AU772059B2 - Filled bagel product and method - Google Patents

Filled bagel product and method Download PDF

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AU772059B2
AU772059B2 AU54069/01A AU5406901A AU772059B2 AU 772059 B2 AU772059 B2 AU 772059B2 AU 54069/01 A AU54069/01 A AU 54069/01A AU 5406901 A AU5406901 A AU 5406901A AU 772059 B2 AU772059 B2 AU 772059B2
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dough
cream cheese
bagel
forming
yeast
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Alvin Burger
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Alvin Burger
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Description

FILLED BAGEL PRODUCT AND METHOD BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Field of the Invention The present invention relates to a unique food product comprising a bagel shell with materials conventionally used as bagel toppings, such as natural or imitation cream, partially or fully enclosed within the shell. The product provides enjoyment of the distinctive bagel and cream cheese taste, with no requirement for cutting or spreading cheese. The product may be frozen either prior to or after setting by steaming or boiling. The product is baked or fried prior to eating. The invention further relates to methods for the production of the filled bagel product.
Discussion of the Related Art Bagels are a toroidally shaped bakery product having a 0. hard outer crust and soft inner crumb portion which combine to provide a distinctive "bagel" taste and feel. Traditionally, the dough is worked on a flour board and set in a warm place to rise, then kneaded again before being formed into rings. The rings are formed from balls of risen dough, either by poking a hole through the center of each ball or by rolling each ball into a long strip, shaping the strip into a ring, and then pressing the ends together.
An important step in the traditional bagel making process is boiling the yeast dough in water in order to close the pores of the dough to form a skin. Boiling is followed by baking in a hot oven to turn the crust golden brown.
A favorite way of enjoying bagels is to slice them in half, and spread a topping, such as cream cheese, on the cut surfaces. Bagels are characteristically cut open by slicing them across their width on a plane perpendicular to the axis of the toroid, and the topping is then spread on them. Because of the hard crust, the cutting process requires a sharp knife which can be hazardous. Further, due to the soft crumb interior, a slightly dull knife will crush the hard crust into the soft crumb interior, compacting the interior, which detracts from appearance and taste. Moreover, such planar cut is typically awkward and does not result in two planar halves.
Spreading the cream cheese on the bagel may also be tedious as the cream cheese is stored in a refrigerator and is very viscous until it warms.
It is known to include certain flavorings or fillers on or in bagel dough, such as unions, poppy seeds, salt, or raisins.
These are materials which have substantially the same handling characteristics as bagel dough: they can withstand the heat of cooking, and are relatively stable at room temperature for extended periods of time. These materials are not what one would consider a "topping".
Although bagels and cream cheese go together during consumption, bagels and cream cheese are very different chemically, and have different storage and handling requirements. Cream cheese is perishable, thermally sensitive, and easily contaminated, and is thus conventionally maintained in a chilled state until use. Cream cheese can not be frozen and thawed without separation of liquids and solids, nor can it be left exposed to air at room temperature for extended periods, nor can it be subject to the high temperatures at which bagel dough is cooked. Thus, for reasons of product preparation as well as for reasons of food storage and handling, it would be counter-intuitive to incorporate cream cheese into a bagel dough shell.
U.S. Patent 5,236,724 entitled "Filled Bagel Dough Product and Method" which issued to the present inventor was first to describe a technique by which cream cheese could actually be incorporated into a bagel dough shell. However, the filled bagel dough product is disclosed as being in the shape of a ball. A ball-shaped product has inherent limitations, both in the cooking process and in the consumption process. A bagel dough ball product, while having advantages of being compact, relatively stable at room temperature, and easy to handle, is necessarily limited in size, since a cream cheese filled bagel ball, if too large, can not be easily eaten by a consumer.
Further, a sphere has a minimal outer surface area and a dome shaped upper surface area. These two factors make it rather difficult to provide toppings on a bagel ball.
While there is no suggestion for the production of a filled bagel product in a shape other than a ball, the present inventor undertook to modify the shape, and discovered that there are significant problems with the handing of a raw bagel dough article filled with cream cheese. These problems included the problem of stretching the bagel dough shell, and the problem of joining a first bagel dough surface to a second bagel dough surface after one or both surfaces had been contacted by cream cheese to for a tight, non-leaking seal.
There is thus a need for a filled bagel dough product which represents an improvement over the bagel ball. There is also a need for methods for the production of such improved products.
Specifically it would be advantageous if a filled bagel dough product could be devised that has the shape and feel of a conventional toroidal bagel and other shapes other than a bagel ball. It'would also be advantageous if such a product could be devised which can be stored for long periods of time in a e freezer.
DEFINITION
•e 0 •In the specification and claims the term "comprising" shall be understood i.0* 25 to have a broad meaning similar to the term "including" and will be understood to imply the inclusion of a stated integer or step or group of integers or steps but not the exclusion of any other integer or.step or group of integers or steps. This 000 definition also applies to variations on the term "comprising" such as "comprise" and "comprises".
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SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Despite the apparent technical contradictions between the bagel preparation process and the filling material handling requirements, the present inventor discovered that a filled bagel dough product can be produced by a method comprising sealing a quantity of filling material within a quantity of bagel dough to form a shaped, filled bagel dough article (such as a toroid or a platelet), proofing the shaped product, optionally chilling the proofed, shaped product to reduce the filler core temperature, and then steaming or boiling the product, freezing the product for long term storage, and 'subsequently baking or frying or otherwise browning to form an appetizing crust; or (2) steaming or boiling the chilled product, and baking or frying or browning the product. Particularly in the case that the filling material is thermally stable, it is not necessary that the filling material be completely sealed in bagel dough, and part of the filling material may be exposed even during the setting and browning (baking or frying) processes.
In the case of forming the toroidal bagel product, the filled shape can be produced by any suitable technique such as co-extrusion, forming by hand, or by laminating an upper hemispherical bagel shell to a filled lower hemispherical bagel shell.
In the case of forming a platelet shaped product, the filled shape can be produced by any suitable technique such as forming a filled ball or other shape and compressing the shape, preferably to a greater extent centrally than peripherally, to form a platelet, or by a laminating process wherein cream 25 cheese is deposited onto a lower bagel shell layer, an upper shell layer is superposed and laminated to the lower bagel shell layer to seal the filling material between the upper and lower layers, and if necessary, cutting or S.trimming the filled product to any desired pattern or shape.
The step of setting prior to cooking forms an external and an internal skin, sets the yeast, and forms a wet crust. That is, as the filling material inside the product gets hot it gives off steam which steams the inside wall of the bagel 0e*0 product.
Surprisingly, the product of the invention can be freezer stored, even in some cases where the filler material itself can not normally be freezer stored.
Prior to being offered for sale the food product may fully cooked (including baking to brown the outer crust) or may be partially cooked, and may be frozen for long .periods of time. The frozen product may be put directly into an oven, and when removed, has the texture and taste of a traditional bagel, except that it is filled with a filling material.
At least some preferred forms of the invention provide a product with filling material wherein the filling material is partially exposed prior to setting and also baking or frying. The set product is easily stored and transported and can be readily baked or fried to provide a distinct party food, snack food or breakfast food. Further the product is compatible with a wide variety of seasonings and flavorings and can be adapted to a local taste hot Cajun style, herbal California style, New York style, etc.
The specific embodiments which follow may be readily utilized as a basis for modifying or designing other filled bread products for carrying out the same purposes of the present invention.
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS Fig. 1 is a partial cut-away perspective view of the filled bagel dough product formed by an extrusion process.
Fig. 2a is a side view of the open-ended hollow bagel dough ball before t.
insertion of the filling.
Fig. 2b is a side view of the open-ended hollow bagel dough ball with the 25 cream cheese filling placed within the hollow.
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Fig. 3 shows a filled bagel ball prior to deformation.
Fig. 4 is a side sectional view of a platelet.
Fig. 5 is a top view of the platelet Fig. 4.
Fig. 6 is a cross-sectional view of Fig. 4, with the product receiving steam.
Fig. 7 is a cross-sectional view of Fig. 4, with the product receiving heat.
Fig. 8 is a schematic diagram showing the automated production of a cream cheese filled bagel dough product in a lamination process.
DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION The preferred ingredients to be used in the invention will be discussed in detail.
Filler The term "cream cheese", as used herein, is intended to refer to any product which can be incorporated in a bagel dough and which gives off sufficient steam in the steaming or baking step of the processes discussed below for forming a skin on the interior surface of the filled bagel dough product. For ease of description the term "cream cheese" is used in the specification, but it is understood that substitutes such as tofu, artificial or imitation cream cheese, marmalade, egg, S" etc. may be used together with or in place of natural cream cheese.
The cream cheese most preferably used in the present invention is a substantially pure, high fat, heat stable low water content) cream cheese. For example, Philadelphia Free Cream Cheese having 30 calories per 1 oz serving, of which 0 calories is from fat, is not a high fat heat stable cream cheese. Philadelphia Light Cream Cheese having 70 calories per 1 oz serving, of which 64 calories is from fat, is also not a high fat heat stable cream cheese. Philadelphia Cream Cheese having 100 calories per 1 oz serving, of which 90 calories is from fat, is a high fat heat stable cream cheese.
The cream cheese according to the present invention may be in admixture with other ingredients which do not materially alter the above characteristics of the cream cheese. For example, the cream cheese may be intimately mixed with heat stable ingredients such as pepper, dried onion, sausage, or dried fish. It may be displaced by jellies or jams or chocolate, these ingredients may be marbled into the cream cheese without diluting or materially altering the cream cheese component, such that the cream cheese component is a discrete component recognizable as having the above characteristics.
The characteristics of the preferred cream cheese are as S follows: at least 75 fat calories per ounce, preferably 80 fat calories per ounce, most preferably 90 fat calories per ounce; water content less than 15% prior to cooking, preferably less than 10% prior to cooking, most preferably less than prior to cooking; heat stable a one ounce cube will not deform or denature when exposed to 550QF dry heat or 2129F steam for 2 minutes, reaching a core temperature of at least 1409F, preferably heat stable at core temperatures below 170QF, most preferably heat stable to core temperatures of 200QF.
Preparing bagel dough Although the present invention is not limited to bagel dough, bagel dough is preferred and the invention will be illustrated with examples using bagel dough. The term "bagel dough" as used herein refers to a very turgid, high protein dough, such as known to make bagels using conventional bagelmaking techniques. Such dough is similar to a lean French bread dough, being firm to the touch and easily rolled upon a floured surface. The dough is comprised of a mixture of flour, water, yeast, salt, and, sometimes, sugar. The flour should be a high gluten flour, such as a good clear spring wheat flour with protein content of typically 13.5-14% of flour weight.
Water should be added in a quantity of typically 48-53% of flour weight. Salt content should typically be 1.5-2.2% of flour weight. Yeast should be added in a quantity of typically 0.5-2% of flour weight. Sugar, which serves as a food for the yeast and not as a contributor to the final product, should be a dextrose, corn syrup, high fructose or other fermentable sugar, and can be added up to 4% of flour weight. Residual sugar contributes to the browning of the crust during baking.
Shaping the product In accordance with the invention, a filled bagel dough product may be produced by any number of processes.
The process may begin with a hollow spherical cup or other shape of stiff, high gluten yeast dough. A quantity of cream cheese is deposited within the cup. The dough edges are brought up and over and sealed around the cream cheese to form a filled ball. This ball forming step may by a manual step or may be a mechanical step as exemplified by, for example, U.S.
Patent Nos. 4,334,464, 4,446,160 and 4,515,819 to Shinriki, wherein a ball-shaped encrusted bakery product is automatically formed by depositing a ball of sticky edible paste material jam) onto a starch film. Thereafter, a dough sheet is S" gathered around the ball to enclose it with dough. In accordance with the present invention, this filled shape is proofed, set and frozen for shipment to fast food outlets where it is fried, seasoned, and served hot.
For forming a torroidal bagel or small bite sized bagel bits, coextrusion is particularly preferred. Such a tube with a cream cheese center and a bread product exterior can be shaped into a bagel shape or can be sliced into bite-sized bits which can be further processed. Coextrusion is well know in the bakery product art. For example, U.S. Patent No. 4,251,201 to Krysiak illustrates an apparatus for the preparation of a filled pretzel. Such filled shapes are also within the contemplation of the invention. Further, U.S. Patent No.
4,882,185 to Hayashi, a vertical tubular extrusion of bread dough crust material and jam or cream core material is cut and formed into two-layered balls without exposure of the core material. Other methods of production of filled dough products are described in U.S. Patent Nos. 4,794,009 and 4,882,185.
The preferred form of the filled bagel dough product of the present invention, shown in Fig. i, may be made by hand or may be made in an automated fashion, using suitable machinery, such as shown in Fig. 8.
As shown in Fig. i, the filled bagel dough product 10 is platelet shaped, possibly having a shallow recess 12 inside the edges. The finished bagel product 10 is a steamed and browned bagel dough product having an outer crust 20 and an inner crumb 16 which surrounds a disk shape of cream cheese 22.
The invention also pertains to ball shaped bagels, and to products using ball shaped bagels as intermediate shapes in the forming of the final products. As shown in Fig. 2a, after the bagel dough is mixed and kneaded to develop the gluten, it is shaped into a cup 11, open on one end 14, exposing a hollow 18.
As illustrated in Fig. 2b, a scoop of cream cheese 22, such as PHILADELPHIA BRAND (TM) at about 4-16LC is inserted into the hollow 18 through the open end 14. The open end 14 is then closed to hermetically seal the cream cheese 22 within the dough ball 11 as shown in Fig. 3. The round sealed ball 11 may be about the size of a nickel prior to proofing. Such a starting product will form a food product approximately the size of a golf ball following proofing and steaming. The size of the food product may vary depending upon intended use. In one form, the final food product may be the size of popcorn, and may be consumed in a single bite. In the case that the food product is the size of a golf ball, two or more bites may be sufficient to ingest the food product.
In the case of platelet shaped food products as discussed below, the product may also be rather large, such as 1-2 Kg., in which case a single food product may serve as a meal, and may be sliced in the manner of a pizza prior to consumption.
The dough ball 11 as shown in Fig. 3 may then be subject to a further forming step. It may be flattened to form a platelet as shown in Fig. 1.
The process for forming the shaped bagel products according to the invention may be as varied as the products themselves. The products may be in any of a variety of shapes and sizes. The product may be elongated, circular, diamond shaped, hexagonal, or even in the shape of a pretzel. The product may be anywhere from about 5 gm. to about 1 Kg., and from about 1 cm in diameter to about 20 cm in diameter for a single serving size, or larger for a multi-serving "pizza" type product.
Proofing oo oi The filled bagel product is then placed to proof within a warm cabinet or unheated oven for 25-90 minutes, preferably minutes at approximately 27-509C, preferably 32-459C, which permits the yeast to raise the dough.
Chilling S"Subsequent to proofing, the product may be chilled before steaming. Chilling is not necessary, particularly when using low water content cream cheese which has been discovered to he thermally stable, but chilling provides the cream cheese with a cool internal temperature which helps protects the cream cheese during steaming, the chilling step should cool the internal cream cheese enough to prevent denaturalization of the cream during steaming, while effectively pasteurizing the cream cheese and giving the cream cheese freezable characteristics as discussed above.
and may be consumed in a single bite. In the case that the food product is the size of a golf ball, two or more bites may be sufficient to ingest the food product.
In the case of platelet shaped food products as discussed below, the.product may also be rather large, such as 1-2 Kg., in which case a single food product may serve as a meal, and may be sliced in the manner of a pizza prior to consumption.
The dough ball 11 as shown in Fig. 3 may then be subject to a further forming step. It may be flattened to form a platelet as shown in Fig. 1.
The process for forming the shaped bagel products according to the invention may be as varied as the products themselves. The products may be in any of a variety of shapes and sizes. The product may be elongated, circular, diamond shaped, hexagonal, or even in the shape of a pretzel. The product may be anywhere from about 5gm. To about 1 Kg., and from about 1 cm in diameter to about 20 cm in diameter for a single serving size, or larger for a multi-serving "pizza" type product.
Proofinq The filled bagel product is then placed to proof within a warm cabinet or 20 unheated oven for 25-90 minutes, preferably 45-60 minutes at approximately 27- 50 0 C, preferably 32-45 0 C, which permits the yeast to raise the dough.
°Chilling Subsequent to proofing, and prior to steaming the product may be chilled.
Chilling provides the cream cheese with a *.Eg ooo* o* during baking, while effectively pasteurizing the cream cheese and giving the cream cheese freezable characteristics as discussed above. The product 10 is chilled until the cream cheese 22 is about 4-10C. This step prevents the cream cheese 22 from becoming denatured by the heat of the baking process, thus, keeping its texture and taste.
However, in the case of using a heat stable cream cheese, this chilling step prior to baking or frying is usually not necessary.
Egg wash The product 10 may be glazed with egg wash prior to the baking step and may be filled with other products, such as poppy seeds, onion, etc., to enhance the flavor and to accommodate the tastes and specific desires of individual consumers.
Toppings At any time subsequent to proofing, toppings such as cheese, tomatoes, spinach, etc. may be applied to the top of .the bagel dough product, particularly the platelet shaped product. Topping prior to baking results in the topping being more firmly adhered to the bagel product, which facilitates handling, transporting, packaging, and consumption.
a Impinger Conveyor Oven The steamed and optionally chilled product may next be placed in an oven for approximately 1-10 minutes, preferably about 2 minutes, of browning (depending upon temperature, type oven, and size of filled product).
As shown in Fig. 7, the product 10 is browned through applied heat 28 in an impinger conveyor oven (similar to a commercial pizza oven) for approximately 2 minutes.
The yeast is most likely fully deactivated prior to the browning step, but any remaining active yeast may continue to ferment within the crumb 16 for a short period to reduce the size of gas cells in the annular interior of the baked product The finished dough texture becomes compacted, since the crusts 16, 17 have already been set during the steaming step.
It is yet a further surprising discovery that a filled bagel product prepared in accordance with the present invention may be baked for an extended period of time to produce a product with a low moisture content, providing a nontraditional bagel dough product which can be stored for long periods without freezing or refrigeration. This dried product is an ideal snack food.
Frying Another option is to take the filled bagel product and, instead of baking in an oven, frying in a conventional manner and then dipping the product in sugar to make a confectionery S type of bagel product or coating with a seasoning to serve as a snack food. The cream cheese may either be encased completely in dough, or, in the case of using a heat stable cream cheese, :the cream cheese may be partially exposed during the steaming and baking or frying steps. A product made by simultaneously frying both the exposed bread dough and exposed cream cheese is completely unique.
Blast Freezer The product 10 may be frozen at any time after proofing and steaming or boiling. For home consumption, for the convenience of the consumer, the dough preferably frozen after the partial or complete browning step. For retail outlets such as fast food establishments in the business of serving fried foods, the proofed set product is preferably frozen immediately after setting. The product may be stored in a freezer for up to one year without deterioration, or up to one month in a refrigerator without deterioration.
The inventive process produces freezable cream cheese 22 which ordinarily would curdle if frozen, or from which liquids would separate from solids during thawing. The steaming step, as shown in Fig. 18, acts chemically to enable the cream cheese 22 to be frozen, together with the bagel shell. Further, upon reheating within the bagel shell, the cream cheese 22 is restored to its original texture and flavor. Thus, the product not only provides a freezable, cream cheese 22 filled bagel product which, upon reheating, is extremely tasty and provides the same enjoyment as conventional heated bagels which are cut open and filled with cream cheese, the product 10 also allows the lengthening of the shelf-life of the cream cheese 22 rr through allowing it to be frozen. The one year period of storage far exceeds the storage capability of separately sold conventional bagels and cream cheese.
Packaging Any conventional packaging process may be used.
Consumption The resulting product is a cream cheese-filled or bearing bagel dough product which can be fried or defrosted or heated to provide enjoyment of the distinctive bagel and cream cheese taste, with no requirement for cutting or spreading the cheese.
The process of the invention enables the steamed product to be frozen, including the cream cheese, for extended periods with no deterioration in quality.
The proofed, steamed product may be sold to consumers in a frozen state, and may be thawed, micro-waved or, preferably, fried, baked or otherwise browned by the consumer prior to consumption. The product need not be thawed prior to baking, and may be microwaved or baked while still frozen. The thawed or frozen product is placed in a hot oven for approximately 1preferably about 2 minutes, of browning (the time varying according to the mass of the individual products). During browning the steam given off by the filling steams and forms a skin on the inside of the shell. The resulting product is a cream cheese-filled bagel dough product which provides enjoyment of the distinctive bagel and cream cheese taste, with no requirement for cutting or spreading the cheese.
In an alternative embodiment of the invention, the product may be proofed and frozen prior to steaming, and may be steamed subsequent to prolonged storage.
Further, the product may even be grilled in much the same way that a grilled cheese sandwich is prepared. Such a product S is crunchy outside, warm and soft inside, low-fat, and can be sold directly to the consumer in much the same way that slices of pizza are currently being sold.
In yet a further embodiment, the filled balls or other shapes may be baked to the point that the bagel shell and cream cheese are dehydrated, forming a dry product which may be stored without requiring freezing. This dried product has a crunchy mouth-feel and can compete with potato chips, nachos, etc.
The product may have been baked or browned prior to being frozen and sold to the consumer, or may have been frozen without baking or with only partial baking.
In the case that the product is frozen without having been baked, the frozen or thawed composite is placed in a heated oven by the consumer, and during baking the steam given off by the filling steams and forms a skin on the inside of the shell.
In the case that the product is browned or partially baked prior to freezing and selling to the consumer, the filling in the filled bagel product gives of steam during the baking process, which forms a skin in the inside wall of the bagel dough shell. This skin allows for cold storage of the composite, and for secondary baking by the consumer to further form a crust on the outside of the shell.
Thus, not only does the process provide a novel bakery product that provides both bagel and cream cheese in a conveniently packaged, prepared combination, but it enables lengthening of the cream cheese shelf-life over what would normally be available for separately sold bagels and cream cheese.
Variations The filled dough product, in addition to being filled with cream cheese, may also be filled with other traditional bagel topping, such as onions, poppy seeds, or lox. The surface may be shined or glazed, if desired, with an egg or other wash.
e S Lamination process The invention further includes a process which can be used to produce a platelet shaped filled bagel dough product, and S preferably a relatively large (half pound) platelet shaped filled bagel dough product.
ooSooS In accordance with this process, as shown in Fig. 8, a sheet of bagel dough 80 is conveyed along conveyor belt 81 in the direction from left to right as shown in Fig. 8. A
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quantity of cream cheese or other filler is deposited from reservoir 82 through outlet 83 onto the lower sheet of bagel dough 80, preferably in the shape of circular paddies about
S.
cm high and 10 cm in diameter. These paddies may be formed by any technique, such as wire cutting of a solidified elongate tubular 10 cm diameter cream cheese feed. As the dough advances further to the right a top sheet or layer of bagel dough 85 is conveyed by conveyor belt 86 and deposited over the lower sheet of bagel dough 80 and filler 84. A drum shaped cookie-cutter type cutting device 87 is used to cut around the perimeter of the filling, and at the same time to laminate the upper and lower sheets of bagel material to each other at the circumferential area of contact. The material around the cut out area is removed, and the cut out laminated products are further processed as discussed above. As the relatively planar shape proofs, it tends to grow upwardly rather than outwardly, so that a 12 cm diameter dough product will rise while proofing but will remain close to 12 cm in diameter.
The advantage of the lamination technique is the ease of forming products of any desired shape, such as squares, hexagons, or decorative ornamental shapes.
The end product for consumption is an approximately 12 cm in diameter, approximately 0.25 Kg. novel food item which has all the desirable characteristics described above, and permits toppings to be easily applied and retained to the upper surface, and which further can serve as a snack or meal for one or more people.
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:In order to permanently adhere the toppings to the upper ooo surface, it is possible to add a quick baking or melting step.
0o 0Although the filled bread product was described herein with great detail with respect to an embodiment comprising se*: cream cheese filled in a bagel shell, it will be readily e g.
sees apparent that the combination is capable of use in a number of other applications. Although this invention has been described in its preferred form with a certain of particularity with respect to a cream cheese filled bagel dough product, it is understood that the present disclosure of the preferred form 00CC .0 has been made only by way of example and that numerous changes in the details of structures and the composition of the combination may be resorted to without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.
Now that the invention has been described,

Claims (30)

1. A process for making a filled dough product, comprising the steps of: a) mixing and kneading flour, salt, yeast and water to form a yeast dough; b) forming a product comprising a cream cheese and yeast dough; c) proofing the product to activate said yeast to raise said dough through fermentation; d) chilling said proofed product to a temperature of 4-10 0 C to cool said filler; e) steaming or boiling the chilled product of step d) to form a steamed or boiled product; and f) baking or frying the steamed or boiled product in an oven.
2. A process as claimed in claim 1, wherein said product is formed by co- extrusion.
3. A process for making a filled dough product, comprising the steps of: a) mixing and kneading flour, salt, yeast and water to form a yeast 20 dough; b) forming a product comprising a cream cheese and yeast dough in the shape of a toroidal bagel; c) proofing the product to activate said yeast to raise said dough through fermentation; 25 d) chilling said proofed product to cool said filler; e) steaming or boiling the chilled product of step d) to form a steamed or i boiled product; and f) baking or frying the steamed or boiled product in an oven.
4. A process as claimed in any one of claims 1 to 3, wherein said dough is a bagel dough, pizza dough or bread dough. A process as claimed in any one of claims 1 to 4, further comprising the step of glazing the product with egg wash.
6. A process as claimed in any one of claims 1 to 5, further comprising the step of applying a topping to the product following proofing.
7. A process as for making a filled dough product, comprising the steps of: a) mixing and kneading flour, salt, yeast, and water to form a yeast dough; b) forming a first layer from said dough; c) depositing a cream cheese on said first layer of dough; d) forming a second layer from said dough and depositing said second layer over said first layer of dough and cream cheese; e) pressing said first and second layers together to laminate said first and second layers together in the area adjacent the deposited cream cheese and to seal said cream cheese between said first and second layers of dough to form a laminated product; d ougf) proofing said laminated product to activate said yeast to raise said dough through fermentation and to produce a proofed product; 20 g) chilling the proofed product to produce a chilled product; h) boiling the chilled product to produce a boiled product; and i) browning said boiled product.
8. A process as claimed in claim 7, wherein said second layer is formed on 25 said first layer by folding at least part of said first layer over said second layer. 0. A process as for making a filled dough product, said process comprising: o selecting a cream cheese; S(b) preparing a raw yeast containing dough selected from the group S 30 consisting of bagel dough, pizza dough, and bread dough; forming a product comprising raw yeast containing dough and a quantity of cream cheese, said filling material being completely or partially sealed by said dough; proofing the product to activate said yeast to raise said dough through fermentation; chilling the proofed product to produce a chilled product; steaming the chilled product to set the dough; and frying or baking. A process as claimed in any one of claims 1 to 9, further comprising a step of freezing at any time prior to baking or frying.
11. A process as claimed in any one of claims 1 to 10, further comprising applying sugar or a spice coating to said product following frying.
12. A process as claimed in any one of claims 1 to 11, wherein said product is formed by co-extrusion, and wherein said composite article is divided after proofing and before setting.
13. A process as claimed in any one of claims 1 to 12, wherein said dough is S 2 comprised of: 20 a) flour having a protein content of 13.5-14%, b) water content of 50-53% that of the flour weight, :o a salt content of 1.5-2.2% that of the flour weight, and d) a yeast content of 0.5-2% that of the flour weight. 25 14. A process as claimed in any one of claims 1 to 13, wherein said product after proofing is from 1 to 3 inches thick and from 2 to 6 inches in diameter. A process as claimed in any one of claims 1 to 14, wherein said product after proofing weighs from 3 ounces to 1 pound. S
16. A process as claimed in claim 1, further comprising a step of freezing the product of step
17. A process for making a filled dough product; comprising the steps of: mixing and kneading flour, water, salt and yeast to form a yeast bagel dough; measuring an amount of cream cheese; forming a filled bagel dough shell by completely enclosing said amount of cream cheese within a shell of bagel dough produced in step said bagel dough shell having an outer surface and an inner surface; pressing against said filled bagel dough shell to deform the shell into a platelet shape, with said cream cheese displaced radially outward without rupture of said shell; proofing the product of step to activate said yeast to raise said bagel dough through fermentation; chilling the product of step to cool said filler to a temperature between 4-10°C; boiling the chilled product of step and browning the boiled product of step
18. A process for forming a composite cream cheese and dough product, said 20 process comprising: selecting a high-fat, heat-stable cream cheese; preparing a raw dough selected from the group consisting of bagel dough, pizza dough, and bread dough; forming a composite by at least partially surrounding a strand of high- fat, heat-stable cream cheese with said raw dough, wherein in said composite, an area of said cream cheese is exposed corresponding at least to the cross-sectional area of said strand of cream cheese; proofing the composite product of step steaming the composite product to set the dough; and baking the product.
19. A process for forming a composite cream cheese and dough product as claimed in claim 18, wherein said dough is pizza dough. A process for forming a composite cream cheese and dough product, said process comprising: selecting a high-fat, heat-stable cream cheese; preparing a raw yeast bagel dough; forming a composite by at least partially surrounding a strand of high- fat, heat-stable cream cheese with said raw dough, wherein in said composite an area of said cream cheese is exposed corresponding at least to the cross-sectional area of said strand of cream cheese; proofing the composite product to activate said yeast to raise said dough through fermentation; steaming the product of step to set the dough; and baking the product.
21. A process for forming a composite cream cheese and dough product as claimed in claim 20, wherein the product is frozen after step and prior to step S22. A process for forming a composite cream cheese and dough product as 20 claimed in claim 20 or claim 21, further including a step of cooling said product to a cream cheese temperature of 500 F, or below 500 F. prior to steaming in step
23. A process for forming a composite cream cheese and dough product as claimed in claim 20 or claim 21, wherein the product prior to steaming weighs 8 ounces or less. S 24. A process for forming a composite cream cheese and dough product as claimed in claim 20 or claim 21, wherein said product prior to steaming weighs 8 ounces or more, is separated after steaming, and after baking, weighs 3 ounces or less. A process for forming a filled dough product, said process comprising: forming a composite comprising a cylinder of bagel, pizza, or bread dough circumscribing a strand cream cheese; proofing the product; steaming the proofed product of step to set the dough; freezing the product; and baking the product.
26. A process for forming a filled dough product, said process comprising: forming a continuous strip of dough; depositing a continuous strand of cream cheese on top of said continuous strip of dough; rolling said continuous strip of dough around said cream cheese to form a continuous cream cheese filled dough tube product; separating said dough tube into segments and proofing, in any order, such that in each segment, an area of cream cheese is exposed corresponding at least to the cross-sectional area of said strand of cream cheese; steaming the product to set said dough; and baking the product.
27. A process for forming a filled dough product as claimed in claim 26, wherein •••the product is chilled after step and prior to step ill
28. A process for forming a filled dough product as claimed in claim 26 or claim 27, wherein the product is frozen after step and prior to step i 29. A continuous process for forming a filled dough product as claimed in any one of claims 26 to 28, wherein said strip of dough is 2.5-4 inches in width and 0.25- 0.5 inches in thickness. A process for forming a filled dough product as in any one of claims 7 to 29, wherein said dough is bagel dough.
31. A process for forming a filled dough product comprising: forming inner and outer longitudinally-extending extrusion conduits; extruding a cream cheese through the inner of said extrusion conduits and extruding a dough through the outer of said extrusion conduits to form a continuous extrudate comprising a cream cheese filled dough shell; separating the extrudate into segments, and proofing the extrudate, said separating and proofing occurring in any order; chilling the product of step (c) steaming the product of step and baking the product of step
32. A process as claimed in any one of claims 1 to 17 and 27 to 29, wherein the chilling step includes chilling the product to a core temperature of 50F or below.
33. A process as claimed in claim 17, further comprising the steps of freezing said proofed product prior to boiling.
34. A process as claimed in any one of claims 17, 18, 19 or 31, further 20 comprising the step of chilling said proofed product to cool said filler subsequent to said boiling or steaming step and prior to said browning or baking step. A process for making a filled dough product, comprising the steps of: mixing and kneading flour, salt, yeast and water to form a yeast bagel 25 dough; forming a first layer of dough from said bagel dough; S. depositing a cream cheese filler material on said first layer of dough; forming a second layer of dough from said bagel dough and depositing said second layer over said first layer and cream cheese; pressing said first and second layers together to laminate the first and second layers together in the area adjacent the deposited cream cheese and to seal said cream cheese between said first and second layers to form a laminated product; proofing said laminated product to activate said yeast to raise said dough through fermentation and to form a proofed product; chilling said proofed product to cool said filler; and steaming said proofed product.
36. A process for making a filled bagel dough product, comprising the steps of: mixing and kneading flour, salt, yeast and water to form a yeast bagel dough; forming a first layer of dough from said bagel dough; depositing cream cheese on said first layer of dough; forming a second layer of dough from said bagel dough and depositing said second layer over said first layer and cream cheese; pressing said first and second layers together to laminate the first and second layers together in the area adjacent the deposited cream cheese and to seal said cream cheese between said first and second layers to form a proofed product; chilling said proofed product to cool said filler; and steaming said proofed product.
37. A process for making a filled bagel dough product; comprising the steps of: mixing and kneading flour, water, salt and yeast to form a yeast bagel dough; o measuring an amount of cream cheese; forming a filled bagel dough shell by completely enclosing said amount of cream cheese within a shell of bagel dough produced in step said bagel dough shell having an outer surface and an inner surface; pressing against said filled bagel dough shell to deform the shell into a platelet shape, with cream cheese displaced radially outward without rupture of said 30 shell; proofing the product of step to activate said yeast to raise said bagel dough through fermentation; chilling the product of step to a core temperature of 4 to 10 0 C or below; boiling the chilled product of step and browning the boiled product of step
38. A process according to claim 37, further comprising the step of freezing said proofed product prior to boiling.
39. A process as in claim 37, further comprising chilling said proofed product to cool said cream cheese subsequent to said boiling step and prior to said browning step. A product produced by any one of claims 1 to 39.
41. A product according to claim 40, wherein said product has exposed cream cheese.
42. A product according to claim 40 or claim 41, wherein said product is fried.
43. A product as claimed in any one of claims 40 to 42, wherein said product has the shape and appearance of a traditional bagel. DATED THIS SEVENTEENTH DAY OF FEBRUARY 2004. ALVIN BURGER BY PIZZEYS PATENT AND TRADE MARK ATTORNEYS EDITORIAL NOTE APPLICATION NUMBER 54069/01 This specification does not contain pages 27 to 28
AU54069/01A 1996-08-06 2001-06-26 Filled bagel product and method Ceased AU772059B2 (en)

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US08/823803 1997-03-24
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Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5236724A (en) * 1991-12-31 1993-08-17 Alvin Burger Filled bagel dough product and method

Patent Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5236724A (en) * 1991-12-31 1993-08-17 Alvin Burger Filled bagel dough product and method

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