WO2020180680A1 - Radical anion functionalization of two-dimensional materials - Google Patents

Radical anion functionalization of two-dimensional materials Download PDF

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WO2020180680A1
WO2020180680A1 PCT/US2020/020383 US2020020383W WO2020180680A1 WO 2020180680 A1 WO2020180680 A1 WO 2020180680A1 US 2020020383 W US2020020383 W US 2020020383W WO 2020180680 A1 WO2020180680 A1 WO 2020180680A1
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salt
functionalized
radical
lewis
layered
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WO2020180680A9 (en
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Karoly NEMETH
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Boron Nitride Power Llc
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Priority to CN202080017481.0A priority Critical patent/CN114222716B/en
Priority to KR1020217027425A priority patent/KR20220002253A/en
Priority to EP20765182.9A priority patent/EP3755657A4/en
Priority to US16/959,778 priority patent/US11453596B2/en
Priority to JP2021550135A priority patent/JP2022535478A/en
Publication of WO2020180680A1 publication Critical patent/WO2020180680A1/en
Publication of WO2020180680A9 publication Critical patent/WO2020180680A9/en

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    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C01INORGANIC CHEMISTRY
    • C01BNON-METALLIC ELEMENTS; COMPOUNDS THEREOF; METALLOIDS OR COMPOUNDS THEREOF NOT COVERED BY SUBCLASS C01C
    • C01B32/00Carbon; Compounds thereof
    • C01B32/20Graphite
    • C01B32/21After-treatment
    • C01B32/22Intercalation
    • C01B32/225Expansion; Exfoliation
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C01INORGANIC CHEMISTRY
    • C01BNON-METALLIC ELEMENTS; COMPOUNDS THEREOF; METALLOIDS OR COMPOUNDS THEREOF NOT COVERED BY SUBCLASS C01C
    • C01B21/00Nitrogen; Compounds thereof
    • C01B21/06Binary compounds of nitrogen with metals, with silicon, or with boron, or with carbon, i.e. nitrides; Compounds of nitrogen with more than one metal, silicon or boron
    • C01B21/064Binary compounds of nitrogen with metals, with silicon, or with boron, or with carbon, i.e. nitrides; Compounds of nitrogen with more than one metal, silicon or boron with boron
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C01INORGANIC CHEMISTRY
    • C01BNON-METALLIC ELEMENTS; COMPOUNDS THEREOF; METALLOIDS OR COMPOUNDS THEREOF NOT COVERED BY SUBCLASS C01C
    • C01B19/00Selenium; Tellurium; Compounds thereof
    • C01B19/007Tellurides or selenides of metals
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C01INORGANIC CHEMISTRY
    • C01BNON-METALLIC ELEMENTS; COMPOUNDS THEREOF; METALLOIDS OR COMPOUNDS THEREOF NOT COVERED BY SUBCLASS C01C
    • C01B21/00Nitrogen; Compounds thereof
    • C01B21/06Binary compounds of nitrogen with metals, with silicon, or with boron, or with carbon, i.e. nitrides; Compounds of nitrogen with more than one metal, silicon or boron
    • C01B21/064Binary compounds of nitrogen with metals, with silicon, or with boron, or with carbon, i.e. nitrides; Compounds of nitrogen with more than one metal, silicon or boron with boron
    • C01B21/0648After-treatment, e.g. grinding, purification
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C01INORGANIC CHEMISTRY
    • C01BNON-METALLIC ELEMENTS; COMPOUNDS THEREOF; METALLOIDS OR COMPOUNDS THEREOF NOT COVERED BY SUBCLASS C01C
    • C01B32/00Carbon; Compounds thereof
    • C01B32/15Nano-sized carbon materials
    • C01B32/182Graphene
    • C01B32/194After-treatment
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C01INORGANIC CHEMISTRY
    • C01BNON-METALLIC ELEMENTS; COMPOUNDS THEREOF; METALLOIDS OR COMPOUNDS THEREOF NOT COVERED BY SUBCLASS C01C
    • C01B32/00Carbon; Compounds thereof
    • C01B32/20Graphite
    • C01B32/21After-treatment
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C01INORGANIC CHEMISTRY
    • C01PINDEXING SCHEME RELATING TO STRUCTURAL AND PHYSICAL ASPECTS OF SOLID INORGANIC COMPOUNDS
    • C01P2004/00Particle morphology
    • C01P2004/20Particle morphology extending in two dimensions, e.g. plate-like

Definitions

  • the present invention relates to the covalent functionalization of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and graphene with Oxy-Borohalide (-OBX1X2X3) and OxyAluminohalide (-OAIX1X2X3) functional groups, where X is selected from the group of halogen elements F, Cl, Br, I. Further, the invention also relates to general radical anion functionalization of two-dimensional materials.
  • Figures 1A and IB show the atomic structure of Li[(BN) 2 0BF 3 ] from a
  • This structure represents the maximum packing density of -OBF3 radical anions with Li + cations on the surface of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN).
  • the constituent atoms are indicated by the following numbers: fluorene (1), boron of the functional group (2), oxygen (3), boron of the h-BN (4), nitrogen (5) and lithium (6). Every second boron atom of h-BN is covalently
  • Li + cations are isolated spheres on the surface.
  • the h-BN substrate is in the central plane.
  • the -OBF3 radical anions are covalently bound to the boron atoms of h-BN through the oxygen atoms of these anionic radicals, while the anionic radical itself has an approximate tetrahedral structure.
  • This atomic structure represents a discharged state of [(BN)20BF3] positive electrode electroactive species and is both ionically and electronically conductive. Note that additional discharge capacity is possible at the expense of reduced electronic conductivity.
  • Sodium (Na + ) or magnesium (Mg 2+ ) cations would form similar structures with [(BN) 2 0BF 3 ] as described in K. Nemeth:“Simultaneous Oxygen and Boron Trifluoride Functionalization of Hexagonal Boron Nitride: A Designer Cathode Material for Energy Storage,” Theoretical Chemistry Accounts (2016) 137-157 .
  • h-BN Functionalized hexagonal boron nitride
  • h-BN has recently been proposed as electroactive species in cathodes of batteries in K.
  • One possible synthesis method for such compounds is based on the reaction of oxygen functionalized h-BN and the
  • Molecules of (0S0 2 F) 2 contain a peroxo group (-0-0-) that is functionalized with fluorosulfonyl groups from both side, resulting in a structure of FO2S-O-O-SO2F. This peroxo bond breaks up easily, even at room temperature as described in the above works, and provides OSO2F radicals.
  • the peroxo bond can however be functionalized by many other functional
  • H2O2 is an effective agent to functionalize h-BN through splitting the peroxide bond and providing - OH radicals, see e.g A.S. Nazarov, V.N. Demin, E.D. Grayfer, A. I.
  • the present invention is directed to the radical anion functionalization of 2D
  • This novel functionalized material may be used as solid electrolyte and/or electroactive species in electrochemical energy storage devices. Further, it may be used as a component of composite materials, such as polymeric composites with good ionic conductivity and heat stability.
  • Mg[(BN) 2 0BF 3 ] they correspond to discharged versions of a battery cathode active material (BN) 2 0BF 3 , when combined with Li, Na and Mg anodes, respectively, as proposed in the above mentioned work by K.
  • the new insight in the present invention is that these salts of functionalized h-BN can be derived as reaction products of h-BN with ionic peroxides Li2[(OBF3)2], Na2[(OBF3)2] and
  • peroxo bond in the above salts will be relatively weak and can be split thermally upon heating the salt.
  • the split anions will be a source of -0-BF 3 radical anions that are capable to functionalize h-BN in a similar way as other radicals did in previously published works. Therefore, the reaction of h-BN with the melt of these salts results in salts of functionalized h-BN corresponding to discharged states of the cathode active functionalized h-BN species.
  • salts may also be used in place of the peroxides.
  • Such salts may be oxides, carbonates and oxalates. The reaction of these latter salts with BF3 would evolve CO2 and CO and provide
  • [OBF3] 2 anions for the functionalization of h-BN A similar reaction between NaHC0 3 and BF3 in aqueous solution has been known for long and produces CO2 and NaOH.BF3 complex, as described in U.S. Patent 3,809,762 by L.O. Gilpatrick entitled“Synthesis of Sodium Hydroxytri-Fluoroborate.”
  • the NaOH.BF3 complex can also be used as a source of radical anions: the NaOH.BF3 complex intercalates the layered 2D material from the melt or evaporating concentrated solution of NaOH.BF3, then the protons are electrochemically extracted and removed as Fb gas from the system leaving behind NaOBF3-functionalized h-BN.
  • Ionic compounds with a radical anion or an anion that is a source of radicals by an activation process can perform similar functionalizations.
  • the activation process may be thermal, electrochemical ultraviolet light-based, mechanical, such as ball-milling based or other.
  • general two-dimensional materials, such as graphene, M0S2, Xenes, MXenes and others may be functionalized by such sources of radical anions.
  • solid peroxides L12O2, Na2C>2 and MgC are reacted with a cold ether solution of BF3 to form the corresponding Lewis adducts Li2[(OBF3)2], Na2[(OBF3)2] and Mg[(OBF3)2], respectively.
  • these adducts are molten slightly above their melting points and are reacted with h-BN, to form stacked functionalized monolayers of h-BN, with approximate compositions of Li[(BN)20BF3], Na[(BN)20BF3] and Mg[(BN)20BF3]2.
  • the Lewis adducts are formed from the solid peroxides dissolved or dispersed in water and gaseous BF3 is bubbled into this medium until all peroxides are converted to the corresponding Lewis adducts.
  • the rest of the process is identical with the first embodiment.
  • the Lewis adducts are formed by the reaction of the solid peroxides with liquid BF3.
  • salts with BF3OH anions are formed by the reaction of BF3 gas with aqueous solution of hydroxides or carbonates or hydrocarbonates or oxalates. After evaporation of the solvent, the melt of these salts is mixed with h-BN and then one proton and one electron per formula unit of the BF3OH anions are electrochemically removed on the cathode by converting them to 3 ⁇ 4 gas and the resulting -OBF 3 anionic radicals covalently functionalize h-BN.
  • h-BN is reacted with a mixture of concentrated hydrogen- peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) and BF 3 .
  • the BF 3 may come from an ether solution, or as gas bubbled into the H 2 O 2 solution.
  • Such a mixture contains Lewis adducts of (H 2 O 2 ) with BF 3 and these adducts are acidic, containing protons and [F 3 B-O-O-BF 3 ] 2 or [HO-O-BF,] anions.
  • Spontaneous decomposition of the peroxide bonds happens at room temperature or at elevated temperatures in these solutions and the resulting radicals functionalize the h-BN layers with -OBF 3 radical anions.
  • the protons may electrochemically or otherwise be exchanged to Li cations.
  • Lewis adducts of hydrazine (N 2 H 4 ) with BF 3 are formed, such as 2BF 3 .N 2 H 4 or BF 3 .N 2 H 4 , for example by following the methods described in W.G. Paterson and M. Onyszchuk: "The Interaction of Boron Trifluoride with Hydrazine", Canadian Journal of Chemistry 39, 986-994 (1961). These adducts will also be acidic.
  • -NH-BF 3 radical anions form that functionalize h-BN.
  • the protons can, again, be exchanged to Li + electrochemically or by other means.
  • the radical anions may be generated by electrochemical extraction of cations other than protons.
  • salts containing BF 3 O 2 anions such as L1 2 OBF 3
  • L1OBF 3 the source of radical anions
  • the source of radical anions is perborates.
  • a well known example of perborates is sodium perborate, NaiBiOxFk, which is a well known bleaching agent and is produced on an industrial scale. The thermal decomposition of NaiBiOxFU has been studied in N. Koga, N. Kameno, Y. Tsuboi, T. Fujiwara, M. Nakano, K.
  • the anions of perborate salts contain a six-membered ring of two peroxide (-0-0-) bridges between two boron atoms, while each of the boron atoms have two other additional covalently bound functional groups attached, such as hydroxyl or fluoro groups and the whole anion collectively carries two negative charges.
  • -0-0- peroxide
  • the peroxide bridges break up between the oxygen atoms and the anions split into two radical anions.
  • the reaction of these radical anions with 2D materials leads to radical anion functionalized 2D materials.
  • a metallic lithium electrode may be coated by such salts of h-BN to provide an ionically conductive and fireproof coating that also avoids dendrite formation and allows for working with metallic anodes on air, without causing corrosion of these anodes.
  • Similar coatings using graphite/graphene fluoride have been described in X. Shen, Y. Li, T. Qian, J. Liu, J. Zhou, C. Yan, and J.B.

Abstract

A radical anion based functionalization of two-dimensional (2D) layered materials is proposed. The covalent functionalization of the basal plane of 2D materials with charge neutral radicals is typically unstable to reduction, leading to detachment of the functional groups from the basal plane upon reduction. This instability hinders the use of functionalized 2D materials as rechargeable electroactive species, unless the functional groups are bound to the edges of the 2D material. However, to achieve high capacity without the creation of many edges and defects, a stable functionalization of the basal plane in the reduced state is required. This goal can be achieved by radical anion functionalization, whereby the reduced/discharged state of the basal-plane-functionalized 2D material is produced. The product of the radical anion functionalization can be used as the discharged state of a cathode active material, solid electrolyte or part of a polymer composite.

Description

Radical Anion Functionalization of Two-Dimensional Materials
The present application takes full benefit of US provisional patent application 62/813276, filed on March 4, 2019, entitled“Synthesis of Oxy-Borohalide and Oxy-Aluminohalide
Functionalized Two-Dimensional Materials by Thermal Splitting of Related Salts” by Karoly Nemeth, to the extent allowed by law.
FIELD OF THE INVENTION
[0001] The present invention relates to the covalent functionalization of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and graphene with Oxy-Borohalide (-OBX1X2X3) and OxyAluminohalide (-OAIX1X2X3) functional groups, where X is selected from the group of halogen elements F, Cl, Br, I. Further, the invention also relates to general radical anion functionalization of two-dimensional materials.
[0002] BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
[0003] Figures 1A and IB show the atomic structure of Li[(BN)20BF3] from a
perspective and a side-wise view, respectively. This structure represents the maximum packing density of -OBF3 radical anions with Li+ cations on the surface of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). The constituent atoms are indicated by the following numbers: fluorene (1), boron of the functional group (2), oxygen (3), boron of the h-BN (4), nitrogen (5) and lithium (6). Every second boron atom of h-BN is covalently
functionalized with -OBF3 radical anions. Li+ cations are isolated spheres on the surface.
The h-BN substrate is in the central plane. The -OBF3 radical anions are covalently bound to the boron atoms of h-BN through the oxygen atoms of these anionic radicals, while the anionic radical itself has an approximate tetrahedral structure. This atomic structure represents a discharged state of [(BN)20BF3] positive electrode electroactive species and is both ionically and electronically conductive. Note that additional discharge capacity is possible at the expense of reduced electronic conductivity. Sodium (Na+) or magnesium (Mg2+) cations would form similar structures with [(BN)20BF3] as described in K. Nemeth:“Simultaneous Oxygen and Boron Trifluoride Functionalization of Hexagonal Boron Nitride: A Designer Cathode Material for Energy Storage,” Theoretical Chemistry Accounts (2018) 137-157 .
[0004] BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
[0005] Functionalized hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) has recently been proposed as electroactive species in cathodes of batteries in K. Nemeth:“Functionalized Boron Nitride Materials as Electroactive Species in Electrochemical Energy Storage Devices”, WO/2015/006161, PCT/US2014/045402 . One possible synthesis method for such compounds is based on the reaction of oxygen functionalized h-BN and the
corresponding boron (B) or Aluminum (Al) trihalides as described in K. Nemeth, A. M. Danby and B. Subramaniam:“Synthesis of Oxygen and Boron Trihalogenide
Functionalized Two-Dimensional Layered Materials in Pressurized Medium,”
WO/2017/196738, PCT/US 17/031579. A computational analysis of these materials has been provided in K. Nemeth:“Simultaneous Oxygen and Boron Trifluoride Functionalization of Hexagonal Boron Nitride: A Designer Cathode Material for Energy
Storage” Theoretical Chemistry Accounts (2018) 137-157 .
[0006] Another approach to the synthesis of functionalized h-BN is based on the thermal splitting of peroxide compounds. The historically first such approach was based on the reaction of h-BN with the powerful oxidizing agent (0S02F)2 as a source of OSO2F radicals and dates back to 1978. It was published by N. Bartlett, R. Biagioni, B.
McQuillan, A. Robertson and A. Thompson in“Novel Salts of Graphite and a Boron Nitride Salt,” J. Chem. Soc. Chem. Commun. 5, 200-201 (1978). In a follow-up paper, the electrical conductivity of the corresponding functionalized h-BN, with approximate composition of (BN^OSC F, was found to be 1.5 S/cm which is similar to carbon black electro-conductive additives used in batteries and is about four orders of magnitude higher than that of LixCoC (0< x < 1), the broadly used cathode material in intercalation based Li-ion batteries. This latter measurement was published in C. Shen , S.G. Mayorga, R. Biagioni, C. Piskoti, M. Ishigami, A. Zettl, N. Bartlett (1999) ,“Intercalation of Hexagonal Boron Nitride by Strong Oxidizers and Evidence for the Metallic Nature of the Products,” J Solid State Chem 147-174 (1999). Another important observation in this latter paper was that the presence of trace amounts of base-metals catalyzes the decomposition of (BN)20S02F to h-BN and to a salt with NO+ cations and SO2F anions as well as to B2O3 and to S2O5F2 gas.
[0007] The good proton-conductivity of functionalized h-BN in the order of 0.1 S/cm has also been described in A. Mofakhami and J-F. Fauvarque (2015)“Material for an Electrochemical Device.” U.S. Patent 9,105,907, and good Li-ion conductivity of h-BN containing membranes has been observed in B. Kumar, J. Kumar, R. Leese, J.P. Fellner,
S J. Rodrigues, K. Abraham:“A Solid-State, Rechargeable, Long Cycle Life Lithium-Air Battery,” J. Electrochem. Soc. 157, A50-54 (2010).
[0008] Molecules of (0S02F)2 contain a peroxo group (-0-0-) that is functionalized with fluorosulfonyl groups from both side, resulting in a structure of FO2S-O-O-SO2F. This peroxo bond breaks up easily, even at room temperature as described in the above works, and provides OSO2F radicals.
[0009] The peroxo bond, can however be functionalized by many other functional
groups, not only with -SO2F. Another example is the tert-butyl group, -C(CH3)3, and the corresponding organic tert-butyl-peroxyde, (OC(CH3)3)2, has been used for
functionalization of h-BN in T. Sainsbury, A. Satti, P. May, Z. Wang, I. McGovern, Y.K. Gunko and J. Coleman:“Oxygen Radical Functionalization of Boron Nitride
Nanosheets,” J. Am. Chem. Soc. 134, 18758 (2012). Even simple hydrogen peroxide, H2O2 is an effective agent to functionalize h-BN through splitting the peroxide bond and providing - OH radicals, see e.g A.S. Nazarov, V.N. Demin, E.D. Grayfer, A. I.
Bulavchenko, A.T. Arymbaeva, H-J. Shin, J-Y. Choi, V.E. Fedorov,“Functionalization and Dispersion of Hexagonal Boron Nitride (h-BN) Nanosheets Treated with Inorganic Reagents,” Chem. Asian. J. 7, 554-560 (2012) and in V. Fedorov, A. Nazarov, V. Demin: "Method of Producing Soluble Hexagonal Boron Nitride," Russian Patent RU 2478077
C2 (2013). [00010] There is clearly a need to find the most effective functionalization reactions for 2D materials in order to exploit their beneficial properties in energy storage, solid electrolytes, electroactive species, composites and many other fields.
[00011] SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
[00012] The present invention is directed to the radical anion functionalization of 2D
layered materials, whereby the 2D layered material is reacted with a salt containing a radical anion and the radical anion covalently binds to the 2D layered material forming a salt of a covalently functionalized 2D material. This novel functionalized material may be used as solid electrolyte and/or electroactive species in electrochemical energy storage devices. Further, it may be used as a component of composite materials, such as polymeric composites with good ionic conductivity and heat stability.
[00013] DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
[00014] All of the above-identified prior art use charge neutral radicals, such as those
derivable from charge neutral peroxides, to achieve the functionalization of the basal plane of h-BN and other 2D-materials. However, ionic peroxides, and radical anion containing salts in general, present a new opportunity to achieve the functionalization of h-BN and produce a reduced form of functionalized h-BN and 2D materials. Examples of such functionalized h-BN-s include Li[(BN)20BF3], Na[(BN)20BF3] and
Mg[(BN)20BF3]: they correspond to discharged versions of a battery cathode active material (BN)20BF3 , when combined with Li, Na and Mg anodes, respectively, as proposed in the above mentioned work by K. Nemeth:“Simultaneous Oxygen and Boron Trifluoride Functionalization of Hexagonal Boron Nitride: A Designer Cathode Material For Energy Storage,” Theoretical Chemistry Accounts 137-157 (2018). The new insight in the present invention is that these salts of functionalized h-BN can be derived as reaction products of h-BN with ionic peroxides Li2[(OBF3)2], Na2[(OBF3)2] and
Mg[(OBF3)2], when the anions of these latter salts split to radical anions through an activation process. These latter salts in turn can be composed as reaction products of peroxides L12O2, Na2C>2 and MgCh containing the Lewis base peroxide anion, with Lewis acid BF3 :
[00015] 2 Li+ + [O-O]2- + 2 BF3 2 Li+ + [F3B-O-O-BF3]2- .
[00016] Similar reactions occur with Na and Mg peroxides. Other Lewis acids, such as BCI3, SO2 or SO3 may also be used to synthesize similar salts with anions containing a peroxo bond. Note that ether solution based complexes of BF3 with H2O2 are well known oxidizing agents in organic chemistry as described first in J. D. McClure and P. H.
Williams: "Hydrogen Peroxide - Boron Trifluoride Etherate, a New Oxidizing Agent,"
The Journal of Organic Chemistry 27, 24-26 (1962).
[00017] Due to the electron withdrawing effect of the Lewis acid functionalization, the
peroxo bond in the above salts will be relatively weak and can be split thermally upon heating the salt. The split anions will be a source of -0-BF3 radical anions that are capable to functionalize h-BN in a similar way as other radicals did in previously published works. Therefore, the reaction of h-BN with the melt of these salts results in salts of functionalized h-BN corresponding to discharged states of the cathode active functionalized h-BN species.
[00018] In addition to the above reaction of peroxide salts with Lewis acids, other salts may also be used in place of the peroxides. Such salts may be oxides, carbonates and oxalates. The reaction of these latter salts with BF3 would evolve CO2 and CO and provide
[OBF3]2 anions for the functionalization of h-BN. A similar reaction between NaHC03 and BF3 in aqueous solution has been known for long and produces CO2 and NaOH.BF3 complex, as described in U.S. Patent 3,809,762 by L.O. Gilpatrick entitled“Synthesis of Sodium Hydroxytri-Fluoroborate.” In fact, the NaOH.BF3 complex can also be used as a source of radical anions: the NaOH.BF3 complex intercalates the layered 2D material from the melt or evaporating concentrated solution of NaOH.BF3, then the protons are electrochemically extracted and removed as Fb gas from the system leaving behind NaOBF3-functionalized h-BN. Similar intercalation of Bronstead acids into h-BN has been observed in N.I. Kovtyukhova, Y. Wang, R. Lv, M. Terrones, V. H. Crespi, and T.E. Mallouk: "Reversible Intercalation of Hexagonal Boron Nitride With Brpnsted Acids." Journal of the American Chemical Society 135, 8372-8381 (2013).
[00019] The above concept can further be generalized beyond peroxo-group containing ionic compounds. Ionic compounds with a radical anion or an anion that is a source of radicals by an activation process can perform similar functionalizations. The activation process may be thermal, electrochemical ultraviolet light-based, mechanical, such as ball-milling based or other. Even further, not only h-BN, but general two-dimensional materials, such as graphene, M0S2, Xenes, MXenes and others may be functionalized by such sources of radical anions.
[00020] In a first embodiment, solid peroxides L12O2, Na2C>2 and MgC are reacted with a cold ether solution of BF3 to form the corresponding Lewis adducts Li2[(OBF3)2], Na2[(OBF3)2] and Mg[(OBF3)2], respectively. After the removal of the solvent, and drying of the products, these adducts are molten slightly above their melting points and are reacted with h-BN, to form stacked functionalized monolayers of h-BN, with approximate compositions of Li[(BN)20BF3], Na[(BN)20BF3] and Mg[(BN)20BF3]2.
[00021] In a second embodiment, the Lewis adducts are formed from the solid peroxides dissolved or dispersed in water and gaseous BF3 is bubbled into this medium until all peroxides are converted to the corresponding Lewis adducts. The rest of the process is identical with the first embodiment.
[00022] In a third embodiment, the Lewis adducts are formed by the reaction of the solid peroxides with liquid BF3.
[00023] In a fourth embodiment, general boron halides are used instead of BF3, otherwise the same processes are used as in the previously described embodiments.
[00024] In a fifth embodiment, salts with BF3OH anions are formed by the reaction of BF3 gas with aqueous solution of hydroxides or carbonates or hydrocarbonates or oxalates. After evaporation of the solvent, the melt of these salts is mixed with h-BN and then one proton and one electron per formula unit of the BF3OH anions are electrochemically removed on the cathode by converting them to ¾ gas and the resulting -OBF3 anionic radicals covalently functionalize h-BN.
[00025] In a sixth embodiment, h-BN is reacted with a mixture of concentrated hydrogen- peroxide (H2O2) and BF3. The BF3 may come from an ether solution, or as gas bubbled into the H2O2 solution. Such a mixture contains Lewis adducts of (H2O2) with BF3 and these adducts are acidic, containing protons and [F3B-O-O-BF3]2 or [HO-O-BF,] anions. Spontaneous decomposition of the peroxide bonds happens at room temperature or at elevated temperatures in these solutions and the resulting radicals functionalize the h-BN layers with -OBF3 radical anions. The protons may electrochemically or otherwise be exchanged to Li cations.
[00026] In a seventh embodiment, Lewis adducts of hydrazine (N2H4) with BF3 are formed, such as 2BF3.N2H4 or BF3.N2H4, for example by following the methods described in W.G. Paterson and M. Onyszchuk: "The Interaction of Boron Trifluoride with Hydrazine", Canadian Journal of Chemistry 39, 986-994 (1961). These adducts will also be acidic. By thermal splitting of the N-N bonds in the hydrazine units, -NH-BF3 radical anions form that functionalize h-BN. The protons can, again, be exchanged to Li+ electrochemically or by other means.
[00027] In an eighth embodiment, the radical anions may be generated by electrochemical extraction of cations other than protons. For example, salts containing BF3O2 anions, such as L12OBF3, would be converted to L1OBF3, by the extraction of one Li cation and one electron per formula unit to generate the -OBF3 radical anions. [00028] In a ninth embodiment, the source of radical anions is perborates. A well known example of perborates is sodium perborate, NaiBiOxFk, which is a well known bleaching agent and is produced on an industrial scale. The thermal decomposition of NaiBiOxFU has been studied in N. Koga, N. Kameno, Y. Tsuboi, T. Fujiwara, M. Nakano, K.
Nishikawa, and A. I. Murata, "Multistep Thermal Decomposition of Granular Sodium Perborate Tetrahydrate: A Kinetic Approach to Complex Reactions in Solid-Gas
Systems." Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics 20, 12557-12573 (2018). The anions of perborate salts contain a six-membered ring of two peroxide (-0-0-) bridges between two boron atoms, while each of the boron atoms have two other additional covalently bound functional groups attached, such as hydroxyl or fluoro groups and the whole anion collectively carries two negative charges. When activated (by heat, ball milling, etc), the peroxide bridges break up between the oxygen atoms and the anions split into two radical anions. The reaction of these radical anions with 2D materials leads to radical anion functionalized 2D materials.
[00029] Mechanical activation of the functionalizing anions is also possible. For example, ball milling or ultrasonic ation in a solvent may cause the splitting of the peroxide bonds and generate the radical anions.
[00030] The above described embodiments can also be carried out with other than h-BN 2D materials, for example with graphite/graphene or with MXenes, etc. Instead of BF3, other Lewis acids may also be used, such as BCb, AIF3 or AICI3.
[00031] Further generalization of the above processes is possible through using radical
anions that are not derived from splitting Lewis adducts containing 0-0 or N-N bonds, but where the radical anion is provided from an entirely general source in the form of a salt. For example, the above mentioned process when one Li per formula unit is electrochemically extracted from LLO.BFs is a way to produce a salt LiOBF3 containing a radical anion OBFy.
[00032] One possible example for utilization of salts of radical anion functionalized h-BN besides electroactive species and electrolytes is in coating applications. For example, a metallic lithium electrode may be coated by such salts of h-BN to provide an ionically conductive and fireproof coating that also avoids dendrite formation and allows for working with metallic anodes on air, without causing corrosion of these anodes. Similar coatings using graphite/graphene fluoride have been described in X. Shen, Y. Li, T. Qian, J. Liu, J. Zhou, C. Yan, and J.B. Goodenough: "Lithium Anode Stable in Air for Low- Cost Fabrication of a Dendrite-Free Lithium Battery," Nature Communications 10, 1-9 (2019). The advantage of a boron nitride coating as opposed to graphite fluoride is higher thermal stability.
[00033] It is to be understood that the above-described embodiments are only illustrative of the application of the principles of the present invention. Numerous modifications and alternative arrangements may be devised by those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention and the appended claims are intended to cover such modifications and arrangements. It is intended that the scope of the invention not be limited by the specification, but be defined by the claims set forth below. [00034] All publications and patent documents cited in this application are incorporated by reference in their entirety for all purposes to the same extent as if each individual publication or patent document were so individually denoted.

Claims

I CLAIM
1. A method for the synthesis of functionalized two-dimensional (2D) layered materials comprising: providing a 2D layered material in one of a stacked form and an exfoliated form; providing a first salt with an anion; reacting the anion of the first salt with a Lewis acid forming a second salt; activating the second salt to produce radical anions; reacting the radical anions with the 2D layered materials to obtain a third salt of functionalized 2D layered materials.
2. The method of Claim 1 wherein the first salt is a peroxide.
3. The method of Claim 1 wherein the first salt is one of a carbonate and a hydrocarbonate.
4. The method of Claim 1 wherein the first salt is an oxalate.
5. The method of Claim 1 wherein the first salt is one of a hydroxide or an oxide.
6. The method of Claim 1 wherein the Lewis acid is a boron trihalide, BX1X2X3, where Xi,
X2 and X3 are each individually selected from the group of the halogen elements F, Cl, Br, and I.
7. The method of Claim 1 wherein the Lewis acid is an aluminum trihalide, AIX1X2X3, where Xi, X2 and X3 are each individually selected from the group of the halogen elements F,
Cl, Br, and I.
8. The method of Claim 1 wherein the Lewis acid is sulfur-dioxide, SO2.
9. The method of Claim 1 wherein the Lewis acid is sulfur-trioxide, SO3.
10. The method of Claim 1 wherein the activation is accomplished by heating.
11. The method of Claim 1 wherein the activation is accomplished by ultrasonication.
12. The method of Claim 1 wherein the activation is accomplished by electrochemical means.
13. The method of Claim 10 wherein the activation occurs in a melt phase of the second salt.
14. The method of Claim 11 wherein the activation occurs in a solution of the second salt.
15. The method of Claim 14 wherein the solution is based on a solvent that is one of liquid BF3, liquid BCI3, molten AIF3, and molten AICI3.
16. The method of Claim 1 wherein the 2D layered material is hexagonal boron nitride.
17. The method of Claim 1 in which the 2D layered material is graphite.
18. The method of Claim 5 wherein the activation is based on electrochemical removal of one of protons and other cations from the second salt producing corresponding radical anions.
19. A method for the synthesis of functionalized two-dimensional (2D) layered materials comprising: providing a 2D layered material in one of a stacked form and an exfoliated form; providing a first salt composed of a cation other than a proton and a radical anion; reacting the radical anion with the 2D layered materials to obtain a second salt of functionalized 2D layered materials.
20. A method for the synthesis of functionalized two dimensional (2D) layered materials comprising: providing a 2D layered material in one of a stacked form and an exfoliated form; providing Lewis adducts of Lewis acids of one of boron trihalides and aluminum trihalides with Lewis bases of one of hydrogen peroxide and hydrazine; mixing the Lewis adduct with the 2D material; activating the Lewis adduct to break up the 0-0 and N-N bonds and produce acidic radicals containing protons and radical anions; reacting the radical anions with the 2D material to obtain radical anion functionalized acidic 2D material.
PCT/US2020/020383 2019-03-04 2020-02-28 Radical anion functionalization of two-dimensional materials WO2020180680A1 (en)

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