 is negligible. Thus the current on the data line 61 is written as:

ILine Ipiexl _ -P /~~ ~ = P-vT)z = = = (1) where ILine represents the current on the data line 61, ip1eXj represents a pixel current, VT
represents the threshold voltage of the driving transistor included in the pixel circuit 60, and [i represents the gain parameter in the TFT characteristics.

[0083] As the threshold voltage of the driving TFT increases during the time, the current oin the data line 61 decreases. By monitoring the extracted voltage Vext, the display controller and scheduler 64 determines the amount of shift in the threshold voltage.

[0084] The threshold voltage VT of the driving transistor can be calculate as:
VT = VP-(ILine/P)0.5 . . . (2) [0085] The programming voltage VP is modified with the extracted information.
The extraction procedure can be implemented for one or several pixels during each frame time.

[0086] Figure 4 illustrates an example of a system for the voltage-extracting, programming and driving of Figure 3, which is employed with a top-emission current-cell pixel circuit 70. The pixel circuit 70 includes an OLED 71, a storage capacitor 72, a driving transistor 73 and switch transistors 74 and 75.

[0087] The transistors 73, 74 and 75 may be n-type TFTs. However, these transistors 73, 74 and 75 may be p-type transistors. The voltage-extracting and programming technique applied to the pixel circuit 70 is also applicable to a pixel circuit having p-type transistors.

[0088] The driving transistor 73 is connected to a data line 76 through the switch transistor 75, and is connected to the OLED 71, and also is connected to the storage capacitor 72 through the switch transistor 74. The gate terminal of the driving transistor 73 is connected to the storage capacitor 72. The gate terminals of the switch transistors 74 and 75 are connected to a select line SEL. The OLED 71 is connected to a voltage supply electrode or line VDD. The pixel circuit 70 is selected by the select line SEL and is driven by DATA on the data line 76.

[0089] A current conveyor (CC) 77 has X, Y and Z terminals, and is used to extract a current on the data line 76 without loading it. A voltage source 78 applies programming voltage to the Y terminal of the CC 77. In the CC 77, the X temiinal is forced by feedback to have the same voltage as that of the Y terminal. Also, the current on the X terminal is duplicated into the Z terminal of the CC 77. A current-controlled voltage source (CCVS) 79 has a positive node and a negative node. The CCVS 79 converts the current on the Z terminal of the CC 77 into a voltage Vext.

[0090] Vext is provided to the display controller and scheduler 64 of Figure 3, where the threshold voltage of the driving transistor 73 is extracted. The display controller and scheduler 64 controls the voltage source 78 based on the extracted threshold voltage.

[0091] Figure 5 illustrates a further example of a system for the voltage-extracting, programming, and driving of Figure 3, which is employed with a bottom-emission current-cell pixel circuit 80. The pixel circuit 80 includes an OLED 81, a storage capacitor 82, a driving transistor 83, and switch transistors 84 and 85. The transistors 83, 84 and 85 may be n-type TFTs. However, these *transistors 83, 84 and 85 may be p-type transistors.

[0092] The driving transistor 83 is connected to a data line 86 through the switch transistor 85, and is connected to the OLED 81, and also is connected to the storage capacitor 82. The gate terminal of the driving transistor 83 is connected to a voltage supply line VDD through the switch transistor 84. The gate terminals of the switch transistors 84 and 85 are connected to a select line SEL. The pixel circuit 80 is selected by the select line SEL and is driven by DATA on the data line 86.

[0093] A current conveyor (CC) 87 has X, Y and Z terminals, and is used to extract a current on the data line 86 without loading it. A voltage source 88 applies a negative programming voltage at the Y terminal of the CC 87. In the CC 87, the X
terminal is forced by feedback to have the same voltage as that of the Y terminal. Also, the current on the X terninal is duplicated into the Z terminal of the CC 87. A current-controlled voltage source (CCVS) 89 has a positive node and a negative node. The CCVS 89 converts the current of the Z terminal of the CC 87 into a voltage Vext.

[0094] Vext is provided to the display controller and scheduler 64 of Figure 3, where the threshold voltage of the driving transistor 83 is extracted. The display controller and scheduler 64 controls the voltage source 88 based on the extracted threshold voltage.

[0095] Figure 6 illustrates a further example of a system for the voltage-extracting, programming and driving of Figure 3, which is employed with a top-emission current-mirror pixel circuit 90. The pixel circuit 90 includes an OLED 91, a storage capacitor 92, mirror transistors 93 and 94, and switch transistors 95 and 96.
The transistors 93, 94, 95 and 96 maybe n-type TFTs. However, these transistors 93, 94, 95 and 96 may be p-type transistors.

[0096] The mirror transistor 93 is connected to a data line 97 through the switch transistor 95, and is connected to the storage capacitor 92 through the switch transistor 96. The gate terminals of the mirror transistors 93 and 94 are connected to the storage capacitor 92 and the switch transistor 96. The mirror transistor 94 is connected to a voltage supply electrode or line VDD through the OLED 91. The gate terminals of the switch transistors 85 and 86 are connected to a select line SEL. The pixel circuit 90 is selected by the select line SEL and is driven by DATA on the data line 97.

[0097] A current conveyor (CC) 98 has X, Y and Z terminals, and is used to extract the current of the data line 97 without loading it. A voltage source 99 applies a positive programming voltage at the Y terminal of the CC 98. In the CC 98, the X
terminal is forced by feedback to have the same voltage as the voltage of the Y terminal.
Also, the current on the X terminal is duplicated into the Z terminal of the CC 98. A
current-controlled voltage source (CCVS) 100 has a positive node and a negative node.
The CCVS 100 converts a current on the Z terminal of the CC 98 into a voltage Vext.

[0098] Vext is provided to the display controller and scheduler 64 of Figure 3, where the threshold voltage of the driving transistor 93 is extracted. The display controller and scheduler 64 controls the voltage source 99 based on the extracted threshold voltage.

[0099] Figure 7 illustrates a further example of a system for the voltage-extracting, programming and driving of Figure 3, which is employed with a bottom-emission current-mirror pixel circuit 110. The pixel circuit 110 includes an OLED 111, a storage capacitor 112, mirror transistors 113 and 116, and switch transistors 114 and 115. The transistors 113, 114, 115 and 116 may be n-type TFTs. However, these transistors 113, 114, 115 and 116 may be p-type transistors.

[00100] The mirror transistor 113 is connected to a data line 117 through the switch transistor 114, and is connected to the storage capacitor 112 through the switch transistor 115. The gate terminals of the mirror transistors 113 and 116 are connected to the storage capacitor 112 and the switch transistor 115. The mirror transistor 116 is connected to a voltage supply line VDD. The mirror transistors 113, 116 and the storage capacitor 112 are connected to the OLED 111. The gate terminals of the switch transistors 114 and 115 are connected to a select line SEL. The pixel circuit 110 is selected by the select line SEL and is driven by DATA on the data line 117.

[00101] A current conveyor (CC) 118 has X, Y and Z terminals, and is used to extract the current of the data line 117 without loading it. A voltage source 119 applies a positive programming voltage at the Y terminal of the CC 118. In the CC 118, the X

terminal is forced by feedback to have the same voltage as the voltage of the Y terminal of the CC 118. Also, the current on the X terminal is duplicated into the Z
terminal of the CC 118. A current-controlled voltage source (CCVS) 120 has a positive node and a negative node. The 120 converts the current on the Z terminal of the CC 118 into a voltage Vext.

[00102] Vext is provided to the display controller and scheduler 64 of Figure 3, where the threshold voltage of the driving transistor 113 is extracted. The display controller and scheduler 64 controls the voltage source 119 based on the extracted threshold voltage.

[00103] Referring to Figures 3-7, using the voltage-extracting technique, time dependent parameters of a pixel (e.g. threshold shift) can be extracted. Thus, the programming voltage can be calibrated with the extracted infonnation, resulting in a stable pixel current over time. Since the voltage of the OLED (i.e. 71 of Figure 4, 81 of Figure 5, 91 of Figure 6, 111 of Figure 7) affects the current directly, the voltage-extracting driving technique described above can also be used to extract OLED
degradation as well as the threshold shift.

[00104] The voltage-extracting technique described above can be used with any current-mode pixel circuit, including current-mirror and current-cell pixel circuit architectures, and are applicable to the display array 10 of Figure 2. A
stable current independent of pixel aging under prolonged display operation can be provided using the extracted information. Thus, the display operating lifetime is efficiently improved.
[00105] It is noted that the transistors in the pixel circuits of Figures 3-7 may be fabricated using amorphous silicon, nano/micro crystalline silicon, poly silicon, organic semiconductors technologies (e.g. organic TFT), NMOS/PMOS technology or CMOS
technology (e.g. MOSFET). The pixel circuits of Figures 3-7 may form AMOLED
display arrays.

[00106] A further technique for programming, extracting time dependent parameters of a pixel and driving the pixel is described in detail with reference to Figures 8-17. The technique includes a step-calibration driving technique. In the step-calibration driving technique, information on the aging of a pixel (e.g.
threshold shift) is extracted. The extracted information will be used to generate a stable pixel current/luminance. Despite using the one-bit extraction technique, the resolution of the extracted aging is defined by display drivers. Also, the dynamic effects are compensated since the pixel aging is extracted under operating condition, which is similar to the driving cycle.

[00107] Figure 8 illustrates a pixel circuit 160 to which a step-calibration driving in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention is applied. The pixel circuit 160 includes an OLED 161, a storage capacitor 162, and a driving transistor 163 and switch transistors 164 and 165. The pixel circuit 160 is a current-programmed, pixel circuit. A plurality of the pixel circuits 160 may form an AMOLED
display.
[00108] The transistors 163, 164 and 165 are n-type TFTs. However, the transistors 163, 164 and 165 may be p-type TFTs. The step-calibration driving technique applied to the pixel circuit 160 is also applicable to a pixel circuit having p-type transistors. The transistors 163, 164 and 165 maybe fabricated using amorphous silicon, nano/micro crystalline silicoin, poly silicon, organic semiconductors technologies (e.g. organic TFT), NMOS/PMOS technology or CMOS technology (e.g.
MOSFET).

[00109] The gate terminal of the driving transistor 163 is connected to a signal line VDATA through the switch transistor 164, and also connected to the storage capacitor 162. The source terminal of the driving transistor 163 is connected to a common ground. The drain terminal of the driving transistor 163 is connected to a monitor line MONITOR through the switch transistor 165, and also is connected to the cathode electrode of the OLED 161.

[00110] The gate terminal of the switch transistor 164 is connected to a select line SELl. The source terminal of the switch transistor 164 is connected to the gate terminal of the driving transistor 163, and is connected to the storage capacitor 162.
The drain terminal of the switch transistor 164 is connected to VDATA.

[00111] The gate terminal of the switch transistor 165 is connected to a select line SEL2. The source terminal of the switch transistor 165 is connected to MONITOR.
The drain terminal of the switch transistor 165 is connected to the drain terminal of the driving transistor 163 and the cathode electrode of the OLED 161. The anode electrode of the OLED 161 is connected to a voltage supply electrode or line VDD.

[00112] The transistors 163 and 164 and the storage capacitor 162 are connected at node A3. The transistors 163 and 165 and the OLED 161 are connected at node B3.
[00113] Figure 9 illustrates an example of a driver and extraction block 170 along with the driving transistor 163 of Figure 8. In Figure 9, each of Rs 171 a and Rs 171b represents the ON resistance of the switch transistors (e.g. 164, 165 of Figure 8).
Cs represents the storage capacitor of the pixel, COLED represents the OLED

capacitance, and CP represents the line parasitic capacitance. In Figure 9, the OLED is presented as a capacitance.

[00114] A block 173 is used to extract the threshold voltage of the driving transistor, during the extraction cycle. The block 173 may be a current sense amplifier 4&

(SA) or a current comparator. In the description, the block 173 is referred to as "SA
block 173".

[00115] If the current of the MONITOR line is higher than a reference current (IREF), the output of the SA block 173 (i.e. Triggers of Figure 10, 11) becomes one. If the current of the MONITOR line is less than the reference current (IREF), the output of the SA block 173 becomes zero.

[00116] It is noted that the SA block 173 can be shared between few columns result in less overhead. Also, the calibration of the pixel circuit can be done one at a time, so the extraction circuits can be shared between the all columns.

[00117] A data process unit (DPU) block 172 is provided to control the programming cycle, contrast, and brightness, to perform the calibration procedure and to control the driving cycle. The DPU block 172 implements extraction algorithm to extract (estimate) the threshold voltage of the driving transistor based on the output from the SA block 173, and controls a driver 174 which is connected to the driving transistor 163.

[00118] Figure 10 illustrates an example of the extraction algorithm implemented by the DPU block 172 of Figure 9. The algorithm of Figure 10 is in a part of the DPU block 172. In Figure 10, VT(i, j) represents the extracted threshold voltage for the pixel (i, j) at the previous extraction cycle, Vs represents the resolution of the driver 174, "i" represents a row of a pixel array and "j" represents a column of a pixel array. Trigger conveys the comparison results of the SA block 173 of Figure 9.

Less state 180 determines the situation in which the actual VT of the pixel is less than the predicted VT (V-rm), Equal_state 181 determines the situation in which the predicted VT (VTm) and the actual VT of the pixel are equal, and Great state 182 determines the situation in which the actual VT of the pixel is greater than the predicted VT
(VTM).
[00119] The DPU block 172 of Figure 9 determines an intermediate threshold voltage VTm as follows:

(Al) When s(i, j)=Less_state (180), the actual threshold voltage is less than VT(i, j), VTm is set to (VT (i, j)-Vs).

(A2) When s(i, j)=Equa1_state (181), the actual threshold voltage is equal to VT(i, j), VTm is set to VT (i, j).

(A3) When s(i, j)=Greater state (182), the actual threshold voltage is greater than VT(i, j), VTM is set to (VT(i, j)+ Vs).

where s(i, j) represents the previous state of the pixel (i, j) stored in a calibration memory (e.g. 208 of Figure 16).

[00120] Figure 11 illustrates a further example of the extraction algorithm implemented by the DPU block 172 of Figure 9. The algorithm of Figure 11 is in a part of the DPU block 172 of Figure 9. In Figure 11, VT(i, j) represents the extracted threshold voltage for the pixel (i, j) at the previous extraction cycle, Vs represents the resolution of the driver 174, "i" represents a row of a pixel array and "j"
represents a column of a pixel array. Trigger conveys the comparison results of the SA
block 173.
[00121] Further, in Figure 11, Vres represents the step that will be added/subtracted to the predicted VT (VTM) in order achieve the actual VT of the pixel, A represents the reduction gain of a prediction step, and K represents the increase gain of the prediction step.

[00122] The operation of Figure 11 is the same as that of Figure 10, except that it has gain extra states L2 and G2 for rapid extraction of abrupt changes. In the gain states, the step size is increased to follow the changes more rapidly. L1 and G1 are the transition states which define the VT change is abrupt or normal.

[00123] Figure 12 illustrates an example of waveforms applied to the pixel circuit 160 of Figure 8. In Figure 12, VCa11-Vg+VTM, and VDR =VP+ VT(i, j) +VUF, where VB represents the bias voltage during the extraction cycle, V-rm is defined based on the algorithm shown in Figure 10 or 11, VP represents a programming voltage, VT(i, j) represents the extracted threshold voltage at the previous extraction cycle, VREF
represents the source voltage of the driving transistor during the programming cycle.
[00124] Referring to Figures 8-12, the operation of the pixel circuit 160 includes operating cycles X51, X52, X53, and X54. In Figurel2, an extraction cycle is separated from a programming cycle. The extraction cycle includes X51 and X52, and the programming cycle includes X53. X54 is a driving cycle. At the end of the programming cycle, node A3 is charged to (Vp+ VT) where Vp is a programming voltage and VT is the threshold voltage of the driving transistor 163.

[00125] In the first operating cycle X51: SELl and SEL 2 are high. Node A3 is charged to V,a,, and node B3 is charged to VUF. Vcal is VB+VTM in which VB is a bias voltage, and VTm the predicted VT, and VREF should be larger than VDD-VoLEM
where VOLEDO is the ON voltage of the OLED 161.

[00126] In the second operating cycle X52: SELl goes to zero. The gate-source voltage of the driving transistor 163 is given by:

1o VGS=VB+VTM+AVB+OV-rM-OVn-OVH

where VGS represents the gate-source voltage of the driving transistor 163, OVB, AVTM, AVT2 and AVH are the dynamic effects depending on VB, VTM, VT2 and VH, respectively. VT2 represents the threshold voltage of the switch transistor 164, and VH
represents the change in the voltage of SELl at the beginning of second operating cycle X52 when it goes to zero.

[00127] The SA block 173 is tuned to sense the current larger than [i(VB)2, so that the gate-source voltage of the driving transistor 163 is larger than (VB +VT), where (3 is the gain parameter in the I-V characteristic of the driving transistor 163.

[00128] As a result, after few iterations, VTm and the extracted threshold voltage VT(i, j) for the pixel (i, j) converge to:

VTM=VT- Y '(VB+VT+VT2-Vx) - Cg2 /(2 ' Cs ) Y 1+Cg2 /(2'Cs) where Cgz represents the gate capacitance of the switch transistor 164.

[00129] In the third operating cycle X53: SELl is high. VDATA goes to VDR.
Node A3 is charged to [VP+VT(i, j)-y(VP-VB)].

~

[00130] In the fourth operating cycle X54: SEL1 and SEL2 go to zero.
Considering the dynamic effects, the gate-source voltage of the driving transistor 163 can be written as:

VGS=VP+VT
[00131] Therefore, the pixel current becomes independent of the static and dynamic effects of the threshold voltage shift.

[00132] In Figure 12, the extraction cycle and the programming cycle are shown as separated cycles. However, the extraction cycle and the programming cycle may be merged as shown in Figure 13. Figure 13 illustrates a further example of waveforms applied to the pixel circuit 160 of Figure 8.

[00133] Referring to Figures 8-11 and 13, the operation of the pixel circuit includes operating cycles X61, X62 and X63. Programming and extraction cycles are merged into the operating cycles X61 and X62. The operating cycle X63 is a driving cycle.

[00134] During the programming cycle, the pixel current is compared with the desired current, and the threshold voltage of the driving transistor is extracted with the algorithm of Figure 10 or 11. The pixel circuit 160 is programmed with VDR=VP+
VT
(i, j)+VRU during the operating cycle X61. Then the pixel current is monitored through the MONITOR line, and is compared with the desired current. Based on the comparison result and using the extraction algorithm of Figures 10 or 11, the threshold voltage VT (i, j) is updated.

[00135] In Figure 8, two select lines SELI and SEL2 are shown. However, a signal select line (e.g. SELl) can be used as a common select line to operate the switch transistors 164 and 165. When using the common select line, SELl of Figure 12 stays at high in the second operating cycle X52, and the VGS remains at (VB+VTM).
Therefore, the dynamic effects are not detected.

[00136] The step-calibration driving technique described above is applicable to the pixel circuit 190 of Figure 14. The pixel circuit 190 includes an OLED
191, a storage capacitor 192, and a driving transistor 193 and switch transistors 194 and 195.

The pixel circuit 190 is a current-programmed, 3-TFT pixel circuit. A
plurality of the pixel circuits 190 may form an AMOLED display.

[00137] The transistors 193, 194 and 195 are n-type TFTs. However, the transistors 193, 194 and 195 may be p-type TFTs. The step-calibration driving technique applied to the pixel circuit 190 is also applicable to a pixel circuit having p-type transistors. The transistors 193, 194 and 195 maybe fabricated using amorphous silicon, nano/micro crystalli.ne silicon, poly silicon, organic semiconductors technologies (e.g. organic TFT), NMOS/PMOS technology or CMOS technology (e.g.
MOSFET).

[00138] The gate terminal of the driving transistor 193 is connected to a signal line VDATA through the switch transistor 194, and also connected to the storage capacitor 192. The source terminal of the driving transistor 193 is connected to the anode electrode of the OLED 191, and is connected to a monitor line MONITOR
through the switch transistor 195. The drain terminal of the driving transistor 193 is connected to a voltage supply line VDD. The gate terminals of the transistors 194 and 195 are connected to select lines SELl and SEL2, respectively.

[00139] The transistors 193 and 194 and the storage capacitor 192 are connected at node A4. The transistor 195, the OLED 191 and the storage capacitor 192 are connected at node B4.

[00140] The structure of the pixel circuit 190 is similar to that of Figure 8, except that the OLED 191 is at the source terminal of the driving transistor 193. The operation of the pixel circuit 190 is the same as that of Figure 12 or 13.

[00141] Since the source terminal of the drive TFT 193 is forced to VREF
during the extraction cycle (X51 and X52 or X62), the extracted data is independent of the ground bouncing. Also, during the programming cycle (X53 or X61), the source terminal of the drive TFT is forced to VREF, the gate-source voltage of the drive TFT
becomes independent of the ground bouncing. As a result of these conditions, the pixel current is independent of ground bouncing.

[00142] Figure 15 illustrates the results of simulation for the step-calibration driving technique. In Figure 15, "Case I" represents an operation of Figure 8 where SELl goes to zero in the second operating cycle (X52 of Figure 12); "Case IP"
represents an operation of Figure 8 where SELl stays at high in the second operating cycle.

[00143] In Figure 15, OVTR is the minimum detectable shift in the threshold voltage of the driving transistor (e.g. 163 of Figure 8), AVT2R is the minimum detectable shift in the threshold voltage of the switch transistor (e.g. 164 of Figure 8), and IPL is the pixel current of the pixel during the driving cycle..

[00144] The pixel current of Case II is smaller than that of Case I for a given programming voltage due to the dynamic effects of the threshold voltage shift.
Also, the pixel current of Case II increases as the threshold voltage of the driving transistor increases (a), and decreases as the threshold voltage of the switch transistor decreases (b). However, the pixel current of Case I is stable. The maximum error induced in the pixel current is less than %0.5 for any shift in the threshold voltage of the driving and switch TFTs. It is obvious that AVT2R is larger than OVIR because the effect of a shift in VT on the pixel current is dominant. These two parameters are controlled by the resolution (Vs) of the driver (e.g. 174 of Figure 9), and the SNR of the SA
block (e.g.
193 of Figure 9). Since a shift smaller than OVTR cannot be detected, and also the time constant of threshold-shift is large, the extraction cycles (e.g. X51, X52 of Figure 12) can be done after a long time interval consisting of several frames, leading to lower power consumption. Also, the major operating cycles become the other programming cycle (e.g. X53 of Figure 12) and the driving cycle (e.g. X54 of Figure 12).
As a result, the programming time reduces significantly, providing for high-resolution, large-area AMOLED displays where a high-speed programming is prerequisite.

[00145] Figure 16 illustrates an example of a system architecture for the step-calibration driving with a display array 200. The display array 200 includes a plurality of the pixel circuits (e.g. 160 of Figure 8 or 190 of Figure 14).

[00146] A gate driver 202 for selecting the pixel circuits, a drivers/SAs block 204, and a data process and calibration unit block 206 are provided to the display array 200. The drivers/SAs block 204 includes the driver 174 and the SA block 173 of Figure 9. The data process and calibration unit block 206 includes the DPU block 172 of Figure 9. "Calibration" in Figure 16 includes the calibration data from a calibration memory 208, and may include some user defined constants for setting up calibration data processing. The contrast and the brightness inputs are used to adjust the contrast and the brightness of the panel by the user. Also, gamma-correction data is defined based on the OLED characteristic and human eye. The gamma-correction input is used to adjust the pixel luminance for human eyes.

[00147] The calibration memory 208 stores the extracted threshold voltage VT(i, j) and the state s(i, j) of each pixel. A memory 210 stores the other required data for the normal operation of a display including gamma correction, resolution, contrast, and etc. The DPU block performs the normal tasks assigned to a controller and scheduler in a display. Besides, the algorithm of Figure 10 or 11 is added to it to perform the calibration.

[00148] Figure 17 illustrates an example of waveforms applied to the system architecture of Figure 16. In Figure 17, each of ROW[1], ROW[2], and ROW[3]
represents a row of the display array 200, "E" represents an extraction operation, "P"
represents a programming operation and "D" represents a driving operation. It is noted that the extraction cycles (E) are not required to be done for all the frame cycle.

Therefore, after a long time interval (extraction interval), the extraction is repeated for a pixel.

[00149] As shown in Figure 17, only one extraction procedure occurs during a frame time. Also, the VT extraction of the pixel circuits at the same row is preformed at the same time.

[00150] Therefore, the maximum time required to refresh a frame is:
zp =n=TP+ZE

where TF represents the frame time, iP represents the time required to write the pixel data into the storage capacitor (e.g. 162 of Figure 8), tiE represents the extraction time, and n represents the number of row in the display array (e.g. 200 of Figure 16).

[00151] Assuming iE =zn.iP, the frame time iF can be written as:
tF =(n+m)=zP

where m represents the timing required for the extraction cycles in the scale of programming cycle timing (iP).

[00152] For example, for a Quarter Video Graphics Array (QVGA) display (240x320) with frame rate of 60Hz, if m=10, the programming time of each row is 66 s, and the extraction time is 0.66ms.

[00153] It is noted that the step-calibration driving technique described above is applicable to any current-programmed pixel circuit other than those of Figures 8 and 14.
[00154] Using the step-calibration driving technique, the time dependent parameter(s) of a pixel, such as threshold shift, is extracted. Then, the programming-voltage is calibrated with the extracted information, resulting in a stable pixel current over time. Further, a stable current independent of the pixel aging under prolonged display operation can be is provided to the pixel circuit, which efficiently improves the display operating lifetime.

[00155] A technique for progranuning, extracting time dependent parameters of a pixel and driving the pixel in accordance with a further embodiment of the present invention is described in detail. The technique includes extracting information on the aging of a pixel (e.g. OLED luminance) by monitoring OLED voltage or OLED
current, and generating luminance. The programming voltage is calibrated with the extracted information, resulting in stable brightness over time.

[00156] Since the OLED voltage/current has been reported to be correlated with the brightness degradation in the OLED (e.g. 161 of Figure 8, 191 of Figure 14), the programming voltage can be modified by the OLED voltage/current to provide a constant brightness.

[00157] For example, during the driving cycle, the voltage/current of the OLED
(161 of Figure 8 or 191 of Figure 14) is extracted while SEL2 is high. Since the OLED
voltage or current has been reported to be correlated with the brightness degradation in the OLED, the programming voltage can be modified by the OLED voltage to provide a constant brightness.

[00158] Figure 18 illustrates an example of waveforms for the voltage/current extraction. The waveforms of Figure 18 are applicable to the pixel circuit 160 of Figure 8 and the pixel circuit 190 of Figure 14 to extract OLED voltage/current. The operation of Figure 18 includes operating cycles X71, X72 and X73. The operating cycles and X72 are an OLED extraction cycle. The operating cycle X73 is one of the operating cycles shown in Figure 12 and 13.

[00159] During the first operating cycle X71, SELl and SEL2 are high, and VDATA is zero. The gate-source voltage of the driving transistor (e.g. 163 of Figure 8) becomes zero. A current or voltage is applied to the OLED (161 of Figure 8) through the MONITOR line.

[00160] During the secoind operating cycle X72, SEL2 is high and SELl is low.
The OLED voltage or current is extracted through the MONITOR line using the algorithm presented in Figures 10 or 11. This waveform can be combined with any other driving waveform.

[00161] In the above description, the algorithm of Figure 10 and 11 is used to predict the aging data, i.e. VT shift, based on the comparison results (current with current or voltage with voltage). However, the algorithm of Figures 10 and 11 is applicable to predict the shift in the OLED voltage VoLED by replacing VT with the VOLED and the comparison result of OLED current/voltage with a reference current/voltage. In the description above, the system architecture shown in Figure 9 is used to compensate for the threshold shift. However, it is understood that the OLED
data is also extracted when the architecture of Figure 9, i.e. DPU 172, block 173, driver 174, is used. This data can be used to compensate for the OLED shift.

[00162] The operating cycle X73 can be any operating cycle including the programming cycle. This depends on the status of the panel after OLED
extraction. If it is during the operation, then X73 is the programming cycle of the waveforms in Figures 12 and 13. The OLED voltage can be extracted during the driving cycle X55/X63 of Figure 12/13. During the driving cycle X55/X63, the SEL2 of Figure 8 or , .
14 goes to a high voltage, and so the voltage of the OLED can be read back through the MONITOR for a specific pixel current.

[00163] Figure 19 illustrates a further example of waveforms for the voltage/current extraction. Figure 20 illustrates a pixel circuit 220 to which the voltage/current extraction of Figure 19 is applied.

[00164] Referring to Figure 20, the pixel circuit 220 includes an OLED 221, a storage capacitor 222, and a driving transistor 223 and switch transistors 224 and 225.
A plurality of the pixel circuits 220 may form an AMOLED display.

[00165] The transistors 223, 224 and 225 are n-type TFTs. However, the transistors 223, 224 and 225 may be p-type TFTs. The voltage/current extraction technique applied to the pixel circuit 220 is also applicable to a pixel circuit having p-type transistors. The transistors 223, 224 and 225 maybe fabricated using amorphous silicon, nano/micro crystalline silicon, poly silicon, organic semiconductors technologies (e.g. organic TFT), NMOS/PMOS technology or CMOS technology (e.g.
MOSFET).

[00166] The gate terminal of the driving transistor 223 is connected to the source terminal of the switch transistor 224, and also connected to the storage capacitor 222.
The one terminal of the driving transistor 223 is connected to a common ground. The other terminal of the driving transistor 223 is connected to a monitor and data line MONITOR/DATA through the switch transistor 235, and is also connected to the cathode electrode of the OLED 221.

[00167] The gate terminal of the switch transistor 224 is connected to a select line SELl. The one terminal of the switch transistor 224 is connected to the gate terminal of the driving transistor 223, and is connected to the storage capacitor 222.

The other terminal of the switch transistor 224 is connected to the cathode electrode of the OLED 221.

[00168] The gate terminal of the switch transistor 225 is connected to a select line SEL2. The one terminal of the switch transistor 225 is connected to MONITOR/DATA. The other terminal of the switch transistor 225 is connected to the ~~

driving transistor 223 and the cathode electrode of the OLED 221. The anode electrode of the OLED 221 is connected to a voltage supply electrode or line VDD.

[00169] The transistors 223 and 224 and the storage capacitor 222 are connected at node A5. The transistors 223 and 225 and the OLED 221 are connected at node B5.
[00170] The pixel circuit 220 is similar to the pixel circuit 160 of Figure 8.

However, in the pixel circuit 220, the MONTTOR/DATA line is used for monitoring and programming purpose.

[00171] Referring to Figures 19-20, the operation of the pixel circuit 220 includes operating cycles X81, X82 and X83.

[00172] During the first operating cycle X81, SELl and SEL2 are high and MONITORIDATA is zero. The gate-source voltage of the driving transistor (223 of Figure 20) becomes zero.

[00173] During the second operating cycle X82, a current or voltage is applied to the OLED through the MONITOR/DATA line, and its voltage or current is extracted.
As described above, the shift in the OLED voltage is extracted using the algorithm presented in Figure 10 or 11 based on the monitored voltage or current. This waveform can be combined with any driving waveform.

[00174] The operating cycle X83 can be any operating cycle including the programming cycle. This depends on the status of the panel after OLED
extraction. .
[00175] The OLED voltage/current can be extracted during the driving cycle of the pixel circuit 220 of Figure 20 after it is programmed for a constant current using any driving technique. During the driving cycle the SEL2 goes to a high voltage, and so the voltage of the OLED can be read back through the MONITOR/DATA line for a specific pixel current.

[00176] Figure 21 illustrates a further example of waveforms for the voltage/current extraction technique. Figure 22 illustrates a pixel circuit 230 to which the voltage/current extraction of Figure 21 is applied. The waveforms of Figure 21 is also applicable to the pixel circuit 160 of Figure 8 to extract OLED
voltage/current.

[00177] Referring to Figure 22, the pixel circuit 230 includes an OLED 231, a storage capacitor 232, and a driving transistor 233 and switch transistors 234 and 235.
A plurality of the pixel circuits 230 may form an AMOLED display.

[00178] The transistors 233, 234 and 235 are n-type TFTs. However, the transistors 233, 234 and 235 may be p-type TFTs. The voltage/current extraction technique applied to the pixel circuit 230 is also applicable to a pixel circuit having p-type transistors. The transistors 233, 234 and 235 may be fabricated using amorphous silicon, nano/micro crystalline silicon, poly silicon, organic semiconductors technologies (e.g. organic TFT), NMOS/PMOS technology or CMOS technology (e.g.
MOSFET).

[00179] The gate terminal of the driving transistor 233 is connected to the source terminal of the switch transistor 234, and also connected to the storage capacitor 232.
The one terminal of the driving transistor 233 is connected to a voltage supply line VDD. The other terminal of the driving transistor 233 is connected to a monitor and data line MONITOR/DATA through the switch transistor 235, and is also connected to the anode electrode of the OLED 231.

[00180] The gate terminal of the switch transistor 234 is connected to a select line SELl. The one terminal of the switch transistor 234 is connected to the gate terminal of the driving transistor 233, and is connected to the storage capacitor 232.

The other terminal of the switch transistor 234 is connected to VDD. .

[00181] The gate terminal of the switch transistor 225 is connected to a select line SEL2. The one terminal of the switch transistor 235 is connected to MONITOR/DATA. The other terminal of the switch transistor 235 is connected to the driving transistor 233 and the anode electrode of the OLED 231. The anode electrode of the OLED 231 is connected to VDD.

[00182] The transistors 233 and 234 and the storage capacitor 232 are connected at node A6. The transistors 233 and 235 and the OLED 231 are connected at node B5.

[00183] The pixel circuit 230 is similar to the pixel circuit 190 of Figure 14.
However, in the pixel circuit 230, the MONITOR/DATA line is used for monitoring and programming purpose.

[00184] Referring to Figures 21-22, the operation of Figure 22 includes operating cycles X91, X92 and X93.

[00185] During the first operating cycle X91, SELl and SEL2 are high and VDD
goes to zero. The gate-source voltage of the driving transistor (e.g. 233 of Figure 21) becomes zero.

[00186] During the second operating cycle X92, a current (voltage) is applied to the OLED (e.g. 231 of Figure 21) through the MONITOR/DATA line, and its voltage (current) is extracted. As described above, the shift in the OLED voltage is extracted using the algorithm presented in Figure 10 or 11 based on the monitored voltage or current. This waveform can be combined with any other driving waveform.

[00187] The operating cycle X93 can be any operating cycle including the programming cycle. This depends on the status of the panel after OLED
extraction.
[00188] The OLED voltage can be extracted during the driving cycle of the pixel circuit 230 of Figure 21 after it is programmed for a constant current using any driving technique. During the driving cycle the SEL2 goes to a high voltage, and so the voltage of the OLED can be read back through the MONITOR/DATA line for a specific pixel current.

[00189] As reported, the OLED characteristics improve under negative bias stress. As a result, a negative bias related to the stress history of the pixel, extracted from the OLED voltage/current, can be applied to the OLED during the time in which the display is not operating. This method can be used for any pixel circuit presented herein.

[00190] Using the OLED voltage/current extraction technique, a pixel circuit can provide stable brightness that is independent of pixel aging under prolonged display operation, to efficiently improve the display operating lifetime.

[00191] A technique for reducing the unwanted emission in a display array having a light emitting device in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention is described in detail. This technique includes removing OLED from a programming path during a programming cycle. This technique can be adopted in hybrid driving technique to extract information on the precise again of a pixel, e.g. the actual threshold voltage shift/mismatch of the driving transistor. The light emitting device is turned off during the programming/calibration cycle so that it prevents the unwanted emission and effect of the light emitting device on the pixel aging.
This technique can be applied to any current mirror pixel circuit fabricated in any technology including poly silicon, amorphous silicon, crystalline silicon, and organic materials.
[00192] Figure 23 illustrates a mirror based pixel circuit 250 to which a technique for removing OLED from a programming path during a programming cycle is applied. The pixel circuit 250 includes an OLED 251, a storage capacitor 252, a programming transistor 253, a driving transistor 254, and switch transistors 255 and 256. The gate terminals of the transistors 253 and 254 are connected to IDATA
through the switch transistors 255 and 256.

[00193] The transistors 253, 254, 255 and 256 are n-type TFTs. However, the transistors 253, 254, 255 and 256 may be p-type TFTs. The OLED removing technique applied to the pixel circuit 250 is also applicable to a pixel circuit having p-type transistors. The transistors 253, 254, 255 and 256 may be fabricated using amorphous silicon, nano/micro crystalline silicon, poly silicon, organic semiconductors technologies (e.g. organic TFT), NMOS/PMOS technology or CMOS technology (e.g.
MOSFET).

[00194] The transistors 253, 254 and 256 and the storage capacitor 252 are connected at node A10. The transistors 253 and 254, the OLED 251 and the storage capacitor 252 are connected at node B 10.

[00195] In the conventional current programming, SEL goes high, and a programming current (IP) is applied to IDATA. Considering that the width of the mirror transistor 253 is "m" times larger than the width of the mirror transistor 254, the current flowing through the OLED 251 during the programming cycle is (m+l)IP.

When "m" is large to gain significant speed improvement, the unwanted emission may become considerable.

[00196] By contrast, according to the OLED. removing technique, VDD is brought into a lower voltage. This ensures the OLED 251 to be removed from a programming path as shown in Figure 24.

[00197] During a programming cycle, SEL is high and VDD goes to a reference voltage (Vref) in which the OLED 251 is reversely biased. Therefore, the OLED
251 is removed from the current path during the programming cycle.

[00198] During the progranuning cycle, the pixel circuit 250 may be 10. programmed with scaled current through IDATA without experiencing unwanted emission.

[00199] During the programming cycle, the pixel circuit 250 may be programmed with current and using one of the techniques describe above. The voltage of the IDATA line is read back to extract the threshold voltage of the mirror transistor 253 which is the same as threshold voltage of the driving transistor 254.

[00200] Also, during the programming cycle, the pixel circuit 250 may be programmed with voltage through the IDATA line, using one of the techniques describe above. The current of the IDATA line is read back to extract the threshold voltage of the mirror transistor 253 which is the same as threshold voltage of the driving transistor 254.

[00201] The reference voltage Vref is chosen so that the voltage at node B10 becomes smaller than the ON voltage of the OLED 251. As a result, the OLED 251 turns off and the unwanted emission is zero. The voltage of the IDATA line includes VP+VT+ AVT ...(3) where Vp includes the drain-source voltage of the driving transistor 254 and the gate-source voltage of the transistor 253, VT is the threshold voltage of the transistor 253 (254), and AVT is the VT shift/mismatch.

. , .

[00202] At the end of the programming cycle, VDD goes to its original value, and so voltage at node Bl0 goes to the OLED voltage VOLED. At the driving cycle, SEL is low. The gate voltage of the transistor 254/253 is fixed and stored in the storage capacitor 252, since the switch transistors 255 and 256 are off. Therefore, the pixel current during the driving cycle becomes independent of the threshold voltage VT.
[00203] The OLED removing technique can be adopted in hybrid driving technique to extract the VT -shift or VT -mismatch. From (3), if the pixel is programmed with the current, the only variant parameter in the voltage of the IDATA line is the VT
shift/mismatch (AVT). Therefore, AVT can be extracted and the programming data can be calibrated with AVT.

[00204] Figure 25 illustrates an example of a system architecture for implementing the OLED removing technique. A display array 260 includes a plurality of pixel circuits, e.g. pixel circuit 250 of Figure 26. A display controller and scheduler 262 controls and schedules the operation of the display array 260. A driver provides operation voltages to the pixel circuit. The driver provides the operation voltage(s) to the pixel circuit based on instructions/commands from the display controller and scheduler 262 such that the OLED is removed from a programming path of the pixel circuit, as described above.

[00205] The controller and scheduler 262 may include functionality of the display controller and scheduler 64 of Figure 3, or may include functionality of the data process and calibration unit 206 of Figure 16. The system of Figure 25 may have any of these functionalities, the calibration-scheduling described above, the voltage/current extraction described above, or combinations thereof.

[00206] The simulation result for the voltage on IDATA line for different VT
is illustrated in Figure 26. Referring to Figures 23-26, the voltage of the IDATA
line includes the shift in the threshold voltage of the transistors 253 and 254.
The programming current is 1 A.

[00207] The unwanted emission is reduced significantly resulting in a higher resolution. Also, individual extraction of circuit aging and light emitting device aging become possible, leading in a more accurate calibration.

[00208] It is noted that each of the transistors shown in Figures 4-8,14, 20, 21, 23 and 24 can be replaced with a p-type transistor using the concept of complementary circuits.

[00209] The present invention has been described with regard to one or more embodiments. However, it will be apparent to persons skilled in the art that a number of variations and modifications can be made without departing from the scope of the invention as defmed in the claims.

Claims (33)

1. A system for a display array having a pixel circuit, the pixel circuit being programmed through a data line, the system comprising:

a data source for providing a programming data into the pixel circuit;
a current-controlled voltage source associated with the data source for converting a current on the data line to a voltage associated with the current to extract a time dependent parameter of the pixel circuit.
2. A system according to claim 1, further comprising:

a controller for determining a time dependent parameter of the pixel circuit based on the extracted voltage.
3. A system according to claim 1, further comprising:

a current conveyor for extracting the current of the data line, the current conveyor including X, Y and Z terminals, the voltage source applying a programming voltage to the Y terminal, the X terminal being connected to the data line and being forced by feedback to have the same voltage as that of the Y terminal, the current of the X terminal being duplicated to the Z terminal which is connected to the current-controlled voltage source.
4. A system according to claim 1, wherein the pixel circuit is a current mirror based pixel circuit.
5. A system according to claim 4, wherein the current mirror based pixel circuit includes:

first and second mirror transistors, each having a gate terminal, a first terminal and a second terminal;

first and second switch transistors, each having a gate terminal, a first terminal and a second terminal;

a storage capacitor; and a light emitting device, wherein the first terminal of the first mirror transistor is connected to the data line through the first switch transistor and is connected to the storage capacitor through the second switch transistor, the second terminal of the first mirror transistor is connected to the storage capacitor and the light emitting device, the gate terminals of the first and second mirror transistors are connected to the storage capacitor and are connected to the data line through the first and second switch transistors, the first terminal of the second mirror transistor is connected to a voltage supply line, the second terminal of the second mirror transistor is connected to the storage capacitor and the light emitting device.
6. A system for a display array including a plurality of pixel circuits, each pixel circuit including a driving transistor, at least one switch transistor, a storage capacitor and a light emitting device, the system comprising:

a monitor for monitoring a current or voltage on the pixel circuit;

a data process unit for controlling the operation of the display array, the data process unit extracting information on an aging of the pixel circuit, based on the monitored current or voltage and determining a state of the pixel circuit;

a driver controlled by the data process unit and for providing programming and calibration data to the pixel circuit, based on the state of the pixel circuit.
7. A system according to claim 6, wherein the data process unit estimates an intermediate threshold voltage V TM of the driving transistor based on the state of the pixel circuit.
8. A system according to claim 7, wherein the data process unit estimates the intermediate threshold voltage V TM using the previous extracted threshold voltage V T(i, j), or a combination of the previous extracted threshold voltage V T(i, j) and a resolution V S of the driver.
9. A system according to claim 8, wherein a programming voltage for the programming is determined based on the V T(i, j) and a programming data.
10. A system according to claim 8, wherein a calibration voltage for the calibration is determined based on the V TM and a bias voltage.
11. A system according to claim 6, wherein the monitor senses the current through a monitor line connected to the pixel circuit.
12. A system according to claim 11, wherein the switch transistor includes first and second switch transistors, each of the driving transistor, the first switch transistor and the second switch transistor including a gate terminal, a first terminal and a second terminal, the gate terminal of the driving transistor being connected to a signal line through the first switch transistor and being connected to the storage capacitor, the first terminal of the driving transistor being connected to the light emitting device and being connected to the monitor line through the second switch transistor, the gate terminals of the first and second switch transistors being connected to first and second select lines, respectively.
13. A system according to claim 12, wherein the first and second select lines are a common select line.
14. A system according to claim 6, wherein the system consecutively implements, to each row of the display array, an extraction operation for extracting the threshold voltage of the driving transistor, a programming operation for programming the pixel circuit and a driving operation for driving the pixel circuit.
15. A system according to claim 6, wherein the system implements, to each row of the display array, one extraction operation for extracting the threshold voltage of the driving transistor during a frame time.
16. A method of driving a display array, the display array including a plurality of pixel circuits, each pixel circuit including a driving transistor, at least one switch transistor, a storage capacitor and a light emitting device, the method comprising the steps of:

applying a current or voltage to the pixel circuit;

monitoring a current or voltage flowing through the pixel circuit;

extracting information on an aging of the pixel circuit, based on the monitored current or voltage and determining the state of the pixel circuit;

providing operation voltage to the pixel circuit, including determining programming and calibration data for the pixel circuit based on the state of the pixel circuit.
17. A method according to claim 16, wherein the extracting step includes the step of:

estimating an intermediate threshold voltage V TM of the driving transistor based on the state of the pixel circuit.
18. A method of driving a display array, the display array including a plurality of pixel circuits, each pixel circuit including a driving transistor, at least one switch transistor, a storage capacitor and a light emitting device, the method comprising the steps of:

applying a current or voltage to the light emitting device;

monitoring a current or voltage flowing through the light emitting device;
predicting a shift in the voltage of the light emitting device, based on the monitored current or voltage and determining the state of the pixel circuit;
and providing, to the light emitting device, a bias associated with the shift in the voltage of the light emitting device.
19. A method according to claim 18, wherein the light emitting device is an organic light emitting diode.
20. A method according to claim 19, wherein the predicting step includes the step of:

estimating an intermediate voltage of the organic light emitting diode.
21. A system for driving a display array, the display array including a plurality of pixel circuits, each pixel circuit including a driving transistor, at least one switch transistor, a storage capacitor and a light emitting device, the system comprising:

a monitor for monitoring a current or voltage on the pixel circuit;

a data process unit for predicting a shift in the voltage of the light emitting device, based on the monitored current or voltage and determining the state of the pixel circuit; and a circuit for providing, to the light emitting device, a bias associated with the shift in the voltage of the light emitting device.
22. A system according to claim 21, wherein the light emitting device is an organic light emitting diode.
23. A system according to claim 22, wherein the data process unit estimates an intermediate voltage of the organic light emitting diode.
24. A system for a display array including a plurality of pixel circuits, each pixel circuit having a driving transistor, at least one switch transistor, a storage capacitor and a light emitting device, the light emitting device being located at a programming path for programming the pixel circuit, the system comprising:

a controller for controlling the operation of the display array;

a driver for providing operation voltage to the pixel circuit based on the control of the controller; and the driver providing the operation voltage to the pixel circuit during a programming cycle such that the light emitting device is removed from the programming path.
25. A system according to claim 24, wherein the driver provides the operation voltage to the pixel circuit during the programming cycle such that the light emitting device being reversely biased.
26. A system according to any one of claims 1-15 and 21-25, wherein the display array is an AMOLED array.
27. A system according to claim 21 or 24, wherein the light emitting device is an organic light emitting diode.
28. A system according to claim 21 or 24, wherein at least one of the transistors is a thin film transistor.
29. A system according to claim 21 or 24, wherein the transistor of the pixel circuit is a n-type or p-type TFT.
30. A method according to claim 17, wherein the step of estimating comprises:
estimating the intermediate threshold voltage V TM using the previous extracted threshold voltage V T(i, j), or a combination of the previous extracted threshold voltage V T(i, j) and a resolution V S of a driver for the programming and calibration.
31. A method according to claim 30, comprising determining a programming voltage for the programming based on the V T(i, j) and a programming data.
32. A method according to claim 30, comprising determining a calibration voltage for the calibration based on the V TM and a bias voltage.
33. A system according to claim 24, wherein the pixel circuit comprises a programming transistor, the at least one switch transistor comprises a first switch transistor and a second switch transistor, gate terminals of the first switch transistor and the second switch transistor being connected to a select line, the first switch transistor and the second switch transistor being connected in series between a data line and a gate terminal of the driving transistor, a gate terminal of the programming transistor being connected to the gate terminal of the driving transistor, the programming transistor being connected between the light emitting device and a connection point between the first switch transistor and the second switch transistor, the storage capacitor being connected between the gate terminal of the driving transistor and the light emitting device, the driving transistor being connected between a supply line and the light emitting device.
CA002590366A 2004-12-15 2005-12-15 Method and system for programming, calibrating and driving a light emitting device display Expired - Fee Related CA2590366C (en)

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Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
CA002490860A CA2490860A1 (en) 2004-12-15 2004-12-15 Real-time calibration scheduling method and algorithm for amoled displays
CA2,490,860 2004-12-15
CA 2503237 CA2503237A1 (en) 2005-04-08 2005-04-08 Step calibration driving method and circuit for amoled displays
CA2,503,237 2005-04-08
CA002509201A CA2509201A1 (en) 2005-06-08 2005-06-08 Oled luminance degradation compensation technique
CA2,509,201 2005-06-08
CA002521986A CA2521986A1 (en) 2005-10-17 2005-10-17 A driving and aging extraction scheme for current programmed amoled pixel circuit with no unwanted emission
CA2,521,986 2005-10-17
CA002526782A CA2526782C (en) 2004-12-15 2005-12-15 Method and system for programming, calibrating and driving a light emitting device display
CA002590366A CA2590366C (en) 2004-12-15 2005-12-15 Method and system for programming, calibrating and driving a light emitting device display

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