WO2018035430A1 - Surgical tissue protection sheath - Google Patents

Surgical tissue protection sheath Download PDF

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Publication number
WO2018035430A1
WO2018035430A1 PCT/US2017/047550 US2017047550W WO2018035430A1 WO 2018035430 A1 WO2018035430 A1 WO 2018035430A1 US 2017047550 W US2017047550 W US 2017047550W WO 2018035430 A1 WO2018035430 A1 WO 2018035430A1
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WO
WIPO (PCT)
Prior art keywords
access sheath
section
sheath
material
tube
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/US2017/047550
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Eugene Chen
Richard C. Ewers
Cang Lam
Stephanie Frimond
Original Assignee
Spiway Llc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US201662377400P priority Critical
Priority to US62/377,400 priority
Priority to US201662396746P priority
Priority to US62/396,746 priority
Application filed by Spiway Llc filed Critical Spiway Llc
Publication of WO2018035430A1 publication Critical patent/WO2018035430A1/en

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Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B90/00Instruments, implements or accessories specially adapted for surgery or diagnosis and not covered by any of the groups A61B1/00 - A61B50/00, e.g. for luxation treatment or for protecting wound edges
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/34Trocars; Puncturing needles
    • A61B17/3417Details of tips or shafts, e.g. grooves, expandable, bendable; Multiple coaxial sliding cannulas, e.g. for dilating
    • A61B17/3421Cannulas
    • A61B17/3423Access ports, e.g. toroid shape introducers for instruments or hands
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B90/00Instruments, implements or accessories specially adapted for surgery or diagnosis and not covered by any of the groups A61B1/00 - A61B50/00, e.g. for luxation treatment or for protecting wound edges
    • A61B90/08Accessories or related features not otherwise provided for
    • A61B2090/0801Prevention of accidental cutting or pricking

Abstract

A surgical sheath for use in endoscopic trans-nasal or intra-ocular surgery is made of a braid material. The sheath may be manufactured by placing a length of braided tube material over a mandrel. The braid material is conformed to the shape of the mandrel and is then heat set. An atraumatic end may be made by folding or rolling one or both ends of the sheath. A coating may also optionally be applied to the braid material. The sheath reduces collateral trauma to the tissues in the surgical pathway.

Description

SURGICAL TISSUE PROTECTION SHEATH

BACKGROUND

[0001] Endoscopic surgery within the head is a common procedure in neurological surgery and otolaryngology. It avoids large cranial incisions and can reduce the need brain retraction and prolonged wound healing. Endoscopic surgery within the head also provides improved illumination and visualization of the target tissues because the camera of the endoscope is brought directly to the surgical site.

[0002] During this type of surgery, there may be local trauma to the tissues in the surgical pathway, resulting from pressure or abrasion caused by the surgical tools. Generally these tissues are the nasal mucosa, turbinates, nasal septum, and sphenoid/frontal/maxillary sinus. When transorbital approaches are used, orbital and periorbital tissue are subject to local trauma. Surgical pathway trauma can add to the trauma of the procedure and prolong the patient's recovery time. Liquids in the surgical pathway, such as mucous, blood, and soiled irrigation fluid, tend to obscure the view of the endoscope. This leads to the constant need for irrigation and suction of the obstructing liquids. In some cases the endoscope may also have to be removed, cleaned and replaced multiple times during a single procedure. This disadvantage tends to increase the complexity and time requirements of the operation. In addition, with each movement of a surgical tool into or out of the surgical pathway, the surrounding tissues are put at risk of additional trauma. Improved devices and methods are therefore needed.

BRIEF STATEMENT OF THE INVENTION

[0003] An access sheath is provided to protect the nasal passageway during endoscopic trans nasal or intra ocular surgery. The access sheath protects the entrance of the nares and sinus from the placement and manipulation of surgical tools both during the initial placement and during manipulation and exchange of surgical tools. The access sheath may provide a guide port to help direct surgical tools into position. In some designs the access sheath may splint the sinus open, to help open and provide access past the turbinate. The access sheath may also help to keep surgical tools and especially an endoscope freer from obscuring matter and secretions

[0004] The access sheath may be flexible for placement in a folded or rolled up configuration, have a hoop or expansion capability to fill and splint the passage, be partially or totally fluid tight to reduce ingress of secretions, and be lubricious for the unobstructed motion of fine surgical tools during delicate micro surgery.

[0005] US Patent No. 8,986,201 B2 discloses an access sheath, which may be made of elastomer, and has many of the performance features described above. However, elastomer has an inherent draw back. Flexible elastomers are inherently tacky and hence create sliding friction on surgical tools. In some designs this has required additives or a coating on the surface of access sheath to reduce friction. Still generally additives and coatings cannot always provide the surgeon with the feel of a surgical tool sliding against a wet mucus layer.

[0006] A nasal access sheath made of a hard plastic material is manufactured in a way to make it flexible, in one embodiment, by using a braided tube. A braid can be made from multiple fibers of plastic monofilament. Monofilaments can be made of rigid and tough plastic such as PET (Polyethylene terephthalate) or Nylon. Monofilaments can even be made from stainless steel. The fibers remain flexible because they have a small diameter, such as 0.08 mm to 0.5 mm. The fibers may have a round cross section, a relatively flat cross section, or elliptical cross section, A plurality of fibers can be braided into a braided tube. As one example, 64 fibers are counter wound in a two over and two under braid. The angle (pics or pitch) of the braided fibers can select the circular profile of the resulting braided tube or sleeve. A braided tube additionally is flexible due to the loose association of the braided fibers and their ability to slide relative to each other but still maintain the intended braided pattern.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0007] In the drawings, the same reference number indicates the same element in each of the views.

[0008] Fig. 1 shows a braided tube. [0009] Fig. 2 shows a braided tube expanded and loaded over a cylindrical mandrel.

[0010] Fig. 3A shows a forming mandrel shaped with a preferred geometry for use in the human sinus.

[0011] Fig. 3B shows a braided tube expanded and loaded over the forming mandrel of Fig. 3A.

[0012] Fig. 4 shows a braided tube that has been heat formed and the mandrel of Fig. 3A removed.

[0013] Fig. 5 shows a heat formed braided tube that has been coated with an elastomer.

[0014] Fig. 6 shows a heat formed braided tube with the braid inverted to form a dual layer, and with the distal end folded back on itself to provide a rounded tip.

[0015] Fig. 7A shows a braided tube created by a single layer of braid formed with a continuation distally of unformed braid. The formed portion was then dipped in a coating of elastomer.

[0016] Fig. 7B show the structure of 7A, where the uncoated distal extension of braid has been inverted back through the formed and coated section.

[0017] Fig. 7C shows the structure of Fig. 7A where the uncoated distal extension of braid was then inverted resulting in a braided tube having a rounded distal end and an un-coated inner surface and a coated outer section.

[0018] Fig. 8A shows the distal end or edge of a single layer braided tube.

[0019] Fig. 8B shows the distal end of a two layer braided tube with an inverted distal end.

[0020] Fig. 9A shows the coated braided tube of Fig. 7C or 8B with two surgical tools placed in parallel.

[0021] Fig. 9B shows the coated braided tube with two surgical tools at an acute angle and the flexible response of the neck of the structure. [0022] Fig. 10A shows the coated braided tube next two an introduction tool that has a longitudinal release slot.

[0023] Fig. 10B shows the coated braided tube loaded into the introduction tool of Fig. 10A.

[0024] Fig. 10C shows the loaded introduction tool being inserted into the nose.

[0025] Fig. 10D shows the introduction tool fully inserted into the nose.

[0026] Fig. 10E shows the coated braided tube being mostly released out of the longitudinal release slot of the introduction tool.

[0027] Fig. 10F shows the coated braided tube fully released out of the longitudinal release slot.

[0028] Fig. 1 1 A shows the access sheath and a plunger deployment tool.

[0029] Fig. 1 1 B shows the access sheath loaded in the plunger deployment tool.

[0030] Fig. 1 1 C shows the access sheath expelled distally from the plunger deployment tool.

[0031] Fig. 12A shows a beam and groove scissor-like delivery tool in an open position.

[0032] Fig. 12B shows the delivery tool of Fig. 12a in a closed position.

[0033] Fig. 12C is a top view of the access sheath of Fig. 5, 8A or 9 loaded onto the delivery tool.

[0034] Fig. 12D is a side view of the access sheath and delivery tool shown in Fig. 12C.

[0035] Fig. 13A and Fig. 13B show an embodiment of an elastomeric access sheath having a rigid plastic internal collar to create a low friction surface.

[0036] Fig. 13C shows a rigid collar for installment in an access sheath, with the rigid collar having radial slots to allow the rigid collar to flex.

[0037] Fig. 13D shows the rigid collar of Fig. 13C installed in an access sheath. [0038] Fig. 14 shows the access sheath with an external rim of elastomer to create an atraumatic tip.

[0039] Fig. 15 is a side view of the access sheath of Figs. 3-9B with preferred dimensions and angles.

[0040] Fig.16 is a bottom view of the sheath shown in FIG. 15.

[0041] Fig. 17 is a section view of the sheath shown in FIG. 15.

[0042] Fig. 18 is left end view of the sheath of FIG. 15.

[0043] Fig. 19 is a right end view of the sheath of FIG. 15.

[0044] Fig. 20 is an enlarged detail view of detail A shown in FIG. 18.

[0045] Fig. 21 is front, top and right side perspective view of the sheath shown in FIG. 15.

[0046] Fig. 22 is rear, bottom and right side perspective view of the sheath shown in FIG. 15

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

[0047] Fig. 1 shows a braided tube 20 in its natural braided state. In Fig. 2 the braid is shown on a cylindrical mandrel 22 to demonstrate its tubular shape and ability to expand. The braided tube 20 can be drawn down to a smaller diameter by stretching and pulling the monofilaments into a more longitudinal alignment. Conversely, the braided tube 20 can be expanded to a larger diameter by compression and pushing the filaments into a more radial directed alignment.

[0048] The braided tube 20, especially if made of plastic, can be placed around a mandrel 22 that causes the braided tube 20 to expand to a specific diameter or shape. The braided tube 20 can then be heat set in an oven. Upon cooling the braided tube 20 will be permanently formed into the shape of the mandrel 22. Heat setting mandrels can be made of hollow or solid stainless steel, Delrin® (acetal homopolymer resin). Mandrels 22 may be made of Teflon® (fluoropolymer), especially if intended to coat the braided tube in a plastic/rubber/silicone dispersion. Heat setting can be done at a variety of temperatures and time, depending on the braided tube material and the heat capacity of the mandrel 22. A useful heat set temperature for nylon or PET braids is 120°C and 150 °C for half an hour, followed by cooling to room temperature in ambient conditions or a quench in water.

[0049] Fig. 2 shows braided tube 20 loaded over a Delrin® forming mandrel 22 prior to heat setting. The mandrel 22 may be sized and shaped to product an access sheath having the shape and dimensions as shown in Figs. 15-22.

[0050] Fig. 3A shows a forming mandrel 22 in a preferred geometry for manufacturing an access sheath 40. Fig. 3B shows a braided tube 20 placed over and around the mandrel 22. After the braided tube 20 is loaded over the forming mandrel 22, the braided tube 20 may be conformed to the shape of the mandrel 22 by a partial or complete wrapping of self- adhering silicone tape over the braided tube 20, or alternatively via a shaping block pressed onto the braided tube 20 on the mandrel 22, with the shaping block having an internal opening complimentary to the mandrel, but sized to account for the thickness of the braided tube 20.

[0051] Fig. 4 shows the braided tube 20 after it has been heat formed, removed from the mandrel 22 and trimmed at both distal and proximal ends. This results in a highly flexible, thin, and simple to manufacture access sheath 40. This sheath 40 is permeable which allows natural mucus lubrication of the sinus to enter into the access sheath for additional lubricity. The braiding pattern may be modified to allow more or less permeability by changing the diameter of fibers or filaments of the braid material. Flat monofilament or multi-filar fibers may be used to increase the PIC (how tight the braiding is formed), and reduce the interstitial spacing between fibers of the braided tube 20.

[0052] The braided tube 20 may be coated with a semipermeable or more preferably an impermeable membrane. A less tacky coating or a harder urethane material, of durometer 50A or harder, may be used. It can be applied in thicknesses of 0.1 mm to 0.3 mm. Due to the thinness and the flexibility of the braided tube, even when coated the braided tube may still remain flexible, foldable, and be able to elongate. [0053] In an alternate embodiment a PET (Polyethylene Terephthalate) braided tube can be used with a uniform coat of a silicone dispersion (poiy imethy!si!oxane polymer). Despite being silicone this combination provides a slick surface relative to surgical tools. This can be attributed to the mechanical nature of the structure. The braid surface provides a non-continuous, undulating surface where a full surface contact is replaced by a series of discrete contact points. Discrete contact points reduce the surface area of contact and hence reduce the friction between access sheath 40 and the surgical tool.

[0054] A single layer braided tube coated in an impermeable silicone, such as polydimethylsiloxane polymer, was found to be a good coating as it applies in a thin layer and despite being silicone (that has inherent tackiness) has little tack. The resulting friction as tested showed 50 grams of friction. This is about the same friction as hydrophilic coated devices when tested new. The lubricious nature of the material also does not degrade over time, unlike hydrophilic coatings.

[0055] Examples of lubricious coatings are: ceramic coatings, Parylene® chemical vapor deposited poly(p-xylylene) polymer coating, and hydrophilic coatings. Similar coatings can provide better friction reduction but may not feel as lubricious as mucous membrane.

[0056] Hydrophilic coating provide lubricity similar to mucous membranes, however they require wetting with water or saline to activate, and need periodic or continuous re-wetting to stay slick. Hydrophilic coatings also wear away after multiple abrasions with surgical tools and may not withstand the long procedure time of skull base neurosurgery. Examples of lubricious additives are: barium sulfate, powdered Teflon (fluoropolymer) glass fillers, and ceramic fillers. These can reduce the surface tack but also tend to provide a surgical tool feel that is different from mucous membranes.

[0057] The elastomeric coating on the internal surface of the braided tube 20 may be reduced. If the mandrel 22 is created from a semi flexible rubber or jacketed in rubber it results in a flexible surface. If the braided tube 20 is loaded over this surface and stretched to tightly engage the mandrel 22, the internal contact points of the braided tube embed slightly into the semi-flexible mandrel surface. This effectively masks the internal surface of the braid. A coating step fully coats the external braided tube while leaving the highest contact points of the internal braided tube uncoated and fully retaining the inherent lubricity of the hard plastic monofilament of the braided tube. A semi flexible surface may also be achieved by jacketing the mandrel in polyolefin shrink tubing. When the braid/jacket mandrel are heated for shaping, the shrink tubing softens and the braided tube will slightly embed. This similarly creates a braid/mandrel assembly that has a partially masked inner braid surface for a follow up coating step.

[0058] Fig. 5 shows a formed braided tube that has been coated in the silicone dispersion described above. The distal end may be made atraumatic for insertion in the delicate anatomy of the nasal cavity, for example by using a double layer 36 of the braided tube material, in contrast to the single layer 34 shown in Fig. 4. The double layer 36 may be provided by inverting the braided tube 20 to create a dual wall braided tube with an un-cut, rolled or rounded edge 32.

[0059] Fig. 6 shows a formed braided tube 20 having an inverted braid section 30 to create the rounded edge 32. The rounded edge 32 can be dipped completely into a coating. This creates an impermeable surface in a simple way, although it may reduce flexibility or the ability to draw down and fold since both braid layers are bonded together.

[0060] Figs. 7A-7C show an alternative to the rounded edge design of Fig. 6, with the benefit of the rounded edge 32 has no coating on the inner surface, while the outer surface is coated, and does not bond the layers together preserving a thinner wall and flexibility.

[0061] Referring now to Fig. 7A, the right side of the braided tube 20 is formed on a mandrel 22 and then coated. The left side is not formed or coated. Referring now to Fig. 7B, the uncoated braid (left side) is inverted and loaded through the shaped and coated right side portion. Referring now to Fig. 7C, the rounded edge 32 (formed via the inverting step) and the coated external surface and uncoated internal surface are shown. For comparison, Fig. 8A shows an access sheath with a straight edge while Fig. 8B shows an access sheath 40 with a rounded edge 32. [0062] As is apparent from the description of Figs. 3-8B above, a method of making a surgical access sheath may include placing a length of braided tube material over a mandrel; conforming the braided tube material to the shape of the mandrel; heating the braided tube material to heat set the braided tube material; removing the braided tube material from the mandrel; and cutting the heat set braided tube material to a desired length. The conforming step can be performed by at least partially wrapping tape over the braided tube material, or placing a shaping block having an internal opening complimentary to the mandrel, over the braided tube material.

[0063] A monofilament material having round or flat fibers may be used as the braided tube material. A sheet or strip of braid material may also be used in place of a tube, with the sheet or strip formed into a tube during the manufacturing process. For example, a strip of braid material may be wrapped around the mandrel and formed into a tube via the heat setting. A coating may be applied to at least part of the heat set braided tube.

[0064] Internal contact points of the braided tube material may optionally be embedded into the mandrel surface, and a coating applied onto at least part of the heat set braided material. One or both ends of the heat set braided material may be folded or rolled to form an atraumatic end.

[0065] Figures 9A and 9B show a finished access sheath 40, and demonstrate its ability to conform to significant angulation of surgical tools 42 and 44. The access sheath 40 can stretch as shown in Fig. 9B when surgical tools are angulated and apply a spreading load on the access sheath 40. In typical endonasal skull base procedures, multiple surgical tools are used to stretch the nares in order to increase the angle formed by two surgical tools creating a triangulation rather than bringing the distal ends of the surgical tools together. The access sheath 40 can preferably stretch as much as or more than the tissue of the nares. The access sheath 40 can accommodate the varied anatomy of the human nares and stretch and contract to accommodate surgical tool requirements. [0066] The access sheath 40 may be compressed or folded for low profile placement and high profile working position. In a simple case the access sheath can be folded by hand and slid into the sinus manually. Loading tools or kits may also be used.

[0067] FIG. 10A-10G show a system or kit 50 for low-profile insertion of the access sheath 40. Fig. 10A shows the access sheath 40 next to an elongated tubular loading tool 52. The loading tool 52 has a flared proximal end 54 to aid in channeling the access sheath 40 into the elongated tubular body 62 of the loading tool 52. The loading tool 52 has an slot 56 along one side to allow the access sheath 40 to be separated from the loading tool after it is placed in the nose of the patient. Fig. 10B - 10F show the placement of the access sheath 40. The access sheath 40 can be loaded via the loading tool 52 to 1 ) Compress and control the access sheath 40 into a compact volume; 2) provide a streamlined low profile shape for inserting the access sheath 40 into the narrow space of the nasal opening and cavity; and/or 3) provide a conduit for deploying the access sheath 40.

[0068] The loading tool 52 has a flared proximal end 54 to allow the access sheath 40 to be easily inserted into the loading tool 52 and compacted into a small volume. A tubular body 62 is joined to the flared proximal end 54 of the loading tool 52. The tubular body 62, which may be straight or have a slight taper towards the distal end, is designed to fit into the nasal opening. The slot 56 along the side of the loading tool 52 provides a conduit for the access sheath 40 to be deployed and released.

[0069] The kit in Figs. 10A-10G may be provided with an access sheath 40 comprising a braid material, and a loading tool 52 having a conical proximal end, and a tubular distal end, and the slot 56 extending along one side of the loading tool, along the entire length of the loading tool. The loading tool comprises a flexible material to allow the slot to be pushed open further, to better allow the sheath to moved out of the loading tool into the nose or other body cavity. The slot has a width equal to 25% to 45% of a minimum diameter of the tubular distal end.

[0070] Turning to Fig. 1 1 A, in an alternative access sheath kit, the access sheath 40 may optionally be folded and slid into a tube 70. The tube 70 may be a thin walled round or oval tube, optionally with an annular collar 74 at the back or proximal end to provide a grasping surface. The folded or rolled access sheath 40 may be inserted into the distal or proximal end of the tube. The plunger 72 is inserted into the proximal end as shown in Fig. 1 1 B. The tube 70 is then introduced into the nose. Advancing the plunger while holding the tube stationery pushes the access sheath 40 out of the distal end of the tube as shown in Fig. 1 1 C. The tube and plunger may then be withdrawn by pulling back on the tube, leaving the access sheath 40 in place in the nose. The plunger 72 may have an enlarged head 76 having a diameter greater than the collar 74 or the tube 70, to limit the extent of travel of the plunger into the tube.

[0071] As shown in Figs. 1 1A-1 1 C, the surgical kit has an access sheath 40 made of a braided material, and a loading tool set including the tube 70 and the plunger 72 slidable into the tube. The access sheath 40 is foldable or compressible to fit into the tube, and with the access sheath expandable when ejected from the tube by the plunger. The tube may have an outside diameter of 5 to 20 mm and be transparent or translucent.

[0072] Fig 12A to 12C show another kit using a folding instrument 80 to fold, introduce and deploy the access sheath 40. The folding instrument 80 is a scissor-like device having a bottom jaw 82 having an elongated grooved channel 84. The top jaw 86 is an elongated rod or beam pivotally attached to the bottom jaw 82, with a handle at the back end of each jaw.

[0073] In use the instrument 80 is opened, as shown in Fig. 12A and the access sheath 40 is placed between the open jaws 82 and 86, or over one of the jaws. Squeezing the handles towards each other pivots the jaws towards a closed position shown in Fig. 12B, with the access sheath folded between the jaws. The jaws are then inserted into the nasal cavity and opened slightly to release the access sheath. The instrument 80 is removed while the access sheath 40 is left in place. The instrument 80 can be re-inserted into the internal channel 45 of the access sheath 40 and then manipulated open and closed to help open and expand the access sheath as needed.

[0074] The designs of Figs. 12A-12C if provided as a surgical kit, includes the access sheath 40 made of a braid material, and the scissor-like loading tool having the first jaw pivotally attached to the second jaw, with the first jaw having a channel and the second jaw movable at least partially into the channel when the scissor-like loading tool is in a closed position, to fold the access sheath.

[0075] Referring to Figs. 13A and 13B, a conical collar insert 90 may be placed in the angle section 154 and flare section 156 of the access sheath 40, shown in Figs. 15- 22. The insert 90 may be made from a hard plastic or metal so that it is inherently lubricious relative to metal or plastic surgical tools 44. The insert 90 provides a lubricious bearing surface at the angle and flare sections of the access sheath 40, where surgical tools 44 extensively contact with the access sheath 40.

[0076] Figs. 13B to 13E show an alternative conical collar insert 100 which is a rigid collar having radial slots 102 to allow it to flex into a more open state in response to forces exerted by surgical tools 44. This allows the surgical tools 44 to be more easily moved into larger acute angles relative to each other. The collar inserts 90 and 100 may each have a flared section 1 10 joined to a tubular section 1 12 having straight or parallel walls. Alternatively the tubular section 1 12 may have a reverse flare wherein it tapers outwardly towards the distal end. As shown in Fig. 13A and 13D, the flared section 1 10 has a shape and dimensions to allow it to fit and be attached into the flare section 156 of the access sheath 40. The tubular section 1 12 is similarly configured to fit into the angle section 154 of the access sheath 40. The inserts 90 and 100 may be attached to the access sheath 40 via adhesive, plastics welding, shrink fit, molded into place, snap fit, etc.

[0077] Fig 14 shows an access sheath 40 with a distal end 120 of an elastomer to create an atraumatic tip 122. The elastomer can be an internal and external rim. Preferably the elastomer is only on the external surface so as not to create an internal surface of elastomer. This provides an atraumatic tip 122 but does not create an internal elastomeric surface that could result in a friction inducing surface at the distal end of the internal channel 45 of the access sheath 40. The elastomer may be provided a cut edge of a single layer of braided tube material, or over the rounded edge 32 of a access sheath 40 having two layers of braided tube material at the edge.

[0078] The elastomer may extend proximally 1 -50 mm on the external surface of the access sheath 40. The external extended elastomeric surface 124 provides a user selectable section that may be cut to a desired length. When cut, a portion of the external extended elastomeric surface 124 remains on the access sheath 40 and provides an atraumatic distal rim. An external rim of elastomer may similarly be used on the proximal end of the access sheath. This provides a section at the proximal end that maintains the integrity of the braided tube and avoid fraying. The external rim of elastomer on the proximal rim, if used, may only be on the external surface so as not to create friction on surgical tools passing through the internal channel 45.

[0079] Figs. 15-22 show dimensions and angles which may be used for the access sheath 40. The mandrel 22 may be sized and shaped to form an access sheath as shown in these Figures. In this example, the access sheath 40 has a body section 152, and angle section 154 and a flare or conical section 156. The sheath 40 may be formed of braid material as a one piece unit with the body section 152, the angle section 154 and the flare section 156 integrally joined together. As shown in Fig. 20, the sheath 40 may have a thin flexible wall 158 having a thickness TT which allows the sheath to conform to the body orifice, or the inner wall of the patient's nostrils in the case of nasal access. The flare section 156 may be provided as a conical ring forming an angle DD of 120-160 or 130-150 degrees with the top wall of the angle section. The sheath 40 may have a single through internal channel 45 extending from a distal opening 162 to a proximal opening 165. As shown in Figs. 18, 19 and 22, the openings 162 and 165, and the cross section of the body section 152, may be generally in the shape of an oval or an ellipse.

[0080] Referring to FIGS. 15 and 17, the distal opening 162 may lie in a plane forming an angle forming an angle BB with the bottom of the sheath 40, with BB ranging from 95 to 125 or 100 to 1 15 degrees. As best shown in fig. 17, the angle section 154 may be described as joined to the body section 152 at a vertical line 151 . The upper and lower walls of the sheath extend distally away from the vertical line 151 towards the distal opening 162 at acute angles to the vertical line 151 , which may the same or different angles. As shown in Fig. 15, the included angle CC between the top surface of the angle section 154 and the lower wall of the body section may range from 25 to 40 or 30 to 35 degrees. The angle PP in fig. 15 relating to the diverging angle of the top and bottom surfaces of the body section is typically 10-20 or 12-16 degrees. Dimension KK may be 8-16 or 10-14 mm, with dimensions MM and SS both generally about 65-85 or 70-80 mm.

[0081] As shown in Figs. 15-17, a surgical sheath 40 includes a conical section; an angle section joined to the conical section, with the conical section having a central axis AF not parallel to a central axis AN of the angle section; a body section joined to the angle section, with the body section having a length at least twice the length of the angle section; and the conical section, the angle section and the body section comprising a braid material. The sheath 40 may further include an insert 90, 100 inside of the conical section, with the insert made of a non-braid material. An elastomer coating may be provided on at least part of an external surface of the sheath. The sheath may have a rolled edge at its distal end.

[0082] Turning to Figs. 15-16 and 20-22, one or more ridges 64 may be provided on an outer surface of the body section 152. The ridges may optionally be provided as rings extending continuously around the outside surface of the body section. The dimensions and angles shown in the drawings of all embodiments may typically be varied by 10, 20 or 30% depending on various design parameters.

[0083] The angle section 154 may allow the proximal end of the sheath 40 to be more easily stretched and/or deflected. This allows for more versatile movement of surgical tools extending through the sheath during surgery. As shown in Figs. 15 and 17 the angle section 154 forms an irregular quadrilateral shape in cross section. In Fig. 17 the angle section 154 may be defined by line F4 along with segments or lines F1 , F2 and F3, with F4 and F2 forming a first acute angle and with F1 and F3 forming a second acute angle. Each of the sides or segments F4, F1 , F2 and F3 forming the angle section 154 may also have different lengths. F3 may be substantially perpendicular to F2. The angle section 154 may alternatively be described via a centerline AN perpendicular to and bisecting segment or line F4 and intersecting a centerline AF of the flare section 156 at an angle AB of 5-30 or 10-20 degrees.

Claims

1 . A surgical sheath comprising:
a conical section;
an angle section joined to the conical section, with the conical section having a central axis AF not parallel to a central axis AN of the angle section;
a body section joined to the angle section, with the body section having a length at least twice the length of the angle section; and
the conical section, the angle section and the body section comprising a braid material.
2. The sheath of claim 1 further including an insert inside of the conical section, with the insert made of a non-braid material.
3. The sheath of claim 2 with the insert having radial slots.
4. The sheath of claims 1 or 2 further comprising an elastomer coating on at least part of an external surface of the sheath.
5. The sheath of claims 1 or 2 further including a rolled edge at a distal end of the sheath.
6. A surgical kit, comprising:
an access sheath comprising a braid material; and
a loading tool having a conical proximal end, and a tubular distal end, and a slot extending from the conical proximal end to the tubular distal end.
7. The kit of claim 6 wherein the loading tool comprises a flexible material.
8. The kit of claim 7 wherein the slot extends along an entire length of the loading tool.
9. The kit of claim 8 wherein the slot has a width equal to 25% to 45% of a minimum diameter of the tubular distal end.
10. The kit of claims 6 or 8 wherein the access sheath has a conical section, an angle section joined to the conical section, with the conical section having a central axis AF not parallel to a central axis AN of the angle section, a body section joined to the angle section, with the body section having a length at least twice the length of the angle section.
1 1 . A surgical kit, comprising:
an access sheath comprising a braid material; and
a loading tool having a tube and a plunger slidable into the tube, with the access sheath foldable or compressible to fit into the tube, and with the access sheath expandable when ejected from the tube by the plunger.
12. The kit of claim 1 1 with the tube having an outside diameter of 5 to 20 mm.
13. The kit of claim 1 1 or 12 wherein the tube is transparent or translucent.
14. The kit of claim 1 1 or 12 with the access sheath having a conical section, an angle section joined to the conical section, with the conical section having a central axis AF not parallel to a central axis AN of the angle section, a body section joined to the angle section, with the body section having a length at least twice the length of the angle section.
15. A surgical kit, comprising:
an access sheath comprising a braid material; and
a scissor-like loading tool having a first jaw pivotally attached to a second jaw, with the first jaw having a channel and the second jaw movable at least partially into the channel when the scissor-like loading tool is in a closed position, to fold the access sheath.
16. A method of making a surgical access sheath, comprising:
placing a length of braided tube material over a mandrel;
conforming the braided tube material to the shape of the mandrel;
heating the braided tube material to heat set the braided tube material;
removing the braided tube material from the mandrel; and
cutting the heat set braided tube material to a desired length.
17. The method of claim 16 wherein the conforming step is performed by at least partially wrapping tape over the braided tube material, or placing a shaping block having an internal opening complimentary to the mandrel, over the braided tube material.
18. The method of claim 16 or 17 with the braided tube material comprising a monofilament material having round or flat fibers.
19. The method of claim 16 or 18 further including applying a coating to at least part of the heat set braided tube material.
20. The method of claim 16 or 18 further including embedding internal contact points of the braided tube material into the mandrel surface, and applying a coating onto at least part of the heat set braided material.
21 . The method of claim 16 or 18 further comprising rolling or folding at least one of a distal end and a proximal end of the heat set braided material to form an atraumatic end.
22. A method for placing a surgical access sheath, comprising:
loading a surgical access sheath into a loading tool, with the surgical access sheath comprising a braid material, and with the loading tool having a conical proximal end, and a tubular distal end, and a slot extending from the conical proximal end to the tubular distal end;
inserting the loading tool into a body orifice;
inserting a surgical tool into an internal channel of the surgical access sheath; moving the surgical tool to move the surgical access sheath out of the loading tool through the slot; and
withdrawing the loading tool from the body orifice.
23. A method for placing a surgical access sheath, comprising:
placing a surgical access sheath into a low profile delivery position, with the surgical access sheath comprising a braid material;
loading the surgical access sheath into a tube;
inserting the loading tool into a body orifice;
moving a plunger into the tube to eject the surgical access sheath out of the tube and into the body orifice; and
withdrawing the tube from the body orifice.
24. A method for placing a surgical access sheath, comprising:
providing a scissor-like loading tool having a first jaw pivotally attached to a second jaw, with the first jaw having a channel and the second jaw movable at least partially into the channel when the scissor-like loading tool is in a closed position;
providing a surgical access sheath comprising a braid material, with the access sheath having an internal channel; placing the access sheath around one of the first jaw and the second jaw, while the jaws are in an open position;
moving the jaws into the closed position, to fold and grasp the surgical access sheath;
inserting the jaws into a body orifice;
opening the jaws to release the surgical access sheath; and
removing the jaws from the body orifice.
PCT/US2017/047550 2016-08-19 2017-08-18 Surgical tissue protection sheath WO2018035430A1 (en)

Priority Applications (4)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US201662377400P true 2016-08-19 2016-08-19
US62/377,400 2016-08-19
US201662396746P true 2016-09-19 2016-09-19
US62/396,746 2016-09-19

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Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20050192608A1 (en) * 2003-10-17 2005-09-01 Miguel Moreno Surgical access device and manufacture thereof
US20060041270A1 (en) * 2004-05-07 2006-02-23 Jay Lenker Medical access sheath
US20060095050A1 (en) * 2004-09-14 2006-05-04 William A. Cook Australia Pty. Ltd. Large diameter sheath
US20070055107A1 (en) * 2003-04-25 2007-03-08 Tyco Healthcare Group Lp Surgical hand access apparatus
US20130190571A1 (en) * 2009-11-14 2013-07-25 SPIWay, LLC Surgical tissue protection sheath

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20070055107A1 (en) * 2003-04-25 2007-03-08 Tyco Healthcare Group Lp Surgical hand access apparatus
US20050192608A1 (en) * 2003-10-17 2005-09-01 Miguel Moreno Surgical access device and manufacture thereof
US20060041270A1 (en) * 2004-05-07 2006-02-23 Jay Lenker Medical access sheath
US20060095050A1 (en) * 2004-09-14 2006-05-04 William A. Cook Australia Pty. Ltd. Large diameter sheath
US20130190571A1 (en) * 2009-11-14 2013-07-25 SPIWay, LLC Surgical tissue protection sheath

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