WO2019075420A1 - Data processing systems for data-transfer risk identification, cross-border visualization generation, and related methods - Google Patents

Data processing systems for data-transfer risk identification, cross-border visualization generation, and related methods Download PDF

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Publication number
WO2019075420A1
WO2019075420A1 PCT/US2018/055736 US2018055736W WO2019075420A1 WO 2019075420 A1 WO2019075420 A1 WO 2019075420A1 US 2018055736 W US2018055736 W US 2018055736W WO 2019075420 A1 WO2019075420 A1 WO 2019075420A1
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data
system
asset
particular
transfer
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PCT/US2018/055736
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French (fr)
Inventor
Kabir A. Barday
Mihir S. Karanjkar
Steven W. Finch
Ken A. Browne
Nathan W. Heard
Aakash H. Patel
Jason L. Sabourin
Richard L. Daniel
Dylan PATTON-KUHL
Kevin Jones
Jonathan Blake Brannon
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OneTrust, LLC
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Priority to US201762572096P priority Critical
Priority to US62/572,096 priority
Priority to US201862728435P priority
Priority to US62/728,435 priority
Application filed by OneTrust, LLC filed Critical OneTrust, LLC
Publication of WO2019075420A1 publication Critical patent/WO2019075420A1/en

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    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q50/00Systems or methods specially adapted for specific business sectors, e.g. utilities or tourism
    • G06Q50/01Social networking
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q10/00Administration; Management
    • G06Q10/06Resources, workflows, human or project management, e.g. organising, planning, scheduling or allocating time, human or machine resources; Enterprise planning; Organisational models
    • G06Q10/063Operations research or analysis
    • G06Q10/0637Strategic management or analysis
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q10/00Administration; Management
    • G06Q10/06Resources, workflows, human or project management, e.g. organising, planning, scheduling or allocating time, human or machine resources; Enterprise planning; Organisational models
    • G06Q10/067Business modelling

Abstract

In particular embodiments, a Cross-Border Visualization Generation System is configured to: (1) identify one or more data assets associated with a particular entity; (2) analyze the one or more data assets to identify one or more data elements stored in the identified one or more data assets; (3) define a plurality of physical locations and identify, for each of the identified one or more data assets, a respective particular physical location of the plurality of physical locations; (4) analyze the identified one or more data elements to determine one or more data transfers between the one or more data systems in different particular physical locations; (5) determine one or more regulations that relate to the one or more data transfers; and (6) generate a visual representation of the one or more data transfers based at least in part on the one or more regulations.

Description

DATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS FOR DATA-TRANSFER RISK IDENTIFICATION, CROSS-BORDER VISUALIZATION GENERATION, AND RELATED METHODS

BACKGROUND

Over the past years, privacy and security policies, and related operations have become increasingly important. Breaches in security, leading to the unauthorized access of personal data (which may include sensitive personal data) have become more frequent among companies and other organizations of all sizes. Such personal data may include, but is not limited to, personally identifiable information (PII), which may be information that directly (or indirectly) identifies an individual or entity. Examples of PII include names, addresses, dates of birth, social security numbers, and biometric identifiers such as a person's fingerprints or picture. Other personal data may include, for example, customers' Internet browsing habits, purchase history, or even their preferences (e.g., likes and dislikes, as provided or obtained through social media).

Many organizations that obtain, use, and transfer personal data, including sensitive personal data, have begun to address these privacy and security issues. To manage personal data, many companies have attempted to implement operational policies and processes that comply with legal and industry requirements. However, there is an increasing need for improved systems and methods to manage personal data in a manner that complies with such policies.

Similarly, as individuals have become more aware of the risks associated with the theft or misuse of their personal data, they have sought additional tools to help them manage which entities process their personal data. There is currently a need for improved tools that would allow individuals to minimize the number of entities that process their personal data - especially entities that the individual doesn't actively do business with.

SUMMARY

A computer-implemented method for generating a visualization of one or more data transfers between one or more data assets, comprising: (1) identifying one or more data assets associated with a particular entity; (2) analyzing the one or more data assets to identify one or more data elements stored in the identified one or more data assets; (3) defining a plurality of physical locations and identifying, for each of the identified one or more data assets, a respective particular physical location of the plurality of physical locations; (4) analyzing the identified one or more data elements to determine one or more data transfers between the one or more data systems in different particular physical locations; (5) determining one or more regulations that relate to the one or more data transfers; and (6) generating a visual representation of the one or more data transfers based at least in part on the one or more regulations.

A computer-implemented method for assessing a risk associated with one or more data transfers between one or more data assets that comprises: (1) creating a data transfer record for a transfer of data between a first asset in a first location and a second asset in a second location; (2) accessing a set of data transfer rules that are associated with the data transfer record; (3) performing a data transfer assessment based at least in part on applying the set of data transfer rules on the data transfer record; (4) identifying one or more data transfer risks associated with the data transfer record, based at least in part on the data transfer assessment; (5) calculating a risk score for the data transfer based at least in part on the one or more data transfer risks associated with the data transfer record; (6) digitally storing the risk score for the data transfer.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Various embodiments of a data model generation and population system are described below. In the course of this description, reference will be made to the accompanying drawings, which are not necessarily drawn to scale, and wherein:

FIG. 1 depicts a data model generation and population system according to particular embodiments.

FIG. 2 is a schematic diagram of a computer (such as the data model generation server 110, or data model population server 120) that is suitable for use in various embodiments of the data model generation and population system shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a flowchart showing an example of steps performed by a Data Model Generation Module according to particular embodiments.

FIGS. 4-10 depict various exemplary visual representations of data models according to particular embodiments.

FIG. 11 is a flowchart showing an example of steps performed by a Data Model Population Module.

FIG. 12 is a flowchart showing an example of steps performed by a Data Population Questionnaire Generation Module.

FIG. 13 is a process flow for populating a data inventory according to a particular embodiment using one or more data mapping techniques.

FIGS. 14-25 depict exemplary screen displays and graphical user interfaces (GUIs) according to various embodiments of the system, which may display information associated with the system or enable access to, or interaction with, the system by one or more users (e.g., to configure a questionnaire for populating one or more inventory attributes for one or more data models, complete one or more assessments, etc.).

FIG. 26 is a flowchart showing an example of steps performed by an Intelligent Identity Scanning Module.

FIG. 27 is schematic diagram of network architecture for an intelligent identity scanning system 2700 according to a particular embodiment.

FIG. 28 is a schematic diagram of an asset access methodology utilized by an intelligent identity scanning system 2700 in various embodiments of the system.

FIG. 29 is a flowchart showing an example of processes performed by a Data Subject Access Request Fulfillment Module 2900 according to various embodiments.

FIGS. 30-31 depict exemplary screen displays and graphical user interfaces (GUIs) according to various embodiments of the system, which may display information associated with the system or enable access to, or interaction with, the system by one or more users (e.g., for the purpose of submitting a data subject access request or other suitable request).

FIGS. 32-35 depict exemplary screen displays and graphical user interfaces (GUIs) according to various embodiments of the system, which may display information associated with the system or enable access to, or interaction with, the system by one or more users (e.g., for the purpose of flagging one or more risks associated with one or more particular questionnaire questions).

FIG. 36 is a flowchart showing an example of processes performed by a Cross-Border Visualization Generation Module 3600 according to various embodiments.

FIGS. 37-38 depict exemplary screen displays and graphical user interfaces (GUIs) according to various embodiments of the system, which may display information associated with the system or enable access to, or interaction with, the system by one or more users (e.g., related to cross-border visualization).

FIG. 39 is a flowchart showing an example of processes performed by an Adaptive

Execution on a Data Model Module 3900 according to various embodiments. FIG. 40 depicts an exemplary screen display and graphical user interface (GUI) according to various embodiments of the system, which may display information associated with the system or enable access to, or interaction with, the system by one or more users.

FIG. 41 is a flowchart showing an example of processes performed by an E-mail Scanning Module 4100 according to various embodiments.

FIG. 42 depicts an exemplary screen display and graphical user interface (GUI) according to various embodiments of the system, which may display information associated with the system or enable access to, or interaction with, the system by one or more users.

FIG. 43 is a flowchart showing an example of processes performed by a Webform Crawling Module 4300 according to various embodiments.

FIG. 44 is a flowchart showing an example of processes performed by a Data Asset and Webform Management Module 4400 according to yet another embodiment.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Various embodiments now will be described more fully hereinafter with reference to the accompanying drawings. It should be understood that the invention may be embodied in many different forms and should not be construed as limited to the embodiments set forth herein. Rather, these embodiments are provided so that this disclosure will be thorough and complete, and will fully convey the scope of the invention to those skilled in the art. Like numbers refer to like elements throughout.

Overview

A data model generation and population system, according to particular embodiments, is configured to generate a data model (e.g., one or more data models) that maps one or more relationships between and/or among a plurality of data assets utilized by a corporation or other entity (e.g., individual, organization, etc.) in the context, for example, of one or more business processes. In particular embodiments, each of the plurality of data assets (e.g., data systems) may include, for example, any entity that collects, processes, contains, and/or transfers data (e.g., such as a software application, "internet of things" computerized device, database, website, data- center, server, etc.). For example, a first data asset may include any software or device (e.g., server or servers) utilized by a particular entity for such data collection, processing, transfer, storage, etc.

As shown in Figures 4 and 5, in various embodiments, the data model may store the following information: (1) the organization that owns and/or uses a particular data asset (a primary data asset, which is shown in the center of the data model in Figure 4); (2) one or more departments within the organization that are responsible for the data asset; (3) one or more software applications that collect data (e.g., personal data) for storage in and/or use by the data asset (e.g., or one or more other suitable collection assets from which the personal data that is collected, processed, stored, etc. by the primary data asset is sourced); (4) one or more particular data subjects (or categories of data subjects) that information is collected from for use by the data asset; (5) one or more particular types of data that are collected by each of the particular applications for storage in and/or use by the data asset; (6) one or more individuals (e.g., particular individuals or types of individuals) that are permitted to access and/or use the data stored in, or used by, the data asset; (7) which particular types of data each of those individuals are allowed to access and use; and (8) one or more data assets (destination assets) that the data is transferred to for other use, and which particular data is transferred to each of those data assets. As shown in Figures 6 and 7, the system may also optionally store information regarding, for example, which business processes and processing activities utilize the data asset.

In particular embodiments, the data model stores this information for each of a plurality of different data assets and may include links between, for example, a portion of the model that provides information for a first particular data asset and a second portion of the model that provides information for a second particular data asset.

In various embodiments, the data model generation and population system may be implemented in the context of any suitable privacy management system that is configured to ensure compliance with one or more legal or industry standards related to the collection and/or storage of private information. In various embodiments, a particular organization, sub-group, or other entity may initiate a privacy campaign or other activity (e.g., processing activity) as part of its business activities. In such embodiments, the privacy campaign may include any undertaking by a particular organization (e.g., such as a project or other activity) that includes the collection, entry, and/or storage (e.g., in memory) of any personal data associated with one or more individuals. In particular embodiments, a privacy campaign may include any project undertaken by an organization that includes the use of personal data, or any other activity that could have an impact on the privacy of one or more individuals.

In any embodiment described herein, personal data may include, for example: (1) the name of a particular data subject (which may be a particular individual); (2) the data subject's address; (3) the data subject's telephone number; (4) the data subject's e-mail address; (5) the data subject's social security number; (6) information associated with one or more of the data subject's credit accounts (e.g., credit card numbers); (7) banking information for the data subject; (8) location data for the data subject (e.g., their present or past location); (9) internet search history for the data subject; and/or (10) any other suitable personal information, such as other personal information discussed herein. In particular embodiments, such personal data may include one or more cookies (e.g., where the individual is directly identifiable or may be identifiable based at least in part on information stored in the one or more cookies).

In particular embodiments, when generating a data model, the system may, for example:

(1) identify one or more data assets associated with a particular organization; (2) generate a data inventory for each of the one or more data assets, where the data inventory comprises information such as: (a) one or more processing activities associated with each of the one or more data assets, (b) transfer data associated with each of the one or more data assets (data regarding which data is transferred to/from each of the data assets, and which data assets, or individuals, the data is received from and/or transferred to, (c) personal data associated with each of the one or more data assets (e.g., particular types of data collected, stored, processed, etc. by the one or more data assets), and/or (d) any other suitable information; and (3) populate the data model using one or more suitable techniques.

In particular embodiments, the one or more techniques for populating the data model may include, for example: (1) obtaining information for the data model by using one or more questionnaires associated with a particular privacy campaign, processing activity, etc.; (2) using one or more intelligent identity scanning techniques discussed herein to identify personal data stored by the system and map such data to a suitable data model, data asset within a data model, etc.; (3) obtaining information for the data model from a third-party application (or other application) using one or more application programming interfaces (API); and/or (4) using any other suitable technique.

In particular embodiments, the system is configured to generate and populate a data model substantially on the fly (e.g., as the system receives new data associated with particular processing activities). In still other embodiments, the system is configured to generate and populate a data model based at least in part on existing information stored by the system (e.g., in one or more data assets), for example, using one or more suitable scanning techniques described herein.

As may be understood in light of this disclosure, a particular organization may undertake a plurality of different privacy campaigns, processing activities, etc. that involve the collection and storage of personal data. In some embodiments, each of the plurality of different processing activities may collect redundant data (e.g., may collect the same personal data for a particular individual more than once), and may store data and/or redundant data in one or more particular locations (e.g., on one or more different servers, in one or more different databases, etc.). In this way, a particular organization may store personal data in a plurality of different locations which may include one or more known and/or unknown locations. By generating and populating a data model of one or more data assets that are involved in the collection, storage and processing of such personal data, the system may be configured to create a data model that facilitates a straightforward retrieval of information stored by the organization as desired. For example, in various embodiments, the system may be configured to use a data model in substantially automatically responding to one or more data access requests by an individual (e.g., or other organization). In still other embodiments, such data model generation and population may improve the functionality of an entity's computing systems by enabling a more streamlined retrieval of data from the system and eliminating redundant storage of identical data. Various embodiments of a system for generating and populating a data model are described more fully below.

In particular embodiments, a Cross-Border Visualization Generation System is configured to: (1) identify one or more data assets associated with a particular entity; (2) analyze the one or more data assets to identify one or more data elements stored in the identified one or more data assets; (3) define a plurality of physical locations and identify, for each of the identified one or more data assets, a respective particular physical location of the plurality of physical locations; (4) analyze the identified one or more data elements to determine one or more data transfers between the one or more data systems in different particular physical locations; (5) determine one or more regulations that relate to the one or more data transfers; and (6) generate a visual representation of the one or more data transfers based at least in part on the one or more regulations.

In various embodiments, a Data Model Adaptive Execution System may be configured to take one or more suitable actions to remediate an identified risk trigger in view of one or more regulations (e.g., one or more legal regulations, one or more binding corporate rules, etc.). For example, in order to ensure compliance with one or more legal or industry standards related to the collection and/or storage of private information (e.g., personal data), an entity may be required to modify one or more aspects of a way in which the entity collects, stores, and/or otherwise processes personal data (e.g., in response to a change in a legal or other requirement). In order to identify whether a particular change or other risk trigger requires remediation, the system may be configured to assess a relevance of the risk posed by the potential risk trigger and identify one or more processing activities or data assets that may be affected by the risk.

The system may, for example: (1) identify and/or detect one or more potential risk triggers; (2) assess and analyze the potential risk triggers to determine a relevance of the risk posed by the risk triggers; (3) use data modelling techniques to identify particular processing activities and/or data assets that may be affected by the risk; (4) determine based on a relevance of the risk and the affected systems/processes whether to take one or more actions; and (5) take a suitable action in response to the risk triggers, if necessary.

The risk triggers may include, for example a change in legal or industry standards/regulations related to the collection, storage, and/or processing of personal data, a data breach, or any other suitable risk trigger. The suitable actions to remediate the risk may include, for example, generating a report and providing it to a privacy officer or other individual, automatically modifying an encryption level of particular data stored by the system, quarantining particular data, etc.

In various embodiments, a system may be configured to substantially automatically determine whether to take one or more actions in response to one or more identified risk triggers (e.g., data breaches, changes in regulations, etc.). For example, the system may substantially automatically determine a relevance of a risk posed by (e.g., a risk level) the one or more potential risk triggers based at least in part on one or more previously-determined responses to similar risk triggers. This may include, for example, one or more previously determined responses for the particular entity that has identified the current risk trigger, one or more similarly situated entities, or any other suitable entity or potential trigger.

The system may, for example: (1) compare the potential risk trigger to one or more previous risks triggers experienced by the particular entity at a previous time; (2) identify a similar previous risk trigger (e.g., one or more previous risk triggers related to a similar change in regulation, breach of data, type of issue identified, etc.); (3) determine the relevance of the current risk trigger based at least in part on a determined relevance of the previous risk trigger; and (4) determine whether to take one or more actions to the current risk trigger based at least in part on one or more determined actions to take in response to the previous, similar risk trigger.

Similarly, in particular embodiments, the system may be configured to substantially automatically determine one or more actions to take in response to a current potential risk trigger based on one or more actions taken by one or more similarly situated entities to one or more previous, similar risk triggers. For example, the system may be configured to: (1) compare the potential risk trigger to one or more previous risk triggers experienced by one or more similarly situated entities at a previous time; (2) identify a similar previous risk trigger (e.g., one or more previous risk triggers related to a similar change in regulation, breach of data, and/or type of issue identified, etc. from the one or more previous risk triggers experienced by the one or more similarly-situated entities at the previous time; (3) determine the relevance of the current risk trigger based at least in part on a determined relevance of the previous risk trigger (e.g., a relevance determined by the one or more similarly situated entities); and (4) determine one or more actions to take in response to the current risk trigger based at least in part on one or more previously determined actions to take in response to the previous, similar risk trigger (e.g., one or more determined actions by the one or more similarly situated entities at the previous time).

In particular embodiments, a Data Access Webform Crawling System is configured to:

(1) identify a webform used to collect one or more pieces of personal data; (2) robotically complete the identified webform; (3) analyze the completed webform to determine one or more processing activities that utilize the one or more pieces of personal data collected by the webform; (4) identify a first data asset in the data model that is associated with the one or more processing activities; (5) modify a data inventory for the first data asset in the data model to include data associated with the webform; and (6) modify the data model to include the modified data inventory for the first data asset.

In addition, various systems and computer-implemented methods are described for: (1) analyzing electronic correspondence associated with a data subject (e.g., the emails within one or more email in-boxes associated with the data subject); (2) based on the analysis, identifying one or more entities (e.g., corporate entities) that that the data subject does not actively do business with (e.g., as evidenced by the fact that the data subject no longer opens emails from the entity, or has set up a rule to automatically delete emails received from the entity); (3) in response to identifying the entity as an entity that the data subject no longer actively does business with, at least substantially automatically generating a data subject access request and, optionally, automatically submitting the data subject access request to the entity.

The system may, for example, be configured to determine whether the data subject actively does business with a particular entity (e.g., purchases products from, or uses one or more services from the entity) based at least in part on one more determined interactions of the data subject with one or more e-mails, or other electronic correspondence, from the entity (e.g., whether the data subject reads the one or more e-mails, selects one or more links within the e- mails, deletes the e-mails without reading them, has set up a rule to auto-delete emails from the entity, has set up a rule to re-route emails from the entity to a particular folder, or other location, designated for promotional materials (e.g., unwanted promotional materials), and/or has set up a rule to associate emails from the entity with metadata indicating that the correspondence is promotional in nature or should be re-routed or auto-deleted. The system may then substantially automatically generate and/or submit a data subject access request on behalf of the data subject that includes a request to be forgotten (e.g., a request for the entity to delete some or all of the data subject's personal data that the entity is processing).

Exemplary Technical Platforms

As will be appreciated by one skilled in the relevant field, the present invention may be, for example, embodied as a computer system, a method, or a computer program product. Accordingly, various embodiments may take the form of an entirely hardware embodiment, an entirely software embodiment, or an embodiment combining software and hardware aspects. Furthermore, particular embodiments may take the form of a computer program product stored on a computer-readable storage medium having computer-readable instructions (e.g., software) embodied in the storage medium. Various embodiments may take the form of web-implemented computer software. Any suitable computer-readable storage medium may be utilized including, for example, hard disks, compact disks, DVDs, optical storage devices, and/or magnetic storage devices.

Various embodiments are described below with reference to block diagrams and flowchart illustrations of methods, apparatuses (e.g., systems), and computer program products. It should be understood that each block of the block diagrams and flowchart illustrations, and combinations of blocks in the block diagrams and flowchart illustrations, respectively, can be implemented by a computer executing computer program instructions. These computer program instructions may be loaded onto a general purpose computer, special purpose computer, or other programmable data processing apparatus to produce a machine, such that the instructions which execute on the computer or other programmable data processing apparatus to create means for implementing the functions specified in the flowchart block or blocks.

These computer program instructions may also be stored in a computer-readable memory that can direct a computer or other programmable data processing apparatus to function in a particular manner such that the instructions stored in the computer-readable memory produce an article of manufacture that is configured for implementing the function specified in the flowchart block or blocks. The computer program instructions may also be loaded onto a computer or other programmable data processing apparatus to cause a series of operational steps to be performed on the computer or other programmable apparatus to produce a computer implemented process such that the instructions that execute on the computer or other programmable apparatus provide steps for implementing the functions specified in the flowchart block or blocks.

Accordingly, blocks of the block diagrams and flowchart illustrations support combinations of mechanisms for performing the specified functions, combinations of steps for performing the specified functions, and program instructions for performing the specified functions. It should also be understood that each block of the block diagrams and flowchart illustrations, and combinations of blocks in the block diagrams and flowchart illustrations, can be implemented by special purpose hardware-based computer systems that perform the specified functions or steps, or combinations of special purpose hardware and other hardware executing appropriate computer instructions.

Example System Architecture

FIG. 1 is a block diagram of a Data Model Generation and Population System 100 according to a particular embodiment. In various embodiments, the Data Model Generation and Population System 100 is part of a privacy compliance system (also referred to as a privacy management system), or other system, which may, for example, be associated with a particular organization and be configured to aid in compliance with one or more legal or industry regulations related to the collection and storage of personal data. In some embodiments, the Data Model Generation and Population System 100 is configured to: (1) generate a data model based on one or more identified data assets, where the data model includes a data inventory associated with each of the one or more identified data assets; (2) identify populated and unpopulated aspects of each data inventory; and (3) populate the unpopulated aspects of each data inventory using one or more techniques such as intelligent identity scanning, questionnaire response mapping, APIs, etc.

As may be understood from Figure 1, the Data Model Generation and Population System 100 includes one or more computer networks 115, a Data Model Generation Server 110, a Data Model Population Server 120, an Intelligent Identity Scanning Server 130, One or More Databases 140 or other data structures, one or more remote computing devices 150 (e.g., a desktop computer, laptop computer, tablet computer, smartphone, etc.), and One or More Third Party Servers 160. In particular embodiments, the one or more computer networks 115 facilitate communication between the Data Model Generation Server 110, Data Model Population Server 120, Intelligent Identity Scanning Server 130, One or More Databases 140, one or more remote computing devices 150 (e.g., a desktop computer, laptop computer, tablet computer, smartphone, etc.), and One or More Third Party Servers 160. Although in the embodiment shown in Figure 1, the Data Model Generation Server 110, Data Model Population Server 120, Intelligent Identity Scanning Server 130, One or More Databases 140, one or more remote computing devices 150 (e.g., a desktop computer, laptop computer, tablet computer, smartphone, etc.), and One or More Third Party Servers 160 are shown as separate servers, it should be understood that in other embodiments, one or more of these servers and/or computing devices may comprise a single server, a plurality of servers, one or more cloud-based servers, or any other suitable configuration. It should be further understood that although any particular name given to any particular server in the course of this description should not be understood to imply any limit to any functionality that such a server may provide to the system. For example, a scanning server may be implemented along with one or more other servers to generate, automate, execute, and/or fulfill one or more data subject access requests. Similarly, a data model population server may be configured to execute one or more scanning steps described herein, etc.

The one or more computer networks 115 may include any of a variety of types of wired or wireless computer networks such as the Internet, a private intranet, a public switch telephone network (PSTN), or any other type of network. The communication link between The Intelligent Identity Scanning Server 130 and the One or More Third Party Servers 160 may be, for example, implemented via a Local Area Network (LAN) or via the Internet. In other embodiments, the One or More Databases 140 may be stored either fully or partially on any suitable server or combination of servers described herein.

FIG. 2 illustrates a diagrammatic representation of a computer 200 that can be used within the Data Model Generation and Population System 100, for example, as a client computer (e.g., one or more remote computing devices 130 shown in Figure 1), or as a server computer (e.g., Data Model Generation Server 110 shown in Figure 1). In particular embodiments, the computer 200 may be suitable for use as a computer within the context of the Data Model Generation and Population System 100 that is configured to generate a data model and map one or more relationships between one or more pieces of data that make up the model.

In particular embodiments, the computer 200 may be connected (e.g., networked) to other computers in a LAN, an intranet, an extranet, and/or the Internet. As noted above, the computer 200 may operate in the capacity of a server or a client computer in a client-server network environment, or as a peer computer in a peer-to-peer (or distributed) network environment. The Computer 200 may be a personal computer (PC), a tablet PC, a set-top box (STB), a Personal Digital Assistant (PDA), a cellular telephone, a web appliance, a server, a network router, a switch or bridge, or any other computer capable of executing a set of instructions (sequential or otherwise) that specify actions to be taken by that computer. Further, while only a single computer is illustrated, the term "computer" shall also be taken to include any collection of computers that individually or jointly execute a set (or multiple sets) of instructions to perform any one or more of the methodologies discussed herein.

An exemplary computer 200 includes a processing device 202, a main memory 204 (e.g., read-only memory (ROM), flash memory, dynamic random access memory (DRAM) such as synchronous DRAM (SDRAM) or Rambus DRAM (RDRAM), etc.), static memory 206 (e.g., flash memory, static random access memory (SRAM), etc.), and a data storage device 218, which communicate with each other via a bus 232.

The processing device 202 represents one or more general-purpose processing devices such as a microprocessor, a central processing unit, or the like. More particularly, the processing device 202 may be a complex instruction set computing (CISC) microprocessor, reduced instruction set computing (RISC) microprocessor, very long instruction word (VLIW) microprocessor, or processor implementing other instruction sets, or processors implementing a combination of instruction sets. The processing device 202 may also be one or more special- purpose processing devices such as an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC), a field programmable gate array (FPGA), a digital signal processor (DSP), network processor, or the like. The processing device 202 may be configured to execute processing logic 226 for performing various operations and steps discussed herein.

The computer 120 may further include a network interface device 208. The computer 200 also may include a video display unit 210 (e.g., a liquid crystal display (LCD) or a cathode ray tube (CRT)), an alphanumeric input device 212 (e.g., a keyboard), a cursor control device 214 (e.g., a mouse), and a signal generation device 216 (e.g., a speaker).

The data storage device 218 may include a non-transitory computer-accessible storage medium 230 (also known as a non-transitory computer-readable storage medium or a non- transitory computer-readable medium) on which is stored one or more sets of instructions (e.g., software instructions 222) embodying any one or more of the methodologies or functions described herein. The software instructions 222 may also reside, completely or at least partially, within main memory 204 and/or within processing device 202 during execution thereof by computer 200 - main memory 204 and processing device 202 also constituting computer- accessible storage media. The software instructions 222 may further be transmitted or received over a network 1 15 via network interface device 208.

While the computer-accessible storage medium 230 is shown in an exemplary embodiment to be a single medium, the term "computer-accessible storage medium" should be understood to include a single medium or multiple media (e.g., a centralized or distributed database, and/or associated caches and servers) that store the one or more sets of instructions. The term "computer-accessible storage medium" should also be understood to include any medium that is capable of storing, encoding or carrying a set of instructions for execution by the computer and that cause the computer to perform any one or more of the methodologies of the present invention. The term "computer-accessible storage medium" should accordingly be understood to include, but not be limited to, solid-state memories, optical and magnetic media, etc. Exemplary System Platform

Various embodiments of a Data Model Generation and Population System 100 may be implemented in the context of any suitable system (e.g., a privacy compliance system). For example, the Data Model Generation and Population System 100 may be implemented to analyze a particular company or other organization's data assets to generate a data model for one or more processing activities, privacy campaigns, etc. undertaken by the organization. In particular embodiments, the system may implement one or more modules in order to at least partially ensure compliance with one or more regulations (e.g., legal requirements) related to the collection and/or storage of personal data. Various aspects of the system's functionality may be executed by certain system modules, including a Data Model Generation Module 300, Data Model Population Module 1100, Data Population Questionnaire Generation Module 1200, Intelligent Identity Scanning Module 2600, Data Subject Access Request Fulfillment Module 2900, Cross-Border Visualization Generation Module 3600, Adaptive Execution on a Data Model Module 3900, E-mail Scanning Module 4100, Webform Crawling Module 4300, and Data Asset and Webform Management Module 4400. These modules are discussed in greater detail below.

Although these modules are presented as a series of steps, it should be understood in light of this disclosure that various embodiments of the Data Model Generation Module 300, Data Model Population Module 1100, Data Population Questionnaire Generation Module 1200, Intelligent Identity Scanning Module 2600, Data Subject Access Request Fulfillment Module 2900, Cross-Border Visualization Generation Module 3600, Adaptive Execution on a Data Model Module 3900, E-mail Scanning Module 4100, Webform Crawling Module 4300, and Data Asset and Webform Management Module 4400 described herein may perform the steps described below in an order other than in which they are presented. In still other embodiments, the Data Model Generation Module 300, Data Model Population Module 1100, Data Population Questionnaire Generation Module 1200, Intelligent Identity Scanning Module 2600, Data Subject Access Request Fulfillment Module 2900, Cross-Border Visualization Generation Module 3600, Adaptive Execution on a Data Model Module 3900, E-mail Scanning Module 4100, Webform Crawling Module 4300, and Data Asset and Webform Management Module 4400 may omit certain steps described below. In various other embodiments, the Data Model Generation Module 300, Data Model Population Module 1100, Data Population Questionnaire Generation Module 1200, Intelligent Identity Scanning Module 2600, Data Subject Access Request Fulfillment Module 2900, Cross-Border Visualization Generation Module 3600, Adaptive Execution on a Data Model Module 3900, E-mail Scanning Module 4100, Webform Crawling Module 4300, and Data Asset and Webform Management Module 4400 may perform steps in addition to those described (e.g., such as one or more steps described with respect to one or more other modules, etc.).

In particular embodiments, the steps that the system executes when executing any of the modules described herein may be performed by any suitable computer server or combination of computer servers (e.g., any suitable computing device, server, or combination of computing device and/or server described herein).

Data Model Generation Module

In particular embodiments, a Data Model Generation Module 300 is configured to: (1) generate a data model (e.g., a data inventory) for one or more data assets utilized by a particular organization; (2) generate a respective data inventory for each of the one or more data assets; and (3) map one or more relationships between one or more aspects of the data inventory, the one or more data assets, etc. within the data model. In particular embodiments, a data asset (e.g., data system, software application, etc.) may include, for example, any entity that collects, processes, contains, and/or transfers data (e.g., such as a software application, "internet of things" computerized device, database, website, data-center, server, etc.). For example, a first data asset may include any software or device (e.g., server or servers) utilized by a particular entity for such data collection, processing, transfer, storage, etc.

In particular embodiments, a particular data asset, or collection of data assets, may be utilized as part of a particular data processing activity (e.g., direct deposit generation for payroll purposes). In various embodiments, a data model generation system may, on behalf of a particular organization (e.g., entity), generate a data model that encompasses a plurality of processing activities. In other embodiments, the system may be configured to generate a discrete data model for each of a plurality of processing activities undertaken by an organization.

Turning to Figure 3, in particular embodiments, when executing the Data Model Generation Module 300, the system begins, at Step 310, by generating a data model for one or more data assets and digitally storing the data model in computer memory. The system may, for example, store the data model in the One or More Databases 140 described above (or any other suitable data structure). In various embodiments, generating the data model comprises generating a data structure that comprises information regarding one or more data assets, attributes and other elements that make up the data model. As may be understood in light of this disclosure, the one or more data assets may include any data assets that may be related to one another. In particular embodiments, the one or more data assets may be related by virtue of being associated with a particular entity (e.g., organization). For example, the one or more data assets may include one or more computer servers owned, operated, or utilized by the entity that at least temporarily store data sent, received, or otherwise processed by the particular entity.

In still other embodiments, the one or more data assets may comprise one or more third party assets which may, for example, send, receive and/or process personal data on behalf of the particular entity. These one or more data assets may include, for example, one or more software applications (e.g., such as Expensify to collect expense information, QuickBooks to maintain and store salary information, etc.).

Continuing to step 320, the system is configured to identify a first data asset of the one or more data assets. In particular embodiments, the first data asset may include, for example, any entity (e.g., system) that collects, processes, contains, and/or transfers data (e.g., such as a software application, "internet of things" computerized device, database, website, data-center, server, etc.). For example, the first data asset may include any software or device utilized by a particular organization for such data collection, processing, transfer, etc. In various embodiments, the first data asset may be associated with a particular processing activity (e.g., the first data asset may make up at least a part of a data flow that relates to the collection, storage, transfer, access, use, etc. of a particular piece of data (e.g., personal data)). Information regarding the first data asset may clarify, for example, one or more relationships between and/or among one or more other data assets within a particular organization. In a particular example, the first data asset may include a software application provided by a third party (e.g., a third party vendor) with which the particular entity interfaces for the purpose of collecting, storing, or otherwise processing personal data (e.g., personal data regarding customers, employees, potential customers, etc.).

In particular embodiments, the first data asset is a storage asset that may, for example: (1) receive one or more pieces of personal data form one or more collection assets; (2) transfer one or more pieces of personal data to one or more transfer assets; and/or (3) provide access to one or more pieces of personal data to one or more authorized individuals (e.g., one or more employees, managers, or other authorized individuals within a particular entity or organization). In a particular embodiment, the first data asset is a primary data asset associated with a particular processing activity around which the system is configured to build a data model associated with the particular processing activity.

In particular embodiments, the system is configured to identify the first data asset by scanning a plurality of computer systems associated with a particular entity (e.g., owned, operated, utilized, etc. by the particular entity). In various embodiments, the system is configured to identify the first data asset from a plurality of data assets identified in response to completion, by one or more users, of one or more questionnaires.

Advancing to Step 330, the system generates a first data inventory of the first data asset. The data inventory may comprise, for example, one or more inventory attributes associated with the first data asset such as, for example: (1) one or more processing activities associated with the first data asset; (2) transfer data associated with the first data asset (e.g., how and where the data is being transferred to and/or from); (3) personal data associated with the first data asset (e.g., what type of personal data is collected and/or stored by the first data asset; how, and from where, the data is collected, etc.); (4) storage data associated with the personal data (e.g., whether the data is being stored, protected and deleted); and (5) any other suitable attribute related to the collection, use, and transfer of personal data. In other embodiments, the one or more inventory attributes may comprise one or more other pieces of information such as, for example: (1) the type of data being stored by the first data asset; (2) an amount of data stored by the first data asset; (3) whether the data is encrypted; (4) a location of the stored data (e.g., a physical location of one or more computer servers on which the data is stored); etc. In particular other embodiments, the one or more inventory attributes may comprise one or more pieces of information technology data related to the first data asset (e.g., such as one or more pieces of network and/or infrastructure information, IP address, MAC address, etc.).

In various embodiments, the system may generate the data inventory based at least in part on the type of first data asset. For example, particular types of data assets may have particular default inventory attributes. In such embodiments, the system is configured to generate the data inventory for the first data asset, which may, for example, include one or more placeholder fields to be populated by the system at a later time. In this way, the system may, for example, identify particular inventory attributes for a particular data asset for which information and/or population of data is required as the system builds the data model.

As may be understood in light of this disclosure, the system may, when generating the data inventory for the first data asset, generate one or more placeholder fields that may include, for example: (1) the organization (e.g., entity) that owns and/or uses the first data asset (a primary data asset, which is shown in the center of the data model in Figure 4); (2) one or more departments within the organization that are responsible for the first data asset; (3) one or more software applications that collect data (e.g., personal data) for storage in and/or use by the first data asset (e.g., or one or more other suitable collection assets from which the personal data that is collected, processed, stored, etc. by the first data asset is sourced); (4) one or more particular data subjects (or categories of data subjects) that information is collected from for use by the first data asset; (5) one or more particular types of data that are collected by each of the particular applications for storage in and/or use by the first data asset; (6) one or more individuals (e.g., particular individuals or types of individuals) that are permitted to access and/or use the data stored in, or used by, the first data asset; (7) which particular types of data each of those individuals are allowed to access and use; and (8) one or more data assets (destination assets) that the data is transferred to from the first data asset, and which particular data is transferred to each of those data assets.

As may be understood in light of this disclosure, the system may be configured to generate the one or more placeholder fields based at least in part on, for example: (1) the type of the first data asset; (2) one or more third party vendors utilized by the particular organization; (3) a number of collection or storage assets typically associated with the type of the first data asset; and/or (4) any other suitable factor related to the first data asset, its one or more inventory attributes, etc. In other embodiments, the system may substantially automatically generate the one or more placeholders based at least in part on a hierarchy and/or organization of the entity for which the data model is being built. For example, a particular entity may have a marketing division, legal department, human resources department, engineering division, or other suitable combination of departments that make up an overall organization. Other particular entities may have further subdivisions within the organization. When generating the data inventory for the first data asset, the system may identify that the first data asset will have both an associated organization and subdivision within the organization to which it is assigned. In this example, the system may be configured to store an indication in computer memory that the first data asset is associated with an organization and a department within the organization.

Next, at Step 340, the system modifies the data model to include the first data inventory and electronically links the first data inventory to the first data asset within the data model. In various embodiments, modifying the data model may include configuring the data model to store the data inventory in computer memory, and to digitally associate the data inventory with the first data asset in memory.

Figures 4 and 5 show a data model according to a particular embodiment. As shown in these figures, the data model may store the following information for the first data asset: (1) the organization that owns and/or uses the first data asset; (2) one or more departments within the organization that are responsible for the first data asset; (3) one or more applications that collect data (e.g., personal data) for storage in and/or use by the first data asset; (4) one or more particular data subjects that information is collected from for use by the first data asset; (5) one or more collection assets from which the first asset receives data (e.g., personal data); (6) one or more particular types of data that are collected by each of the particular applications (e.g., collection assets) for storage in and/or use by the first data asset; (7) one or more individuals (e.g., particular individuals, types of individuals, or other parties) that are permitted to access and/or use the data stored in or used by the first data asset; (8) which particular types of data each of those individuals are allowed to access and use; and (9) one or more data assets (destination assets) the data is transferred to for other use, and which particular data is transferred to each of those data assets. As shown in Figures 6 and 7, the system may also optionally store information regarding, for example, which business processes and processing activities utilize the first data asset.

As noted above, in particular embodiments, the data model stores this information for each of a plurality of different data assets and may include one or more links between, for example, a portion of the model that provides information for a first particular data asset and a second portion of the model that provides information for a second particular data asset.

Advancing to Step 350, the system next identifies a second data asset from the one or more data assets. In various embodiments, the second data asset may include one of the one or more inventory attributes associated with the first data asset (e.g., the second data asset may include a collection asset associated with the first data asset, a destination asset or transfer asset associated with the first data asset, etc.). In various embodiments, as may be understood in light of the exemplary data models described below, a second data asset may be a primary data asset for a second processing activity, while the first data asset is the primary data asset for a first processing activity. In such embodiments, the second data asset may be a destination asset for the first data asset as part of the first processing activity. The second data asset may then be associated with one or more second destination assets to which the second data asset transfers data. In this way, particular data assets that make up the data model may define one or more connections that the data model is configured to map and store in memory.

Returning to Step 360, the system is configured to identify one or more attributes associated with the second data asset, modify the data model to include the one or more attributes, and map the one or more attributes of the second data asset within the data model. The system may, for example, generate a second data inventory for the second data asset that comprises any suitable attribute described with respect to the first data asset above. The system may then modify the data model to include the one or more attributes and store the modified data model in memory. The system may further, in various embodiments, associate the first and second data assets in memory as part of the data model. In such embodiments, the system may be configured to electronically link the first data asset with the second data asset. In various embodiments, such association may indicate a relationship between the first and second data assets in the context of the overall data model (e.g., because the first data asset may serve as a collection asset for the second data asset, etc.).

Next, at Step 370, the system may be further configured to generate a visual representation of the data model. In particular embodiments, the visual representation of the data model comprises a data map. The visual representation may, for example, include the one or more data assets, one or more connections between the one or more data assets, the one or more inventory attributes, etc.

In particular embodiments, generating the visual representation (e.g., visual data map) of a particular data model (e.g., data inventory) may include, for example, generating a visual representation that includes: (1) a visual indication of a first data asset (e.g., a storage asset), a second data asset (e.g., a collection asset), and a third data asset (e.g., a transfer asset); (2) a visual indication of a flow of data (e.g., personal data) from the second data asset to the first data asset (e.g., from the collection asset to the storage asset); (3) a visual indication of a flow of data (e.g., personal data) from the first data asset to the third data asset (e.g., from the storage asset to the transfer asset); (4) one or more visual indications of a risk level associated with the transfer of personal data; and/or (5) any other suitable information related to the one or more data assets, the transfer of data between/among the one or more data assets, access to data stored or collected by the one or more data assets, etc.

In particular embodiments, the visual indication of a particular asset may comprise a box, symbol, shape, or other suitable visual indicator. In particular embodiments, the visual indication may comprise one or more labels (e.g., a name of each particular data asset, a type of the asset, etc.). In still other embodiments, the visual indication of a flow of data may comprise one or more arrows. In particular embodiments, the visual representation of the data model may comprise a data flow, flowchart, or other suitable visual representation.

In various embodiments, the system is configured to display (e.g., to a user) the generated visual representation of the data model on a suitable display device.

Exemplary Data Models and Visual Representations of Data Models (e.g., Data Maps)

Figures 4-10 depict exemplary data models according to various embodiments of the system described herein. Figure 4, for example, depicts an exemplary data model that does not include a particular processing activity (e.g., that is not associated with a particular processing activity). As may be understood from the data model shown in this figure, a particular data asset (e.g., a primary data asset) may be associated with a particular company (e.g., organization), or organization within a particular company, sub-organization of a particular organization, etc. In still other embodiments, the particular asset may be associated with one or more collection assets (e.g., one or more data subjects from whom personal data is collected for storage by the particular asset), one or more parties that have access to data stored by the particular asset, one or more transfer assets (e.g., one or more assets to which data stored by the particular asset may be transferred), etc.

As may be understood from Figure 4, a particular data model for a particular asset may include a plurality of data elements. When generating the data model for the particular asset, a system may be configured to substantially automatically identify one or more types of data elements for inclusion in the data model, and automatically generate a data model that includes those identified data elements (e.g., even if one or more of those data elements must remain unpopulated because the system may not initially have access to a value for the particular data element). In such cases, the system may be configured to store a placeholder for a particular data element until the system is able to populate the particular data element with accurate data.

As may be further understood from Figure 4, the data model shown in Figure 4 may represent a portion of an overall data model. For example, in the embodiment shown in this figure, the transfer asset depicted may serve as a storage asset for another portion of the data model. In such embodiments, the transfer asset may be associated with a respective one or more of the types of data elements described above. In this way, the system may generate a data model that may build upon itself to comprise a plurality of layers as the system adds one or more new data assets, attributes, etc.

As may be further understood from Figure 4, a particular data model may indicate one or more parties that have access to and/or use of the primary asset (e.g., storage asset). In such embodiments, the system may be configured to enable the one or more parties to access one or more pieces of data (e.g., personal data) stored by the storage asset.

As shown in Figure 4, the data model may further comprise one or more collection assets (e.g., one or more data assets or individuals from which the storage asset receives data such as personal data). In the exemplary data model (e.g., visual data map) shown in this figure, the collection assets comprise a data subject (e.g., an individual that may provide data to the system for storage in the storage asset) and a collection asset (e.g., which may transfer one or more pieces of data that the collection asset has collected to the storage asset).

Figure 5 depicts a portion of an exemplary data model that is populated for the primary data asset Gusto. Gusto is a software application that, in the example shown in Figure 5, may serve as a human resources service that contains financial, expense, review, time and attendance, background, and salary information for one or more employees of a particular organization (e.g., GeneriTech). In the example of Figure 5, the primary asset (e.g., Gusto) may be utilized by the HR (e.g., Human Resources) department of the particular organization (e.g., GeneriTech). Furthermore, the primary asset, Gusto, may collect financial information from one or more data subjects (e.g., employees of the particular organization), receive expense information transferred from Expensify (e.g., expensing software), and receive time and attendance data transferred from Kronos (e.g., timekeeping software). In the example shown in Figure 5, access to the information collected and/or stored by Gusto may include, for example: (1) an ability to view and administer salary and background information by HR employees, and (2) an ability to view and administer employee review information by one or more service managers. In the example shown in this figure, personal and other data collected and stored by Gusto (e.g., salary information, etc.) may be transferred to a company banking system, to QuickBooks, and/or to an HR file cabinet.

As may be understood from the example shown in Figure 5, the system may be configured to generate a data model based around Gusto that illustrates a flow of personal data utilized by Gusto. The data model in this example illustrates, for example, a source of personal data collected, stored and/or processed by Gusto, a destination of such data, an indication of who has access to such data within Gusto, and an organization and department responsible for the information collected by Gusto. In particular embodiments, the data model and accompanying visual representation (e.g., data map) generated by the system as described in any embodiment herein may be utilized in the context of compliance with one or more record keeping requirements related to the collection, storage, and processing of personal data.

Figures 6 and 7 depict an exemplary data model and related example that is similar, in some respects, to the data model and example of Figures 4 and 5. In the example shown in Figures 6 and 7, the exemplary data model and related example include a specific business process and processing activity that is associated with the primary asset (Gusto). In this example, the business process is compensation and the specific processing activity is direct deposit generation in Gusto. As may be understood from this figure, the collection and transfer of data related to the storage asset of Gusto is based on a need to generate direct deposits through Gusto in order to compensate employees. Gusto generates the information needed to conduct a direct deposit (e.g., financial and salary information) and then transmits this information to: (1) a company bank system for execution of the direct deposit; (2) Quickbooks for use in documenting the direct deposit payment; and (3) HR File cabinet for use in documenting the salary info and other financial information.

As may be understood in light of this disclosure, when generating such a data model, particular pieces of data (e.g., data attributes, data elements) may not be readily available to the system. In such embodiment, the system is configured to identify a particular type of data, create a placeholder for such data in memory, and seek out (e.g., scan for and populate) an appropriate piece of data to further populate the data model. For example, in particular embodiments, the system may identify Gusto as a primary asset and recognize that Gusto stores expense information. The system may then be configured to identify a source of the expense information (e.g., Expensify).

Figure 8 depicts an exemplary screen display 800 that illustrates a visual representation (e.g., visual data map) of a data model (e.g., a data inventory). In the example shown in Figure 8, the data map provides a visual indication of a flow of data collected from particular data subjects (e.g., employees 801). As may be understood from this figure, the data map illustrates that three separate data assets receive data (e.g., which may include personal data) directly from the employees 801. In this example, these three data assets include Kronos 803 (e.g., a human resources software application), Workday 805 (e.g., a human resources software application), and ADP 807 (e.g., a human resources software application and payment processor). As shown in Figure 8, the transfer of data from the employees 801 to these assets is indicated by respective arrows.

As further illustrated in Figure 8, the data map indicates a transfer of data from Workday 805 to ADP 807 as well as to a Recovery Datacenter 809 and a London HR File Center 811. As may be understood in light of this disclosure, the Recovery Datacenter 809 and London HR File Center 811 may comprise additional data assets in the context of the data model illustrated by the data map shown in Figure 8. The Recover Datacenter 809 may include, for example, one or more computer servers (e.g., backup servers). The London HR File Center 811 may include, for example, one or more databases (e.g., such as the One or More Databases 140 shown in Figure 1). AS shown in Figure 8, each particular data asset depicted in the data map may be shown along with a visual indication of the type of data asset. For example, Kronos 803, Workday 805, and ADP 807 are depicted adjacent a first icon type (e.g., a computer monitor), while Recover Datacenter 809 and London HR File Center 811 are depicted adjacent a second and third icon type respectively (e.g., a server cluster and a file folder). In this way, the system may be configured to visually indicate, via the data model, particular information related to the data model in a relatively minimal manner.

Figure 9 depicts an exemplary screen display 900 that illustrates a data map of a plurality of assets 905 in tabular form (e.g., table form). As may be understood from this figure, a table that includes one or more inventory attributes of each particular asset 905 in the table may indicate, for example: (1) a managing organization 910 of each respective asset 905; (2) a hosting location 915 of each respective asset 905 (e.g., a physical storage location of each asset 905); (3) a type 920 of each respective asset 905, if known (e.g., a database, software application, server, etc.); (4) a processing activity 925 associated with each respective asset 905; and/or (5) a status 930 of each particular data asset 905. In various embodiments, the status 930 of each particular asset 905 may indicate a status of the asset 905 in the discovery process. This may include, for example: (1) a "new" status for a particular asset that has recently been discovered as an asset that processes, stores, or collects personal data on behalf of an organization (e.g., discovered via one or more suitable techniques described herein); (2) an "in discovery" status for a particular asset for which the system is populating or seeking to populate one or more inventory attributes, etc.

Figure 10 depicts an exemplary data map 1000 that includes an asset map of a plurality of data assets 1005A-F, which may, for example, be utilized by a particular entity in the collection, storage, and/or processing of personal data. As may be understood in light of this disclosure, the plurality of data assets 1005A-F may have been discovered using any suitable technique described herein (e.g., one or more intelligent identity scanning techniques, one or more questionnaires, one or more application programming interfaces, etc.). In various embodiments, a data inventory for each of the plurality of data assets 1005A-F may define, for each of the plurality of data assets 1005A-F a respective inventory attribute related to a storage location of the data asset.

As may be understood from this figure, the system may be configured to generate a map that indicates a location of the plurality of data assets 1005A-F for a particular entity. In the embodiment shown in this figure, locations that contain a data asset are indicated by circular indicia that contain the number of assets present at that location. In the embodiment shown in this figure, the locations are broken down by country. In particular embodiments, the asset map may distinguish between internal assets (e.g., first party servers, etc.) and external/third party assets (e.g., third party owned servers or software applications that the entity utilizes for data storage, transfer, etc.).

In some embodiments, the system is configured to indicate, via the visual representation, whether one or more assets have an unknown location (e.g., because the data model described above may be incomplete with regard to the location). In such embodiments, the system may be configured to: (1) identify the asset with the unknown location; (2) use one or more data modeling techniques described herein to determine the location (e.g., such as pinging the asset, generating one or more questionnaires for completion by a suitable individual, etc.); and (3) update a data model associated with the asset to include the location.

Data Model Population Module

In particular embodiments, a Data Model Population Module 1100 is configured to: (1) determine one or more unpopulated inventory attributes in a data model; (2) determine one or more attribute values for the one or more unpopulated inventory attributes; and (3) modify the data model to include the one or more attribute values.

Turning to Figure 11, in particular embodiments, when executing the Data Model Population Module 1100, the system begins, at Step 1110, by analyzing one or more data inventories for each of the one or more data assets in the data model. The system may, for example, identify one or more particular data elements (e.g., inventory attributes) that make up the one or more data inventories. The system may, in various embodiments, scan one or more data structures associated with the data model to identify the one or more data inventories. In various embodiments, the system is configured to build an inventory of existing (e.g., known) data assets and identify inventory attributes for each of the known data assets.

Continuing to Step 1120, the system is configured to determine, for each of the one or more data inventories, one or more populated inventory attributes and one or more unpopulated inventory attributes (e.g., and/or one or more unpopulated data assets within the data model). As a particular example related to an unpopulated data asset, when generating and populating a data model, the system may determine that, for a particular asset, there is a destination asset. In various embodiments, the destination asset may be known (e.g., and already stored by the system as part of the data model). In other embodiments, the destination asset may be unknown (e.g., a data element that comprises the destination asset may comprise a placeholder or other indication in memory for the system to populate the unpopulated inventory attribute (e.g., data element).

As another particular example, a particular storage asset may be associated with a plurality of inventory assets (e.g., stored in a data inventory associated with the storage asset). In this example, the plurality of inventory assets may include an unpopulated inventory attribute related to a type of personal data stored in the storage asset. The system may, for example, determine that the type of personal data is an unpopulated inventory asset for the particular storage asset.

Returning to Step 1130, the system is configured to determine, for each of the one or more unpopulated inventory attributes, one or more attribute values. In particular embodiments, the system may determine the one or more attribute values using any suitable technique (e.g., any suitable technique for populating the data model). In particular embodiments, the one or more techniques for populating the data model may include, for example: (1) obtaining data for the data model by using one or more questionnaires associated with a particular privacy campaign, processing activity, etc.; (2) using one or more intelligent identity scanning techniques discussed herein to identify personal data stored by the system and then map such data to a suitable data model; (3) using one or more application programming interfaces (API) to obtain data for the data model from another software application; and/or (4) using any other suitable technique. Exemplary techniques for determining the one or more attribute values are described more fully below. In other embodiments, the system may be configured to use such techniques or other suitable techniques to populate one or more unpopulated data assets within the data model.

Next, at Step 1140, the system modifies the data model to include the one or more attribute values for each of the one or more unpopulated inventory attributes. The system may, for example, store the one or more attributes values in computer memory, associate the one or more attribute values with the one or more unpopulated inventory attributes, etc. In still other embodiments, the system may modify the data model to include the one or more data assets identified as filling one or more vacancies left within the data model by the unpopulated one or more data assets.

Continuing to Step 1150, the system is configured to store the modified data model in memory. In various embodiments, the system is configured to store the modified data model in the One or More Databases 140, or in any other suitable location. In particular embodiments, the system is configured to store the data model for later use by the system in the processing of one or more data subject access requests. In other embodiments, the system is configured to store the data model for use in one or more privacy impact assessments performed by the system.

Data Model Population Questionnaire Generation Module

In particular embodiments, a Data Population Questionnaire Generation Module 1200 is configured to generate a questionnaire (e.g., one or more questionnaires) comprising one or more questions associated with one or more particular unpopulated data attributes, and populate the unpopulated data attributes based at least in part on one or more responses to the questionnaire. In other embodiments, the system may be configured to populate the unpopulated data attributes based on one or more responses to existing questionnaires.

In various embodiments, the one or more questionnaires may comprise one or more processing activity questionnaires (e.g., privacy impact assessments, data privacy impact assessments, etc.) configured to elicit one or more pieces of data related to one or more undertakings by an organization related to the collection, storage, and/or processing of personal data (e.g., processing activities). In particular embodiments, the system is configured to generate the questionnaire (e.g., a questionnaire template) based at least in part on one or more processing activity attributes, data asset attributes (e.g., inventory attributes), or other suitable attributes discussed herein.

Turning to Figure 12, in particular embodiments, when executing the Data Population

Questionnaire Generation Module 1200, the system begins, at Step 1210, by identifying one or more unpopulated data attributes from a data model. The system may, for example, identify the one or more unpopulated data attributes using any suitable technique described above. In particular embodiments, the one or more unpopulated data attributes may relate to, for example, one or more processing activity or asset attributes such as: (1) one or more processing activities associated with a particular data asset; (2) transfer data associated with the particular data asset (e.g., how and where the data stored and/or collected by the particular data asset is being transferred to and/or from); (3) personal data associated with the particular data assets asset (e.g., what type of personal data is collected and/or stored by the particular data asset; how, and from where, the data is collected, etc.); (4) storage data associated with the personal data (e.g., whether the data is being stored, protected and deleted); and (5) any other suitable attribute related to the collection, use, and transfer of personal data by one or more data assets or via one or more processing activities. In other embodiments, the one or more unpopulated inventory attributes may comprise one or more other pieces of information such as, for example: (1) the type of data being stored by the particular data asset; (2) an amount of data stored by the particular data asset; (3) whether the data is encrypted by the particular data asset; (4) a location of the stored data (e.g., a physical location of one or more computer servers on which the data is stored by the particular data asset); etc.

Continuing to Step 1220, the system generates a questionnaire (e.g., a questionnaire template) comprising one or more questions associated with one or more particular unpopulated data attributes. As may be understood in light of the above, the one or more particulate unpopulated data attributes may relate to, for example, a particular processing activity or a particular data asset (e.g., a particular data asset utilized as part of a particular processing activity). In various embodiments, the one or more questionnaires comprise one or more questions associated with the unpopulated data attribute. For example, if the data model includes an unpopulated data attribute related to a location of a server on which a particular asset stores personal data, the system may generate a questionnaire associated with a processing activity that utilizes the asset (e.g., or a questionnaire associated with the asset). The system may generate the questionnaire to include one or more questions regarding the location of the server.

Returning to Step 1230, the system maps one or more responses to the one or more questions to the associated one or more particular unpopulated data attributes. The system may, for example, when generating the questionnaire, associate a particular question with a particular unpopulated data attribute in computer memory. In various embodiments, the questionnaire may comprise a plurality of question/answer pairings, where the answer in the question/answer pairings maps to a particular inventory attribute for a particular data asset or processing activity.

In this way, the system may, upon receiving a response to the particular question, substantially automatically populate the particular unpopulated data attribute. Accordingly, at Step 1240, the system modifies the data model to populate the one or more responses as one or more data elements for the one or more particular unpopulated data attributes. In particular embodiments, the system is configured to modify the data model such that the one or more responses are stored in association with the particular data element (e.g., unpopulated data attribute) to which the system mapped it at Step 1230. In various embodiments, the system is configured to store the modified data model in the One or More Databases 140, or in any other suitable location. In particular embodiments, the system is configured to store the data model for later use by the system in the processing of one or more data subject access requests. In other embodiments, the system is configured to store the data model for use in one or more privacy impact assessments performed by the system.

Continuing to optional Step 1250, the system may be configured to modify the questionnaire based at least in part on the one or more responses. The system may, for example, substantially dynamically add and/or remove one or more questions to/from the questionnaire based at least in part on the one or more responses (e.g., one or more response received by a user completing the questionnaire). For example, the system may, in response to the user providing a particular inventory attribute or new asset, generates additional questions that relate to that particular inventory attribute or asset. The system may, as the system adds additional questions, substantially automatically map one or more responses to one or more other inventory attributes or assets. For example, in response to the user indicating that personal data for a particular asset is stored in a particular location, the system may substantially automatically generate one or more additional questions related to, for example, an encryption level of the storage, who has access to the storage location, etc.

In still other embodiments, the system may modify the data model to include one or more additional assets, data attributes, inventory attributes, etc. in response to one or more questionnaire responses. For example, the system may modify a data inventory for a particular asset to include a storage encryption data element (which specifies whether the particular asset stores particular data in an encrypted format) in response to receiving such data from a questionnaire. Modification of a questionnaire is discussed more fully below with respect to Figure 13.

Data Model Population via Questionnaire Process Flow

Figure 13 depicts an exemplary process flow 1300 for populating a data model (e.g., modifying a data model to include a newly discovered data asset, populating one or more inventory attributes for a particular processing activity or data asset, etc.). In particular, Figure 13 depicts one or more exemplary data relationships between one or more particular data attributes (e.g., processing activity attributes and/or asset attributes), a questionnaire template (e.g., a processing activity template and/or a data asset template), a completed questionnaire (e.g., a processing activity assessment and/or a data asset assessment), and a data inventory (e.g., a processing activity inventory and/or an asset inventory). As may be understood from this figure the system is configured to: (1) identify new data assets; (2) generate an asset inventory for identified new data assets; and (3) populate the generated asset inventories. Systems and methods for populating the generated inventories are described more fully below.

As may be understood from Figure 13, a system may be configured to map particular processing activity attributes 1320A to each of: (1) a processing activity template 1330A; and (2) a processing activity data inventory 1310A. As may be understood in light of this disclosure, the processing activity template 1330A may comprise a plurality of questions (e.g., as part of a questionnaire), which may, for example, be configured to elicit discovery of one or more new data assets. The plurality of questions may each correspond to one or more fields in the processing activity inventory 1310A, which may, for example, define one or more inventory attributes of the processing activity.

In particular embodiments, the system is configured to provide a processing activity assessment 1340A to one or more individuals for completion. As may be understood from Figure 13, the system is configured to launch the processing activity assessment 1340A from the processing activity inventory 1310A and further configured to create the processing activity assessment 1340A from the processing activity template 1330. The processing activity assessment 1340A may comprise, for example, one or more questions related to the processing activity. The system may, in various embodiments, be configured to map one or more responses provided in the processing activity assessment 1340A to one or more corresponding fields in the processing activity inventory 1310A. The system may then be configured to modify the processing activity inventory 1310A to include the one or more responses, and store the modified inventory in computer memory. In various embodiments, the system may be configured to approve a processing activity assessment 1340A (e.g., receive approval of the assessment) prior to feeding the processing activity inventory attribute values into one or more fields and/or cells of the inventory.

As may be further understood from Figure 13, in response to creating a new asset record (e.g., which the system may create, for example, in response to a new asset discovery via the processing activity assessment 1340A described immediately above, or in any other suitable manner), the system may generate an asset inventory 1310B (e.g., a data asset inventory) that defines a plurality of inventory attributes for the new asset (e.g., new data asset).

As may be understood from Figure 13, a system may be configured to map particular asset attributes 1320B to each of: (1) an asset template 1330BA; and (2) an asset inventory 1310A. As may be understood in light of this disclosure, the asset template 1330B may comprise a plurality of questions (e.g., as part of a questionnaire), which may, for example, be configured to elicit discovery of one or more processing activities associated with the asset and/or one or more inventory attributes of the asset. The plurality of questions may each correspond to one or more fields in the asset inventory 1310B, which may, for example, define one or more inventory attributes of the asset.

In particular embodiments, the system is configured to provide an asset assessment 1340B to one or more individuals for completion. As may be understood from Figure 13, the system is configured to launch the asset assessment 1340B from the asset inventory 1310B and further configured to create the asset assessment 1340B from the asset template 1330B. The asset assessment 1340B may comprise, for example, one or more questions related to the data asset. The system may, in various embodiments, be configured to map one or more responses provided in the asset assessment 1340B to one or more corresponding fields in the asset inventory 1310B. The system may then be configured to modify the asset inventory 1310B (e.g., and/or a related processing activity inventory 1310A) to include the one or more responses, and store the modified inventory in computer memory. In various embodiments, the system may be configured to approve an asset assessment 1340B (e.g., receive approval of the assessment) prior to feeding the asset inventory attribute values into one or more fields and/or cells of the inventory.

Figure 13 further includes a detail view 1350 of a relationship between particular data attributes 1320C with an exemplary data inventory 13 IOC and a questionnaire template 1330C. As may be understood from this detail view 1350, a particular attribute name may map to a particular question title in a template 1330C as well as to a field name in an exemplary data inventory 13 IOC. In this way, the system may be configured to populate (e.g., automatically populate) a field name for a particular inventory 13 IOC in response to a user providing a question title as part of a questionnaire template 1330C. Similarly, a particular attribute description may map to a particular question description in a template 1330C as well as to a tooltip on a fieldname in an exemplary data inventory 13 IOC. In this way, the system may be configured to provide the tooltip for a particular inventory 13 IOC that includes the question description provided by a user as part of a questionnaire template 1330C.

As may be further understood from the detail view 1350 of Figure 13, a particular response type may map to a particular question type in a template 1330C as well as to a field type in an exemplary data inventory 13 IOC. A particular question type may include, for example, a multiple choice question (e.g., A, B, C, etc.), a freeform response, an integer value, a drop down selection, etc. A particular field type may include, for example, a memo field type, a numeric field type, an integer field type, a logical field type, or any other suitable field type. A particular data attribute may require a response type of, for example: (1) a name of an organization responsible for a data asset (e.g., a free form response); (2) a number of days that data is stored by the data asset (e.g., an integer value); and/or (3) any other suitable response type- In still other embodiments, the system may be configured to map a one or more attribute values to one or more answer choices in a template 1330C as well as to one or more lists and/or responses in a data inventory 13 IOC. The system may then be configured to populate a field in the data inventory 13 IOC with the one or more answer choices provided in a response to a question template 1330C with one or more attribute values.

Exemplary Questionnaire Generation and Completion User Experience

Figures 14-25 depict exemplary screen displays that a user may encounter when generating a questionnaire (e.g., one or more questionnaires and/or templates) for populating one or more data elements (e.g., inventory attributes) of a data model for a data asset and/or processing activity. Figure 14, for example, depicts an exemplary asset based questionnaire template builder 1400. As may be understood from Figure 14, the template builder may enable a user to generate an asset based questionnaire template that includes one or more sections 1420 related to the asset (e.g., asset information, security, disposal, processing activities, etc.). As may be understood in light of this disclosure, the system may be configured to substantially automatically generate an asset based questionnaire template based at least in part on the one or more unpopulated inventory attributes discussed above. The system may, for example, be configured to generate a template that is configured to populate the one or more unpopulated attributes (e.g., by eliciting responses, via a questionnaire to one or more questions that are mapped to the attributes within the data inventory).

In various embodiments, the system is configured to enable a user to modify a default template (e.g., or a system-created template) by, for example, adding additional sections, adding one or more additional questions to a particular section, etc. In various embodiments, the system may provide one or more tools for modifying the template. For example, in the embodiment shown in Figure 14, the system may provide a user with a draft and drop question template 1410, from which the user may select a question type (e.g., textbox, multiple choice, etc.).

A template for an asset may include, for example: (1) one or more questions requesting general information about the asset; (2) one or more security-related questions about the asset; (3) one or more questions regarding how the data asset disposes of data that it uses; and/or (4) one or more questions regarding processing activities that involve the data asset. In various embodiments, each of these one or more sections may comprise one or more specific questions that may map to particular portions of a data model (e.g., a data map).

Figure 15 depicts an exemplary screen display of a processing activity questionnaire template builder 1500. The screen display shown in Figure 15 is similar to the template builder shown in Figure 14 with respect to the data asset based template builder. As may be understood from Figure 15, the template builder may enable a user to generate a processing activity based questionnaire template that includes one or more sections 1520 related to the processing activity (e.g., business process information, personal data, source, storage, destinations, access and use, etc.). As may be understood in light of this disclosure, the system may be configured to substantially automatically generate a processing activity based questionnaire template based at least in part on the one or more unpopulated inventory attributes related to the processing activity (e.g., as discussed above). The system may, for example, be configured to generate a template that is configured to populate the one or more unpopulated attributes (e.g., by eliciting responses, via a questionnaire to one or more questions that are mapped to the attributes within the data inventory).

In various embodiments, the system is configured to enable a user to modify a default template (e.g., or a system-created template) by, for example, adding additional sections, adding one or more additional questions to a particular section, etc. In various embodiments, the system may provide one or more tools for modifying the template. For example, in the embodiment shown in Figure 15, the system may provide a user with a draft and drop question template 1510, from which the user may select a question type (e.g., textbox, multiple choice, asset attributes, data subjects, etc.). The system may be further configured to enable a user to publish a completed template (e.g., for use in a particular assessment). In other embodiments, the system may be configured to substantially automatically publish the template.

In various embodiments, a template for a processing activity may include, for example:

(1) one or more questions related to the type of business process that involves a particular data asset; (2) one or more questions regarding what type of personal data is acquired from data subjects for use by a particular data asset; (3) one or more questions related to a source of the acquired personal data; (4) one or more questions related to how and/or where the personal data will be stored and/or for how long; (5) one or more questions related to one or more other data assets that the personal data will be transferred to; and/or (6) one or more questions related to who will have the ability to access and/or use the personal data.

Continuing to Figure 16, an exemplary screen display 1600 depicts a listing of assets 1610 for a particular entity. These may, for example, have been identified as part of the data model generation system described above. As may be understood from this figure, a user may select a drop down indicator 1615 to view more information about a particular asset. In the exemplary embodiment shown in Figure 16, the system stores the managing organization group for the "New Asset", but is missing some additional information (e.g., such as a description 1625 of the asset). In order to fill out the missing inventory attributes for the "New Asset", the system, in particular embodiments, is configured to enable a user to select a Send Assessment indicia 1620 in order to transmit an assessment related to the selected asset to an individual tasked with providing one or more pieces of information related to the asset (e.g., a manager, or other individual with knowledge of the one or more inventory attributes).

In response to the user selecting the Send Assessment indicia 1620, the system may create the assessment based at least in part on a template associated with the asset, and transmit the assessment to a suitable individual for completion (e.g., and/or transmit a request to the individual to complete the assessment).

Figure 17 depicts an exemplary assessment transmission interface 1700 via which a user can transmit one or more assessments for completion. As shown in this figure, the user may assign a respondent, provide a deadline, indicate a reminder time, and provide one or more comments using an assessment request interface 1710. The user may then select a Send Assessment s) indicia 1720 in order to transmit the assessment.

Figure 18 depicts an exemplary assessment 1800 which a user may encounter in response to receiving a request to complete the assessment as described above with respect to Figures 16 and 17. As shown in Figure 18, the assessment 1800 may include one or more questions that map to the one or more unpopulated attributes for the asset shown in Figure 16. For example, the one or more questions may include a question related to a description of the asset, which may include a free form text box 1820 for providing a description of the asset. Figure 19 depicts an exemplary screen display 1900 with the text box 1920 completed, where the description includes a value of "Value_l". As shown in Figures 18 and 19, the user may have renamed "New Asset" (e.g., which may have included a default or placeholder name) shown in Figures 16 and 17 to "7th Asset." Continuing to Figure 20, the exemplary screen display 2000 depicts the listing of assets 2010 from Figure 16 with some additional attributes populated. For example, the Description 2025 (e.g., "Value_l") provided in Figure 19 has been added to the inventory. As may be understood in light of this disclosure, in response to a user providing the description via the assessment shown in Figures 18 and 19, the system may be configured to map the provided description to the attribute value associated with the description of the asset in the data inventory. The system may have then modified the data inventory for the asset to include the description attribute. In various embodiments, the system is configured to store the modified data inventory as part of a data model (e.g., in computer memory).

Figures 21-24 depict exemplary screen displays showing exemplary questions that make up part of a processing activity questionnaire (e.g., assessment). Figure 21 depicts an exemplary interface 2100 for responding to a first question 2110 and a second question 2120. As shown in Figure 21, the first question 2110 relates to whether the processing activity is a new or existing processing activity. The first question 2110 shown in Figure 21 is a multiple choice question. The second question 2120 relates to whether the organization is conducting the activity on behalf of another organization. As shown in this figure, the second question 2120 includes both a multiple choice portion and a free-form response portion.

As discussed above, in various embodiments, the system may be configured to modify a questionnaire in response to (e.g., based on) one or more responses provided by a user completing the questionnaire. In particular embodiments, the system is configured to modify the questionnaire substantially on-the-fly (e.g., as the user provides each particular answer). Figure 22 depicts an interface 2200 that includes a second question 2220 that differs from the second question 2120 shown in Figure 21. As may be understood in light of this disclosure, in response to the user providing a response to the first question 2110 in Figure 21 that indicates that the processing activity is a new processing activity, the system may substantially automatically modify the second question 2120 from Figure 21 to the second question 2220 from Figure 22 (e.g., such that the second question 2220 includes one or more follow up questions or requests for additional information based on the response to the first question 2110 in Figure 21).

As shown in Figure 22, the second question 2220 requests a description of the activity that is being pursued. In various embodiments (e.g., such as if the user had selected that the processing activity was an existing one), the system may not modify the questionnaire to include the second question 2220 from Figure 22, because the system may already store information related to a description of the processing activity at issue. In various embodiments, any suitable question described herein may include a tooltip 2225 on a field name (e.g., which may provide one or more additional pieces of information to guide a user's response to the questionnaire and/or assessment).

Figures 23 and 24 depict additional exemplary assessment questions. The questions shown in these figures relate to, for example, particular data elements processed by various aspects of a processing activity.

Figure 25 depicts a dashboard 2500 that includes an accounting of one or more assessments that have been completed, are in progress, or require completion by a particular organization. The dashboard 2500 shown in this figure is configured to provide information relate to the status of one or more outstanding assessments. As may be understood in light of this disclosure, because of the volume of assessment requests, it may be necessary to utilize one or more third party organizations to facilitate a timely completion of one or more assessment requests. In various embodiments, the dashboard may indicate that, based on a fact that a number of assessments are still in progress or incomplete, that a particular data model for an entity, data asset, processing activity, etc. remains incomplete. In such embodiments, an incomplete nature of a data model may raise one or more flags or indicate a risk that an entity may not be in compliance with one or more legal or industry requirements related to the collection, storage, and/or processing of personal data.

Intelligent Identity Scanning Module

Turning to Figure 26, in particular embodiments, the Intelligent Identity Scanning Module 2600 is configured to scan one or more data sources to identify personal data stored on one or more network devices for a particular organization, analyze the identified personal data, and classify the personal data (e.g., in a data model) based at least in part on a confidence score derived using one or more machine learning techniques. The confidence score may be and/or comprise, for example, an indication of the probability that the personal data is actually associated with a particular data subject (e.g., that there is at least an 80% confidence level that a particular phone number is associated with a particular individual.)

When executing the Intelligent Identity Scanning Module 2600, the system begins, at

Step 2610, by connecting to one or more databases or other data structures, and scanning the one or more databases to generate a catalog of one or more individuals and one or more pieces of personal information associated with the one or more individuals. The system may, for example, be configured to connect to one or more databases associated with a particular organization (e.g., one or more databases that may serve as a storage location for any personal or other data collected, processed, etc. by the particular organization, for example, as part of a suitable processing activity. As may be understood in light of this disclosure, a particular organization may use a plurality of one or more databases (e.g., the One or More Databases 140 shown in Figure 1), a plurality of servers (e.g., the One or More Third Party Servers 160 shown in Figure 1), or any other suitable data storage location in order to store personal data and other data collected as part of any suitable privacy campaign, privacy impact assessment, processing activity, etc.

In particular embodiments, the system is configured to scan the one or more databases by searching for particular data fields comprising one or more pieces of information that may include personal data. The system may, for example, be configured to scan and identify one of more pieces of personal data such as: (1) name; (2) address; (3) telephone number; (4) e-mail address; (5) social security number; (6) information associated with one or more credit accounts (e.g., credit card numbers); (7) banking information; (8) location data; (9) internet search history; (10) non-credit account data; and/or (11) any other suitable personal information discussed herein. In particular embodiments, the system is configured to scan for a particular type of personal data (e.g., or one or more particular types of personal data).

The system may, in various embodiments, be further configured to generate a catalog of one or more individuals that also includes one or more pieces of personal information (e.g., personal data) identified for the individuals during the scan. The system may, for example, in response to discovering one or more pieces of personal data in a particular storage location, identify one or more associations between the discovered pieces of personal data. For example, a particular database may store a plurality of individuals' names in association with their respective telephone numbers. One or more other databases may include any other suitable information.

The system may, for example, generate the catalog to include any information associated with the one or more individuals identified in the scan. The system may, for example, maintain the catalog in any suitable format (e.g., a data table, etc.). In still other embodiments, in addition to connecting to a database, the system may be configured to: (1) access an application through one or more application programming interfaces (APIs); (2) use one or more screen scraping techniques on an end user page to identify and analyze each field on the page; and/or (3) connect to any other suitable data structure in order to generate the catalog of individuals and personal information associated with each of the individuals. In some embodiments, the system may be configured to analyze one or more access logs and applications set up through a system active directory or SSO portal for which one or more applications might contain certain data for user groups. The system may then be configured to analyze an email environment to identify one or more links to particular business applications, which may, for example, be in use by an entity and contain certain data. In still other embodiments, the system may be configured to analyze one or more system log files (Syslog) from a security environment to capture which particular applications an entity may be using in order to discover such applications.

Continuing to Step 2620, the system is configured to scan one or more structured and/or unstructured data repositories based at least in part on the generated catalog to identify one or more attributes of data associated with the one or more individuals. The system may, for example, be configured to utilize information discovered during the initial scan at Step 2610 to identify the one or more attributes of data associated with the one or more individuals.

For example, the catalog generated at Step 2610 may include a name, address, and phone number for a particular individual. The system may be configured, at Step 2620, to scan the one or more structured and/or unstructured data repositories to identify one or more attributes that are associated with one or more of the particular individual's name, address and/or phone number. For example, a particular data repository may store banking information (e.g., a bank account number and routing number for the bank) in association with the particular individual's address. In various embodiments, the system may be configured to identify the banking information as an attribute of data associated with the particular individual. In this way, the system may be configured to identify particular data attributes (e.g., one or more pieces of personal data) stored for a particular individual by identifying the particular data attributes using information other than the individual's name.

Returning to Step 2630, the system is configured to analyze and correlate the one or more attributes and metadata for the scanned one or more structured and/or unstructured data repositories. In particular embodiments, the system is configured to correlate the one or more attributes with metadata for the associated data repositories from which the system identified the one or more attributes. In this way, the system may be configured to store data regarding particular data repositories that store particular data attributes.

In particular embodiments, the system may be configured to cross-reference the data repositories that are discovered to store one or more attributes of personal data associated with the one or more individuals with a database of known data assets. In particular embodiments, the system is configured to analyze the data repositories to determine whether each data repository is part of an existing data model of data assets that collect, store, and/or process personal data. In response to determining that a particular data repository is not associated with an existing data model, the system may be configured to identify the data repository as a new data asset (e.g., via asset discovery), and take one or more actions (e.g., such as any suitable actions described herein) to generate and populate a data model of the newly discovered data asset. This may include, for example: (1) generating a data inventory for the new data asset; (2) populating the data inventory with any known attributes associated with the new data asset; (3) identifying one or more unpopulated (e.g., unknown) attributes of the data asset; and (4) taking any suitable action described herein to populate the unpopulated data attributes.

In particular embodiments, the system my, for example: (1) identify a source of the personal data stored in the data repository that led to the new asset discovery; (2) identify one or more relationships between the newly discovered asset and one or more known assets; and/or (3) etc.

Continuing to Step 2640, the system is configured to use one or more machine learning techniques to categorize one or more data elements from the generated catalog, analyze a flow of the data among the one or more data repositories, and/or classify the one or more data elements based on a confidence score as discussed below.

Continuing to Step 2650, the system, in various embodiments, is configured to receive input from a user confirming or denying a categorization of the one or more data elements, and, in response, modify the confidence score. In various embodiments, the system is configured to iteratively repeat Steps 2640 and 2650. In this way, the system is configured to modify the confidence score in response to a user confirming or denying the accuracy of a categorization of the one or more data elements. For example, in particular embodiments, the system is configured to prompt a user (e.g., a system administrator, privacy officer, etc.) to confirm that a particular data element is, in fact, associated with a particular individual from the catalog. The system may, in various embodiments, be configured to prompt a user to confirm that a data element or attribute discovered during one or more of the scans above were properly categorized at Step 2640.

In particular embodiments, the system is configured to modify the confidence score based at least in part on receiving one or more confirmations that one or more particular data elements or attributes discovered in a particular location during a scan are associated with particular individuals from the catalog. As may be understood in light of this disclosure, the system may be configured to increase the confidence score in response to receiving confirmation that particular types of data elements or attributes discovered in a particular storage location are typically confirmed as being associated with particular individuals based on one or more attributes for which the system was scanning.

Exemplary Intelligent Identity Scanning Technical Platforms

Figure 27 depicts an exemplary technical platform via which the system may perform one or more of the steps described above with respect to the Intelligent Identity Scanning Module 2600. As shown in the embodiment in this figure, an Intelligent Identity Scanning System 2600 comprises an Intelligent Identity Scanning Server 130, such as the Intelligent Identity Scanning Server 130 described above with respect to Figure 1. The Intelligent Identity Scanning Server 130 may, for example, comprise a processing engine (e.g., one or more computer processors). In some embodiments, the Intelligent Identity Scanning Server 130 may include any suitable cloud hosted processing engine (e.g., one or more cloud-based computer servers). In particular embodiments, the Intelligent Identity Scanning Server 130 is hosted in a Microsoft Azure cloud.

In particular embodiments, the Intelligent Identity Scanning Server 130 is configured to sit outside one or more firewalls (e.g., such as the firewall 195 shown in Figure 26). In such embodiments, the Intelligent Identity Scanning Server 130 is configured to access One or More Remote Computing Devices 150 through the Firewall 195 (e.g., one or more firewalls) via One or More Networks 115 (e.g., such as any of the One or More Networks 115 described above with respect to Figure 1).

In particular embodiments, the One or More Remote Computing Devices 150 include one or more computing devices that make up at least a portion of one or more computer networks associated with a particular organization. In particular embodiments, the one or more computer networks associated with the particular organization comprise one or more suitable servers, one or more suitable databases, one or more privileged networks, and/or any other suitable device and/or network segment that may store and/or provide for the storage of personal data. In the embodiment shown in Figure 27, the one or more computer networks associated with the particular organization may comprise One or More Third Party Servers 160, One or More Databases 140, etc. In particular embodiments, the One or More Remote Computing Devices 150 are configured to access one or more segments of the one or more computer networks associated with the particular organization. In some embodiments, the one or more computer networks associated with the particular organization comprise One or More Privileged Networks 165. In still other embodiments, the one or more computer networks comprise one or more network segments connected via one or more suitable routers, one or more suitable network hubs, one or more suitable network switches, etc.

As shown in Figure 27, various components that make up one or more parts of the one or more computer networks associated with the particular organization may store personal data (e.g., such as personal data stored on the One or More Third Party Servers 160, the One or More Databases 140, etc.). In various embodiments, the system is configured to perform one or more steps related to the Intelligent Identity Scanning Server 2600 in order to identify the personal data for the purpose of generating the catalog of individuals described above (e.g., and/or identify one or more data assets within the organization's network that store personal data)

As further shown in Figure 27, in various embodiments, the One or More Remote Computing Devices 150 may store a software application (e.g., the Intelligent Identity Scanning Module). In such embodiments, the system may be configured to provide the software application for installation on the One or More Remote Computing Devices 150. In particular embodiments, the software application may comprise one or more virtual machines. In particular embodiments, the one or more virtual machines may be configured to perform one or more of the steps described above with respect to the Intelligent Identity Scanning Module 2600 (e.g., perform the one or more steps locally on the One or More Remote Computing Devices 150).

In various embodiments, the one or more virtual machines may have the following specifications: (1) any suitable number of cores (e.g., 4, 6, 8, etc.); (2) any suitable amount of memory (e.g., 4 GB, 8 GB, 16 GB etc.); (3) any suitable operating system (e.g., CentOS 7.2); and/or (4) any other suitable specification. In particular embodiments, the one or more virtual machines may, for example, be used for one or more suitable purposes related to the Intelligent Identity Scanning System 2700. These one or more suitable purposes may include, for example, running any of the one or more modules described herein, storing hashed and/or non-hashed information (e.g., personal data, personally identifiable data, catalog of individuals, etc.), storing and running one or more searching and/or scanning engines (e.g., Elasticsearch), etc..

In various embodiments, the Intelligent Identity Scanning System 2700 may be configured to distribute one or more processes that make up part of the Intelligent Identity Scanning Process (e.g., described above with respect to the Intelligent Identity Scanning Module 1800). The one or more software applications installed on the One or more Remote Computing Devices 150 may, for example, be configured to provide access to the one or more computer networks associated with the particular organization to the Intelligent Identity Scanning Server 130. The system may then be configured to receive, from the One or more Remote Computing Devices 150 at the Intelligent Identity Scanning Server 130, via the Firewall 195 and One or More Networks 115, scanned data for analysis.

In particular embodiments, the Intelligent Identity Scanning System 2700 is configured to reduce an impact on a performance of the One or More Remote Computing Devices 150, One or More Third Party Servers 160 and other components that make up one or more segments of the one or more computer networks associated with the particular organization. For example, in particular embodiments, the Intelligent Identity Scanning System 2700 may be configured to utilize one or more suitable bandwidth throttling techniques. In other embodiments, the Intelligent Identity Scanning System 2700 is configured to limit scanning (e.g., any of the one or more scanning steps described above with respect to the Intelligent Identity Scanning Module 2600) and other processing steps (e.g., one or more steps that utilize one or more processing resources) to non-peak times (e.g., during the evening, overnight, on weekends and/or holidays, etc.). In other embodiments, the system is configured to limit performance of such processing steps to backup applications and data storage locations. The system may, for example, use one or more sampling techniques to decrease a number of records required to scan during the personal data discovery process.

Figure 28 depicts an exemplary asset access methodology that the system may utilize in order to access one or more network devices that may store personal data (e.g., or other personally identifiable information). As may be understood from this figure, the system may be configured to access the one or more network devices using a locally deployed software application (e.g., such as the software application described immediately above). In various embodiments, the software application is configured to route identity scanning traffic through one or more gateways, configure one or more ports to accept one or more identity scanning connections, etc.

As may be understood from this figure, the system may be configured to utilize one or more credential management techniques to access one or more privileged network portions. The system may, in response to identifying particular assets or personally identifiable information via a scan, be configured to retrieve schema details such as, for example, an asset ID, Schema ID, connection string, credential reference URL, etc. In this way, the system may be configured to identify and store a location of any discovered assets or personal data during a scan.

Data Subject Access Request Fulfillment Module

Turning to Figure 29, in particular embodiments, a Data Subject Access Request Fulfillment Module 2900 is configured to receive a data subject access request, process the request, and fulfill the request based at least in part on one or more request parameters. In various embodiments, an organization, corporation, etc. may be required to provide information requested by an individual for whom the organization stores personal data within a certain time period (e.g., 30 days). As a particular example, an organization may be required to provide an individual with a listing of, for example: (1) any personal data that the organization is processing for an individual, (2) an explanation of the categories of data being processed and the purpose of such processing; and/or (3) categories of third parties to whom the data may be disclosed.

Various privacy and security policies (e.g., such as the European Union's General Data Protection Regulation, and other such policies) may provide data subjects (e.g., individuals, organizations, or other entities) with certain rights related to the data subject's personal data that is collected, stored, or otherwise processed by an organization. These rights may include, for example: (1) a right to obtain confirmation of whether a particular organization is processing their personal data; (2) a right to obtain information about the purpose of the processing (e.g., one or more reasons for which the personal data was collected); (3) a right to obtain information about one or more categories of data being processed (e.g., what type of personal data is being collected, stored, etc.); (4) a right to obtain information about one or more categories of recipients with whom their personal data may be shared (e.g., both internally within the organization or externally); (5) a right to obtain information about a time period for which their personal data will be stored (e.g., or one or more criteria used to determine that time period); (6) a right to obtain a copy of any personal data being processed (e.g., a right to receive a copy of their personal data in a commonly used, machine-readable format); (7) a right to request erasure (e.g., the right to be forgotten), rectification (e.g., correction or deletion of inaccurate data), or restriction of processing of their personal data; and (8) any other suitable rights related to the collection, storage, and/or processing of their personal data (e.g., which may be provided by law, policy, industry or organizational practice, etc.).

As may be understood in light of this disclosure, a particular organization may undertake a plurality of different privacy campaigns, processing activities, etc. that involve the collection and storage of personal data. In some embodiments, each of the plurality of different processing activities may collect redundant data (e.g., may collect the same personal data for a particular individual more than once), and may store data and/or redundant data in one or more particular locations (e.g., on one or more different servers, in one or more different databases, etc.). In this way, a particular organization may store personal data in a plurality of different locations which may include one or more known and/or unknown locations. As such, complying with particular privacy and security policies related to personal data (e.g., such as responding to one or more requests by data subjects related to their personal data) may be particularly difficult (e.g., in terms of cost, time, etc.). In particular embodiments, a data subject access request fulfillment system may utilize one or more data model generation and population techniques (e.g., such as any suitable technique described herein) to create a centralized data map with which the system can identify personal data stored, collected, or processed for a particular data subject, a reason for the processing, and any other information related to the processing.

Turning to Figure 21, when executing the Data Subject Access Request Module 2100, the system begins, at Step 2110, by receiving a data subject access request. In various embodiments, the system receives the request via a suitable web form. In certain embodiments, the request comprises a particular request to perform one or more actions with any personal data stored by a particular organization regarding the requestor. For example, in some embodiments, the request may include a request to view one or more pieces of personal data stored by the system regarding the requestor. In other embodiments, the request may include a request to delete one or more pieces of personal data stored by the system regarding the requestor. In still other embodiments, the request may include a request to update one or more pieces of personal data stored by the system regarding the requestor. In still other embodiments, the request may include a request based on any suitable right afforded to a data subject, such as those discussed above.

Continuing to Step 2120, the system is configured to process the request by identifying and retrieving one or more pieces of personal data associated with the requestor that are being processed by the system. For example, in various embodiments, the system is configured to identify any personal data stored in any database, server, or other data repository associated with a particular organization. In various embodiments, the system is configured to use one or more data models, such as those described above, to identify this personal data and suitable related information (e.g., where the personal data is stored, who has access to the personal data, etc.). In various embodiments, the system is configured to use intelligent identity scanning (e.g., as described above) to identify the requestor's personal data and related information that is to be used to fulfill the request.

In still other embodiments, the system is configured to use one or more machine learning techniques to identify such personal data. For example, the system may identify particular stored personal data based on, for example, a country in which a website that the data subject request was submitted is based, or any other suitable information.

In particular embodiments, the system is configured to scan and/or search one or more existing data models (e.g., one or more current data models) in response to receiving the request in order to identify the one or more pieces of personal data associated with the requestor. The system may, for example, identify, based on one or more data inventories (e.g., one or more inventory attributes) a plurality of storage locations that store personal data associated with the requestor. In other embodiments, the system may be configured to generate a data model or perform one or more scanning techniques in response to receiving the request (e.g., in order to automatically fulfill the request).

Returning to Step 2130, the system is configured to take one or more actions based at least in part on the request. In some embodiments, the system is configured to take one or more actions for which the request was submitted (e.g., display the personal data, delete the personal data, correct the personal data, etc.). In particular embodiments, the system is configured to take the one or more actions substantially automatically. In particular embodiments, in response a data subject submitting a request to delete their personal data from an organization's systems, the system may: (1) automatically determine where the data subject's personal data is stored; and (2) in response to determining the location of the data (which may be on multiple computing systems), automatically facilitate the deletion of the data subject's personal data from the various systems (e.g., by automatically assigning a plurality of tasks to delete data across multiple business systems to effectively delete the data subject's personal data from the systems). In particular embodiments, the step of facilitating the deletion may comprise, for example: (1) overwriting the data in memory; (2) marking the data for overwrite; (2) marking the data as free (e.g., and deleting a directory entry associated with the data); and/or (3) any other suitable technique for deleting the personal data. In particular embodiments, as part of this process, the system uses an appropriate data model (see discussion above) to efficiently determine where all of the data subject's personal data is stored.

Data Subject Access Request User Experience

Figures 30-31 depict exemplary screen displays that a user may view when submitting a data subject access request. As shown in Figure 30, a website 30000 associated with a particular organization may include a user-selectable indicia 3005 for submitting a privacy-related request. A user desiring to make such a request may select the indicia 3005 in order to initiate the data subject access request process.

Figure 31 depicts an exemplary data subject access request form in both an unfilled and filled out state. As shown in this figure, the system may prompt a user to provide information such as, for example: (1) what type of requestor the user is (e.g., employee, customer, etc.); (2) what the request involves (e.g., requesting info, opting out, deleting data, updating data, etc.); (3) first name; (4) last name; (5) email address; (6) telephone number; (7) home address; and/or (8) one or more details associated with the request.

As discussed in more detail above, a data subject may submit a subject access request, for example, to request a listing of any personal information that a particular organization is currently storing regarding the data subject, to request that the personal data be deleted, to opt out of allowing the organization to process the personal data, etc.

Alternative Embodiments

In particular embodiments, a data modeling or other system described herein may include one or more features in addition to those described. Various such alternative embodiments are described below.

Processing Activity and Data Asset Assessment Risk Flagging

In particular embodiments, the questionnaire template generation system and assessment system described herein may incorporate one or more risk flagging systems. Figures 32-35 depict exemplary user interfaces that include risk flagging of particular questions within a processing activity assessment. As may be understood from these figures, a user may select a flag risk indicia to provide input related to a description of risks and mitigation of a risk posed by one or more inventory attributes associated with the question. As shown in these figures, the system may be configured to substantially automatically assign a risk to a particular response to a question in a questionnaire. In various embodiments, the assigned risk is determined based at least in part on the template from which the assessment was generated.

In particular embodiments, the system may utilize the risk level assigned to particular questionnaire responses as part of a risk analysis of a particular processing activity or data asset. Various techniques for assessing the risk of various privacy campaigns are described in U.S. Patent Application No. 15/256,419, filed September 2, 2016, entitled "Data processing systems and methods for operationalizing privacy compliance and assessing the risk of various respective privacy campaigns," which is hereby incorporated herein in its entirety.

Cross-Border Visualization Generation System

In particular embodiments, a Cross-Border Visualization Generation System is configured to analyze one or more data systems (e.g., data assets), identify data transfers between/among those systems, determine whether any particular regulations apply to the identified data transfers, and generate a visual representation of physical locations of the one or more data systems and the one or more data transfers between them. The system may, for example, color-code one or more lines or indicators showing a transfer of data between a first and second data system. The one or more indicators may convey, for example: (1) whether the data transfer is secure; (2) a type or level of security that is applied to the transfers; (3) one or more regulations that apply to the transfer; and/or (4) any other suitable information related to the transfer of particular data between the first and second data system.

Various processes performed by the Cross-Border Visualization Generation System may be implemented by a Cross-Border Visualization Generation Module 3600. Referring to Figure 36, in particular embodiments, the system, when executing the Cross-Border Visualization Generation Module 3600, is configured to: (1) identify data systems associated with a particular entity; (2) determine a location of the data systems; (3) identity one or more transfers of particular data elements between particular data systems of the one or more data systems; (4) determine one or more regulations that relate to the one or more data transfers; and (5) generate a visual representation of the one or more data transfers based at least in part on the one or more regulations.

When executing the Cross-Border Visualization Generation Module 3600, the system begins, at Step 3610, by identifying one or more data systems (e.g., data assets) associated with a particular entity. The particular entity may include, for example, a particular organization, company, sub-organization, etc. In particular embodiments, the one or more data assets (e.g., data systems) may include, for example, any entity that collects, processes, contains, and/or transfers data (e.g., such as a software application, "internet of things" computerized device, database, website, data-center, server, etc.). For example, a first data asset may include any software or device utilized by a particular entity for such data collection, processing, transfer, storage, etc. In various embodiments, the first data asset may be at least partially stored on and/or physically located in a particular location. For example, a server may be located in a particular country, jurisdiction, etc. A piece of software may be stored on one or more servers in a particular location, etc.

In particular embodiments, the system is configured to identify the one or more data systems using one or more data modeling techniques. As discussed more fully above, a data model may store the following information: (1) the entity that owns and/or uses a particular data asset (e.g., such as a primary data asset, an example of which is shown in the center of the data model in Figure 4); (2) one or more departments within the organization that are responsible for the data asset; (3) one or more software applications that collect data (e.g., personal data) for storage in and/or use by the data asset; (4) one or more particular data subjects (or categories of data subjects) that information is collected from for use by the data asset; (5) one or more particular types of data that are collected by each of the particular applications for storage in and/or use by the data asset; (6) one or more individuals (e.g., particular individuals or types of individuals) that are permitted to access and/or use the data stored in, or used by, the data asset; (7) which particular types of data each of those individuals are allowed to access and use; and (8) one or more data assets (destination assets) that the data is transferred to for other use, and which particular data is transferred to each of those data assets.

As may be understood in light of this disclosure, the system may utilize a data model (e.g., or one or more data models) of data assets associated with a particular entity to identify the one or more data systems associated with the particular entity.

Continuing to Step 3620, the system is configured to analyze the one or more data assets (e.g., data systems) to identify one or more data elements stored in the one or more identified data systems. In particular embodiments, the system is configured to identify one or more data elements stored by the one or more data systems that are subject to transfer (e.g., transfer to the one or more data systems such as from a source asset, transfer from the one or more data systems to a destination asset, etc.). In particular embodiments, the system is configured to identify a particular data element that is subject to such transfer (e.g., such as a particular piece of personal data or other data). In some embodiments, the system may be configured to identify any suitable data element that is subject to transfer and includes personal data. The system may be configured to identify such transfer data using any suitable technique described herein.

In any embodiment described herein, personal data may include, for example: (1) the name of a particular data subject (which may be a particular individual); (2) the data subject's address; (3) the data subject's telephone number; (4) the data subject's e-mail address; (5) the data subject's social security number; (6) information associated with one or more of the data subject's credit accounts (e.g., credit card numbers); (7) banking information for the data subject; (8) location data for the data subject (e.g., their present or past location); (9) internet search history for the data subject; and/or (10) any other suitable personal information, such as other personal information discussed herein.

As may be understood from this disclosure, the transfer of personal data may trigger one or more regulations that govern such transfer. In particular embodiments, personal data may include any data which relate to a living individual who can be identified: (1) from the data; or (2) from the data in combination with other information which is in the possession of, or is likely to come into the possession of a particular entity. In particular embodiments, a particular entity may collect, store, process, and/or transfer personal data for one or more customers, one or more employees, etc.

In various embodiments, the system is configured to use one or more data models of the one or more data assets (e.g., data systems) to analyze one or more data elements associated with those assets to determine whether the one or more data elements include one or more data elements that include personal data and are subject to transfer. In particular embodiments, the transfer may include, for example: (1) an internal transfer (e.g., a transfer from a first data asset associated with the entity to a second data asset associated with the entity); (2) an external transfer (e.g., a transfer from a data asset associated with the entity to a second data asset associated with a second entity); and/or (3) a collective transfer (e.g., a transfer to a data asset associated with the entity from an external data asset associated with a second entity).

Next, at Step 3630, the system is configured to define a plurality of physical locations and identify, for each of the one or more data systems, a particular physical location of the plurality of physical locations. In some embodiments, the system is configured to define the plurality of physical locations based at least in part on input from a user. The system may, for example, define each of the plurality of physical locations based at least in part on one or more geographic boundaries. These one or more geographic boundaries may include, for example: (1) one or more countries; (2) one or more continents; (3) one or more jurisdictions (e.g., such as one or more legal jurisdictions); (4) one or more territories; (5) one or more counties; (6) one or more cities; (7) one or more treaty members (e.g., such as members of a trade, defense, or other treaty); and/or (8) any other suitable geographically distinct physical locations.

The system may then be configured to identify, for each of the one or more data systems identified at Step 3610, an associated physical location. For example, the system may be configured to determine in which of the one or more defined plurality of physical locations each particular data system is physically located. In particular embodiments, the system is configured to determine the physical location based at least in part on one or more data attributes of a particular data asset (e.g., data system) using one or more data modeling techniques (e.g., using one or more suitable data modeling techniques described herein). In some embodiments, the system may be configured to determine the physical location of each data asset based at least in part on an existing data model that includes the data asset. In still other embodiments, the system may be configured to determine the physical location based at least in part on an IP address and/or domain of the data asset (e.g., in the case of a computer server or other computing device) or any other identifying feature of a particular data asset.

Returning to Step 3640, the system is configured to analyze the identified one or more data elements to determine one or more data transfers between one or more data systems in different particular physical locations. The system may, for example, analyze a data model based on each particular data asset to identify one or more data transfers between and/or among the one or more data assets (e.g., data systems). For example, as may be understood from Figure 4, a particular asset (e.g., storage asset) may receive data, for example, from a data subject, a collection asset, or other suitable source (e.g., data asset). The particular asset may further, in some embodiments, transfer data to a transfer asset (e.g., an asset to which the particular asset transfers data). The system may be configured to identify such data transfers between and/or among one or more data assets for the purpose of generating a visual representation of such data transfers.

Continuing to Step 3650, the system is configured to determine one or more regulations that relate to (e.g., apply to) the one or more data transfers. As may understood in light of this disclosure, one or more regulations (e.g., industry regulations, legal regulations, etc.) may govern the transfer of personal data (e.g., between one or more jurisdictions, physical locations, and the like). In particular, the one or more regulations may impose one or more minimum standards on the handling of the transfer of such personal data in the interest of protecting the privacy of one or more data subjects or other individuals with whom the personal data is associated. In particular instances, it may be inevitable (e.g., as a result of the sharing of customer data, the centralization of IT services, etc.) that a particular entity or company (e.g., a particular entity whose business activities span a plurality of jurisdictions or locations) will undertake one or more data transfers that may triggers the one or more regulations.

In particular embodiments, the one or more regulations described above may include one or more transfer restrictions. In various embodiments, the one or more transfer restrictions may restrict transfer from a first location (e.g., jurisdiction) to a second location (e.g., jurisdiction) absent an adequate level of privacy protection. A particular exemplary transfer restriction may, for example, require data transferred from a first location to a second location to be subject to the same level of privacy protection at the second location that the data enjoys in the first location. For example, the first location may, for example, place any suitable limit on the collection and storage of personal data (e.g., one or more time limits, one or more encryption requirements, etc.). In particular embodiments, the one or more regulations may include a transfer restriction that prohibits transfer of personal data from the first location to a second location unless the second location places limits on the collection and storage of personal data that are at least as stringent as the first location.

In various embodiments, the system may, for example: (1) analyze one or more first storage restrictions on personal data stored in a first data asset; (2) analyze one or more second storage restrictions on personal data stored in a second data asset to which the first data asset transfers personal data; and (3) compare the one or more first storage restrictions with the one or more second storage restrictions. The system may then, for example, flag a transfer of data from the first data asset to the second data asset based at least in part on the comparison. For example, in response to determining that the one or more second restrictions are less stringent than the one or more first restrictions, the system may flag the transfer as risky or noncompliant. In another example, in response to determining that the one or more second restrictions are at least as stringent as the one or more first restrictions, the system may flag (e.g., automatically flag) the transfer as acceptable or compliant.

In particular embodiments, the system may be configured to substantially automatically determine that a transfer to a particular location is adequate. The system may, for example, store a listing (e.g., in memory) of one or more locations (e.g., countries) deemed automatically adequate as destinations of transferred personal data. In such embodiments, the one or more regulations may include a regulation that any location on the 'safe list' provides adequate privacy protection for personal data. The system may then substantially automatically determine that a transfer of data that includes a 'safe list' location as a target destination in a transfer would automatically meet an adequacy standard for data transfer. In a particular example, the one or more locations on the 'safe list' may include one or more countries (e.g., Argentina, Canada, Israel, Switzerland, Uruguay, Jersey, Guernsey, the Isle of Man, etc.).

In various other embodiments, the one or more regulations may include a regulation that a transfer of personal data to a location that is part of a safe harbor is acceptable. In various embodiments, a safe harbor may include a commitment to adhere to a set of safe harbor principles related to data protection. In a particular example, a United States company wishing to identify as a safe harbor entity may be required to self-certify to the U.S. Department of Commerce that it adheres to the Safe Harbor principles and to make a public declaration of the adherence.

In particular other embodiments, the system may identify a particular privacy shield arrangement between a first and second location in order to determine an adequacy of a transfer of data from the first location to the second location. In particular, a privacy shield arrangement may facilitate monitoring of an entity's compliance with one or more commitments and enforcement of those commitments under the privacy shield. In particular, an entity entering a privacy shield arrangement may, for example: (1) be obligated to publicly commit to robust protection of any personal data that it handles; (2) be required to establish a clear set of safeguards and transparency mechanisms on who can access the personal data it handles; and/or (3) be required to establish a redress right to address complaints about improper access to the personal data.

In a particular example of a privacy shield, a privacy shield between the United States and Europe may involve, for example: (1) establishment of responsibility by the U.S. Department of Commerce to monitor an entity's compliance (e.g., a company's compliance) with its commitments under the privacy shield; and (2) establishment of responsibility of the Federal Trade Commission having enforcement authority over the commitments. In a further example, the U.S. Department of Commerce may designate an ombudsman to hear complaints from Europeans regarding U.S. surveillance that affects personal data of Europeans.

In some embodiments, the one or more regulations may include a regulation that allows data transfer to a country or entity that participates in a safe harbor and/or privacy shield as discussed herein. The system may, for example, be configured to automatically identify a transfer that is subject to a privacy shield and/or safe harbor as 'low risk.'

In some embodiments, the one or more regulations may include a regulation that a location that is not deemed automatically adequate as a data transfer target (e.g., a location to which data is being transferred) may be deemed adequate by entering one or more contracts (e.g., standard clauses) with an entity that is the source of the transferred data. For example, the system may automatically determine that a particular data transfer is adequate by identifying a contract that exists between a first entity and a second entity, where the first entity is transferring data from a first asset to a second asset associated with the second entity. In various embodiments, the one or more data elements that make up a data model (e.g., for the first data asset) may indicate the existence of any contracts that the first entity has executed related to the transfer of data with one or more other entities. In various embodiments, the system is configured to analyze the one or more contracts to determine whether the one or more contracts apply to a particular data transfer of the one or more transfers identified at Step 3640.

In particular embodiments, the one or more contracts may include one or more third party beneficiary rights to the one or more data subjects whose personal data is subject to transfer. In such embodiments, such contracts may, for example, be enforced by an exporting entity (e.g., the entity that is transferring the data) as well as the data subject themselves.

In particular embodiments, a further method of legitimizing a transfer of data between one or more data assets may include implementing one or more binding corporate rules. In particular embodiments, the one or more binding corporate rules may be approved by a regulating authority. In such embodiments, the one or more regulations referred to in step 3650 may include one or more regulations related to the existence of one or more binding corporate rules (e.g., that have been approved by a regulating authority).

In various embodiments, the one or more binding corporate rules may include a scheme that involves an entity (e.g., corporate group) setting up an internal suite of documents that set out how the entity intends to provide adequate safeguards to individuals whose personal data is being transferred to a second location (e.g., country). In particular embodiments, the one or more binding corporate rules may include one or more safeguards that are no less than those required by the location in which the personal data is originally stored.

At Step 3660, the system continues by generating a visual representation of the one or more data transfers based at least in part on the one or more regulations. The system may, for example, generate a visual representation of a map that includes the plurality of physical locations described above. The system may then indicate, on the visual representation, a location of each of the one or more data systems (e.g., using a suitable marker or indicia). In particular embodiments, the system may color code one or more of the plurality of physical locations based on, for example, an existence of a privacy shield, a prevailing legal requirement for a particular jurisdiction, etc.

In various embodiments, the system may be configured to generate, on the map, a visual representation of a data transfer between at least a first data asset and a second data asset (e.g., where the first and second data asset are in two different physical locations). For example, the system may generate a linear representation of the transfer, or other suitable representation. In particular embodiments, they system is configured to color code the visual representation of the transfer based at least in part on the physical locations, one or more regulations, etc. In still other embodiments, the system is configured to color code the visual representation of the transfer based at least in part on the one or more regulations that the system has determined apply to the transfer (e.g., one or more binding corporate rules, privacy shield, etc.). This may, for example, indicate a legal basis of each particular identified data transfer.

In various embodiments, the system may be configured to substantially automatically flag a particular transfer of data as problematic (e.g., because the transfer does not comply with an applicable regulation). For example, a particular regulation may require data transfers from a first asset to a second asset to be encrypted. The system may determine, based at least in part on the one or more data elements, that the transfer is not encrypted. In response, the system may flag the transfer as High risk (e.g., using a particular color such as red). In various other embodiments, the system may be configured to determine a risk level of a particular transfer based at least in part on the physical location of each of the data assets, the one or more regulations, the type of data being transferred (e.g., whether the data contains personal data), etc.

In particular embodiments, the visual representation may be used by a particular entity to demonstrate compliance with respect to one or more regulations related to the transfer of personal data. In such embodiments, the visual representation may serve as a report that indicates the legal basis of any transfer performed by the entity (e.g., and further serve as documentation of the entity's compliance with one or more legal regulations).

Risk Identification for Cross-Border Data Transfers

In various embodiments, the Cross-Border Visualization Generation System may identify one or more risk associated with a cross-border data transfer. In various embodiments, a data transfer record may be created for each transfer of data between a first asset in a first location and a second asset in a second location where the transfer record may also include information regarding the type of data being transferred, a time of the data transfer, an amount of data being transferred, etc. The system may apply data transfer rules to each data transfer record. The data transfer rules may be configurable to support different privacy frameworks (e.g., a particular data subject type is being transferred from a first asset in the European Union to a second asset outside of the European Union) and organizational frameworks (e.g., to support the different locations and types of data assets within an organization). The applied data transfer rules may be automatically configured by the system (e.g., when an update is applied to privacy rules in a country or region) or manually adjusted by the particular organization (e.g., by a privacy officer of the organization). The data transfer rules to be applied may vary based on the data being transferred. For example, if the data being transferred includes personal data, then particular data transfer rules may be applied (e.g., encryption level requirements, storage time limitations, access restrictions, etc.).

In particular embodiments, the system may perform a data transfer assessment on each data transfer record based on the data transfer rules to be applied to each data transfer record. The data transfer assessment performed by the system may identify risks associated with the data transfer record, and in some embodiments, a risk score may be calculated for the data transfer. For example, a data transfer that contains sensitive data that includes a customer credit card, has a source location in one continent (e.g., at a merchant), and has a destination location in a different continent (e.g., in a database), may have a high risk score because of the transfer of data between two separate continents and the sensitivity of the data being transferred.

The risk score may be calculated in any suitable way, and may include risk factors such as a source location of the data transfer, a destination location of the data transfer, the type of data being transferred, a time of the data transfer, an amount of data being transferred, etc. Additionally, the system may apply weighting factors (e.g., custom weighting factors or automatically determined ones) to the risk factors. Further, in some implementation, the system can include a threshold risk score where a data transfer may be terminated (e.g., automatically) if the data transfer risk score indicates a higher risk than the threshold risk score (e.g., the data transfer risk score being higher than the threshold risk score). When the data transfer risk score indicates a lower risk than the threshold risk score, then the system may process the data transfer. In some implementations, if one or more of the risk factors indicate a heightened risk for the data transfer, then the system can notify an individual associated with the particular organization. For example, the individual associated with the particular organization may enable the data transfer to process, flag the data transfer for further evaluation (e.g., send the data transfer information to another individual for input), or terminate the data transfer, among other actions.

The system may process the data transfer after evaluating the data transfer assessment and/or the risk score for the data transfer. Additionally, in some implementations, the system may initiate the data transfer via a secure terminal or secure link between a computer system of the source location and a computer system of the destination location where the system to prevent interception of the data or unwarranted access to the additional information. Cross-Border Visualization Generation User Experience

Figures 37-38 depict exemplary screen displays that a user may view when reviewing a cross-border visualization generated by the system as described above. As shown in Figure 37, the system may be configured to generate a visual representation of an asset map (e.g., a data asset map, data system map, etc.). As may be understood from this Figure, the system may be configured to generate a map that indicates a location of one or more data assets for a particular entity. In the embodiment shown in this figure, locations that contain a data asset are indicated by circular indicia that contain the number of assets present at that location. In the embodiment shown in this figure, the locations are broken down by country. In particular embodiments, the asset map may distinguish between internal assets (e.g., first party servers, etc.) and external/third party assets (e.g., third party owned servers that the entity utilizes for data storage, transfer, etc.).

In some embodiments, the system is configured to indicate, via the visual representation, whether one or more assets have an unknown location (e.g., because the data model described above may be incomplete with regard to the location). In such embodiments, the system may be configured to: (1) identify the asset with the unknown location; (2) use one or more data mapping techniques described herein to determine the location (e.g., pinging the asset); and (3) update a data model associated with the asset to include the location.

As shown in Figure 38, the system may be further configured to indicate, via a suitable line or other visual, a transfer of data between a first asset in a first location and a second asset in a second location. As may be understood from this figure, the transfer indicated by the line has a "High" risk level, contains sensitive data that includes a customer credit card, has a source location of Spain (e.g., at a merchant), and has a destination location of Brazil (e.g., in a database). In various other embodiments, the system may generate a visual representation that includes a plurality of transfers between a plurality of asset locations.

Adaptive Execution on a Data Model

In various embodiments, a Data Model Adaptive Execution System may be configured to take one or more suitable actions to remediate an identified risk trigger in view of one or more regulations (e.g., one or more legal regulations, one or more binding corporate rules, etc.). For example, in order to ensure compliance with one or more legal or industry standards related to the collection and/or storage of private information (e.g., personal data), an entity may be required to modify one or more aspects of a way in which the entity collects, stores, and/or otherwise processes personal data (e.g., in response to a change in a legal or other requirement). In order to identify whether a particular change or other risk trigger requires remediation, the system may be configured to assess a relevance of the risk posed by the potential risk trigger and identify one or more processing activities or data assets that may be affected by the risk.

Certain functionality of a Data Model Adaptive Execution System may be implemented via an Adaptive Execution on a Data Model Module 3900. A particular embodiment of the Adaptive Execution on a Data Model Module 3900 is shown in Figure 39. When executing the Adaptive Execution on a Data Model Module 3900, the system may be configured, at Step 3910, to identify and/or detect one or more potential risk triggers. In particular embodiments, the system is configured to identify one or more potential risk triggers in response to receiving a notification of a security breach (e.g., data breach) of one or more data assets (e.g., one or more data assets utilized by a particular organization). For example, in response to receiving an indication that Salesforce (e.g., a customer relationship management platform) has had a data breach, the system may identify one or more potential risk triggers in the form of any data that the system receives from, or processes via Salesforce.

In still other embodiments, the system is configured to identify one or more potential risk triggers in response to determining (e.g., receiving an input or indication) that one or more legal or industry requirements that relate to the collection, storage, and/or processing of personal data have changed. For example, a particular legal regulation related to an amount of time that personal data can be stored, an encryption level required to be applied to personal data, etc. may change. As another example, a safe harbor arrangement (e.g., such as the safe harbor arrangement discussed above) may be determined to be inadequate justification for a transfer of data between a first and second location. In this example, the system may be configured to receive an indication that 'safe harbor' is no longer an adequate justification for data transfer from a first asset in a first location to a second asset in a second location.

Continuing to Step 3920, the system is configured to assess and analyze the one or more potential risk triggers to determine a relevance of a risk posed by the one or more potential risk triggers. The system may, for example, determine whether the one or more potential risk triggers are related to one or more data assets (e.g., one or more data elements of one or more data assets) and/or processing activities associated with a particular entity. When analyzing the one or more potential risk triggers to determine a relevance of a risk posed by the one or more potential risk triggers, the system may be configured to utilize (e.g., use) a formula to determine a risk level of the identified one or more potential risk triggers. The system may, for example, determine the risk level based at least in part on: (1) an amount of personal data affected by the one or more potential risk triggers; (2) a type of personal data affected by the one or more potential risk triggers; (3) a number of data assets affected by the one or more potential risk triggers; and/or (4) any other suitable factor.

For example, in response to identifying a data breach in Salesforce, the system may, for example: (1) determine whether one or more systems associated with the entity utilize Salesforce; and (2) assess the one or more systems utilized by Salesforce to evaluate a risk posed by the data breach. The system may, for example, determine that the entity utilizes Salesforce in order to store customer data such as name, address, contact information, etc. In this example, the system may determine that the Salesforce data breach poses a high risk because the data breach may have resulted in a breach of personal data of the entity's customers (e.g., data subjects).

In still another example, in response to determining that safe harbor is no longer a valid justification for a data transfer between two locations, the system may be configured to: (1) determine whether one or more data transfers involving one or more data assets associated with the particular entity are currently justified via a safe harbor arrangement; and (2) in response to determining that the one or more data transfers are currently justified via a safe harbor arrangement, assessing a risk of the one or more transfers in view of the determined inadequacy of safe harbor as a data transfer justification. In particular embodiments, the system may identify one or more supplemental justifications and determine that the determined inadequacy of safe harbor poses a low risk. In other embodiments, the system may be configured to determine that the determined inadequacy of safe harbor poses a high risk (e.g., because the system is currently performing one or more data transfers that may be in violation of one or more legal, internal, or industry regulations related to data transfer).

Returning to Step 3930, the system is configured to use one or more data modeling techniques to identify one or more processing activities and/or data assets that may be affected by the risk. As discussed above, the system may utilize a particular data model that maps and/or indexes data associated with a particular data asset. The data model may, for example, define one or more data transfers, one or more types of data, etc. that are associated with a particular data asset and/or processing activity. In some embodiments, the system is configured to use the data model to identify one or more data assets and/or processing activities that may be affected by the risk assessed at Step 3920. In various embodiments, the system is configured to identify, using any suitable data modeling technique described herein, one or more pieces of personal data that the system is configured to collect, store, or otherwise process that may be affected by the one or more potential risk triggers.

Next, at Step 3940, the system is configured to determine, based at least in part on the identified one or more processing activities and/or data assets and the relevance of the risk, whether to take one or more actions in response to the one or more potential risk triggers. In particular embodiments, the system may, for example: (1) determine to take one or more actions in response to determining that a calculated risk level is above a threshold risk level; (2) determine to take the one or more actions in response to determining that the one or more potential risk triggers may place the entity in violation of one or more regulations (e.g., legal and/or industry regulations); etc.

In some embodiments, the system may determine whether to take one or more actions based at least in part on input from one or more individuals associated with the entity. The one or more individuals may include, for example, one or more privacy officers, one or more legal representatives, etc. In particular embodiments, the system is configured to receive input from the one or more individuals, and determine whether to take one or more actions in response to the input.

Continuing to Step 3950, the system is configured to take one or more suitable actions to remediate the risk in response to identifying and/or detecting the one or more potential risk triggers.

In particular embodiments, the one or more actions may include, for example: (1) adjusting one or more data attributes of a particular data asset (e.g., an encryption level of data stored by the data asset, one or more access permissions of data stored by the particular data asset, a source of data stored by the particular data asset, an amount of time the data is stored by a particular asset, etc.); (2) generating a report indicating the risk level and the identified one or more risk triggers; (3) providing the report to one or more individuals (e.g., a privacy officer or other individual); and/or (4) taking any other suitable action, which may, for example, be related to the identified one or more potential risk triggers. Automatic Risk Remediation Process

In various embodiments, a system may be configured to substantially automatically determine whether to take one or more actions in response to one or more identified risk triggers as discussed above in the context of the Adaptive Execution on a Data Model Module 3900. In particular embodiments, the system is configured to substantially automatically perform one or more steps related to the analysis of and response to the one or more potential risk triggers discussed above. For example, the system may substantially automatically determine a relevance of a risk posed by (e.g., a risk level) the one or more potential risk triggers based at least in part on one or more previously-determined responses to similar risk triggers. This may include, for example, one or more previously determined responses for the particular entity that has identified the current risk trigger, one or more similarly situated entities, or any other suitable entity or potential trigger.

In particular embodiments, the system may, for example, when determining whether to take one or more actions in response to the one or more potential risk triggers (e.g., as discussed above with respect to Step 3940 of the Adaptive Execution on a Data Model Module): (1) compare the potential risk trigger to one or more previous risks triggers experienced by the particular entity at a previous time; (2) identify a similar previous risk trigger (e.g., one or more previous risk triggers related to a similar change in regulation, breach of data, type of issue identified, etc.); (3) determine the relevance of the current risk trigger based at least in part on a determined relevance of the previous risk trigger; and (4) determine whether to take one or more actions to the current risk trigger based at least in part on one or more determined actions to take in response to the previous, similar risk trigger.

Similarly, in particular embodiments, the system may be configured to substantially automatically determine one or more actions to take in response to a current potential risk trigger based on one or more actions taken by one or more similarly situated entities to one or more previous, similar risk triggers. For example, the system may be configured to: (1) compare the potential risk trigger to one or more previous risk triggers experienced by one or more similarly situated entities at a previous time; (2) identify a similar previous risk trigger (e.g., one or more previous risk triggers related to a similar change in regulation, breach of data, and/or type of issue identified, etc. from the one or more previous risk triggers experienced by the one or more similarly-situated entities at the previous time; (3) determine the relevance of the current risk trigger based at least in part on a determined relevance of the previous risk trigger (e.g., a relevance determined by the one or more similarly situated entities); and (4) determine one or more actions to take in response to the current risk trigger based at least in part on one or more previously determined actions to take in response to the previous, similar risk trigger (e.g., one or more determined actions by the one or more similarly situated entities at the previous time).

In various embodiments, the one or more similarly-situated entities may include, for example: (1) one or more other entities in a geographic location similar to a geographic location of the entity that has identified the one or more potential risk triggers (e.g., a similar country, jurisdiction, physical location, etc.); (2) one or more other entities in a similar industry (e.g., banking, manufacturing, electronics, etc.); (3); one or more entities of a similar size (e.g., market capitalization, number of employees, etc.); (4) one or more entities that are governed by one or more similar regulations (e.g., such as any suitable regulation discussed herein); and/or (5) any other suitably similarly situated entity.

In various embodiments, the system is configured to use one or more machine learning techniques to analyze one or more risk levels assigned to previously identified risk triggers, determine a suitable response to similar, currently-identified risk triggers based on previously determined responses, etc.

In particular embodiments, the system may, for example, be configured to: (1) receive risk remediation data for a plurality of identified risk triggers from a plurality of different entities; (2) analyze the risk remediation data to determine a pattern in assigned risk levels and determined response to particular risk triggers; and (3) develop a model based on the risk remediation data for use in facilitating an automatic assessment of and/or response to future identified risk triggers.

In a particular example of a reactive system for automatically determining a suitable action to take in response to an identified risk trigger, the system may take one or more suitable actions in response to identifying a data beach in Salesforce (e.g., as discussed above). In particular embodiments, the system may, for example: (1) substantially automatically identify one or more actions taken by the system in response to a similar data breach of one or more different vendors; and (2) determine a suitable action to take in response to the data breach based on the one or more actions taken in response to the similar data breach. The similar data breach may include, for example, a breach in data of a similar type, or any other similar breach. In another example, the system may be configured to identify one or more similarly situated entities that have experienced a data breach via Salesforce or other similar vendor. The system, may, for example, be configured to determine a suitable action to take based at least in part on an action taken by such a similar entity to a similar data breach. In still another example, the system may be configured, based on one or more previous determinations related to a data breach by a vendor (e.g., such as by Salesforce) to take no action in response to the identified risk trigger (e.g., because the identified risk may pose no or minimal danger).

Systems and Methods for Automatically Remediating Identified Risks

A data model generation and population system, according to particular embodiments, is configured to generate a data model (e.g., one or more data models) that maps one or more relationships between and/or among a plurality of data assets utilized by a corporation or other entity (e.g., individual, organization, etc.) in the context, for example, of one or more business processes. In particular embodiments, each of the plurality of data assets (e.g., data systems) may include, for example, any entity that collects, processes, contains, and/or transfers data (e.g., such as a software application, "internet of things" computerized device, database, website, data- center, server, etc.). For example, a first data asset may include any software or device (e.g., server or servers) utilized by a particular entity for such data collection, processing, transfer, storage, etc.

In particular embodiments, a system may be configured to generate and maintain one or more disaster recovery plans for particular data assets based on one or more relationships between/among one or more data assets operated and/or utilized by a particular entity.

In various embodiments, a system may be configured to substantially automatically determine whether to take one or more actions in response to one or more identified risk triggers. For example, an identified risk trigger include any suitable risk trigger such as that a data asset for an organization is hosted in only one particular location thereby increasing the scope of risk if the location were infiltrated (e.g., via cybercrime). In particular embodiments, the system is configured to substantially automatically perform one or more steps related to the analysis of and response to the one or more potential risk triggers discussed above. For example, the system may substantially automatically determine a relevance of a risk posed by (e.g., a risk level) the one or more potential risk triggers based at least in part on one or more previously-determined responses to similar risk triggers. This may include, for example, one or more previously determined responses for the particular entity that has identified the current risk trigger, one or more similarly situated entities, or any other suitable entity or potential trigger.

In particular embodiments, the system may, for example, be configured to: (1) receive risk remediation data for a plurality of identified risk triggers from a plurality of different entities; (2) analyze the risk remediation data to determine a pattern in assigned risk levels and determined response to particular risk triggers; and (3) develop a model based on the risk remediation data for use in facilitating an automatic assessment of and/or response to future identified risk triggers.

In some embodiments, in response to a change or update is made to one or more processing activities and/or data assets (e.g., a database associated with a particular organization), the system may use data modeling techniques to update the risk remediation data for use in facilitating an automatic assessment of and/or response to future identified risk triggers. For example, the system may be configured to use a data map and/or data model described herein to, for example: (1) particular systems that may require some remedial action in response to an identified breach/incident for one or more related systems; (2) automatically generate a notification to an individual to update a disaster recovery plan for those systems; and/or (3) automatically generate a disaster recovery plan that includes one or more actions in response to identifying an incident in one or more related systems identified using the data mapping techniques described herein. In various embodiments, in response to modification of a privacy campaign, processing activity, etc. of the particular organization (e.g., add, remove, or update particular information), the system may update the risk remediation data for use in facilitating an automatic assessment of and/or response to future identified risk triggers. For example, the system may be configured to (1) identify one or more changes to one or more relationships between/among particular data assets in response to a change in one or more business processes; and (2) modify (e.g., and/or generate a notification to modify) one or more disaster recovery plans for any affected data assets.

In particular embodiments, the system may, for example, be configured to: (1) access risk remediation data for an entity that identifies one or more suitable actions to remediate a risk in response to identifying one or more data assets of the entity that may be affected by one or more potential risk triggers; (2) receive an indication of an update to the one or more data assets; (3) identify one or more potential updated risk triggers for an entity; (4) assess and analyze the one or more potential updated risk triggers to determine a relevance of a risk posed to the entity by the one or more potential updated risk triggers; (5) use one or more data modeling techniques to identify one or more data assets associated with the entity that may be affected by the risk; and (6) update the risk remediation data to include the one or more actions to remediate the risk in response to identifying the one or more potential updated risk triggers.

Webform Crawling to Map Processing Activities in a Data Model

In particular embodiments, a data mapping system (e.g., such as any suitable data mapping and/or modeling system described herein) may be configured to generate a data model that maps one or more relationships between and/or among a plurality of data assets utilized by a corporation or other entity (e.g., individual, organization, etc.) in the context, for example, of one or more business processes and/or processing activities. In various embodiments, when generating the data model, the system may identify one or more webforms utilized by the system in the collection and processing of personal data and determine one or more particular data assets and/or processing activities that utilize such data. Although in the course of this description, the system is described as crawling (e.g., and/or scanning) one or more webforms, it should be understood that other embodiments may be utilized to scan, crawl or analyze any suitable electronic form in order to map any data input via the electronic form in any suitable manner.

In particular embodiments, the system may be configured to use one or more website scanning tools to, for example: (1) identify a webform (e.g., on a website associated with a particular entity or organization); (2) robotically complete the webform; (3) and analyze the completed webform to determine one or more particular processing activities, and/or business processes, etc. that use one or more pieces of data submitted via the webform.

As may be understood in light of this disclosure, one or more legal and/or industry regulations may require an entity to, for example, maintain a record of one or more processing activities undertaken by the entity that includes: (1) a name and contact details of a controller responsible for the processing activity; (2) a purpose of the processing; (3) a description of one or more categories of data subjects and/or of one or more categories of personal data collected as part of the processing activity; (4) one or more categories of recipients to whom the personal data may be disclosed, including recipients in one or more second countries or other locations; (5) one or more transfers of the personal data to a second country or an international organization; (6) a time limit for erasure of the personal data, if applicable; (7) an identification of one or more security measures taken in the collection and/or storage of the personal data; and/or (8) any other suitable information.

As may be further understood in light of this disclosure, a particular organization may undertake a plurality of different privacy campaigns, processing activities, etc. that involve the collection and storage of personal data. In some embodiments, each of the plurality of different processing activities may collect redundant data (e.g., may collect the same personal data for a particular individual more than once), and may store data and/or redundant data in one or more particular locations (e.g., on one or more different servers, in one or more different databases, etc.). Additionally, one or more sub-organizations (e.g., subgroups) of an organization or entity may initiate a processing activity that involves the collection of personal data without vetting the new processing activity with a privacy compliance officer or other individual within the company tasked with ensuring compliance with one or more prevailing privacy regulations. In this way, a particular organization may collect and store personal data in a plurality of different locations which may include one or more known and/or unknown locations, or may collect personal data for a purpose that is not immediately apparent (e.g., using one or more webforms). As such, it may be desirable for an entity to implement a system that is configured to scan one or more webforms that collect personal data to identify which particular processing activity (e.g., or processing activities) that personal data is utilized in the context of.

Various processes are performed by the Data Access Webform Crawling System and may be implemented by a Webform Crawling Module 4300. Referring to Figure 43, in particular embodiments, the system, when executing the Webform Crawling Module 4300, is configured to: (1) identify a webform used to collect one or more pieces of personal data; (2) robotically complete the identified webform; (3) analyze the completed webform to determine one or more processing activities that utilize the one or more pieces of personal data collected by the webform; (4) identify a first data asset in the data model that is associated with the one or more processing activities; (5) modify a data inventory for the first data asset in the data model to include data associated with the webform; and (6) modify the data model to include the modified data inventory for the first data asset.

When executing the Webform Crawling Module 4300, the system begins, at Step 4310, by identifying a webform used to collect one or more pieces of personal data. The system may use one or more website scanning tools to identify the webform. The webform may be a website associated with a particular entity or organization. For example, the webform may be a "Contact Us" form that is on the particular organization's website or any other type of webform associated with the particular organization. At Step 4320, the system is configured to robotically complete the identified webform. The identified webform may be completed by using a virtual profile that emulates a user profile, and the virtual profile may include an e-mail address. The system may monitor the e-mail account associated with the e-mail address for a confirmation e-mail related to the completion of the identified webform where the system may receive and interact with the confirmation e-mail. Additionally, the system may analyze (e.g., scrape) the confirmation e-mail for the data associated with the webform. The data associated with the webform may identify one or more processing activities and one or more pieces of personal data collected by the webform.

Next, at Step 4330, the system is configured to analyze the completed webform to determine one or more processing activities that utilize the one or more pieces of personal data collected by the webform. In some implementations, the system may analyze one or more pieces of computer code associated with the webform to determine the one or more processing activities that utilize the one or more pieces of personal data collected by the webform. Further, the system may analyze the one or more pieces of computer code to identify a storage location to which the one or more pieces of personal data collected by the webform are routed. At Step 4340, the system is configured to identify a first data asset in the data model that is associated with the one or more processing activities. In some implementations, the system may identify a processing activity based on the storage location of the identified one or more pieces of personal data, and an asset may be associated with a particular storage location.

Continuing to Step 4350, the system is configured to modify a data inventory for the first data asset in the data model to include data associated with the webform. The system may include an indication that the one or more processing activities operate with data included in the first data asset. Additionally, the system may indicate that the one or more pieces of personal data are utilized by the identified one or more processing activities.

At Step 4360, the system continues by modifying the data model to include the modified data inventory for the first data asset. In some implementations, the system may include a mapping of the first data asset to the one or more processing activities that utilize the one more pieces of personal data. The mapping may be based on the analysis of the computer code associated with the webform. Moreover, in some implementations, the system may add the first data asset to a third-party data repository, and the first data asset may include an electronic link to the webform. The third-party repository is further discussed below.

Central Consent Repository

In particular embodiments, any entity (e.g., organization, company, etc.) that collects, stores, processes, etc. personal data may require one or more of: (1) consent from a data subject from whom the personal data is collected and/or processed; and/or (2) a lawful basis for the collection and/or processing of the personal data. In various embodiments, the entity may be required to, for example, demonstrate that a data subject has freely given specific, informed, and unambiguous indication of the data subject's agreement to the processing of his or her personal data for one or more specific purposes (e.g., in the form of a statement or clear affirmative action). As such, in particular embodiments, an organization may be required to demonstrate a lawful basis for each piece of personal data that the organization has collected, processed, and/or stored. In particular, each piece of personal data that an organization or entity has a lawful basis to collect and process may be tied to a particular processing activity undertaken by the organization or entity.

A particular organization may undertake a plurality of different privacy campaigns, processing activities, etc. that involve the collection and storage of personal data. In some embodiments, each of the plurality of different processing activities may collect redundant data (e.g., may collect the same personal data for a particular individual more than once), and may store data and/or redundant data in one or more particular locations (e.g., on one or more different servers, in one or more different databases, etc.). In this way, because of the number of processing activities that an organization may undertake, and the amount of data collected as part of those processing activities over time, one or more data systems associated with an entity or organization may store or continue to store data that is not associated with any particular processing activity (e.g., any particular current processing activity). Under various legal and industry standards related to the collection and storage of personal data, such data may not have or may no longer have a legal basis for the organization or entity to continue to store the data. As such, organizations and entities may require improved systems and methods to maintain an inventory of data assets utilized to process and/or store personal data for which a data subject has provided consent for such storage and/or processing. In various embodiments, the system is configured to provide a third-party data repository system to facilitate the receipt and centralized storage of personal data for each of a plurality of respective data subjects, as described herein. Additionally, the third-party data repository system is configured to interface with a centralized consent receipt management system.

In various embodiments, the system may be configured to, for example: (1) identify a webform used to collect one or more pieces of personal data, (2) determine a data asset of a plurality of data assets of the organization where input data of the webform is transmitted, (3) add the data asset to the third-party data repository with an electronic link to the webform, (4) in response to a user submitting the webform, create a unique subject identifier to submit to the third-party data repository and the data asset along with the form data provided by the user in the webform, (5) submit the unique subject identifier and the form data provided by the user in the webform to the third-party data repository and the data asset, and (6) digitally store the unique subject identifier and the form data provided by the user in the webform in the third-party data repository and the data asset.

In some embodiments, the system may be further configured to, for example: (1) receive a data subject access request from the user (e.g., a data subject rights' request, a data subject deletion request, etc.), (2) access the third-party data repository to identify the unique subject identifier of the user, (3) determine which data assets of the plurality of data assets of the organization include the unique subject identifier, (4) access personal data of the user stored in each of the data assets of the plurality of data assets of the organization that include the unique subject identifier, and (5) take one or more actions based on the data subject access request (e.g., delete the accessed personal data for a data subject deletion request).

The system may, for example: (1) generate, for each of a plurality of data subjects, a respective unique subject identifier in response to submission, by each data subject, of a particular webform; (2) maintain a database of each respective unique subject identifier; and (3) electronically link each respective unique subject identifier to each of: (A) a webform initially submitted by the user; and (B) one or more data assets that utilize data received from the data subject via the webform.

The Webform Crawling Data System may also implement a Data Asset and Webform Management Module 4400. Referring to Figure 44, in particular embodiments, the system, when executing the Data Asset and Webform Management Module 4400, is configured for: (1) identifying a webform used to collect one or more pieces of personal data; (2) determining a data asset of a plurality of data assets of the organization where input data of the webform is transmitted; (3) adding the data asset to the third-party data repository with an electronic link to the webform; (4) in response to a user submitting the webform, creating a unique subject identifier to submit to the third-party data repository and the data asset along with form data provided by the user in the webform; (5) submitting the unique subject identifier and the form data provided by the user in the webform to the third-party data repository and the data asset; and (6) digitally storing the unique subject identifier and the form data provided by the user in the webform in the third-party data repository and the data asset.

When executing the Data Asset and Webform Management Module 4400, the system begins, at Step 4410, by identifying a webform used to collect one or more pieces of personal data. In particular embodiments, the system may be configured to use one or more website scanning tools to, for example, identify a webform. The webform may be a website associated with a particular entity or organization. For example, the webform may be a "Contact Us" form that is on the particular organization's website or any other type of webform associated with the particular organization.

At Step 4420, the system is configured to determine a data asset of a plurality of data assets of the organization where input data of the webform is transmitted. The system may perform the determination by identifying where the input data of the webform is transmitted (e.g., Salesforce). Continuing to Step 4430, the system is configured to add the data asset to the third-party data repository with an electronic link to the webform. The system may provide the third-party data repository with a reference to the data asset, or in some implementations, the system may provide the one or more pieces of personal data that were transmitted to the one or more data assets to the third-party repository. The system may associate the electronic link to the webform with the identified data asset that includes the one or more pieces of personal data.

Returning to Step 4440, the system is configured to create a unique subject identifier to submit to the third-party data repository and the data asset along with form data provided by the user in the webform in response to a user submitting the webform. In response to a user inputting form data (e.g., name, address, credit card information, etc.) at the webform and submitting the webform, the system may, based on the link to the webform, create a unique subject identifier to identify the user. The unique subject identifier may be any type of numerical, alphabetical, or any other type of identifier to identify the user.

Continuing to Step 4450, the system is configured to submit the unique subject identifier and the form data provided by the user in the webform to the third-party data repository and the data asset. The system is configured to submit the unique subject identifier to the third-party data repository and the data asset along with the form data. Further, the system may use the unique subject identifier of a user to access and update each of the data assets of the particular organization (i.e., including the other data assets of the particular organization where the form data is not transmitted). For example, in response to a user submitting a data subject access request to delete personal data the particular organization has stored of the user, the system may use the unique subject identifier of the user to access and retrieve the user's personal data stored in all of the data assets (e.g., Salesforce, Eloqua, Marketo, etc.) utilized by the particular organization. At Step 4460, the system continues by digitally storing the unique subject identifier and the form data provided by the user in the webform in the third-party data repository and the data asset.

Further, in some implementations, the system may be configured to receive a data subject access request from the user. The data subject access request may be one or more different types of data subject access requests, and may be, for example, a data subject deletion request or a data subject rights request. Upon the system receiving the data subject access request, the system may be configured to access the third-party data repository to identify the unique subject identifier of the user, determine which data assets of the plurality of data assets of the organization include the unique subject identifier, and access personal data of the user stored in each of the data assets of the plurality of data assets of the organization that include the unique subject identifier. Upon the data subject access request being a data subject deletion request, then the system may delete the accessed personal data of the user stored in each of the data assets of the plurality of data assets of the organization that include the unique subject identifier. When the data subject access request is a data subject rights request, the system may generate a data subject rights request report that includes the accessed personal data of the user stored in each of the data assets of the plurality of data assets of the organization that include the unique subject identifier. Further, the data subject rights request report may be transmitted to the user. In some implementations, the system may transmit the data subject rights request report to the user via a secure electronic link. Webform Generation User Experience

Figure 40 depicts an exemplary webform that a particular entity may include on a website for completion by one or more customers or users of the website. As may be understood from Figure 40, the webform may collect personal data such as, for example: (1) first name; (2) last name; (3) organization name; (4) country of residence; (5) state; (6) phone number; (7) e-mail address; (8) website; and/or (9) any other suitable personal data. As may be further understood from this Figure, an entity (e.g., or a system controlled by the entity) may use the webform to collect such personal data as part of one or more processing activities (e.g., e-mail marketing, online surveys, event marketing, etc.). In various embodiments, the system may be configured to scan a particular webform to identify a particular processing activity for which the entity is collecting the personal data.

In various embodiments, the system may, for example: (1) robotically fill out the webform (e.g., using one or more virtual profiles); (2) analyze one or more pieces of computer code associated with the webform (e.g., javascript, HTML, etc.); and (3) map one or more business processes that utilize the data collected via the webform based at least in part on the analyzed one or more pieces of computer code. In particular embodiments, a particular entity that utilizes a webform to collect personal data for use in a particular processing activity (e.g., business process) may analyze one or more pieces of computer code associated with the webform to determine: (1) one or more systems associated with the entity to which data entered the webform is routed (e.g., one or more data assets that serve as a destination asset to data entered via the webform); (2) a purpose for the collection of the data entered via the webform (e.g., a processing activity that utilizes the destination asset discussed above; (3) a type of data collected via the webform; and/or (4) any other suitable information related to the collection of data via the webform.

In particular embodiments, a system may be configured to transmit a webform completion confirmation e-mail to a user that completes the webform. In various embodiments, the system may be configured to analyze the e-mail or other message to identify one or more business processes that utilize the data collected by the webform (e.g., by analyzing/scraping one or more contents of the e-mail or other message). The system may then determine a purpose of the data collection and/or an associated processing activity based at least in part on the analysis. Scanning Electronic Correspondence to Facilitate Automatic Data Subject Access Request Submission

In various embodiments, any system described herein may be configured for: (1) analyzing electronic correspondence associated with a data subject (e.g., the emails within one or more email in-boxes associated with the data subject, or a plurality of text messages); (2) based on the analysis, identifying one or more entities (e.g., corporate entities) that that the data subject does not actively do business with (e.g., as evidenced by the fact that the data subject no longer opens emails from the entity, has set up a rule to automatically delete emails received from the entity, has blocked texts from the entity, etc.); (3) in response to identifying the entity as an entity that the data subject no longer does business with, at least substantially automatically generating a data subject access request and, optionally, automatically submitting the data subject access request to the identified entity.

The system may, for example, be configured to determine whether the data subject still uses one or more services from a particular e-mail sender (e.g., service provider) based at least in part on one more determined interactions of the data subject with one or more e-mails, or other electronic correspondence, from the service provider (e.g., whether the data subject reads the e- mail, selects one or more links within the e-mail, deletes the e-mail without reading it, etc.). The system may then substantially automatically generate and/or complete a data subject access request on behalf of the data subject that includes a request to be forgotten (e.g., a request for the entity to delete some or all of the data subject's personal data that the entity is processing).

For purposes of simplicity, various embodiments will now be described in which the system scans a plurality of emails associated with a data subject in order to identify one or more entities that the data subject no longer does business with. However, it should be understood that, in other embodiments, the same or similar techniques may be used in analyzing other types of electronic or other correspondence to identify entities that the data subject no longer does business with. For example, the system may analyze text messages, social media posts, scans of paper mail, or any other correspondence and/or other documents associated with the data subject to determine whether the data subject does business with particular entities. In various embodiments, the system bases this determination on its analysis of multiple different types of electronic correspondence between the data subject and one or more entities (which may include one-way correspondence in which the recipient of a particular correspondence doesn't respond, or two-way correspondence, in which the recipient of the correspondence responds to the correspondence).

In various embodiments, various functions performed by an E-mail Scanning System may be implemented via an E-mail Scanning Module 4100. Figure 41 depicts an E-mail Scanning Module 4100 according to a particular embodiment, which may be executed, for example, on any of the servers 110, 120, 130, 160 shown in Figure 1, or on one or more remote computing devices 150. When executing an exemplary E-mail Scanning Module 4100, the system begins, at Step 4110, by providing a software application for installation on a computing device. In particular embodiments, the software application may be configured to integrate with an e-mail service (e.g., gmail, yahoo, live, Microsoft Exchange, etc.) in order to provide access to a data subject's e-mail (e.g., a data subject's e-mail). In particular embodiments, the software application may be embodied as a software plugin that interfaces with a particular software application (e.g., Microsoft Outlook) in order to provide access to the data subject's e-mail to the systems. In other embodiments, the software application may be embodied as a browser plugin for use with a web browser to provide access to the data subject's web-based e-mail service. In particular embodiments, the system is configured to provide the software application for installation on a data subject's computing device (e.g., mobile computing device, etc.). In such embodiments, the software application may be embodied as a client-side software application that executes one or more of the processes described below on a client computing device (e.g., such as the data subject's computing device on which the data subject accesses his or her e- mails).

In still other embodiments, the system is configured to provide the software application for installation on one or more suitable servers (e.g., one or more suitable servers that host a particular e-mail service). In particular embodiments, for example, the system is configured to: (1) receive authorization from a data subject to access his or her e-mails; and (2) use a software application installed on one or more remote servers to perform one or more of the functions described below. In such embodiments, the system may be configured to provide the software application to the one or more remote servers. In particular other embodiments, the system may be at least partially integrated in one or more remote servers (e.g., via a direct server integration). In such embodiments, the system may be at least partially integrated with one or more remote e- mail servers (e.g., one or more remote servers that store and/or process a data subject's emails). Returning to Step 4120, the system is configured to use the software application to scan and optionally index one or more data subject e-mails, and then analyze information derived from the emails to identify a subject entity (e.g., corporate or non-corporate entity) from which each of the one or more data subject e-mails was received by a data subject. The system may, for example, be configured to scan and/or index the data subject's emails to identify one or more subject entities as the sender of the emails. In particular embodiments, the one or more subject entities may include one or more subject entities (e.g., corporate entities) that would be required to respond to a data subject access request, if received from the data subject. For example, the one or more subject entities may include any subject company that collects, stores, or otherwise processes the data subject's personal data. The system may, for example, be configured to identify particular e-mails of the data subject's indexed e-mails that were received from any suitable entity (e.g., Target, Home Depot, etc.). The system may, for example, scan an e-mail's subject field, body, sender, etc. to identify, for example: (1) a name of the subject company; (2) an e-mail domain associated with the subject company; and/or (3) any other suitable information which may identify the subject entity as the sender of the e-mail.

In some embodiments, the system may be configured to identify e-mail messages from a subject entity based at least in part on an email mailbox in which the messages are located in the data subject's e-mail account. For example, the data subject's e-mail account may already presort incoming messages into one or more categories (e.g., which may include, for example, a promotions category, a junk category, etc.). In such embodiments, the system may be configured to limit the one or more e-mails that the system scans and/or indexes to e-mails that have been identified as promotional in nature (or that have been placed into any other pre-defined category, such as Spam) by the data subject's e-mail service.

Continuing to Step 4130, the system is configured to use an algorithm to determine whether the data subject actively does business with the entity. In particular embodiments, the system is configured to make this determination based at least in part on (e.g., partially or entirely on): (1) whether the data subject opens any of the one or more e-mails received from the subject company; (2) how long the data subject spends reviewing one or more of the e-mails that the data subject does open from the subject company; (3) whether the data subject deletes one or more of the e-mails from the subject company without reading them; (4) what portion (e.g., percentage) of e-mails received from the subject company the data subject opens; (5) whether the data subject selects one or more links contained in one or more e-mails received from the subject company; (6) how much time the data subject spends viewing a website to which a link is provided in the one or more e-mails from the subject company; (7) whether the data subject has set up a rule (e.g., a software-based rule) to auto-delete or block emails from the subject company; (8) whether the data subject has set up a rule (e.g., a software-based rule) to redirect emails received from the subject company to a specific folder or other location (e.g., a folder designated for commercial correspondence, or a folder designated for unwanted correspondence); (9) whether the data subject has submitted a request to the particular entity for the particular entity not to send emails to the data subject; (10) whether the data subject has submitted a request to the particular entity for the particular entity not to send text messages to the data subject; (11) whether the data subject has submitted a request to the particular entity for the particular entity not to call the data subject; and/or (12) any other suitable information related to the data subject's use of one or more services, or purchase of goods, related to the one or more e-mails or other electronic correspondence received by the data subject from the subject company. In particular embodiments, the system is configured to automatically (e.g., using one or more computer processors) determine the information of any of the items listed above (e.g., whether the data subject has set up a rule to redirect emails received from the subject company to a specific folder) using any suitable technique.

As noted above, the system may, in addition, or alternatively, make the determination described above by analyzing electronic correspondence other than emails, such as texts, social media postings, etc. that involve the data subject and the entity. For example, the system may determine that the data subject no longer actively does business with a particular entity if the data subject configures software (e.g., messaging software on the data subject's smartphone) to block texts from the particular entity.

In various embodiments, the system is configured to utilize an algorithm that takes into account one or more of the various factors discussed above to determine whether the data subject still actively does business with the subject entity (e.g., and therefore would likely be interested in continuing to receive e-mails from the subject company). In doing so, the system may assign any appropriate value to each of the factors in determining whether to determine that the data subject no longer does business with the subject entity. Similarly, the system may allow the calculation to be customized by allowing users to assign weighting factors to each particular variable.

As a simple example, the system may use the following formula to determine whether the data subject does business with a particular entity: Data Subject Disengagement Rating = (Emails Opened Value) + (Texts Read Value) +

(Emails Automatically Deleted Value) + (Texts Blocked Value)

In a particular example, the system is configured to determine that the data subject no longer actively does business with the entity if the Data Subject Disengagement Rating is above 80. In this example, the system may assign: (1) a value of 80 to the Emails Read Value if the data subject opens fewer than 5% of emails received from the from the entity; (2) a value of 50 to the Emails Read Value if the data subject opens between 5% - 25% of emails received from the entity; and (3) a value of 0 to the Emails Read Value if the data subject opens over 25% of emails received from the from the entity. The system may assign similar values to the other variables based on the user's other email and text related activities. For example, the system may assign a value of 100 to Text Blocked Value if the data subject has actively blocked (e.g., via software instructions) texts from the entity, and a value of 0 to Text Blocked Value if the data subject has not actively blocked texts from the entity. Similarly, the system may assign a value of 100 to Emails Automatically Deleted Value if the data subject has set software to automatically delete (e.g., immediately delete or route to a junk folder) emails from the entity, and a value of 0 to Emails Automatically Deleted Value if the data subject has not initiated such a setting.

As noted above, the system may allow users to customize the calculation above by assigning a weighting value to any of the values included in the Data Subject Disengagement Rating calculation. For example, the system may allow the user to assign a weighting value of 1.2 to Emails Opened Value if that particular user believes that this factor should be weighted 20% higher than usual in the calculation.

In various embodiments, the system is configured to, in response to determining that the data subject no longer actively does business with the entity, automatically generate, populate, and/or submit a data subject access request to the entity. In various embodiments, the data subject access request may include: (1) a request to delete some or all of the data subject's personal data that is being processed by the entity (e.g., in the form of a "right to be forgotten" request); (2) a request to rectify inaccurate personal data of the data subject that is being processed by the entity; (3) a request to access of a copy of personal information of the data subject processed by the entity; (4) a request to restrict the processing of the data subject's data by the entity; and/or (5) a request to transfer the data subject's data from the entity to a specified controller.

As a particular example, the system may generate a focused request to have the entity delete all of the data subject's personal data that the entity is processing in conjunction with a particular service offered by the entity. For example, at Step 4140, the system is configured to substantially automatically complete one or more data subject access requests on behalf of the data subject for one or more services that the data subject no longer uses.

Figure 42 depicts an exemplary data subject access request form that the system may substantially automatically generate, complete and/or submit for the data subject on the data subject's behalf. As shown in this figure, the system may complete information such as, for example: (1) what type of requestor the data subject is (e.g., employee, customer, etc.); (2) what the request involves (e.g., deleting data, etc.); (3) the requestor's first name; (4) the requestor's last name; (5) the requestor's email address; (6) the requestor's telephone number; (7) the requestor's home address; and/or (8) one or more details associated with the request. In particular embodiments, the system is configured to use an index of information about a particular entity or service to automate filling out the data subject access request.

In various embodiments, the system may receive at least some data from the data subject in order to complete the data subject access request. In other embodiments, the system is configured to scan one or more e-mails from the subject company to obtain one or more particular pieces of information for use in filling out the data subject access request (e.g., by identifying a shipping address in a particular e-mail, billing address, first name, last name, and/or phone number of the data subject from a previous order that the data subject placed with the subject company, etc.). In particular embodiments, the system may automatically identify all of the information needed to populate the data subject access request by identifying the information from within one or more individual electronic correspondence associated with the data subject (e.g., one or more texts or emails from the entity to the data subject).

In particular embodiments, the system may be configured to send a message to the data subject (e.g., via e-mail) prior to automatically completing the data subject access request. The message may, for example, require the data subject to confirm that the data subject would like the system to complete the request on the data subject's behalf. In various embodiments, in response to the data subject confirming that the data subject would like the system to complete the request, the system automatically populates the request and submits the request to the entity on the data subject's behalf.

In other embodiments, the system may automatically submit the request without explicit authorization from the data subject (e.g., the data subject may have provided a blanket authorization for submitting such requests when configuring the system's settings.)

In some embodiments, the Email Scanning System may comprise a third party system that is independent from the one or more subject entities. In such embodiments, the Email Scanning System may be implemented as part of a service for data subjects who may desire to exercise one or more privacy rights, but who aren't necessarily aware of which companies may be storing or processing their personal data, or who don't want to spend the time to submit data subject access requests manually. Similarly, various embodiments of the system may be implemented as part of a service that advantageously provides a data subject with an automated way of submitting data subject access requests to subject companies whose services the data subject no longer uses.

In still other embodiments, the system may be provided by a subject entity (e.g., company) for use by data subjects. Because subject companies are subject to requirements (e.g., in the form of laws and regulations) related to the storage and processing of personal data, it may benefit the subject company to no longer burden itself with storing or processing data related to a data subject that is no longer purchasing the subject entity's goods or utilizing the subject entity's services (e.g., that is no longer actively engaged with the entity). In such embodiments, the system may be configured to: (1) substantially automatically submit the data subject access request; and (2) respond to and fulfill the data subject access request (e.g., the same system or related systems utilized by a particular subject entity may be configured to both submit and fulfill the data subject access request). In other embodiments, the subject entity may unilaterally modify (e.g., edit or delete) the data subject's personal data within one or more of its systems in response to determining that the data subject does not actively do business with the subject entity. In particular embodiments for example, in response to the system submitting a request to delete the data subject's personal data from a subject entity's systems, the system may: (1) automatically determine where the data subject's personal data, which is processed by the subject entity, is stored; and (2) in response to determining the location of the data (e.g., which may be on multiple computing systems), automatically facilitate the deletion of the data subject's personal data from the various systems (e.g., by automatically assigning one or more tasks to delete data across one or more computer systems to effectively delete the data subject's personal data from the systems). In particular embodiments, the step of facilitating the deletion of the personal data may comprise, for example: (1) overwriting the data in memory; (2) marking the data for overwrite; (2) marking the data as free (e.g., and deleting a directory entry associated with the data); and/or (3) any other suitable technique for deleting the personal data. In particular embodiments, as part of this process, the system uses an appropriate data model (see discussion above) to efficiently determine where all of the data subject's personal data is stored.

Conclusion

Although embodiments above are described in reference to various privacy management systems, it should be understood that various aspects of the system described above may be applicable to other privacy -related systems, or to other types of systems, in general.

Also, although various embodiments are described as having the system analyze a data subject's interaction with email, text messages (e.g., SMS or MMS messages), or other electronic correspondence to determine whether the data subject actively does business with a particular entity, in other embodiments, the system may make this determination without analyzing electronic correspondence (e.g., emails or texts) or a data subject's interaction with electronic correspondence. For example, in particular embodiments, the system may automatically determine whether a data subject has requested that a particular entity not send emails to the data subject and, at least partially in response to making this determination, automatically generate, populate, and/or submit a data subject access request to the particular entity. Such a data subject access request may include, for example, any of the various data subject access requests described above (e.g., a request to delete all of the data subject's personal data that is being processed by the particular entity). The system may execute similar functionality in response to determining that the data subject has requested that the particular entity not send text (e.g., SMS or MMS) messages to the data subject, call the data subject, etc. It should be understood that, in various embodiments, the system may generate, populate, and/or submit any of the data subject access requests referenced above electronically (e.g., via a suitable computing network).

While this specification contains many specific embodiment details, these should not be construed as limitations on the scope of any invention or of what may be claimed, but rather as descriptions of features that may be specific to particular embodiments of particular inventions. Certain features that are described in this specification in the context of separate embodiments may also be implemented in combination in a single embodiment. Conversely, various features that are described in the context of a single embodiment may also be implemented in multiple embodiments separately or in any suitable sub-combination. Moreover, although features may be described above as acting in certain combinations and even initially claimed as such, one or more features from a claimed combination may in some cases be excised from the combination, and the claimed combination may be directed to a sub-combination or variation of a subcombination.

Similarly, while operations are depicted in the drawings in a particular order, this should not be understood as requiring that such operations be performed in the particular order shown or in sequential order, or that all illustrated operations be performed, to achieve desirable results. In certain circumstances, multitasking and parallel processing may be advantageous. Moreover, the separation of various system components in the embodiments described above should not be understood as requiring such separation in all embodiments, and it should be understood that the described program components and systems may generally be integrated together in a single software product or packaged into multiple software products.

Many modifications and other embodiments of the invention will come to mind to one skilled in the art to which this invention pertains having the benefit of the teachings presented in the foregoing descriptions and the associated drawings. Therefore, it is to be understood that the invention is not to be limited to the specific embodiments disclosed and that modifications and other embodiments are intended to be included within the scope of the appended claims. Although specific terms are employed herein, they are used in a generic and descriptive sense only and not for the purposes of limitation.

Claims

Claims What is claimed is:
1. A computer-implemented data processing method for generating a visualization of one or more data transfers between one or more data assets, the method comprising:
identifying one or more data assets associated with a particular entity;
analyzing the one or more data assets to identify one or more data elements stored in the identified one or more data assets;
defining a plurality of physical locations and identifying, for each of the identified one or more data assets, a respective particular physical location of the plurality of physical locations; analyzing the identified one or more data elements to determine one or more data transfers between the one or more data systems in different particular physical locations;
determining one or more regulations that relate to the one or more data transfers; and generating a visual representation of the one or more data transfers based at least in part on the one or more regulations.
2. The computer-implemented data processing method of Claim 1, wherein the method further comprises using at least one data model to identify the one or more data elements stored in the one or more identified data assets, the data model comprising:
a respective digital inventory for each of the one or more data assets, each respective digital inventory comprising one or more inventory attributes selected from the group consisting of:
one or more processing activities associated with each respective data asset;
transfer data associated with each respective data asset; and
one or more pieces of personal data associated with each respective data asset; and
a data map identifying one or more electronic associations between at least two of the one or more data assets.
3. The computer-implemented data processing method of Claim 2, wherein the one or more data elements comprise the one or more inventory attributes.
4. The computer-implemented data processing method of Claim 3, wherein determining one or more regulations that relate to the one or more data transfers comprises analyzing the transfer data associated with each respective data asset to identify the one or more regulations.
5. The computer-implemented data processing method of Claim 4, wherein the one or more regulations comprise one or more transfer restrictions.
6. The computer-implemented data processing method of Claim 5, wherein:
the one or more data transfers comprise a first transfer from a first data asset in a first location to a second data asset in a second location;
the one or more inventory attributes associated with the first data asset comprise one or more first data storage attributes; and
the one or more inventory attributes associated with the second data asset comprise one or more second data storage attributes.
7. The computer-implemented data processing method of Claim 6, wherein:
the one or more transfer restrictions comprise a first transfer restriction related to the first transfer; and
the first transfer restriction comprises a restriction that the one or more second data storage attributes comprise one or more second data security restrictions that are at least as stringent as one or more first data security restrictions associated with the one or more first data storage attributes.
8. The computer-implemented data processing of Claim 6, wherein:
the one or more regulations comprise a first regulation related to the first transfer; and the first regulation comprises a regulation based at least in part on one or more regulations selected from the group consisting of:
one or more binding corporate rules;
a privacy shield;
a safe harbor regulation; and one or more contract provisions.
9. The computer-implemented data processing method of Claim 1, wherein generating the visual representation of the one or more data transfers comprises:
generating a visual representation of a map comprising the plurality of physical locations; superimposing an indicia for each of the one or more data assets that indicates the respective particular physical location of the plurality of physical locations for each of the one or more data assets; and
generating a visual indication of the one or more data transfers between the one or more data assets.
10. The computer-implemented data processing method of Claim 10, wherein generating the visual representation of the one or more data transfers further comprises:
modifying the visual representation such that each visual indication of the one or more data transfers is color coded based at least in part on the one or more regulations.
11. The computer-implemented data processing method of Claim 1, wherein identifying the one or more data elements comprises analyzing the one or more data assets using one or more intelligent identity scanning techniques.
12. The computer-implemented data processing method of Claim 11, wherein the one or more intelligent identity scanning techniques comprise:
scanning one or more databases to generate a catalog of one or more individuals and one or more pieces of personal information associated with the one or more individuals;
scanning one or more data repositories based at least in part on the generated catalog to identify one or more attributes of data associated with the one or more individuals;
analyzing and correlating the one or more attributes and metadata for the scanned one or more data repositories;
using one or more machine learning techniques to categorize one or more data elements from the generated catalog;
analyzing a flow of the data elements among the one or more data repositories; categorizing the one or more data elements based on a confidence score;
receiving input from one or more users confirming or denying a categorization of the one or more data elements; and
in response to receiving the input, modifying the confidence score.
13. The computer-implemented data processing method of Claim 12, further comprising: providing a software application for installation on a computing device that is networked with one or more data repositories associated with an organization; and
providing a communication channel between one or more remote scanning servers and the software application, wherein:
the software application is configured to communicate with the one or more remote scanning servers via a firewall; and
the software application is configured to transmit the one or more attributes of data associated with the one or more individuals to the one or more remote scanning servers.
14. The computer-implemented data processing method of Claim 13, wherein:
the step of categorizing the one or more data elements is performed by the one or more remote scanning servers.
15. A computer-implemented data processing method for assessing a risk associated with one or more data transfers between one or more data assets, the method comprising:
creating a data transfer record for a transfer of data between a first asset in a first location and a second asset in a second location;
accessing a set of data transfer rules that are associated with the data transfer record; performing a data transfer assessment based at least in part on applying the set of data transfer rules on the data transfer record;
identifying one or more data transfer risks associated with the data transfer record, based at least in part on the data transfer assessment;
calculating a risk score for the data transfer based at least in part on the one or more data transfer risks associated with the data transfer record; and digitally storing the risk score for the data transfer.
16. The computer-implemented data processing method of Claim 15, wherein the method further comprises:
comparing the risk score for the data transfer to a threshold risk score;
determining that the risk score for the data transfer is greater than the threshold risk score; and
in response to determining that the risk score for the data transfer is greater than the threshold risk score, terminating the data transfer.
17. The computer-implemented data processing method of Claim 15, wherein the method further comprises:
comparing the risk score for the data transfer to a threshold risk score;
determining that the risk score for the data transfer is less than the threshold risk score; and
in response to determining that the risk score for the data transfer is less than the threshold risk score, processing the data transfer between the first asset in the first location and the second asset in the second location.
18. The computer-implemented data processing method of Claim 15, further comprising: processing the data transfer between the first asset in the first location and the second asset in the second location.
19. The computer-implemented data processing method of Claim 15, wherein the data transfer risks comprise at least one data transfer risk selected from a group consisting of:
a source location of the data transfer;
a destination location of the data transfer;
a type of data being transferred;
a time of the data transfer; and
an amount of data being transferred.
20. The computer-implemented data processing method of Claim 15, wherein processing the data transfer comprises:
generating a secure link between one or more processors associated with the first asset in the first location and a computing device associated with the second asset in the second location; transferring, via the secure link, the data of the data transfer between the first asset in the first location and the computing device associated with the second asset in the second location; and
digitally storing the data of the data transfer at the computing device associated with the second asset in the second location.
PCT/US2018/055736 2017-10-13 2018-10-12 Data processing systems for data-transfer risk identification, cross-border visualization generation, and related methods WO2019075420A1 (en)

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