CA1078640A - Building system and precast module for use therein - Google Patents

Building system and precast module for use therein

Info

Publication number
CA1078640A
CA1078640A CA237,585A CA237585A CA1078640A CA 1078640 A CA1078640 A CA 1078640A CA 237585 A CA237585 A CA 237585A CA 1078640 A CA1078640 A CA 1078640A
Authority
CA
Canada
Prior art keywords
module
modules
horizontal
slab
wall
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired
Application number
CA237,585A
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Zenon A. Zielinski
Czesia Zielinski
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Individual
Original Assignee
Individual
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Individual filed Critical Individual
Priority to CA237,585A priority Critical patent/CA1078640A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of CA1078640A publication Critical patent/CA1078640A/en
Expired legal-status Critical Current

Links

Classifications

    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B1/00Constructions in general; Structures which are not restricted either to walls, e.g. partitions, or floors or ceilings or roofs
    • E04B1/348Structures composed of units comprising at least considerable parts of two sides of a room, e.g. box-like or cell-like units closed or in skeleton form
    • E04B1/34815Elements not integrated in a skeleton
    • E04B1/34823Elements not integrated in a skeleton the supporting structure consisting of concrete

Abstract

ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE

The invention relates to a construction module and a building system and method utilizing such modules. The module comprises a horizontal slab section having opposed surfaces and at least one transverse support projection rigidly secured to horizontal slab section and extending a predetermined distance above the surfaces from a respective one of the opposed surfaces in a respective half-section of the horizontal slab section. The support section is also provided with an end support edge. The projection also constitutes a load supporting projection when the module is positioned in a building structure.

Description

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The present invention relates to a precast concrete building system where large precast modules are used combining horizontal slabs with wall or column support elements.
Various precast building systems are now being used in practice. Many precast building systems use separate precast elements in -the form of columns, beams or joists and siabs. The disadvantage of known systems is that of requiring a plurality of segments, and of connections therebetween. The connections are usually placed at points where colum~s are joined with beams or slabs. This is a most undesirable place because of natural ~ forces acting on buildings. In corners' junction between hori-; zontal beams and vertical columns there is accumulation of ver-tical and horizontal forces together with shear and bending mo-ments which makes connections very clifficult and expensive.
Single vertical elements like columns, have to be braced in both directions during the erections, so they will not overturn and bring a catastrophy. Plurality of clifferent connections and their complexity make these systems in practice, limited in application and unecomonical.
Other systems use precast large size slabs and walls ~ -or panels. Paneli~ed building systems can be seen as improve-ment while comparing with the post and beam systems, yet they are still difficult because of the plurality of different panels and of connections. They also require lespecially wall panels) bracing during the construction against overturning and failure.
Also known, are systems using precast concrete frames and slabs ~;
resting on them. Precast concreteframes are also disadvantageous because of the requirement for bracing in perpendicular planes.
- 0ther difficulties inherited by this system are the difficult connections of frames with floor panels. Known also are precast concrete systems where segments are prefabricated in the form ~ .

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of complete boxes whereon boxes are made in the factory or in casting yard and then transported and stacked one on top of another. The box system is also uneconomical in practice, because of the requirement for very heavy cranes and the difficulties in transporting boxes which are very heavy and of large volume. The box system also does not allow the use of modern thin-wall ribbed concepts for the ma~ing of floor and wall slabs~ The box system also requires very special and expensive forms for production.
It is a feature of the present invention to provide a precast building system which substantially overcomes all the above-mentioned disadvantages.
It is a further feature of the present invention to provide a con~struction module combining floor and wall or column into a single unit.
It is a further feature of the present invention to provide precast concrete modules which are self-supporting and where columns or walls and floor slabs are connected into single units that are easy to produce, to store, to transport and to erect.
It lS a further feature of the present invention to 7 utilize modules mainly for floors and walls, and in the form of a thin flat slab or waffle or ribbed slabs, where thin slabs being combined together with ribs provide stiffness and rigidity to precast modules as well as to the entire building after it i$
erected.
It is a further feature of the present invention to introduce precast concrete modules of large sizes which can extend from one to the other external wall of building, where apartments can be accommodated in between walls using conventional material for additional partitions.

It is a further feature of the present invention to
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t78~0 have wall elements or column elements projec-ting both ways from slabs upwards and downwards and to locate a connecting joint between modules in the middle heights between floors, where it is a most desirable place for accommodating forces acting on buildings (gravity forces, life load, horizontal forces, torsion, moments) such connections being simple because of loading basic-ally only with vertical forces, and horizontal (shear) forces, without moments, thus making connections which are economical and simple. In some applications no structural connections are required except for the bearing of one element on top of another one. However, additional welded, bolted or post tensioned connections may be used, if desired, in cases of the presence of earthquake forces or uplift forces due to gas explosion or nega- ;
^tive forces due to overturning wind loading etc.
According to a further feature, the present invention provides a system where only one type of precast element, or only a few types, are being used on construction sites whereon ~
these elements may be used in any desirable way as one segment ~-being stacked up on top of another one, or in a staggering manner, placed side-by-side to the other with some segments omitted or one placed on the other on a split-level ~asis.
Another feature o~ this system, is that modules can be placed at a distance, thus providing gaps between them to accommodate partition walls or vertical conduits or stacks of plumbing and installation. Introduced here, prefabricated modules can be placed in a building at angles in a perpendicular direction, one to another, as it may be required for architectural purposes.
A still further feature is to provide a system where ~ ~ -modules are connected in the middle between the upper and lower floor. This feature makes erection work very easy because of having connection at relatively low level, approximately four ;feet from the ground thus eliminating use of any working plat--form, ladders etc. It is possible, however, to shift the con-
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connection upward or downward to the extreme case, when modules will resemble an open box or table~ It is a further feature of this invention to use walls bent around the slab in an angle, in U-~hape, or in rectangles up to a complete box shape or to have some walls completely omitted.
According to a broad aspect of the present inven-tion, there is provided a prefabricated construction module for use in a building structure, said module comprising a horizontal rectangular slab section having opposed surfaces and at least two spaced apart transvere wall sections secured to said horizontal slab section and extending a predetermined distance above each said opposed surfaces to a height of sub-stantially halE a complete wall height where there is no bend-ing moment, said wall sections constituting a load s~lpporting projection when said module is juxtaposed with other modules in said building structure and said horizontal slab consti~
tuting a floor and ceiling surface hy said opposed surfaces, respectively, for adjacent room sections, said wall sections . having an end connecting edye for connection to a juxtaposed : 20 end connecting edge of a wall section of another module, and an extension support notch protruding beyond at least opposed ones of said wall sections extending in a direction parallel to the horizontal plane of said horizontal slab in an area of no bending moment to an end connecting edge situated to provide additional support outside the module for supporting flat panel members between adjacent modules for the construc-tion of a building structure having strength properties com-parable to a fully monolithic structure, said extension sup~
; port notch being a projection of said horizontal slab.

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The invention will now be described with reference to the pre~erred embodiment illustrated by the examples shown in the accompanying drawings in which:
FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of an example of .
a building being constructed with precast concrete modules of the present invention with different alternatives of the modules beilag shown and having full wall elements, wall elements with openings for windows, or with openings which make the walls in the form of columns, or having floor slabs extended vertically to create balcony railing FIGURE 2A is a perspectiv~ view of a module com- ~
posed of a floor slab and wall, ~ : -' ~.

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FIGURE 2B .is a perspective view of a module compose~l of floor slabs, wall slab, and columns, FIGURE 2C is a perspective view of a module composed of a floor slab and columns and wall slab protruding only down-ward on one side, with no upward protrusion, FIGURE 3A is a perspective view of a module having a floor slab combined with walls in the form of angles;
EIGURE 3B is a perspective view of a module having a U-shape wall slab, ~-FIGURE 3C is a perspective view of a module having a wall slab extending about the perimeter of the floor slab -FIGURE 4A is a perspective view illustrating floor :
slabs extending into a balcony barrier;
FIGURE 4B is a perspective view illustrating both ways of an extension of the floor slab and bracke-t notch on wall slab to be used as a support for an intermediate floor panel, FIGURE 4C is a perspective view illustrating the extension of a wall slab into a shelf which could be used as a ~stairway landing platform or other purpose;
.
FIGURE 5 is a perspective view of a-two-storey module, --:
FIGURE 6A is a side elevation showing the construction of a building using different types of modules;
;, FIGURE 6B is a side elevation showing the construction of a building using modules and flat ~loor panels, ;~ FIGURE 7A is a plan view showing the modules composed ~ -of flat slab, wall and columns, with openings for door and a gap in between the modules with additional cross-wall panel and open gap for vertical conduits;
FIGURE 7B is a plan view showing the use of modules where wall slabs are projecting in such a manner that flat panels can be supported in intermediate locations;
FIGURE 7C is a plan view showing a composltion where ' ' - : . .
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different modules and flat panels are being used for -the con-struction of buildings including those oriented in perpendicular directions, FIGURE 8A is an exploded perspective view of a con-nector showing a metal shoe embedded in concrete and a separate double cone insert to be placed in the opening guiding the upper segment during the erection time;
FIGURE 8B is a sectional ~iew of the connection, FIGURE 8C is a section view along section lines X-~ -of Figure 8B, FIGURE 9 is a side view showing a stacking arrangement of modules for storage and transportation, FIGURE 10A shows a plan view of a panel structure, FIGURE 10B shows section in the direction perpendicular ' to the longitudinal axis of the panel of Figure 10A, FIGURE lOC shows a section of a panel along longitudinal line, FIGURE llA shows a plan view of the mould for the producti.on of a panel;
.20 FIGURE 11B shows a sectional view of the mould along .,. :
the longitudinal axis of the panel; ~ ' FIGURE llC shows a sectional view of the structural concept of the mould in perpendicular direction to longitudinal .
, axis of the panel, :
E'IGURE llD shows examples of the use of a continuous ' mould for the production,of panels of a different length, being ' . ., multiples of basic modular component, ., FIGURE 12A is a plan view of a module made using an economical structural system of thin-slabs, and ribs, where ~:
the ri~s are distributed on a modular basi.s, .
FIGURE 12B is a cross-sectional view along cross-sec- ' ' tional line X-X of Figures 12A, and ~ .

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FIGURE 12C is a cross-sectional view along cross-sectional line Y-Y of FIGURE 12A.
Referring now to FIGURE 1, there is shown a partial building structure employing different construction modules A
of this invention. The modules A each comprise essentially a span slab 1 having opposed transveræ support projections 2 in the form of wall slabs 2' or column 2" whereupon, some modules have an "H" configuration when viewed from an end. Horizontal slab projections (4) can also be provided to constitute balconies.
A projecting vertical slab 5 may extend outward from an end of the projection 4 to form a balcony barrier. This figure also shows how cut-outs of spaces between columns in vertical walls can be used for providing window or door openings, 6 and 7, respectively.
This figure also shows a junction joint 8 formed between separate modules A and extending in a horizontal direction or in a zig-zag direction at 9 for providing additional shear resistance to the ; building. This figure also shows horizontal junction joints 10 between the longitudinal side edges of the floor slabs and vertical junction joints between the vertical side edges of adjacent transverse projections 2.
It can be seen from FIGURE 1, that separate modules A are being used here as self-supporting elements resting one on top of another. Projecting guide means 12 (in the form of pins or other suitable means) may be provided in order to guide the modules in place to simplify and speed theerection process of a structure. ~his figure shows a three~storey bullding of modules A which begins at ground level on a foundation 13 cast in place in the ground. However, this invention provides for the erection of buildings with a large number of floors, for example twenty or thirty, or more storeys being common and different types of foundations are provided dependlng on the building specification.

Referring now to FIGURES 2A to 2-C there is shown :

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modules A having different transverse support projections. In particular, FIGURE 2A shows a standard module A with a span or floor slah 1 and wall projections 2' upward and downward. FIGURE
2B shows a module A with a floor slab 1 and wall slab 2' pro-truding upward on the left side, and columns 2" protruding upward on the right side. There are four columns 2" protruding downward two on each end of the slab 1. FIGURE 2C shows again, another example of module A where there is a floor slab 1 with a wall slab 2' protruding downward on the left, columns 2", of special curved shape, protruding upward on the left and a wall slab 2' with a zig-zag cut-out 14 projecting downward on the right. There is no support projection upward on the right sideO All these ~egments in this case, have been illustrated with guide means 12 located in corners of transverse projections.
Referring now to FIGURE~ 3A to 3C, there is shown -~
three examples, of different modules A with different wall slab configurations. In particular, FIGURE 3A shows a module A
with transverse wall slabs 2' having a transverse corner ex-tension 16 to form a slab 2" of "L"-shape. FIGURE 3B shows wall spans 2' protruding upwards defining "C" or "U" shape walls 17.
FIGURE 3C shows a module A with walls 18 protruding upward and downward (18) about the entire periphery of the slab 1 to form a closed tube or open box.
Referring now to FIGURES 4A to 4C, there is shown modules A with different protrusions of the horizontal slab 1 and wall 2' or columns 2". FIGURE 4A shows a module A with a - --horizontal span slab 1 protruding both ways in -the form of balconies 4 and a balcony railing 5 being provided with complete walls 2' or columns 2" having right angle cross-sections, such as shown at 20. FIGURE 4B illustrates a module A where in addition to balcony pxotrusion 4 and horizontal slab 1, a side protrusion 21 may be provided and the wall 2' may have an exten-' ..
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sion 22 on one side thereo~. Further, an extension support notch 23 protrudes from the outer face of wall 2' and is provided to support intermediate flat panels 32 (see Fig~ 6B) or other structural elements as it may be required in a particular struc-; tural design. FIGURE 4C illustrates again an e~ample where the wall at the lower portion of the module has an extension flange 24 in the form of a horizontal slab which can be used as a landing platform for a stairway or as a beginning of a floor slab in staggered floor composition.
Referring now to FIGURE 5, there is shown a two-storey module B with two floor slabs la, projecting balconies 4a, a solid vertical wall 2'a projecting dow~lward and upward and a full-storey, intermedia-te wall 25 on the left and with columns
4"a projecting downward and full-storey high columns 26 in be-tween the floor slabs la with window openings 6a between columns and door openlngs 7a. This kind of two-storey module B can be produced as a homogeneous unit in the casting yard or prefabrica-tion factory or produced out of single-storey modules A, as des-cribed earlier, and connected into two-storey module as it will be done in the erection of a building. In this particular embodiment two modules A are interconnected in the erection yard, and then lifted and placed in the building as a monolithic two-storey ` module B.
~ eferring now to FIGURES 6A and 6B, there is shown side elevation views of examples of structural systems for multi-storey buildings using different kinds of modules A and flat panels. In FIGURE 6A there is shown the use of different modules A with different floor extensions 4, 23 and 24, resting on spaced apart foundation walls 13 whereupon the different modules A are supported to form different floor levels. In one case a flat floor panel 27 is supported in between foundation walls 13 and different open spaces (29, 30, 31) are being created, in an-other case, flat panel 38a is used as a wall bearing. As --10-- i '. ' . ~ . - ~

shown, one~storey regular spaces 31', as well as two-storey interior open spaces 29 and 30 or 1-1/2 storey open space 31 are formed. This figure shows how modular large-size pre-fabricated building modules A can be used to create various different spaces as it may be required for functional and architectural purposes~
FIGURE 5B illustrates a building with a regular horizontal one-level floor arrangement but which is achieved by using a combined structural system composed of flat span panels 32 staggered with different configuration of modules A such as at 34, 35 and 36 whereupon these modules A are resting ~ -directly on foundation footings 33 thus creating half-storey high crawl spaces 37. This figure also illustrates how different modules A are arranged in a staggering manner so there are no i-places where all horizontal junctions in the building would be located in the same vertlcal plane. This arrangement makes buildings stronger, and allows the making of horizontal junc-tions between the modules and flat panels in a simple manner with-out special interlocking and horizontal force-resisting connecting elements. Both the above illustrations, FIGU~E 6A and FIGURE 6B

are given as examples of the use of the modules of the present in-vention and many other configurations are possible to suit parti-cular designs.
; Referring now to FIGU~ES 7A-C, there are shown in plan, different building plans where different modules A are used to create different buildings. Varieties of modules A with regular horizontal slabs l with or without projections 4 are used to-gether with intermediate horizontal panels 40 resting on wall ex tension 22a on notch extensions 23 as described and shown in FIGURE 4B. Vertical panels 38 may also be supported by wall exten- -si~n 22 to form side walls~ The modules A are arranged in such a way that open spaces 39 may be created be-tween them for locating .. . .

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vertical panels or vertical installation conduits, or unused open spaces 42. In these examples, there are different vertical elements being used in the form of vertical walls 2' or columns 2"
or special "L" shaped columns 20. Larger extensions 41 of floor slab 1 are also shown ln FIGURE 7C.
Referring now to FIGURES 8A-C, there is shown the detail construction of connector 60 to be used between the modules A. In particular, FIGURE 8A shows a connector arrangement between a wall slab 2' and column 2" resting thereon. FIGURE 8B shows a vertical and horizontal section through this connection. This particular connection is given as an example only and other type connectors may be suitable for interconnection. The main elements of this connector 60 consi,sts of a prefabricated metal shoe or inserts 43 in the form of a square cup with a round conical inward cavity 44.
When one module is being erected, on alignment pin in the form of a double cylinder metal cone 45 is being placed into the cavity 44 of a module which just been erected. I'his cone 45 when placed in position serves as the guide means 12, already described. A U-shape metallic spacer plate 46 is placed about the cone 45 to form a gap between interconnected modules. Different thicknesses of plates 46 may be used as it will be required in order to achieve perfect horizontal alignment of modules. Another important func-tion of this plate 46 is to create a gap in junctions 8 or 9 be-tween erected modules A which has to be filled with cement mortar, dry pack, epoxy or other filling of compression force resisting i. -material. Cone 45 and plate 46 may~be replaced with alternative set comprising bolt and nut.
In cases where a building may be subjected to possible uplift forces due to extreme load, horizontal wind forces, or earthquake forces, it may be required to provide securement means for resista~ce against tensile forces acting upward, between upper and lower modules. In such cases, an additional steel plate 47 or a number of plates can be placed on vertical faces of ., ' :

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both shoes 43 and connected to them by means such as welding.
After the welding operation is completed, the exposed metal shoe and the connecting plates 47 can be covered with covering mortar 48. For that purpose, shoes have smaller dimensions than the column or walls. In every case, metal shoes 43 have to be integrally connected with the columns or walls. For this pur-pose, metal studs 49 having hooks or anchors 50 are welded to metallic shoes. I'he diameter of these studs or anchors and the length has to be defined by static calculation on the basis of anticipated pull-up or uplift forces. As has already been men-tioned, any other connection between upper and lower modules A can be used and has been foreseen as part of this invention.
However, it is recommended to use guides as shown in Fig. 8, for the purpose of simplifying the alignment and erection process.
The configuration of the joints could be changed to provide additional horizontal resistance against possible horizontal or shearing ~orces if required. For example, the joints could be made with projections or zig-zag configurations, as already shown in FIGURE 1.
Referring now to FIGURE 9, there is shown three modules A placed one on top of another in a staggered manner, and trans-ported on a vehicle platform 70. The same staggering arrangement can be used for storing of the modules A in a pre~abrication yard or factory. The invention does introduce large-size prefabricated modules which can be stored at a minimum volume or the minimum space consumption.
Referring now to FIGURES lOA-C there is shown a flat panel which can be used for walls or floors such as designated by numerals 1, 2', 38, 38a and 40. In particular, FIGURE lOA shows the schematic plan of such a panel. FIGURE lOB shows alternatives of a longitudinal section of the panel and FIGURE lOC shows an .

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alternative of the cross-section of the panel. One panel is made as a multiple of the modular component panels cast jointly in a multiple modular mould of length being of multiple of a basic module as it may be required for the design. The panel is composed of a thin wall slab 51 which may be of very little thickness such as 1" or 1-1/2" or more, as it may be required because of local code regulations. The required rigidity of the panels themselves, and of the whole building afterwards is provided by means of the perimeter ribs 52, 53 or 54 along a longitudinal direction and ribs 55, 56, 57 and 58 along the short direction and intermediate ribs (59). Different kinds of longi-tudinal and end ribs are shown here as they may be required for particular locations of panel in the building. For example, the rib 53 and similarly, rib 58 correspond to panels being used in the floor where the configuration of the ribs, when panels are placed side-by-side, creates a space which after being filled in with concrete makes the interlockirlg arrangement able to carry the shear force in the structure. Rihs 54 and 56 respectively are designed for panels being supported or notches of adjoining panels as described before. Rib type 52 or 57, respectively, apply to panels which may be used in walls as panel 38a shown in Fig. 6A where ribs are finished under perpendicular angle creating flat surfaces used for bearing of one element on top of another.
Also, intermediate ribs can be confisurated in a different manner, for example, as shown in the longitudinal section as rib 59 or re-duced in size rib 60. The panels can be produced as solid elements without openings or with different openings 61 as may be required.
In this particular case, opening 61 provides for accommodation of window or door. In this sense, panels can be seen as stressed skln made of thin slab and rigid ribs where the ribs are -~
arranged in a grid like manner. The depth of it is defining rigidity and strength of the floor or wall including the resis- -tance against buckling. I`he depth and the size of the ribs can be chosen accordingly to design requirements. Thus, -the designed panels provide structural elements of minimum con-sumption of structural ma-terials. Also, they are economical to use in building construction. Panals can be reinforced in any practical and code-acceptable manner. The most practical reinforcement arrangement is done by means of welded wire fabric 64 in the slab, longitudinal reinforcing bar in cross-ribs 62 and main reinforcing bars 63 in long ribs. Diameter of these bars can be chosen in accordance with the working conditions of the particular panel. A stronger reinforcement 63 will be required for panels used for floors. Lesser reinforcement will be required for panels used in wallsr Referring now to FIGURES llA-D, there is shown the mould for producing the panels previously described with reference to FIGURES lOA and lOB. In particular, FIGURE llA shows schemati-cally fragment of the plan of the mou:Ld. FIGURE llB shows a fragment of the longitudinal section. FIGURE llC shows a schematically perpendicular section of the mould. FIGURE llD
shows two examples of how panels of different multiples in this case, of three-module multiples, two-module multiples, four-module multiples, and so on could b~ cast il~ continuous mould.
Structure of the mould can be made out of a number of boxes 65 placed and fixed to the base 66. All boxes are of ~he same size corresponding to modular rib arrangement of the panel. The edge elements 67 are placed along both sides of the boxes in a dis-tance providing space accommodation for longitudinal ribs (like 52, 53 or 5~j. In the same manner, edge elements 68 are placed at the beginning and at the end of so described mould.
Now, in case of required opening to be provided in the panel, a frame 69 can be placed on the top of the particular box 65 where concrete will not be placed during the casting operation, thus - , creating space open for window to comeO For obtaining of panels of different lengths, in so designed continuous mould, dividers 70 are being placed in the mould in places, as desired. Thus, a universal casting arrangement is being designed where, in a continuous long mould, different panels of different module multiples for example, double multiples, triple multiples, quadruple multiples, and so on, can be achieved, in continuous and thus economic casting operation. As it has been mentioned before, the same mould can be used for the production of panels for walls and floors, except the particular panels will differ with the amount and ~ind of major reinforcement being placed in the longitudinal ribs. Other reinforcements, like mesh in the slab, secondary rein~orcement in cross-ribs, will be p-rovided for structural purpose, thus of the same kind and of minimum con-sumption of the amount of steel. DifEerent configuration of edges 53, 54, 56, 57, 58, etc. can be achieved by placing in the moulds of different blocklng inserts.
Referring now again to FIGURE 12A there is shown a plan view and sections of a large-size module combining a flat panel and a wall element and column, in form of an economic system combining thin-wall sla~ 51 with cross-ribs 59, longitudinal ribs 52 or 53, in the same manner as it was done in the place of flat panels. The purpose of this figure is to illustrate the concept of production where continuous moulds can be used both for production of flat panels as well as large-size space modules described earlier, whereupon ribs are distributed in a modular manner, and whereupon modules of different multiples can be pro-duced with walls or columns projecting outward and downward from floor planes, in locations as it may be desired. This figure also illustrates how different size modules can be produced in the same specially designed continuous mould.

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FIGURE 15 demo.~nstrates one example of how modules subject to this invention can be made. It is possible to make these modules in any other way that it may be desired for architec-tural or other functional reasons. For ex~mple, it is possible to make a flat wall for floor and walls in the form of a single thickness - slab or with any rib arrangements, where the number and pattern of ribs can vary, as required.

::

Claims (4)

The embodiments of the invention in which an exclu-sive property or privilege is claimed are defined as follows:-
1. A prefabricated construction module for use in a building structure, said module comprising a horizontal rectangular slab section having opposed surfaces and at least two spaced apart transverse wall sections secured to said horizontal slab section and extending a predetermined distance above each said opposed surfaces to a height of substantially half a complete wall height where there is no bending moment, said wall sections constituting a load sup-porting projection when said module is juxtaposed with other modules in said building structure and said horizontal slab constituting a floor and ceiling surface by said opposed surfaces, respectively, for adjacent room sections, said wall sections having an end connecting edge for connection to a juxtaposed end connecting edge of a wall section of another module, and an extension support notch protruding beyond at least opposed ones of said wall sections extending in a direc-tion parallel to the horizontal plane of said horizontal slab in an area of no bending moment to an end connecting edge situated to provide additional support outside the module for supporting flat panel members between adjacent modules for the construction of a building structure having strength properties comparable to a fully monolithic structure, said extension support notch being a projection of said horizontal slab.
2. A module as claimed in claim 1 wherein said module is made from precast concrete.
3. A module as claimed in claim 1 wherein said extension support notch is a straight horizontal edge.
4. A module as claimed in claim 1 wherein said wall sections are constituted by columns each having an end connecting edge, said columns having at least one section thereof aligned in a common plane.
CA237,585A 1975-10-08 1975-10-08 Building system and precast module for use therein Expired CA1078640A (en)

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Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP0080980A1 (en) * 1981-11-30 1983-06-08 Francesco Ruscica Modular building component for construction of buildings and process and machine for the manufacturing thereof
WO1992003627A1 (en) * 1990-08-15 1992-03-05 John Clement Preston Hoardings for a construction site
EP0513949A2 (en) * 1991-05-10 1992-11-19 Bruno Scarpa Framework consisting of two elements by four rectangular trihedrons each for the load bearing structure of a uniform measured building
US5359825A (en) * 1992-01-17 1994-11-01 Concrete Concepts, Inc. Modular construction system
WO2007067081A1 (en) * 2005-12-08 2007-06-14 Grzegorz Czarnecki House developable upwards
NL1040406C2 (en) * 2013-09-24 2015-04-07 Mattheus Hendrikus Wieringen AN INNOVATIVE INNOVATIVE LIVING AND CONSTRUCTION CONCEPT "THE GROWTH ACCOMMODATION". A DEMONTABLE SUSTAINABLE PREFAB CONCRETE BUILDING CASE; FLEXIBLE COMPOSED OF LIVING UNITS THAT ARE VARIABLE IN SIZE AND WITH FREE ARCHITECTURE FOR THE BUILDING PEEL.

Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP0080980A1 (en) * 1981-11-30 1983-06-08 Francesco Ruscica Modular building component for construction of buildings and process and machine for the manufacturing thereof
WO1992003627A1 (en) * 1990-08-15 1992-03-05 John Clement Preston Hoardings for a construction site
AU645345B2 (en) * 1990-08-15 1994-01-13 John Clement Preston Hoardings for a construction site
EP0513949A2 (en) * 1991-05-10 1992-11-19 Bruno Scarpa Framework consisting of two elements by four rectangular trihedrons each for the load bearing structure of a uniform measured building
EP0513949A3 (en) * 1991-05-10 1993-05-12 Bruno Scarpa Framework consisting of two elements by four rectangular trihedrons each for the load bearing structure of a uniform measured building
US5359825A (en) * 1992-01-17 1994-11-01 Concrete Concepts, Inc. Modular construction system
WO2007067081A1 (en) * 2005-12-08 2007-06-14 Grzegorz Czarnecki House developable upwards
NL1040406C2 (en) * 2013-09-24 2015-04-07 Mattheus Hendrikus Wieringen AN INNOVATIVE INNOVATIVE LIVING AND CONSTRUCTION CONCEPT "THE GROWTH ACCOMMODATION". A DEMONTABLE SUSTAINABLE PREFAB CONCRETE BUILDING CASE; FLEXIBLE COMPOSED OF LIVING UNITS THAT ARE VARIABLE IN SIZE AND WITH FREE ARCHITECTURE FOR THE BUILDING PEEL.

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