WO1994000208A1 - Hand pump water gun with remote water source - Google Patents

Hand pump water gun with remote water source

Info

Publication number
WO1994000208A1
WO1994000208A1 PCT/US1993/002467 US9302467W WO1994000208A1 WO 1994000208 A1 WO1994000208 A1 WO 1994000208A1 US 9302467 W US9302467 W US 9302467W WO 1994000208 A1 WO1994000208 A1 WO 1994000208A1
Authority
WO
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
water
air
pressurized
tank
gun
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/US1993/002467
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Lonnie G. Johnson
Bruce M. D'andrade
Original Assignee
Johnson Lonnie G
Andrade Bruce M D
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41BWEAPONS FOR PROJECTING MISSILES WITHOUT USE OF EXPLOSIVE OR COMBUSTIBLE PROPELLANT CHARGE; WEAPONS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F41B9/00Liquid ejecting guns, e.g. water pistols, devices ejecting electrically charged liquid jets, devices ejecting liquid jets by explosive pressure
    • F41B9/0003Liquid ejecting guns, e.g. water pistols, devices ejecting electrically charged liquid jets, devices ejecting liquid jets by explosive pressure characterised by the pressurisation of the liquid
    • F41B9/0006Liquid ejecting guns, e.g. water pistols, devices ejecting electrically charged liquid jets, devices ejecting liquid jets by explosive pressure characterised by the pressurisation of the liquid the liquid being pressurised prior to ejection
    • F41B9/0015Liquid ejecting guns, e.g. water pistols, devices ejecting electrically charged liquid jets, devices ejecting liquid jets by explosive pressure characterised by the pressurisation of the liquid the liquid being pressurised prior to ejection the liquid being pressurised by compressed gas, e.g. air
    • F41B9/0018Liquid ejecting guns, e.g. water pistols, devices ejecting electrically charged liquid jets, devices ejecting liquid jets by explosive pressure characterised by the pressurisation of the liquid the liquid being pressurised prior to ejection the liquid being pressurised by compressed gas, e.g. air the gas being compressed utilising a manual piston pump
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B05SPRAYING OR ATOMISING IN GENERAL; APPLYING LIQUIDS OR OTHER FLUENT MATERIALS TO SURFACES, IN GENERAL
    • B05BSPRAYING APPARATUS; ATOMISING APPARATUS; NOZZLES
    • B05B9/00Spraying apparatus for discharge of liquids or other fluent material, without essentially mixing with gas or vapour
    • B05B9/03Spraying apparatus for discharge of liquids or other fluent material, without essentially mixing with gas or vapour characterised by means for supplying liquid or other fluent material
    • B05B9/04Spraying apparatus for discharge of liquids or other fluent material, without essentially mixing with gas or vapour characterised by means for supplying liquid or other fluent material with pressurised or compressible container; with pump
    • B05B9/0403Spraying apparatus for discharge of liquids or other fluent material, without essentially mixing with gas or vapour characterised by means for supplying liquid or other fluent material with pressurised or compressible container; with pump with pumps for liquids or other fluent material
    • B05B9/0426Spraying apparatus for discharge of liquids or other fluent material, without essentially mixing with gas or vapour characterised by means for supplying liquid or other fluent material with pressurised or compressible container; with pump with pumps for liquids or other fluent material with a pump attached to the spray gun or discharge device

Abstract

A toy water gun having a housing (60) with extending handle (95), trigger (65), and barrel (81). The water gun is connected to at least one remote water source (38, 148) external from and indirectly connected to the housing (60). The indirect connection is by tubing or hosing (138) external of said housing. Also included is a pressurized air and water storage tank (3) external from and connected to the housing. The pressurized tank has an orifice between said pressurized tank and said housing through which all liquids and gases pass. There is also a pump piston (33) for withdrawing air or water from the remote source or sources (38, 148), and for depositing the withdrawn air or water into the pressurized tank (3). A plurality of one-way flow valves (30, 43) are included wherein at least one one-way flow valve (30) prohibits water and air from flowing from the pressurized tank to the pumping means, at least one other said one-way flow valve (43) prohibits water and air from flowing from the pumping means to the remote source or sources of air and water. There is a nozzle affixed to the end of said barrel and an avenue of release connecting the nozzle to the pressurized tank. There is a trigger for regulating the flow of water and air through the avenue of release.

Description

HAND PUMP WATER GUN WITH REMOTE WATER SOURCE

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Field of the Invention

The present invention is directed to a toy water

squirt gun, and more particularly to such a toy water

squirt gun that uses a self-contained pumping means

to draw water from at least one remote water source

to compress an air cushion with the drawn water, and

store the water pressurized by the compressed air in

at least one pressurized reservoir. The water is

then released in a selective manner through a narrow

nozzle, causing the stored water to be propelled

forward in a narrow stream.

2. Prior Art Statement

Water guns have for decades been a very popular

child's toy. Since the toy industry is very co petitive, hundreds of different style water guns

have been developed in an attempt to profit from the

toy's inherent popularity. The most traditional

forms of water guns are activated by a pumping

action, either manually through the trigger or

automatically through a battery operated motor. Such

pump action water guns work, but the guns are limited

in the distance the water traveled, the amount of

water projected and the duration of the pumping

cycle. In an attempt to improve upon water guns, the

toy industry has developed pressure activated water

guns. Such pressure activated water guns work upon

the principle of pressure differentials between the

water held within the toy and the atmosphere. The

water within the toy is subjected to a pressure higher than that of the ambient air. As a result,

when the water within the toy is given an avenue of

escape, the water will stream out under the pressure.

Prior art that shows pressure differential types of

water guns are exemplified by the following:

United States Patent Number 3,197,070 to Curtis

F. Pearl et al, shows a water gun activated by

trapping water in a collapsible area. As the device

is collapsed, the pressure of the water builds,

spraying the water out of the one small orifice left

within the pressured volume. Once the confined

volume is fully collapsed, the re-expansion of the

volume draws forth more water from a reservoir, thus

priming the water gun for another cycle. The water

being pressurized is limited to the volume of the collapsible volume. The Pearl invention cannot store

pressurized water for use at a later time, nor can

?:

the pressure of the water be increased by cycling the

pumping action of the invention while restraining

water discharge.

United States Patent Number 4,854,480 to Robert

S. Shindo and United States Patent Number 4,735,239

to Michael E. Salmon et al, both show toy water

devices that use an elastic bladder to pressurize

water. The bladders are filled with high pressure

water, and the bladders respond by elastically

deforming. The source of pressurized water is then

removed and the water within the expanded bladder is

held in place by a clamping device activated by a

trigger. The water gun is used by selectively releasing the clamp, allowing the water to flow from

the expanded bladder.

Water guns have also been developed that use air

pressure to pressurize water and force water through

squirt channels. Such toys that use air pumps to

pressurize water are exemplified by the following:

U. S. Patent Number 4,214,674 to Jones et al,

shows a two-piece apparatus consisting of a

pressurized water reservoir and a discharging gun.

Air is introduced into the water reservoir via a hand

operated pump. The air pressurizes the water,

forcing it up through the discharging gun, where the

rate of discharge can be regulated by a trigger.

United States Patent No. 4,239,129 to Gary F.

Esposito describes a water pistol and/or flashlight structure which includes a reciprocal pump within the

gun housing. The pump is used to pressurize air

within the tank after water has been added, and a

trigger is used for subsequent release of the water.

Battery operated lights and sound are also provided.

United States Patent No. 3,578,789, issued to

Giampiero Ferri, describes a water pistol which

includes a main liquid reservoir and a pressurized

liquid reservoir contained within the main liquid

reservoir. A trigger-actuated pump is used with a

manually operated three way valve to selectively

supply liquid: (a) from the pump to the pressurized

reservoir; (b) from the pump to the nozzle and to the

pressurized liquid reservoir; or, (c) from the pump

to both the pressurized liquid reservoir and the nozzle. The Ferri water gun is limited in many ways

as compared to the present invention. Ferri does not

have a separate hand pump but relies only upon the

trigger as a pump (limited to finger pumping) . Ferri

requires manual valve switching with complicated

steps not easily performed by young children. Ferri

has limited liquid capacity as the main liquid

reservoir is inside the housing (handle) and is very

limited in pressurized tank capacity as the Ferri

pressurized tank is within the main liquid reservoir.

Thus, although prior art does show toy water

guns that have collapsible water chambers and self-

contained pumping means, the prior art neither

teaches nor suggests a toy water gun that uses a

self-contained, hand operated water pumping device to draw both water and air or either from at least one

remote source, to pressurize air with the water

drawn, and to store the pressurized air and water in

at least one pressurized tank, where it can

accumulate until discharged. Additionally, the

safety of the invention is assured by a triggering

device that automatically and safely discharges

pressurized water when over pressurized, until the

maximum allowable pressure is reached.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is a toy water gun having

a housing with extending handle, trigger and barrel.

The water gun is connected to at least one remote

water source external from and indirectly connected

to the housing. The indirect connection is by tubing or hosing external of said housing and having a vent

to surrounding ambient atmosphere so air may enter

therethrough. Also included is a pressurized air and

water storage tank external from and connected to the

housing. The pressurized tank has only one orifice

between said pressurized tank and said housing

through which all liquids and gasses pass. There is

also a pumping means for withdrawing air or water

from the remote source or sources, and for depositing

the withdrawn air or water into the pressurized tank.

A plurality of one-way flow valves are included

wherein at least one one-way flow valve prohibits

water and air from flowing from the pressurized tank

to the pumping means, at least one said one-way flow

valve prohibits water and air from flowing from the pumping means to the remote source or sources of air

and water. There is a nozzle with a narrow orifice

therethrough, which affixed to the end of said barrel

and an avenue of release connecting the nozzle to the

pressurized tank. There is also a controlling means

for regulating the flow of water and air through the

avenue of release, the controlling means being

actuatable by. the trigger.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The invention will be more fully understood by

referring to the following detailed specification,

the above specification and the claims set forth

herein, when taken in connection with the drawings

appended hereto, wherein:

Figure 1 shows a perspective view of one preferred embodiment of the present invention; and,

Figure 2 shows a partially fragmented side view

of a different preferred embodiment of the present

invention, illustrating the claimed inner mechanisms.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PRESENT INVENTION

The present invention is, as mentioned, directed

toward a toy water gun that uses a manually operated

pump to draw water and/or air, and then pressurize

the air to exert pressure on the water, storing the

water and air under pressure until selectively

discharged. The science of pressurized water toys is

not new, and over the years many different designs

have been developed utilizing a pumping action to

pressurize water. As applied to the art of toy water

squirt guns, the most common type of device involves a two-stroke pump, wherein the pump draws water into

a chamber through a large orifice during the priming

stroke, and forces water out of the chamber through a

very narrow orifice during the compression stroke.

This simple system forms the basis of thousands of

devices in addition to water guns, such as non-

aerosol dispensing devices for hair spray, perfume,

window cleaner, and countless other products that are

dispensed in a narrow stream or mist.

The problem with simple two-stroke squirting

systems is that the amount of liquid that can be

expelled is limited to a single volume of the

compressible area; also, the pressure of the liquid

exiting the device is dependent directly upon the

force being applied during the time of expulsion. Consequently, when water is squirted in this manner,

only a small volume is released with each pumping

action. When attempts are made to increase the

amount of water propelled by increasing the volume of

the compressible area, the pumping action cannot

displace the water at a high pressure, resulting in

expulsion of water at low pressures.

Water guns advantageously involve squirting

large volumes of water at high pressures. The higher

the pressure, the longer the distance the water can

be propelled, thus increasing the range and power of

the water gun. The present invention water gun uses

a two-stroke pump to store and pressurize large

amounts of water. The present invention draws air

from the surrounding ambient environment and a predetermined volume of water from a remote source,

pressurizes air with the drawn water and deposits the

pressurized air and water in at least one storage

tank, herein referred to as a "pressurized tank",

where it remains under pressure. As more and more

water and/or air are drawn, pressurized and deposited

within the pressurized tank, the volume and the

pressure on the stored water increases, compressing

the air within the pressurized tank. The water

propelled by the compressed air can then be

selectively released through a narrow orifice,

creating a stream of propelled water. The

pressurized tank system of the present invention

allows the user of the invention to determine the

volume and pressure of the water to be discharged, and also allows a user to refill and replace the

water from a remote source without disabling the

water gun's ability to discharge water. The

pressurized tank system gives the water guns of the

present invention a variety of firing characteristics

that are unique in the art of toy water guns,

allowing an operator to choose and adjust the range

and power of the water gun. By having at least one

pressurized tank, and possibly two or more of such

pressurized tanks, sufficient or increased storage

for more shots, and increased pressurized water for

longer duration shots, are achieved.

The present invention also has other advantages

over many other pressurized container water guns, in

that, instead of pumping air into a chamber that already contains water, the present invention pumps

water or air or water and air (hereinafter "water

and/or air") into a chamber containing air. The

pumping of water is more efficient than the pumping

of air, thus less pumping strokes are required and

higher pressures are easier to achieve.

When designing toys involving pressurized air

and water, one consideration is that of safety. Toys

are designed to be inexpensive so as to be widely

marketable. As such, most toys are made of plastics

or other inexpensive materials. Such materials do

not have large tensile strengths or fatigue

characteristics, and therefore do not lend themselves

well to containing pressurized fluids. Plastic

containments of pressurized liquids, if not properly designed, can rupture and explode, causing injury.

The present invention has a unique design that allows

for both the use of high pressure air and the

elimination of potential rupturing hazards. The

present invention, in some preferred embodiments, has

one or more cylindrical pressurized tanks, each with

a single orifice or opening between the pressurized

tanks and the housing of the water gun, through which

water and gasses pass. The single orifice, in

conjunction with the generous radii used at the

cylinder ends, serve to maintain the integrity of the

water tank walls and minimize the stress points

throughout the material of the pressurized tank,

thereby allowing for the safe use of pressures

generated by the present invention. Pressurized tanks having other shapes, such as spheres, with a

minimum, and preferably, no seams, may also be used

advantageously and safely with water guns of the

present invention.

The present invention is thus directed to a toy

water gun which is operated by drawing water from a

remote source and by selectively releasing water from

at least one pressurized water tank. The present

invention has a manually operated pump incorporated

into the design. As the pump is cycled, water and/or

air are drawn from at least one remote water source

and the ambient atmosphere, respectively. Once

drawn, the water and/or air are forced by the pump

through conduits or passages in the housing into at

least one pressurized tank. As the amount of water and/or air forced into the pressurized tank

increases, the pressure of the air displaced by the

water within the pressurized tank increases. The

pressure of the air on the water within the

pressurized tank increases with each cycle of the

pump, until the pump can no longer overcome the

pressure of the air on the water within the

pressurized tank. The pressurized air and water

within the pressurized tank has an avenue of release

that is regulated by the trigger mechanism of the

invention which has a safety pressure release within

its design. When no force is applied to the trigger,

the pressurized water and air are held at bay with no

means of release. When force is applied to the

trigger, the heavier water is first released from the bottom of the pressurized tank and is channeled

through a narrow nozzle. The escape of the air-

pressurized water through the narrow nozzle creates a

plurality of sequential bursts or a continuous stream

of propelled water that lasts as long as the trigger

is engaged or until the pressure within the

pressurized tank equals the ambient air pressure.

Referring now to Figure 1, one preferred

embodiment of the present invention, water gun 1, is

shown. Figure 1 shows a perspective view of the

present invention water gun 1 and a remote water

source 148. Gun 1 includes pressurized tank 3

connected to main housing 60 that is shaped generally

in the form of a gun having a handle 95, trigger 65

and barrel 81. There is a slider handle 73 which surrounds barrel 81 and is slidable toward and away

from nozzle encasement 77. Slider handle 73 is

connected to piston rod 31 (see Figure 2), which

itself constitutes a portion of a pumping means for

operation of toy gun 1. Outside conduit 138 has a

connection section 134 which includes optional

valving and vent means described below.

Outside conduit 138 has distal end 144 submerged

in or otherwise in fluid communication with remote

water source 148. In this illustration, the remote

water source 148 is in the form of a pond with land

158, as shown. However, the water source remotely

located from the present invention water guns

otherwise may be lakes, swimming pools, tubs, spas,

sinks, or any other open water source, whereby the extended outside conduit is merely submerged or

dropped into the remote water source. Further, the

present invention water gun could be used with or

include an enclosed remote water source, such as one

or more vats, large bottles or tanks or other

container. These may be connected indirectly through

coupling means (via the outside conduit) to the water

gun or not connected directly to the enclosed water

source by a coupling so long as there is a means of

causing water to communicate between the enclosed

water source and the water gun, such as a flexible

conduit immersed in the water in the enclosed water

source.

The internal functioning and operational aspects

of the toy water gun 1 shown in Figure 1 are the same as for the toy water gun 101 shown in Figure 2,

except that gun 1 is connected to an open water

source and gun 101 is indirectly attached to a closed

water source. Thus, the description below as to

Figure 2 applies to all aspects of the Figure 1 water

gun 1 except for the water source arrangement.

Referring now to Figure 2, there is shown a side

view partially in vertical cross section of water gun

101 with most parts the same as water gun 1 of Figure

1 with like parts like numbered. Thus, the inner

workings of present invention water guns can best be

visualized and explained in discussing Figure 2.

Water 35 is placed within water storage reservoir 38

(preferably as well as in a second water storage

reservoir not shown in this figure because it is behind reservoir 38 in this side view) . The water 35

is introduced by being poured through the filling

port and cap assembly 83. Alternatively, filling

port and cap assembly 83 could be eliminated and

reservoir 38 could be filled through the neck 28, by

immersion in a water source and removal of base cap

27.

The water storage reservoir 38 is shown in

Figure 2 as being bottle shaped, with a neck 28

having threads, as shown. However, it should also be

understood that the storage reservoir 38 can be

formed in any shape or size, as long as it is

designed to hold and store water. Support strappings

96 and 98 hold reservoir 38 to plate 94 which is

attached to shoulder straps, a belt or clip 99. Thus, reservoir 38 may be clipped or strapped to a

belt or back or leg or arm of a user, or otherwise

attached to a user.

Water 35 and air from air space 69 are drawn

from the storage reservoir 38 (and from the unseen

adjacent reservoir) through outside conduit 102,

which is connected to attachment 134 and then through

tube 29, tube 14, and to tube 47 that connects with

the pressurized tank 3. The present invention water

gun will draw either water 35 or air 69 from the

storage reservoir 38, depending on the orientation of

the invention when the operator draws materials from

the storage reservoir 38. As water 35 and/or air 69

are drawn from the storage reservoir 38, a partial

vacuum is produced within reservoir 38. The vacuum is eliminated by a vent valve 84 located atop cap 83

of storage reservoir 38. Vent valve 84 may be a

simple flap or even a small orifice, as long as air

can enter the reservoir 38 and little or no water

spills out. Thus, a vent valve 84 may be located on

cap assembly 83 or could alternatively be located

directly on storage reservoir 38.

The force drawing the water 35 or air 69 from

the storage reservoir 38 is created by the movement

of the piston 33 within its cylinder 34. The

movement of the presently preferred piston 33 within

the cylinder 34 has two-cycle strokes, a priming

stroke where water 35 is drawn forth from the water

storage reservoir 38, and/or air is drawn from the

water storage reservoir 38 or the ambient atmosphere through vent valve 19, and a compression stroke

wherein water 35 and/or air 69 are displaced by the

piston 33. In one preferred embodiment, the priming

stroke starts when the piston 33 is retreated within

its cylinder 34 (toward the front or left side, in

Figure 2), creating an expanding volume chamber 15.

The vacuum created by the expanding chamber 15, draws

water 35 and/or air 69 through the conduit 102 and

tube 29 and into the chamber 15. The flow of water

35 and/or air 69 into the expanding chamber 15 opens

a one-way valve that is normally biased in a closed

position.

The one-way valve that is shown in Figure 2

consists of a ball 30 that is biased against an

elastomeric seal 11 by a spring 13. As a vacuum is created by the piston 33, the force of the spring 13

is overcome and the ball 30 drops away from the

elastomeric seal 11, allowing water and/or air to

pass. As the piston 33 is advanced within its

cylinder 34 (to the rear of the water gun or the

right in Figure 2), the compression stroke begins and

pressure is placed on the water or air now within the

chamber. The- air is compressed, closing the one-way

valve by assisting the spring 13 to push the ball 30

against its seal 11. Although a ball and seal one¬

way valve is illustrated, it should be understood

that any type of a one-way valve would work within

the present invention as long as the valve made a

seal that is both airtight and watertight.

The compression stroke created by the advancement of the piston 33 within the cylinder 34

(to the rear or the right in Figure 2) causes

pressure to be put on the water 35 and/or air 69

within the chamber 15. The pressurized water and/or

air, as a result of the diminishing volume of the

compression stroke of the chamber 15, opens a second

one-way valve that leads to the pressurized tank 3

through tubes or conduits 47 and 45. As the piston

33 is reciprocated within its cylinder 34, water 35

and/or air 69 is repeatedly drawn through the outside

conduit 102 from the storage reservoir 38 or other

remote source and deposited into the pressurized tank

3. As more and more water and/or air is drawn and

forced into the pressurized tank 3, the air pressure

within pressurized tank 3 increases until the force used to drive the piston 33 can no longer overcome

the stored pressure, or until the pressure is

released through the safety valve 63, normally

actuated by the trigger 65.

The movement of the piston 33 within cylinder 34

draws water and/or air from storage reservoir 38 and

the vent valve 19 into tube 29. However, when the

storage reservoir 38 is positioned so that the air

within the storage reservoir 38 is in contact with

the neck 28, the movement of the piston 33 will draw

air into the pumping chamber 15. When the pumping

chamber 15 is compressed, the air will become

pressurized and flow into the pressurized tank 3,

increasing an air cushion in air space 92 in the

pressurized tank 3, while increasing the pressure on the water but not increasing the volume of any water

91 present within the pressurized tank 3. By having

a pumping action that can introduce both air and

water 91 into the pressurized tank 3, the pressure of

the air can be increased above that available by an

air pumping system alone because of the relative

inefficiency of an air pump. The pumping of water is

more efficient than that of air because of the

incompressibility of liquids. Therefore the work

available from the pumping system is maximized when

used to pump water against an air cushion.

The operation of the pumping action is achieved

by the piston 33 being driven by a piston rod 31 that

is affixed to a handle 73. The handle 73, as shown

in this embodiment, is slidably attached to the barrel 81. As the handle 73 is manually reciprocated

along the barrel 81, the motion is transferred to the

piston 33, creating the desired pumping effect.

Although a linear pumping action is shown, it should

be understood that a variety of orientations and

multiple linkage configurations could be manipulated

by a user to create the desired pumping motion.

Once the desired pressure is obtained within the

pressurized tank 3, the water 91, pressurized by the

compressed air in space 92, is discharged by

selectively opening an exit orifice to the

surrounding ambient atmosphere. The pressure

differential between the ambient atmosphere and the

air in space 92 causes the water 91 to stream out.

In the shown embodiment of the present invention, the pathway connecting the pressurized tank 3 to the

ambient atmosphere is a series of tubes or conduits,

an exit tube 67, at least a portion of which is

preferably flexible, pump connection tube 47 and

elbow tube 45. As water and/or air leaves the

pumping chamber 15, it passes by a one-way valve 43

and into a T-shaped connection 53. The T-shaped

connection 53 on one side attaches to the flexible

exit tube 67, and on the other side attaches to

connection tube 47. As water and/or air is forced

into the T-shaped connection 53, the water and/or air

tries to enter both the exit tube 67 and the

connection tube 47. However, the flexible portion of

the exit tube 67 is closed by the trigger actuated

pinch valve 63, leaving the connection tube 47 as the only pathway through which the water may pass. The

connection tube 47 leads to the pressurized tank 3

through elbow 45, consequently all air and/or water

expelled by the pump is led into the pressurized tank

3. When pressurized water 91, stored within the

pressurized tank 3 is to be discharged, the trigger

65 is depressed. The trigger 65 may be formed with a

pinch bar 63 that is biased against the exit tube 67

by a spring 57, e.g. a leaf /spring, a compression

spring, an extension spring or the like. As the

trigger 65 is depressed, the bias of the spring 57 is

overcome and the pinch bar 63 is lifted away from the

exit tube 67. With the exit tube 67 open, the

integrity of the pressurized tank 3 is now breached

and the pressurized water 91 is offered an avenue of escape to the ambient atmosphere. The pressure

differential between the pressurized air within air

space 92 above water 91 in tank 3 and the ambient

atmosphere causes the water 91 to flow back out

through the elbow 45, through the connection tube 47,

through the T-shaped connection 53 and through the

exit tube 67, until the water 91 is discharged

through the exit orifice 75 formed at the end of the

exit tube 67.

The amount of pressurized water 91 being

discharged through exit orifice 75 is controlled by

the user in a variety of ways. A user can control

the amount of water discharged by controlling the

depression of the trigger 65. If the trigger 65 is

depressed and left in that position, the pressurized water 91 will be discharged until the pressurized

tank 3 is empty, or until the pressure of the

compressed air in air space 92 equals that of the

ambient air. The user may choose to discharge the

pressurized water 91 selectively, depressing the

trigger 65 for short periods of time, resulting in

numerous shots being allowed before the pressurized

tank 3 needs to be refilled or repressurized. A user

may also choose to vary the pressure and amount of

water being discharged by selectively adding the air

within pressurized tank 3. The more air is added,

the larger the air cushion the and longer the

invention may propel water. The use of two or more

storage reservoirs, such as reservoir 38, permits the

user to carry at least twice the capacity of a single reservoir and thus longer operation before going back

to the water source, such as a sink faucet, hose,

etc. When the Figure 1 embodiment, toy gun 1, is

used, an "infinite" supply of water is drawn from the

remote source.

As mentioned, the present invention water gun

101 is operated by selectively releasing the

pressurized water 91 through a narrow nozzle 75. The

selective release of the pressurized water is

controlled by the trigger mechanism of the water gun.

Since the present invention has the ability to

operate at high pressures, the trigger release

mechanism performs two functions. First, it controls

the amount of water released, and second, the trigger

mechanism serves as a safety valve. The presently preferred trigger 65 of the present invention has a

spring biased pinch bar valve 63 that pinches the

tube exit 67 for the pressurized water 91 against a

stop 59 that is part of the main housing.

The pinch bar 63 is biased against the stop 59

by a calibrated spring 57. The spring 57 is held at

one end by a formation 55 of the main housing.

The strength of the spring 57 in its biased

configuration is calibrated, so that when the

pressure of water 91 within the exit tube 67 reaches

a predetermined maximum value, the spring 57 will

allow the pinch bar 63 to rise and water will be

released until a safe pressure is maintained.

Thus, the predetermined maximum value for the

yielding of the spring 57 or other release means may preferably be between about 50 pounds per square inch

and about 90 pounds per square inch. Other

predetermined pressures of higher or lower value,

e.g. about 100 pounds per square inch, may be used

depending upon the particular components and specific

configuration of a particular embodiment.

The above Figures show only selected embodiments

of the present invention, and although these figures

show preferred embodiments of the invention, it

should be understood that the present invention can

be practiced in many forms other than those shown.

The basis of the present invention is a remote

container, reservoir or tank design with extra tank

capacity (and an almost unlimited supply of water

where a pool, pond, lake, stream, etc, type of large volume water source is used) , that uses a manual

water pump and a series of one-way valves and tubes

to draw ambient water from at least one remote

storage reservoir, pumping said water into at least

one pressurized tank, where it is pressurized against

an air cushion, and discharge that water selectively

to the ambient atmosphere. The illustrated

embodiments shown in the Figures are designs for the

present invention which are both efficient and

inexpensive to manufacture. It should therefore be

understood that in light of the appended claims, that

the invention may be practiced other than as

specifically described, and individual parts may be

modified or connected in orientations other than

those shown.

Claims

-41-WHAT IS CLAIMED IS:
1. A toy water gun having a housing with
extending handle, trigger and barrel, said
water gun comprising:
(a) at least one water source
external from, remotely located
from and indirectly connectable
to said housing, and at least one
outside conduit external of said
housing for connecting said
. source to said housing;
(b) at least one pressurized air and
water tank external from and
connected to said housing, said
pressurized tank having an -42-
orifice between said pressurized
tank and said housing through
which all liquids and gasses
pass;
(c) a pumping means for withdrawing water from
said water source, air or a combination
thereof, and for depositing said withdrawn
air and/or water into said pressurized
tank;
(d) a plurality of one-way flow valves,
wherein at least one of said one-way flow
valves prohibits water and air from
flowing from said pressurized tank to said
pumping means, at least one of said one-way
flow valves prohibits water and air from flowing from said pumping means to said
water source;
(e) a nozzle having a narrow orifice
therethrough, said nozzle being
affixed to the end of said barrel;
(f) an avenue of release connecting said
nozzle to said pressurized tank; and,
(g) a controlling means for regulating the
flow of water and air through said
avenue of release, said controlling
means being actuatable by said trigger.
2. The water gun of claim 1, wherein said
pumping means is a reciprocatable piston
within a cylinder, said pumping means having a priming stroke wherein said piston retreats
within said cylinder, and a compression stroke
wherein said piston advances within said
cylinder.
3. The water gun of claim 2 wherein said piston
is affixed to a rod, said rod terminating
at a handle.
4. The water gun of claim 2 wherein said
priming stroke of said pumping means draws water
through said outside conduit from said source
and/or air into said cylinder, past at least two
of said one-way flow valves.
5. The water gun of claim 4 wherein said
compression stroke of said pumping means
forces said withdrawn water and/or air into
said pressurized tank.
The water gun of claim 3 wherein said handle
is slidably affixed to said barrel.
7. The water gun of claim 1 wherein at least a
portion of said avenue of release is a flexible
tube.
8. The water gun of claim 7 wherein said
controlling means for regulating the flow of
water through said avenue of release is a spring biased pinch means that pinches a length
of said flexible tube, selectively collapsing
said flexible tube.
9. The water gun of claim 8 wherein said spring
biased pinch means is a pinch bar having a
spring bias which is overcome by a force applied
to said trigger, whereby said pinch bar is
formed as part of said trigger and said force
applied to said trigger through a lever action
causes said pinch bar to move in opposition of
said spring bias.
10. The water gun of claim 8 wherein said spring
biased pinch means is a pinch bar having a spring bias created by a spring having one end
affixed to said housing and the other end
engaging said pinch bar.
11. The water gun of claim 7 wherein said spring
biased pinch means has a spring bias calibrated
to yield to pressure within said avenue of
release, when said pressure within said avenue
of release exceeds a predetermined maximum
value.
12. The water gun of claim 1 wherein said at least
one water source is at least one refillable tank
connected to said outside conduit.
13. The water gun of claim 12 having at least two
refillable tanks as water sources.
14. The water gun of claim 12 wherein said
refillable tank is in the form of a pack
attachable to a user.
15. The water gun of claim 1 having at least two
pressurized tanks.
16. A toy water gun having a housing with extending
handle, trigger and barrel, said water gun
comprising:
(a) at least one outside conduit external of
said housing connecting said housing to a remote source of water;
(b) at least one pressurized air and water tank
external from and connected to said
housing, said pressurized tank having only
one orifice between said pressurized tank
and said housing through which all liquids
and gasses pass;
(c) a pumping means for withdrawing
water from a remote water source, air or a
combination thereof, and for depositing
. said withdrawn air and/or water into said
pressurized tank;
(d) a plurality of one-way flow valves, wherein
at least one of said one-way flow valves
prohibits water and air from flowing from said pressurized tank to said pumping
means, at least one of said one-way flow
valves prohibits water and air from flowing
from said pumping means to a remote water
source;
(e) a nozzle having a narrow orifice
therethrough, said nozzle being affixed to
the end of said barrel;
(f) an avenue of release connecting said
nozzle to said pressurized tank; and,
(g) a controlling means for regulating the flow
of water and air through said avenue of
release, said controlling means being
actuatable by said trigger.
17. The water gun of claim 16 wherein said pumping
means is a reciprocatable piston within a
cylinder, said pumping means having a priming
stroke wherein said piston retreats within said
cylinder, and a compression stroke wherein said
piston advances within said cylinder.
18. The water gun of claim 17 wherein said piston is
affixed to a rod, said rod terminating at a
handle.
19. The water gun of claim 17 wherein said priming
stroke of said pumping means draws water through
said outside conduit from said remote water
source and/or air into said cylinder, past at least two of said one-way flow valves,
20. The water gun of claim 19 wherein said
compression stroke of said pumping means forces
said withdrawn water and/or air into said
pressurized tank.
21. The water gun of claim 18 wherein said handle
is slidably affixed to said barrel.
22. The water gun of claim 16 wherein at least a
portion of said avenue of release is a flexible
tube.
23. The water gun of claim 22 wherein said controlling means for regulating the flow of
water through said avenue of release is a spring
biased pinch means that pinches a length of said
flexible tube, selectively collapsing said
flexible tube.
24. The water gun of claim 23 wherein said spring
biased pinch means is a pinch bar having a
spring bias which is overcome by a force applied
to said trigger, whereby said pinch bar is
formed as part of said trigger and said force
applied to said trigger through lever action
causes said pinch bar to move in opposition of
spring bias.
25. The water gun of claim 23 wherein said spring
biased pinch means is a pinch bar having a
spring bias created by a spring having one end
affixed to said housing and the other end
engaging said pinch bar.
26. The water gun of claim 22 wherein said spring
biased pinch means has a spring bias calibrated
to yield to pressure within said avenue of
release, when said pressure within said avenue
of release exceeds a predetermined maximum
value.
27. The water gun of claim 16 wherein said at least
one water source is an open, independent water source .
28. The water gun of claim 16 having at least two
pressurized tanks.
PCT/US1993/002467 1992-06-22 1993-03-23 Hand pump water gun with remote water source WO1994000208A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US90201492 true 1992-06-22 1992-06-22
US902,014 1992-06-22

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
WO1994000208A1 true true WO1994000208A1 (en) 1994-01-06

Family

ID=25415185

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
PCT/US1993/002467 WO1994000208A1 (en) 1992-06-22 1993-03-23 Hand pump water gun with remote water source

Country Status (2)

Country Link
CA (1) CA2092759A1 (en)
WO (1) WO1994000208A1 (en)

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FR2770833A1 (en) * 1997-11-10 1999-05-14 Techniplast Fluid or paste distributor
EP1254072A1 (en) * 1999-12-08 2002-11-06 OMS Investments, Inc. Hand holdable pump spray apparatus
CN107044799A (en) * 2017-05-23 2017-08-15 山东英才学院 Multifunctional toy water gun for children

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CN107044799A (en) * 2017-05-23 2017-08-15 山东英才学院 Multifunctional toy water gun for children

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