CA2048569C - Double tank pinch trigger pump water gun - Google Patents

Double tank pinch trigger pump water gun

Info

Publication number
CA2048569C
CA2048569C CA 2048569 CA2048569A CA2048569C CA 2048569 C CA2048569 C CA 2048569C CA 2048569 CA2048569 CA 2048569 CA 2048569 A CA2048569 A CA 2048569A CA 2048569 C CA2048569 C CA 2048569C
Authority
CA
Canada
Prior art keywords
water
air
gun
pressure
water storage
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Fee Related
Application number
CA 2048569
Other languages
French (fr)
Other versions
CA2048569A1 (en
Inventor
Bruce M. D'andrade
Lonnie G. Johnson
Original Assignee
Bruce M. D'andrade
Lonnie G. Johnson
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US68024791A priority Critical
Priority to US07/680,247 priority
Application filed by Bruce M. D'andrade, Lonnie G. Johnson filed Critical Bruce M. D'andrade
Publication of CA2048569A1 publication Critical patent/CA2048569A1/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of CA2048569C publication Critical patent/CA2048569C/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Application status is Expired - Fee Related legal-status Critical

Links

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41BWEAPONS FOR PROJECTING MISSILES WITHOUT USE OF EXPLOSIVE OR COMBUSTIBLE PROPELLANT CHARGE; WEAPONS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F41B9/00Liquid ejecting guns, e.g. water pistols, devices ejecting electrically charged liquid jets, devices ejecting liquid jets by explosive pressure
    • F41B9/0003Liquid ejecting guns, e.g. water pistols, devices ejecting electrically charged liquid jets, devices ejecting liquid jets by explosive pressure characterised by the pressurisation of the liquid
    • F41B9/0006Liquid ejecting guns, e.g. water pistols, devices ejecting electrically charged liquid jets, devices ejecting liquid jets by explosive pressure characterised by the pressurisation of the liquid the liquid being pressurised prior to ejection
    • F41B9/0015Liquid ejecting guns, e.g. water pistols, devices ejecting electrically charged liquid jets, devices ejecting liquid jets by explosive pressure characterised by the pressurisation of the liquid the liquid being pressurised prior to ejection the liquid being pressurised by compressed gas, e.g. air
    • F41B9/0018Liquid ejecting guns, e.g. water pistols, devices ejecting electrically charged liquid jets, devices ejecting liquid jets by explosive pressure characterised by the pressurisation of the liquid the liquid being pressurised prior to ejection the liquid being pressurised by compressed gas, e.g. air the gas being compressed utilising a manual piston pump
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41BWEAPONS FOR PROJECTING MISSILES WITHOUT USE OF EXPLOSIVE OR COMBUSTIBLE PROPELLANT CHARGE; WEAPONS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F41B9/00Liquid ejecting guns, e.g. water pistols, devices ejecting electrically charged liquid jets, devices ejecting liquid jets by explosive pressure
    • F41B9/0003Liquid ejecting guns, e.g. water pistols, devices ejecting electrically charged liquid jets, devices ejecting liquid jets by explosive pressure characterised by the pressurisation of the liquid
    • F41B9/0006Liquid ejecting guns, e.g. water pistols, devices ejecting electrically charged liquid jets, devices ejecting liquid jets by explosive pressure characterised by the pressurisation of the liquid the liquid being pressurised prior to ejection
    • F41B9/0015Liquid ejecting guns, e.g. water pistols, devices ejecting electrically charged liquid jets, devices ejecting liquid jets by explosive pressure characterised by the pressurisation of the liquid the liquid being pressurised prior to ejection the liquid being pressurised by compressed gas, e.g. air
    • F41B9/0028Liquid ejecting guns, e.g. water pistols, devices ejecting electrically charged liquid jets, devices ejecting liquid jets by explosive pressure characterised by the pressurisation of the liquid the liquid being pressurised prior to ejection the liquid being pressurised by compressed gas, e.g. air the gun having an unpressurised liquid reservoir

Abstract

ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE

The present invention is directed toward a toy water gun which is operated by selectively releasing water from a water reservoir pressurized with air. The present invention has a manually operated pump incorporated into the design. As the pump is cycled, water and air is drawn from a water storage tank. Once drawn, the water and air are forced into a pressure reservoir. As the amount of water and air forced into the pressure reservoir increases, the pressure on the water within the pressure reservoir increases. The pressure of the water and air within the pressure reservoir increases with each cycle of the pump, until the pump can no longer overcome the pressure of the water and air within the pressure tank.
The pressurized water and air within the pressure tank has an avenue of release that is regulated by the trigger mechanism of the invention. When no force is applied to the trigger, the pressurized water and air are held at bay with no means of release. When force is applied to the trigger, the water is first released from the pressurized container and is channeled through a narrow nozzle. The escape of the water, under pressure, through the narrow nozzle creates a stream of propelled water that lasts as long as the trigger is engaged or until the air pressure propelling the water equals the ambient pressure.

Description

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION ~ :
. ;.
FIELD OF THE INVENTION ; .:

The present invention is directed toward a toy water squlrt yun, and more parkicularly to such toy water squirt guns that use a sel~-contained pumping means to draw water from a storage reservoir, compress an air cushion with the drawn water, and store the water pressurized by the compressed air in a second pressurized reservoir. The 10 water is then released in a ~ :

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selective mannex through a narrow nozzle, causing the stored water to be propelled forward in a narrow stream. .
2. Prior_Art Statement ~.
Water gun~ have for decades been a very popular child's toy. Since the toy industry is very competitive, hundred~ of different style water gun~ have been dsveloped in an attempt to pro~it rom the toy'~ inherent popularity. The mo3t traditional ~orms of water gun~ are activated by a pumping action, either manually through the trigger or automatically through a battery operated motor. Such pump aation water guns work, but the gun3 are limlted in the di~tance the water : 15 traveled, the amount of water projected and the duration of the pumping cycle. In an attempt to :.
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improve upon water guns, the toy industry has developed pressure activated water guns. Such pressure water guns work upon the principle of pxessure differentials between the water held within the toy and the atmosphere. The water within the toy is held at a pressure higher than that o the ambient air, As a xe3ult, when the water within the to~ i~ given an avenue o~ e~aape, the water will stream out llnder the pressure.
Prior art that shows pressure dif~erential type~
of water guns are exemplified by the following:
U. S. Patent Number 3,197,070 to Curtis F. ; ;
Pearl ek al, shows a water gun activated by trapping water in a aollapsible area. A~ th~
device i~ collapsed, the pressure of the water ~ . .
~ :: builds, spraying the water out of the one small ,"~ ,.','~.

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orifice left within the pressured volume. Once the confined volume is fully collapsed, the re-expansion of the volume draws forth more water from a reservoir, thus priming the water gun for another cycle. The water being pressurized is lLmited to the volume of the collapsible volume.
The Peaxl invention cannot store pres~urized water ~or u~e at a later time, nor can the pre~sure of the water be increased by cycling the pumping action of the invention while restraining water discharge.
U. S. Patent Number 4,854,480 to Robert S.
Shindo and U. S. Patent Numher ~,735,~39 to Michael E. Salmon et al, both show koy water devices that use an elastic bladder to pressurize water. The bladders are filIed with high pressure ..

-5~ 5~9 water, and the bladders respond by elastically deforming. The source of pressurized water is then removed and the water within the expanded bladder is held in place by a clamping device activated by a trigger. The water gun i~ used by selectively releasing the water from the expanded bladder.
Water guns have also been developed that use , .......... ...... ...... ............................................................. ...~ .
air pressure to pressurize watar and ~orce water khrough squirt channels. Such toys that use air pumps to pressurize water are exempli~ied by the . ,: ...:" .
~oLlowing:

U. S. Patent Mumber 4,214,674 to Jones et al, ' ~;~" '`' 3how~ a two-piece appaxatus consisting o~ a . .
~ 15 pre~surized water reservoir and a discharging gun.
.
; . ~ Air i~ introduced into the water reservoir via a ..",~., : _5_ ~:

2~3S~9 hand operated pump. The air pressurizes the water, forcing it up through the di.scharging gun~ :
where the rate of discharge can be regulated by a trigger.
Thus, although prior art doe show toy water guns that have collapsible water chambers and sel~-contained pumping mean~, prior art neither teaches nor ~ugge~ts a toy water gun that U9~S a .-self-contained water pumping device to draw both water and air from a ~torage reservoir, pressurize air with the water drawn, and store the pre~surized air and water in a ~econd pre~surized reservoir, where it can accumulate until di~charged. Additionally, tha safety of the invention i~ a~sured by a triggering device that : automatically and ~a~ely di~charges pre~surized -7~

water when over pressurized, until the maximum allowable pressure is reached~

SUMM~RY OF THE INVENTION
The present invention is directed toward a toy water gun which i8 operated by selectively releasing water from a pressurized watex reservoir. The pre~ent invent~on has a manuall~
operated pump incorporated into the design. As the pump is cycled, water and air is drawn from a ~, . . .
water storage tank. Once drawn, the water and air are forced into a second pres~ure reservoir. As the amount of water and air forced into the pre~sure reservoir increases, the pre~sure of the air displaced by the water within the pressure reservoir increases. The pressure of the air and water within the pressure reQervoir increases with ~ : : t each cycle of the pump, until the pump can no longer overcome the pressure of the air and water within the pressure tank. The pressurized air and water within the pressure tank has an avenue of release that is regulated by the trigger mechanism of the invention which has a ~afety pressure release withln it~ de~ign. When no ~orco i~
applied to the trigger, the pres~urized water and air are hçld at bay with no means of release.
When force is applied to the trigger, the heavier water is irst released from the bottom of the pressurized container and i9 channeled through a narrow nozzle. The e~cape ~f the pre~surized water through the narrow nozzle creates a stream o~ propelled water that lasts as long a~ the trigger is engaged or until tbe pre~sure witbin :

-.9 -the pressurized container equals the ambient ~ir pressure.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
-, The invention will be more fully understood by referring to the following detailed ~
~ : ' specifications, the above speciication and the claims set forth herein, when taken in connection with the drawings appended hereto, wherein:
. ,: .
Figure 1 shows a perspective view of one preferred embodiment to the present invention; and :: - ,' .
Figure 2 shows a partially fragmented side view of the embodiment depicted in Figure 1, ".,',.,", i.llustrating the claimed inner mechanisms. ~

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DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF TXIE PRESENT_INVENTION
The present .invention is, as mentioned, directed toward a toy water gun that uses a manually operated pump to draw and pressurize ~
water and air, storing the wat~r and air under : ~.
pressure until selectively discharged. The science of pres~urized waker toy~ is not new, and over the years many d.lfferent de~igns have been developed utilizing a pumping action to pressurize .
water. As applied to the art of toy water squirt guns, the most common type of device involves a two-stroke pump, wherein the pump draws water into .
a chamber through a large orifice during the priming ~troke, and forces water out of the -~
cham~er through a very narrow orif.ice during the ..
compression ~troke. This simple system forms the ~ ~ t. :~ .

basis of thousands of devices in addition to water ,~.
guns, such as non-aerosol dispensing devices for hair spray, perfume, window cleaner., and countless .. -, , ,- ~ .
other products that are dispensed in a narrow .. .. .
stream or mist.
The problem with simple two-~troke ~quirting : ;
systems i9 that the ~mount o~ 1uid that ca~ be .;, ..:, expelled i~ limited to the ~olume oP the compressible area; also, the pressure of the ~ . . ~ .
liquid exiting the device is dependent directly : .:
.. :
upon the force being applied during the time of expul~ion. Consequently, when water i8 squirted in thi~ manner, only a small volume is released with each pumping actlon. When attempts are made ..
to increase the amount of water propelled by increa~ing the volume of the compressible area, - . - . .

~ ~ J, : ,' ' the pumping action cannot displace the water at a high pressure, resulting in expulsion of water at low pressures.
Water guns need the characteristic of squirting a large volume of water at high pressure~. The higher the pressure, the longer the di~ta~ce the water can be propelled, thu~
increasing the range and power o~ the water gun.
~he pre~ent invention water gun uses a common two-stroke pump to store and pressurize large amounts ~.
of water. The present invention draw~
prede~ermined volumes of water and air from a storage container, pressurizes air with ~he drawn ,.
water and deposit~ the pressurized air and water :~ 15 in a second storage tank, where it remains under ..

: . . pres~ure. As more and more water and air are ~.:
~,"''"', -12- .

i : , 356~ -drawn, press~rized and deposited within the second stor~ge container, the volume and the pressure of the stored water increa~es, compressing the air :
within the second container. The water propelled by the compressed air can then be selectively relea~ed through a narrow oriice, creating a ~.
stream of propelled water. The double tank sy~tem of the present inventlon allow~ the u~ex oP the . invention to determine the volume and pressure of ;~
the water to be discharged, and also allow~ a user :
to refill and replace the non-pre~surized water storage tank without disabling the water gun'~ ;
ability to di~aharge water. The double tank system gives water gun~ a varleky of firing characteristic3 that i9 uni~ue in the art of toy water guns, allowing an operator to choose and ;.

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-13- ~ :

t ' '' ~ , adjust the range and power of the water gun.
The present invention also has other advantages over other pressurized container water guns, in that, instead of pumping only air into a chamber that already contains water, the present invention pumps water into a chamber which i9 ~illed with air. The pumping o~ water i8 more ef~icient than the pumping o air, thus le~s pumping ~trokes are required and higher pressures are easier to achieve.
When designing toys involving pressurized air and water, the problem becomes one o~ ~a~ety.
.
Toys are designed to be inexpensive so a~ to be widely marketable. A8 such, most toys are made of ~;
plastics or other inexpensive material~. Such ~-materials do not have laxge tensile strength3 or :

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-15- 2~4~5~9 fatigue characteristics, and therefore do not lend -~.
themselves well to containing pressurized fluids.
Plastic containments of pressurized liquids, if not properly designed, can rupture and explode, .~
causing injury. The present invention has a :
unique design that allows for both the use of high pressure air and the elimination of potential xupturing hazards. The present-invention has a ;.
cylindrical pressurized reservoir with a single , .
opening. The single orifice, in conjunction with the generous radii used at the cylinder ends, serve to maintain the integrity of the water reservoir walls and minimize the stres~ points :. . ~. :
throughout the material of the pre~surized .:
.. .
reservoir, thereby allowing for the safe use of ~ pressures generated by the present invention. ..
. . .
. ,, . :
.... -15-~ 2~5~9 Referring now to Figures 1 and 2, one preferred embodiment of the present invention 1 is shown. Figure 1 shows a perspective view of the present invention 1 and Figure 2 shows a fragmented side view of the present invention, exposing the internal mechanisms with like parts belng like numbered. As shown from Figures 1 and 2, the embodiment ~hown of the present invention has two tanks, a water storage tank 38 and a pressurized tank 3. 30th tanks 38, 3 attach to a main housing 60 that is shaped generally in the form o~ a gun having a handle 95, trigger 65 and .
barrel 81. ~he water storage tank 38 i held firmly to the hou~ing 60 with a hoop 37. The hoop 37 minimizes the stresses on the tapered neck of the storage tank 3e as tho water 69 within shifts .' ~, -17~ 6 during movement.
Referring now solely to Figure 2, the inner workings of the present invention 1 can best be visualized and explained. Water 69 is placed within water storage tank 38. The water S9 is introduced in one of two way~. Fir3t, the water 69 can be poured through the optional ~illing cap 83, or the water ~torage tank 38 can be removed ~rom the housing 60 and water can be poured through the neck opening of the storage tank 38.
The water storage tank 38 i~ ~hown in Figure ~ as being bottle shaped, with a neck terminating in a threaded head 28. The ~torage tank 38, in the shown embodiment, screws into the housing 60.
However, it should be understood that the storage tank 38 can be formed unistructurally with the ;20~8~6~ :

housing 60, and if so formed, the optional filling cap 83 would become a necessary part ofthe design. It should also be understood that the storage tank 38 can be formed in any shape or ~
size, as long as the design holds and stores .
water.
Water 63 and air 35 axe drawn from the ~torage tank 38 through an ori~ice 29 that connect~ with the storage tank 38. The invention }0 will draw either water 63 or air 35 from the :~:
.: , storage tank 38, depending on the orientation o~
the Lnvention when the operator draws materials ~rom the storage tank 38. As water 69 or air 35 ..
are taken ~rom the storage tank 38, a partial : vacuum iu produced within. The vacuum i8 : eliminated by a vent valve 19 that allows air 35 ~ f~`f~ }~

5~9 -19~

to enter into the storage container 38 as the vacuum developsO The vent valve 19 is biased by a . ., spring 9 in the closed position, preventing water from escaping, and an optional elastomeric washer 7 helps seat the vent valve 19, enhancing its ability to prevent the escape of water. It should be understood that although a vent valve 1~ is tho be~t mode of the invention, the invention mAy ~unction without such a valve so long as the ;~
storage container has an open vent to the ambient air. Similarly, an elastomeric seal 25 can be .
used to help seat the water storage tank 38 against the housing 60, the elastomeric seal having an orifice therethrough, allowing for the ~: .
passaga of the dr~w tube 29 and the vacuum venting passage 2~1.
, 2~ 6 The force drawing the water 69 or air 35 from the storage tank 38 i5 created by the movement of the piston 33 within its cylinder 34. The movement of the piston 33 within the cylinder 34 has two-cycle strokes, a priming stroke where water 69 or air 35 are drawn forth from the water ~torage xe~ervoir 38, and a compre~ion ~troko wherein water 69 or ai.r 35 are di~placed by the piston 33. The priming stroke starts when the ..
piston 33 i8 retreated within it~ cylindsr 34, creating a large volume chamber 15. The vacuum created by the expanding chamber 15, draw~ water 69 or air 35 through the draw tube 2.9 and into the chamber 15. The flow of water 69 or air 35 into the expanding chamber 15 open~ a one-way valve ,` ,' .
thak i~ normally bia ed in a closed po~ition. The :::

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one-way valve that i5 shown in ~igure 2 consists of a ball 30 that is biased against an ,elastomeric seal 11 by a spring 13. As a vacuum is created by the piston 33, the force o~ the spring 13 is overcome and the ball 30 drops away from the elastomeric seal 11, allowing water 69 or air 35 to pa95- As the pi~ton 33 is advanced within its cylinder 34, the com~res~ion ~trok~
begins and water 69 or air 35 now within the chamber is compressed, closing the one-way valve by assisting the spring 13 to push the ball 30 against its seal.11. Although a ball and seal one-way valve is illustrated, it should be understood that any design of a one-way valve ; 15 would work within the present invention as long as ~ :
. .
the valve made ~ seal that is both air and water ; ;

, .
. -21- -2~ 35;69 tight.

The compression stroke created by the advancement of the piston 33 within the cylinder 34 causes the water 69 or air within the chamber .
15 to become pressurized. The watex 69 or air 35, as a result of the diminishing volume of the chamber 15, opens a second one-way valve that leads to the pre~surized ~torage tank 3. A~ the piston 33 is reciprocated within its cylinder 34, water 6~ or air 35 is repeatedly drawn from the ;.
storage tank 38 and deposited into the pressurized ~ .
storage tank 3. As more and more water 69 or air .
35 is drawn and forced into the pres~urized :~
storage tank 3, the pressure with tank 3 increases until the force used to drive the piston 33 can no :~-~ .'': .
longer overcome the stored pressures, or until the '., ' .: ' . .. ~ .
. ~ -? ~

2 ~ 8S6 pressure is released through the safety trigger 65.
The movement of the piston 33 within cylinder 34 draws water 69 or air 35 from storaga tank 38 through an orifice 29. However, when the storage tank 34 is positioned so that the air 35 within the storage tank 38 i9 in contact with the orifice 29, the movement o the piston 33 will draw air 35 into the pumping chamber 15. When the pumping chamber 15 i~ compressed, the air 35 will become pressurized and flow into the pressurized storage tank 3, forming an air aushion, whLle not ;;`.
increa~ing the pressure o~ any water ~1 present ~ ;
within the pressurized storage tank 3. By having ;
lS a pumping action that can introduce both air 92 -and water 91 into the pressurized storage tank 3, .
~ 23- :

-24- ~ 5~

the pressure of the air 35 can be increased above that available by an air pumping system alone ~ ~:
becau~e of the inefficiency of a normil hand pump, The pumping of water 91 is more efficient than that of air 92 because of the incompressibility of liquids, therefore the work available from th0 pumping ~y~tem i~ maximized when used to pump ,; . ' water again~t an air cushion.
The operation of the pumping action is :.:
achieved by the piston 33 being driven by a piston -:
'::
rod 31 that is affixed to a handle 73. The handle :
73, a~ shown in thi~ embodiment, is slidably .
attached to the barrel 81. As the handle 73 is ~ :
. ... .. .
manually reciprocated along the barrel 81, the motion is transferred to the piston 33, creating .-: .
the de~ired pumping efect. Although a linear .
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pumping action is shown, it should be understood that a variety of orientations ancl multiple linkage configurations could be mc3nipulated by a user to create the desired pumping motion~ -Once the desired pressure i6 obtained within the pressurized tank 3, the water 91 stressed by the compressed air 92, is discharged by ~electively opening a~ exit ori~ice to tha surrounding ambient air. The pressure ~ ;
differential between the ambient air and the water :~
9l cause~ the water 91 to stre~n out. In the shown embodiment of the present invention, the ..
pathway connecting the pressurized tank 3 to the ambient alr i~ a pair o~ tubes, a flexible exit tube 67 and a pump connection tube 47. As wat-r l -or air leaves the pumping chamber 15, it passes by :
: .

: ' ~ . . .

2~ 356~ :

a one-way valve 43 and into a T-shap~d connection 53. The T-shaped connection 53 on one side attacheq to the flexible exit tube~ 67, and on the other side attaches to connection tube 47. As water or air is forced into the T~haped :-.
connection 53, the water or air tries to enter .
both the exit tube ~7 and the connection tube 47.
However, the exit tube 67 1~ clo~ed by the trigger pinch bar 63, leaving the connection tube 47 a~ . .
.~ :
the only pathway through which the water may pas3.
. . ~ , .
The connection tube 47 leads to the pressure tank 3, consequently all or air water expelled by the ... ..
pump i~ led into the pres~ure tank 3. When pres~u~ized water 91, stored within the pressure ; :;
tank 3 i5 to be di~charget, the trigger 65 i8 depressed. The trigger 65 is formed with a pinch ' ' ~ .: ..
~ -~6~
.
: . .

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bar 63 that is biased against the exit tube 67 by a spring 57. As the trigger 65 is depressed, the bias of the spring 57 is overcome and the pinch bar 63 is lifted away from the exit tube 67.
With the exit tube 67 open, the integrity of the - ;
pressure tank 3 i8 now breached and the pre~suri~ed water 91 is offered an avenue of escape to the a~ent air. The pre~ure differential between the pressurized water 91 and the ambient air causes the water 91 to flow back out through the connection tube 47, through the T- ; .
~haped connection 53 and through the exit tube 67, until the water 91 i~ di~charged khrough the exit orifice 75 fonmed at the end of the exit tube 67.
The amount of pressurized water 91 being , :
.;
di3charged through exit orifice 75 ic controlled ~
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;~41~569 by the user in a variety of ways. A user can control the amount of water discharged by controlling the depression of the trigger 65. If the triqger 65 is depressed and let in that position, the pressurized water 91 will be discharged until the pressure tank 3 is empty, or ;
until the pressure of the compressed air 92 equals that of the ambient air. The user may choo~e to .
discharge the pressurized water 91 selectively, depressing the trigger 65 for short periods of ;:.
time, resulting in numerous shots being allowed before the pressure tank 3 needs to be refilled.
A user may also choose to vary the pressure and amount o~ water being discharged by selectively ~:
adding the air 92 within pressure tank 3. The more water 91 or air 92 i~ added, the higher the ~ . .. ..

:~ , 2~4~ii6~

pressure and the farther and longer the invention may propel water.
As mentioned, the present invention water gun ' is operated by selectively releasing the prsssurized water 91 through a narrow nozzle 75.
The selective release of the pressurized water is controlled by the trigger mechanism of the water gun. Slnae the pre~ent invention has the abll:lty - to operate at high pressures, the trlgger release mechanism performs two functions. First, it controls the amount of water released, and second, the trigger mechanism serves as a safety valve.
The trigger 65 o~ the present invention has a pinch bar extension 63 that pinches the exit ' ' hosing 67 for the pressurized water 91 against a top 59 that is part of the main housing.

The pinch bar 63 is biased against the stop 59 by a calibrated spring 57. The spring 57 is held at one end by a formation 55 of the main housing. ~ -The strength of the spring 57 in its biased configuration is calibrated, 90 that when the ;~ - -pressure of water 91 within the exit tubing 67 reaches a predetermined maximum valve~ the 8pring 57 will allow the pinch bar 63 to rise and water 67 will be released until a sa~e pressure is - : :
maintained. : ~ :
Figures 1 and 2 show only one embodiment of the present invention, and although ~hese igures show the be3t mode o~ the invention, it should be under~tood that the present in~ention can be ' '''.
practiced in many form~ other than that shown.
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-31~

The basis of the present invention is a double tank desi~n that uses a manual wal:er pump and a series of one way val~s and tubes to draw ambient water from one tank, pumping said water into a :::
second tank, where it i5 presssurized again~t an air cushion and discharge that water selectively to the amblent air. The illustrated embodim~nt shown in Figures 1 and 2 shows a design ~or the present invention that i8 both effîcient and :
inexpensivQ to manufacture. It should therefore be understood that in light of the appended claim~, the invention may he practiced other than is speci~ically desc~ibed, and indivldual parts may be modified or connected in orientatians othe~
than those shown.
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Claims (19)

1. A toy water gun having a housing with extending handle, trigger and barrel, said water gun comprising:
(a) a water storage reservoir connected to said housing, said water storage reservoir having at least one orifice formed thereon for the addition and subtraction of water therefrom; and said water storage reservoir having at least one vent to the surrounding ambient air;

(b) a pressurized water storage tank connected to said housing, said pressurized water storage tank having only one orifice through which all liquids and gasses pass;

(c) a pump means that can selectively draw air or water or a combination thereof from said vented water storage reservoir, depositing same into said pressurized water storage tank to thus vary the ratio of air to water therein;

(d) a plurality of one-way flow valves, wherein at least one of said one-way flow valves prohibits water and air from flowing from said pressurized water storage tank to said pumping means and another at least one of said one-way flow valves prohibits water and air from flowing from said pumping means to said water storage reservoir;
(e) a nozzle having a narrow orifice therethrough, said nozzle being affixed to the end of said barrel;
(f) an avenue of release connecting said nozzle to said pressurized water storage tank; and (g) a controlling means for regulating the flow of water and air through said avenue of release, said controlling means being attached to said trigger of said water gun and regulated by the movement of said trigger.
2. The water gun of claim 1, wherein a one-way venting valve allows ambient air to enter said water storage reservoir through said vent while preventing water from exiting said water storage reservoir through said vent.
3. The water gun of claim 1, wherein said pumping means is the reciprocation of a piston within a cylinder, said reciprocation of said piston having two-cycle strokes, a priming stroke wherein said piston retreats within said shaft, and a compression stroke wherein said piston advances within said shaft.
4. The water gun of claim 3 wherein said piston is affixed to a rod, said rod terminating at a handle.
5. The water gun of claim 3 wherein said priming stroke of said pumping means draws water or air into said cylinder from said water storage reservoir, past at least one of said one-way flow valves.
6. The water gun of claim 5 wherein said compression stroke of said pumping means forces said water or said air, drawn from said water storage reservoir, out of said cylinder and into said pressurized water storage tank.
7. The water gun of claim 4 wherein said handle is slidably affixed to said barrel.
8. The water gun of claim 1 wherein said avenue of release is a flexible tube.
9. The water gun of claim 1 wherein the level and orientation of water within said water storage reservoir determines whether said pumping means draws water or air from within said water storage reservoir.
10. The water gun of claim 9 wherein a user of said gun can selectively draw air or water from said water storage reservoir with said pumping means by changing the orientation of said gun.
11. The water gun of claim 8 wherein said controlling means for regulating the flow of water through said avenue of release is a spring biased pinch bar that presses a length of said avenue of release against said housing of said water gun, collapsing said length of said avenue of release.
12. The water gun of claim 11 wherein said spring bias of said pinch bar is overcome by a force applied to said trigger, whereby said pinch bar is formed as part of said trigger and said force applied to said trigger through a lever action, causes said pinch bar to move in opposition of said spring bias.
13. The water gun of claim 1 wherein said water storage reservoir is detachable from said gun.
14. The water gun of claim 11 wherein said spring bias is created by a leaf spring having one end affixed to said housing of said gun.
15. The water gun of claim 2 wherein said one-way venting valve opens each time the air pressure within said water storage reservoir is less than that of the ambient air.
16. The water gun of claim 1 wherein said pressurized storage tank can safely hold water or air at a pressure of least one hundred pounds per square inch.
17. The water gun of claim 1 wherein said water storage reservoir has a sealable orifice thereon for the addition of water thereto.
18. The water gun of claim 13 wherein water stored within said pressurized water storage tank can be discharged from said gun while said water storage reservoir is detached from said gun.
19. The water gun of claim 11 wherein said spring bias pinch bar is calibrated to yield to pressure within said avenue of release, when said pressure within said avenue of release exceeds a predetermined maximum value.
CA 2048569 1991-04-03 1991-08-07 Double tank pinch trigger pump water gun Expired - Fee Related CA2048569C (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US68024791A true 1991-04-03 1991-04-03
US07/680,247 1991-04-03

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
CA2048569A1 CA2048569A1 (en) 1992-10-04
CA2048569C true CA2048569C (en) 1993-01-05

Family

ID=24730338

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
CA 2048569 Expired - Fee Related CA2048569C (en) 1991-04-03 1991-08-07 Double tank pinch trigger pump water gun

Country Status (3)

Country Link
JP (1) JPH0694395A (en)
CA (1) CA2048569C (en)
IT (1) IT1251661B (en)

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
IT1251661B (en) 1995-05-19
ITMI912660A1 (en) 1992-10-04
ITMI912660D0 (en) 1991-10-08
JPH0694395A (en) 1994-04-05
CA2048569A1 (en) 1992-10-04

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