WO2017180225A1 - Dental abutment tool - Google Patents

Dental abutment tool Download PDF

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Publication number
WO2017180225A1
WO2017180225A1 PCT/US2017/016019 US2017016019W WO2017180225A1 WO 2017180225 A1 WO2017180225 A1 WO 2017180225A1 US 2017016019 W US2017016019 W US 2017016019W WO 2017180225 A1 WO2017180225 A1 WO 2017180225A1
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WO
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Patent type
Prior art keywords
abutment
opposing
dental
semi
head
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/US2017/016019
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Johnny Shane WRIGHT
John Henry JOSEPH
Original Assignee
Dental Tool Development, LLC
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61CDENTISTRY; APPARATUS OR METHODS FOR ORAL OR DENTAL HYGIENE
    • A61C3/00Dental tools or instruments
    • A61C3/10Tooth pincettes or the like
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61CDENTISTRY; APPARATUS OR METHODS FOR ORAL OR DENTAL HYGIENE
    • A61C8/00Means to be fixed to the jaw-bone for consolidating natural teeth or for fixing dental prostheses thereon; Dental implants; Implanting tools
    • A61C8/0048Connecting the upper structure to the implant, e.g. bridging bars
    • A61C8/005Connecting devices for joining an upper structure with an implant member, e.g. spacers
    • A61C8/0066Connecting devices for joining an upper structure with an implant member, e.g. spacers with positioning means

Abstract

Provided herein are dental abutment tools configured to securely hold and align abutment components during installation on dental implants. Such dental abutment tools comprise first and second opposing arms, a first end from which the first and second opposing arms extend, and first and second opposing heads attached to terminal ends of the first and second opposing arms, respectively, wherein the first and second opposing heads are spaced apart. The first opposing head comprises a cupped head, and the second opposing head comprises a substantially flat head, both of which are configured to conform to an abutment component of a dental implant.

Description

DESCRIPTION

DENTAL ABUTMENT TOOL

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims the benefit of and priority to U.S. Provisional

Patent Application Serial No. 62/321 ,356, filed April 12, 2016, the disclosure of which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.

TECHNICAL FIELD

The presently disclosed subject matter relates to dental abutment tools and related devices, systems and methods. The presently disclosed subject matter also relates to the use of dental prosthetics and tools associated therewith. BACKGROUND

Dental implants, also referred to as dental or tooth prosthetics, provide a long lasting way to replace missing teeth. Missing teeth can cause significant health problems for a subject, can impair chewing, eating and talking, and can lead to social anxiety. Thus, there is a need and desire to replace missing teeth.

Dental implants of various forms have been used in dentistry for decades. When performed under ideal conditions dental implants have a high success rate. Properly implanted tooth prosthetics look and function like natural teeth.

Dental implant surgery includes placing an anchor or implant, often a titanium screw, directly into a patient's jawbone. Once the jaw and gums have fully healed from implanting the anchor, a prosthetic tooth or crown is attached to the anchor. To facilitate attachment of the crown to the implant an abutment is often times used. The abutment can be configured to engage the anchor/implant on one end, and secure the prosthetic tooth or crown on the other. In the confined space of the mouth of a patient, properly securing and seating the abutment on an implant during a dental implant procedure, and particularly during post-surgical abutment installation, can be difficult. Therefore, there is an unmet need for a dental implant tool or dental abutment tool configured to aid in the placement and securement of dental implants, particularly engaging the abutment portion to the implant portion post-surgically.

SUMMARY

Provided herein are dental abutment tools comprising first and second opposing arms, a first end from which the first and second opposing arms extend, and first and second opposing heads attached to terminal ends of the first and second opposing arms, respectively, wherein the first and second opposing heads are spaced apart, wherein the first opposing head comprises a cupped head, wherein the second opposing head comprises a substantially flat head, and wherein the first and second opposing heads are configured to grasp an abutment component of a dental implant. In some embodiments, the first and second opposing arms can be configured to be depressible to bring the spaced apart first and second opposing heads closer together. In some embodiments, the first and second opposing arms can be spring-loaded, wherein the first and second opposing arms are configured to return to an original position upon release of a depressible pressure on the opposing arms.

In some embodiments, the cupped head can comprise an outer wall defining a semi-circular cylindrical structure, and an inner surface of the outer wall, wherein the inner surface can comprise a semi-cylindrical opening extending the length of the outer wall and a tapered semi-conical portion at a lower portion, or lower half, of the semi-cylindrical opening. In some embodiments, the cupped head comprises an outer wall defining a semi-circular cylindrical structure, and an inner surface of the outer wall, wherein the inner surface comprises a semi-cylindrical opening extending the length of the outer wall and one or more tapered planes at a lower portion of the semi-cylindrical opening. In some embodiments, the tapered semi-conical portion, the one or more tapered planes, and/or the semi- cylindrical opening can be configured to apply a force to a cone portion of an abutment to be installed on a dental implant.

In some embodiments, the cupped head can further comprise a bead extending from the inner wall into an interior of the semi-cylindrical opening. In some embodiments, the bead can be configured to engage a groove around an abutment cone. In some embodiments, the width of the cupped head between the bead extending from the inner wall into an interior of the semi-cylindrical opening can be about 0.2 inches, wherein the bead depth can be about 0.02 inches, wherein the included angle of the tapered semi- conical portion can be about 17 degrees.

In some embodiments, the cupped head can be configured to securely hold an abutment in place in the dental abutment tool. In some embodiments, the flat head can be configured to engage a flat portion of an abutment.

In some embodiments, the flat head can extend from the second opposing arm in substantially a same vertical plane as the second opposing arm, wherein a lower portion of the flat head can comprise an about 5° to about 20° inward bend configured to optimize a grip of the flat head on the flat portion of the abutment.

In some aspects, such tools can further comprise a locking element configured to temporarily lock the opposing arms in a depressed state.

Also provided herein are methods of installing a dental implant abutment, including surgically implanting a dental implant into a bone of a subject, providing a dental abutment tool, comprising first and second opposing arms, a first end from which the first and second opposing arms extend, and first and second opposing heads attached to terminal ends of the first and second opposing arms, respectively, wherein the first and second opposing heads are spaced apart, wherein the first opposing head comprises a cupped head, wherein the second opposing head comprises a substantially flat head, and wherein the first and second opposing heads are configured to grasp an abutment component of a dental implant, and using the dental abutment tool to align and secure an abutment to the implant. In some embodiments, the method can further comprise attaching a dental prosthetic to the abutment.

In some embodiments, the first and second opposing arms can be spring-loaded, wherein the first and second opposing arms can be configured to return to an original position upon release of a depressible pressure on the opposing arms. In some embodiments, the cupped head comprises an outer wall defining a semi-circular cylindrical structure, and an inner surface of the outer wall, wherein the inner surface comprises a semi- cylindrical opening extending the length of the outer wall and a tapered semi-conical portion at a lower portion of the semi-cylindrical opening. In some embodiments, the tapered semi-conical portion and/or the semi- cylindrical opening can be configured to apply a force to a cone portion of an abutment to be installed on a dental implant.

In some embodiments, the cupped head further comprises a bead extending from the inner wall into an interior of the semi-cylindrical opening, wherein the bead is configured to engage a groove around an abutment cone. In some embodiments, the width of the cupped head between the bead extending from the inner wall into an interior of the semi-cylindrical opening is about 0.2 inches, wherein the bead depth is about 0.02 inches, wherein the included angle of the tapered semi-conical portion is about 17 degrees.

Also provided herein are dental implant kits, comprising a dental implant, an abutment component, and a dental abutment tool, comprising first and second opposing arms, a first end from which the first and second opposing arms extend, and first and second opposing heads attached to terminal ends of the first and second opposing arms, respectively, wherein the first and second opposing heads are spaced apart, wherein the first opposing head comprises a cupped head, wherein the second opposing head comprises a substantially flat head, and wherein the first and second opposing heads are configured to grasp an abutment component of a dental implant. In some embodiments, the dental implant kit can further comprise a dental prosthetic. Embodiments of the presently disclosed subject matter having been stated hereinabove, and which is achieved in whole or in part by the presently disclosed subject matter, other embodiments will become evident as the description proceeds when taken in connection with the accompanying Examples as best described hereinbelow.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The presently disclosed subject matter can be better understood by referring to the following figures. The components in the figures are not necessarily to scale, emphasis instead being placed upon illustrating the principles of the presently disclosed subject matter (often schematically). In the figures, like reference numerals designate corresponding parts throughout the different views. A further understanding of the presently disclosed subject matter can be obtained by reference to an embodiment set forth in the illustrations of the accompanying drawings. Although the illustrated embodiment is merely exemplary of systems for carrying out the presently disclosed subject matter, both the organization and method of operation of the presently disclosed subject matter, in general, together with further objectives and advantages thereof, may be more easily understood by reference to the drawings and the following description. The drawings are not intended to limit the scope of this presently disclosed subject matter, which is set forth with particularity in the claims as appended or as subsequently amended, but merely to clarify and exemplify the presently disclosed subject matter.

For a more complete understanding of the presently disclosed subject matter, reference is now made to the following drawings in which:

Figure 1 is a schematic illustration of an exemplary dental implant system;

Figure 2 is a partial cross-sectional depiction of an exemplary dental implant system after implantation;

Figure 3 is a perspective view of an exemplary abutment component of a dental implant system; Figures 4A through 4E are perspective (Figures 4A and 4B), top (Figure 4C), side (Figure 4D) and end (Figure 4E) views of a dental abutment tool as disclosed herein;

Figure 5 is a schematic view of a dental abutment tool as disclosed herein;

Figures 6A and 6B are perspective and cross-sectional views, respectively, of a head configuration of a dental abutment tool as disclosed herein;

Figure 7 is a close-up view of a dental abutment tool engaging an abutment component of a dental implant system; and

Figures 8A-8C are perspective, cross-sectional and bottom views, respectively, of a head configuration of a dental abutment tool as disclosed herein. DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The presently disclosed subject matter now will be described more fully hereinafter, in which some, but not all embodiments of the presently disclosed subject matter are described. Indeed, the presently disclosed subject matter can be embodied in many different forms and should not be construed as limited to the embodiments set forth herein; rather, these embodiments are provided so that this disclosure will satisfy applicable legal requirements.

The terminology used herein is for the purpose of describing particular embodiments only and is not intended to be limiting of the presently disclosed subject matter.

All technical and scientific terms used herein, unless otherwise defined below, are intended to have the same meaning as commonly understood by one of ordinary skill in the art. References to techniques employed herein are intended to refer to the techniques as commonly understood in the art, including variations on those techniques or substitutions of equivalent techniques that would be apparent to one of skill in the art. While the following terms are believed to be well understood by one of ordinary skill in the art, the following definitions are set forth to facilitate explanation of the presently disclosed subject matter.

In describing the presently disclosed subject matter, it will be understood that a number of techniques and steps are disclosed. Each of these has individual benefit and each can also be used in conjunction with one or more, or in some cases all, of the other disclosed techniques.

Accordingly, for the sake of clarity, this description will refrain from repeating every possible combination of the individual steps in an unnecessary fashion. Nevertheless, the specification and claims should be read with the understanding that such combinations are entirely within the scope of the invention and the claims.

Following long-standing patent law convention, the terms "a", "an", and "the" refer to "one or more" when used in this application, including the claims. Thus, for example, reference to "a tool" includes a plurality of such tools, and so forth.

Unless otherwise indicated, all numbers expressing quantities of ingredients, reaction conditions, and so forth used in the specification and claims are to be understood as being modified in all instances by the term "about". Accordingly, unless indicated to the contrary, the numerical parameters set forth in this specification and attached claims are approximations that can vary depending upon the desired properties sought to be obtained by the presently disclosed subject matter.

As used herein, the term "about," when referring to a value or to an amount of a composition, mass, weight, temperature, time, volume, concentration, percentage, etc., is meant to encompass variations of in some embodiments ±20%, in some embodiments ±10%, in some embodiments ±5%, in some embodiments ±1 %, in some embodiments ±0.5%, and in some embodiments ±0.1 % from the specified amount, as such variations are appropriate to perform the disclosed methods or employ the disclosed compositions.

The term "comprising", which is synonymous with "including" "containing" or "characterized by" is inclusive or open-ended and does not exclude additional, unrecited elements or method steps. "Comprising" is a term of art used in claim language which means that the named elements are essential, but other elements can be added and still form a construct within the scope of the claim.

As used herein, the phrase "consisting of" excludes any element, step, or ingredient not specified in the claim. When the phrase "consists of" appears in a clause of the body of a claim, rather than immediately following the preamble, it limits only the element set forth in that clause; other elements are not excluded from the claim as a whole.

As used herein, the phrase "consisting essentially of" limits the scope of a claim to the specified materials or steps, plus those that do not materially affect the basic and novel characteristic(s) of the claimed subject matter.

With respect to the terms "comprising", "consisting of", and "consisting essentially of", where one of these three terms is used herein, the presently disclosed and claimed subject matter can include the use of either of the other two terms.

As used herein, the term "and/or" when used in the context of a listing of entities, refers to the entities being present singly or in combination. Thus, for example, the phrase "A, B, C, and/or D" includes A, B, C, and D individually, but also includes any and all combinations and subcombinations of A, B, C, and D.

A dental implant, sometimes referred to as an endosseous implant, is a surgical element that interfaces with the bone of the jaw or skull to support a dental prosthesis. The dental implant can act as an orthodontic anchor to support prosthetic elements such as a crown, bridge, denture, and/or facial prosthesis, each of which can in some embodiments be generally referred to as dental prostheses. A dental implant works by intimately interacting with and bonding to bone material in the jaw or skull of a patient. This is facilitated by osseointegration, which is a biological phenomenon that allows certain materials, such as for example titanium and some ceramics, to form an intimate bond to bone. The bond is sufficiently strong to allow the implant to support physical loads, e.g. chewing and biting, for many years. With a dental implant serving as an anchor a prosthetic tooth can be securely attached in a manner that closely mimics a natural tooth. Often times an abutment component is used to facilitate the connection between the implant or anchor and the dental prosthetic.

Thus, a dental implant surgery can comprise the implantation of a dental implant into the jaw bone or skull bone. A period of time, such as days, weeks or months, can sometimes be needed to allow sufficient osseointegration to ensure a secure bond between the dental implant and bone. Next, in a post-surgical phase, the dental prosthetic (for example, a tooth, crown, bridge or denture) can be secured to the implant, or an abutment can be secured to the implant first and then the prosthetic to the abutment. Where an abutment is used a screw or other securing member can be used to secure the abutment to the implant. Where an abutment is used, the prosthetic is then secured to the abutment using dental cement, a small screw, or fused with the abutment as one piece during fabrication.

Exemplary dental implant systems are illustrated in Figures 1 and 2. Figure 1 illustrates an exemplary dental implant system 10, including implant 12, abutment 14 and prosthetic 16, configured to be implanted into an upper or lower jaw 20 of patient's mouth. Implant 12 is configured to be implanted into the jawbone, followed by securement of abutment 14 to implant 12, thereby providing an attachment point for prosthetic 16. In an implanted state, as depicted in Figure 2, implant 12 can be embedded in bone 22, including for example a jaw bone of a patient, surrounded by gum tissue 24. Abutment 14 is shown in an installed position wherein it can be engaged to implant 12. By securing abutment 14 to implant 12, prosthetic 16, e.g. a crown, bridge, denture, and/or facial prosthesis, has a secure place to be attached proximate to gum tissue 24 similar to a native tooth.

As illustrated in Figure 3, abutment 14, also referred to as abutment component, used in dental implants can in some embodiments comprise a base portion 30, a main body portion 32, a conical head 34, a flat portion 36 on conical head 34, a groove 38 (or female groove), an implant engaging portion 40, and a cylindrical opening 42 from an upper portion of conical head 34. In some embodiments abutment 14 can be configured to engage an implant post-surgically by receiving a portion of the implant extending from the bone into implant engaging portion 40 of abutment 14, or by slidingly engaging base portion 30 into an opening in the implant. By way of example and not limitation, base portion 30 can in some embodiments comprise a hexagonal, octagonal or other geometric shape, which can in some embodiments be configured to be received and align with a receiving portion or opening in implant 12 (see Figures 1 and 2). In some embodiments abutment 14 can be secured to implant 12 by passing a screw or other threaded member through cylindrical opening 42 and into a threaded portion in implant 12. Abutments, including those depicted in Figures 1 , 2 and 3, can be made of titanium, zirconia, zirconia with a titanium base, and other suitable materials and/or combinations thereof.

Installing and properly aligning abutments post-surgically, including those depicted in Figures 1 , 2 and 3, can be a challenge for dentists and dental practitioners. Often times positioning, aligning and properly seating the abutment on the implant can be quite difficult, particularly given the confined space within the mouth of a patient. In a model such an abutment can be turned or twisted as needed to achieve optimal orientation, and there are no other anatomical structures or tissues to get in the way. However, in a patient in the dental chair there is only so much freedom the clinician has in terms of orientation to gain access to the implant site. And there are cheeks, teeth, the tongue and soft tissue with which to contend, particularly post- surgically where tissue can be at least partly covering or obscuring the dental implant. There are currently some tools available to attempt to assist in holding and positioning abutments, but such tools are inadequate and do not sufficiently aid in abutment positioning. Provided herein is a dental abutment tool that allows a clinician or dentist to maintain a secure hold on the abutment while it is positioned and secured to an implant. As illustrated in Figures 4A through 4E, dental abutment tool 50 as disclosed herein can in some embodiments comprise two opposing arms, including a left arm 52L and right arm 52R, a terminal end 54, and two opposing heads 56, one at each end of the opposing arms 52L and 52R. Opposing arms 52L and 52R and terminal end 54 can substantially form a tweezer or similar pinching device with opposing arms 52L and 52R having a depressible functionality allowing opposing heads 56 to be brought closer together. Opposing arms 52L and 52R can in some embodiments be substantially similar and comprise substantially flat or planar, and in some embodiments ergonomic, extended members spaced apart and extending from a joined portion making up terminal end 54. In some embodiments opposing arms 52L and 52R can have a slight curvature as they extent from terminal end 54. By binding or joining (welding, gluing, bonding) ends of opposing arms 52L and 52R together at terminal end 54 and thereby spacing them apart as they extend from terminal end 54 a resilient or spring loaded functionality can be imparted in opposing arms 52L and 52R. Thus, in some embodiments the two opposing arms can in some embodiments have a resilient or spring- loaded effect, provided in some embodiments by the curvature of the opposing arms and joinder at the terminal end. As such, when pressed together by opposing fingers/thumbs of a user opposing arms 52L and 52R, and opposing heads 56 attached thereto, can be brought or pinched together, and upon release of depressible pressure by a user return to the spaced apart orientation. This resilient effect allows a user to squeeze or depress the opposing arms 52L and 52R together to thereby manipulate opposing heads 56, and then release pressure on the opposing arms whereby they return to their original and opened position.

To provide a spring-loaded functionality opposing arms 52L and 52R, and in some embodiments all or substantially all of dental abutment tool 50, can be made of a material with sufficient strength and rigidity yet flexibility to allow for the tweezer-like function. By way of example and not limitation, dental abutment tool 50 can comprise a metal material or alloy material, including for example steel or stainless steel. In some embodiments dental abutment tool 50 can comprise a plastic material, polymer material, carbon fiber material, titanium or combinations thereof.

Opposing heads 56, one at each end of the opposing arms 52L and

52R, can in some embodiments comprise flat head 58 and cupped head 60. Although depicted in Figures 4A-4E with cupped head 60 on opposing arm 52L and flat head 58 on opposing arm 52R, the two types of opposing heads 56 can be on either opposing arm 52L or 52R without departing from the scope of the instant disclosure. That is, in some embodiments the disclosed dental abutment tool 50 can be provided in both left hand and right hand versions. As an example only, one orientation is illustrated in Figures 4A-4E, but one of ordinary skill in the art can envision the opposing orientation without departing from the scope of the instant disclosure.

One of the two opposing heads can comprise a flat head 58 while the other opposing head can comprise a cupped head 60. As described further herein, cupped head 60 and flat head 58 can be configured to securely hold an abutment (such as abutment 14 in Figures 1 -3) of a dental implant to thereby facilitate the positioning and securement of the abutment to an implant post-surgically within a patient with ease, particularly as compared to currently available tools and methodologies.

Cupped head 60 can be configured to engage an abutment used in a dental implant system, including providing a semi-circular cylindrical structure configured to mate with or align with conical head 34 of abutment 14 (Figure 3). On the opposing arm (arm 52L or 52R) flat head 58 can be configured to engage flat portion 36 of abutment 14 (Figure 3). By mating flat head 58 with flat portion 36 of abutment 14 the abutment is further secured in the grasp of dental tool 50 and in some embodiments can prevent the abutment from spinning or rotating within the tool during placement of the abutment. Moreover, flat head 58 can be used to locate or position flat portion 36 of abutment 14 to the outside of the jawline, as can be required during dental implant surgery. Moreover, in some embodiments flat head 58 can also assist in aligning a hex or other geometric configuration on base portion 30 of the abutment with a hex socket or matching receiving portion of an implant that is implanted in the bone.

Flat head 58 can in some embodiments comprise a substantial continuation of the opposing arm from which it extends (52L or 52R in Figure 4A), positioned at an approximately 90° to approximately 150° angle A, in some embodiments an about 1 20° angle A, with respect to the horizontal plane X of the opposing arm from which it extends (52L or 52R), as depicted in Figure 5. In some embodiments flat head 58 can extend from its opposing arm (52L or 52R) in substantially the same vertical plane Y as the opposing arm from which it extends, while in some embodiments a lower portion, or approximately the lower half or lower 50%, of flat head 58 can have a slight (about 5° to about 20°) bend 66 inwards towards head 60 as depicted in the end view of Figure 4E (also in Figure 7 discussed further below). Such a configuration can in some embodiments optimize the grip and/or alignment of flat head 58 with flat portion 36 of abutment 14, particularly when abutment 14 is gripped or held by dental abutment tool 50. Moreover, in some aspects flat head 58 can be about 0.05 to about 0.20 inches wide, including for example about 0.1 0 inches wide. In some aspects flat head 58 can have serrations, grooves or other textured profile to improve grip, while in some embodiments it can be smooth or substantially free of serrations.

Figure 5 provides further characterizations of dental abutment tool 50. Dental abutment tool 50 as provided herein can be configured at various sizes and dimensions based on the desired use and need. For example, dental abutment tool 50 as illustrated in Figure 5 can have a length L of about 2 to about 10 inches, or about 2 inches, about 3 inches, about 4 inches, about 5 inches, about 6 inches, about 7 inches, about 8 inches, about 9 inches, or about 10 inches. Dental abutment tool 50 as illustrated in Figure 5 can have a thickness T, or height of opposing arms 52L/52R, of about 0.25 to about 0.45 inches, or about 0.25, about 0.3, about 0.35, about 0.4 or about 0.45 inches. Dental abutment tool 50 as illustrated in Figure 5 can have a head width HW, namely cupped head 60, of about 0.1 to about 0.4 inches, or about 0.1 , about 0.2, about 0.25, about 0.3, about 0.35 or about 0.4 inches. In some aspects, dental abutment tool 50 as illustrated in Figures 4A-4E and 5 can be about 6 inches long, about 0.25 to about 0.45 inches wide/thick, and have a head width of about 0.20 inches.

As would be appreciated by one of ordinary skill in the art, the length, width, height and angular orientation of the various parts of such a tool can be varied without departing from the scope of the instant disclosure. Indeed, the instant disclosure contemplates various sizes of the disclosed dental abutment tools for different applications in a dental implant surgery, postsurgical application or related procedure as conditions dictate, e.g. size and/or age of the patient, the surgery location within the patient's mouth, the size of the surgeon's hands, the size and/or type of dental implant/abutment, etc.

Figures 6A and 6B illustrate in further detail embodiments of the opposing heads of the disclosed dental abutment tools, and particularly cupped head 60. As discussed herein, cupped head 60 can in some embodiments be configured to engage an abutment used in a dental implant system. For clarity, cross-sectional views of at least portions of cupped head 60 of Figures 6A and 6B are shown separate and apart from opposing arm 52R/52L of dental abutment tool 50 to which it would be connected, such as depicted in Figures 4A to 4E, and 5.

In some embodiments cupped head 60 can comprise an outer wall defining a semi-circular cylindrical structure, and an inner surface of the outer wall, wherein the inner surface comprises a semi-cylindrical opening extending the length of the outer wall and a tapered semi-conical portion at a lower portion of the semi-cylindrical opening. Referring particularly to Figures 6A and 6B, cupped head 60 can in some embodiments comprise a body 90 comprising an outer wall 82 and inner wall 84 defining a semicircular cylindrical structure. Inner wall 84 of body 90 can define a semi- cylindrical opening 88 extending the length of, or substantially the entire length of, body 90. A portion, including in some embodiments a lower portion, of semi-cylindrical opening 88 can comprise a tapered cone 92 or tapered semi-conical portion. In some embodiments a male bead or tongue 86 can extend from an inner wall 84 into the interior of semi-cylindrical opening 88, as depicted in Figures 6A and 6B, and in some embodiments can be located at a lower portion of tapered cone 92.

Cupped head 60 can in some embodiments be configured to have an opening suitable for receiving and/or mating with an abutment 14 (see, e.g. Figure 3). Thus, cupped head 60 can have a head width HW as shown in Figure 6B, or width between tongue 86 on opposing sides of the opening, of about 0.05 to about 0.4 inches, or about 0.05, about 0.1 , about 0.15, about 0.2, about 0.25, about 0.3, about 0.35 or about 0.4 inches. In some embodiments head width HW can be about 0.1 97 inches. In some embodiments male bead or tongue 86 can have a bead depth BD of about 0.01 to about 0.03 inches, or in some embodiments about 0.0197 inches. In some embodiments, tapered cone 92, or tapered semi-conical portion, of semi-cylindrical opening 88 can be angled or tapered to match or substantially match the shape, or angle or taper, of an abutment 14 (see, e.g. Figure 3). Angle A' as depicted in Figure 6B can in some embodiments be about 3 to about 15 degrees, including for example about 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 1 1 , 1 2, 1 3, 14 or 15 degrees, for an included angle of about 6 to about 30 degrees. By way of example and not limitation, angle A' as depicted in Figure 6B can in some embodiments be about 8.5 degree, for an included angle of about 1 7 degrees.

In some embodiments tapered cone 92, and/or semi-cylindrical opening 88, is configured to apply a force and/or friction on conical head 34 of abutment 14 to be installed on an implant 12. In some embodiments bead 86 at or near the bottom of tapered cone 92 can be engage and align with groove 38 around conical head 34. By engaging bead 86 of abutment tool 50 with groove 38 of abutment 14 the abutment can be securely held in place in the dental abutment tool, particularly by preventing the tapered conical head 34 of the abutment from sliding down and being forced out of cupped head 60 when the opposing arms of the tool are clamped together.

With the semi-cylindrical opening 88 in cupped head 60, tool 50 allows in some embodiments an abutment 14 to be installed with a retaining screw at the same time so all that is left to do is tighten and torque the screw after installation. That is, with semi-cylindrical opening 88 in cupped head 60 the cylindrical opening 42 of abutment 14 is accessible even when abutment 14 is being held by tool 50. As such, a retaining screw that secures an abutment 14 to an implant 12 can pass through cylindrical opening 42 of abutment 14 and into the implant during placement of the abutment via the dental abutment tool. In some aspects opening 88 can be configured to allow a wrench or other tool to be placed along with a screw and the abutment so that they can be assembled together and held by tool 50 with it in the locked position prior to installation. A dentist or other technician can then pick up the tool, abutment, screw and wrench all at once and set and tighten the abutment screw simultaneously.

In some embodiments, and as illustrated in Figures 4A through 4D, a dental abutment tool 50 as disclosed herein can comprise a locking element 64. Such locking element 64 can be positioned between opposing arms 52L/52R and affixed to one of the two opposing arms 52L or 52R. Note that while locking element 64 is affixed to or associated with opposing arm 52L in Figures 4A through 4D, this is only by way of example and can be on the alternate arm without departing from the scope of the instant disclosure. Locking element 64 can be configured to engage receiving portion 68, which is an opening in the opposing arm (opposing arm 52R in Figures 4A through 4D), and lock the two opposing arms together upon depression of the opposing arms by a user. In some aspects receiving portion 68 can be configured to allow locking element 64 to pass therethrough and engage locking element 64 by tension or resistance, such as for example by an interaction between a wall or side of receiving portion 68 and a notch or raised portion on locking element 64. Upon manipulation and release of locking element 64 the two opposing arms 52L/52R, and thereby the opposing heads attached thereto, can return to their opened positions. In some embodiments a stop element 62 can also be provided to limit the degree to which opposing arms 52L/52R can be depressed.

Turning now to Figure 7, a close-up view is provided of a dental abutment tool 50 engaging or firmly holding an abutment component 14 of a dental implant system. Flat head 58 and cupped head 60 are shown securely holding abutment 14. On one side flat head 58 engages or abuts against flat portion 36 of abutment 14 to align and/or orient abutment 14 and keep it from rotating or spinning in cupped head 60. In some embodiments bend 66 can allow flat head 58 to align with flat portion 36 of abutment 14 to optimize the grip and/or alignment even when the two opposing heads are brought together to grip abutment 14. Moreover, bend 66 can maintain pressure on bead 86 to keep abutment 14 from sliding up or down in tool 50 during abutment installation. On the opposing side cupped head 60 can be configured to conform to conical head 34 thereby gripping the abutment 14. Figures 8A, 8B and 8C illustrate in further detail embodiments of the opposing heads of the disclosed dental abutment tools, and particularly the cupped head, illustrated here as cupped head 100. In some embodiments the cupped head can be configured as illustrated in Figures 6A and 6B, namely cupped head 60, while in some embodiments the cupped head can be configured as shown in Figures 8A-8C as cupped head 100. Even in Figures 4A-4E, 5 and 7, where the cupped head is shown as cupped head 60, it will be understood that cupped head 100 can be substituted for cupped head 60 without departing from the scope of the instant disclosure. In some embodiments cupped head 100 can function and serve the same purposes as cupped head 60, but in a different configuration as discussed below.

As discussed herein, cupped head 100 can in some embodiments be configured to engage an abutment used in a dental implant system. For clarity, cross-sectional views of at least portions of cupped head 100 of Figures 8A-8C are shown separate and apart from opposing arm 52R/52L of dental abutment tool 50 to which it would be connected, such as depicted in Figures 4A to 4E, and 5.

In some embodiments cupped head 100 can comprise an outer wall defining a semi-circular cylindrical structure, and an inner surface of the outer wall, wherein the inner surface comprises a semi-cylindrical opening extending the length of the outer wall and a tapered semi-conical portion at a lower portion of the semi-cylindrical opening. Referring particularly to Figures 8A-8C, cupped head 100 can in some embodiments comprise a body 110 comprising an outer wall 102 and inner wall 104 defining a semi- circular cylindrical structure. Inner wall 104 of body 110 can define a semi- cylindrical opening 108 extending the length of, or substantially the entire length of, body 110. A portion, including in some embodiments a lower portion, of semi-cylindrical opening 108 can comprise one or more tapered planes 112 or tapered planar portion. Tapered planar portion 112 can in some embodiments comprise angular planes P1 and P2, in some embodiments set at an about 90 degree angle with respect to one another. In some embodiments a male bead or tongue 106 can extend from an inner wall 104 into the interior of tapered planar portion 112, as depicted in Figures 8A-8C, and in some embodiments can be located at a lower portion of tapered planar portion 112.

Figure 8C is a bottom view of cupped head 100 showing an angle A" between planes P1 and P2. Angle A" can in some embodiments be 90 degrees, or about 90 degrees, or in some embodiments about 50 to about 150 degrees, or about 60 to about 120 degrees, or about 80 to about 1 00 degrees, or about 85 to about 95 degrees. In some aspects both planes P1 and P2 and tongue 106 on each can have the same or about the same angle A".

Cupped head 100 can in some embodiments be configured to have an opening suitable for receiving and/or mating with an abutment 14 (see, e.g. Figure 3). Thus, cupped head 100 can have a head width HW as shown in Figure 8B, or width between tongue 106 on opposing sides of the opening, of about 0.05 to about 0.4 inches, or about 0.05, about 0.1 , about 0.1 5, about 0.2, about 0.25, about 0.3, about 0.35 or about 0.4 inches. In some embodiments head width HW can be about 0.197 inches. In some embodiments male bead or tongue 106 can have a bead depth BD of about 0.01 to about 0.03 inches, or in some embodiments about 0.0197 inches. In some embodiments, tapered planar portion 112, and particularly planes P1 and P2, of semi-cylindrical opening 108 can be angled or tapered to match or otherwise allow contact with the angle or taper of an abutment 14 (see, e.g. Figure 3). Angle A' as depicted in Figure 8B can in some embodiments be about 3 to about 15 degrees, including for example about 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 1 1 , 1 2, 1 3, 14 or 15 degrees, for an included angle of about 6 to about 30 degrees. By way of example and not limitation, angle A' as depicted in Figure 8B can in some embodiments be about 8.5 degree, for an included angle of about 1 7 degrees.

In some embodiments tapered planar portion 112, and/or semi- cylindrical opening 108, is configured to apply a force and/or friction on conical head 34 of abutment 14 to be installed on an implant 12. In some embodiments bead 106 at or near the bottom of tapered planar portion 112 can be engage and align with groove 38 around conical head 34. By engaging bead 106 of abutment tool 50 with groove 38 of abutment 14 the abutment can be securely held in place in the dental abutment tool, particularly by preventing the tapered conical head 34 of the abutment from sliding down and being forced out of cupped head 100 when the opposing arms of the tool are clamped together.

With the semi-cylindrical opening 108 in cupped head 100, tool 50 allows in some embodiments an abutment 14 to be installed with a retaining screw at the same time so all that is left to do is tighten and torque the screw after installation. That is, with semi-cylindrical opening 108 in cupped head 100 the cylindrical opening 42 of abutment 14 is accessible even when abutment 14 is being held by tool 50. As such, a retaining screw that secures an abutment 14 to an implant 12 can pass through cylindrical opening 42 of abutment 14 and into the implant during placement of the abutment via the dental abutment tool. In some aspects opening 108 can be configured to allow a wrench or other tool to be placed along with a screw and the abutment so that they can be assembled together and held by tool 50 with it in the locked position prior to installation. A dentist or other technician can then pick up the tool, abutment, screw and wrench all at once and set and tighten the abutment screw simultaneously.

In some embodiments methods of installing dental implants and/or abutments are provided herein. Such methods can comprise surgically implanting a dental implant into a bone of a subject, e.g. a jaw bone, as is currently understood by those of ordinary skill in the art. Once the implant is sufficiently secured, and healed as needed, a dental abutment tool as provided herein can be used post-surgically to align and secure an abutment to the implant. Based on the configuration of the dental abutment tool the ease and accuracy of alignment and placement of the abutment, particularly in the confined space of a human mouth, is dramatically improved as compared to existing tools and methods. In some embodiments, the method can further comprise attaching a dental prosthetic to the abutment. The subjects for which such methods and surgical procedures can be performed include any mammalian species, including for example humans.

By way of example and not limitation, methods of installing a dental implant abutment can include, surgically implanting a dental implant into a bone of a subject, providing a dental abutment tool as described herein, and using the dental abutment tool post-surgically to align and secure an abutment to the implant. In some embodiments, the method can further comprise attaching a dental prosthetic to the abutment.

Also provided herein are dental implant kits. Such kits can comprise a dental implant, an abutment component, and a dental abutment tool as provided herein. In some embodiments the kit can comprise a plurality of tools ranging in left and right hand orientations, and/or varying sizes. Such a dental implant kit can also comprise one or more dental prosthetics. Such a dental implant kit can also comprise screws, hardware or other materials necessary for securing the implant, abutment and/or prosthetic. Such a dental implant kit can also include instructions and/or directions for using the disclosed dental abutment tools.

It will be understood that various details of the presently disclosed subject matter may be changed without departing from the scope of the presently disclosed subject matter. Furthermore, the foregoing description is for the purpose of illustration only, and not for the purpose of limitation.

Claims

CLAIMS What is claimed is:
1 . A dental abutment tool comprising:
first and second opposing arms;
a first end from which the first and second opposing arms extend; and first and second opposing heads attached to terminal ends of the first and second opposing arms, respectively;
wherein the first and second opposing heads are spaced apart;
wherein the first opposing head comprises a cupped head;
wherein the second opposing head comprises a substantially flat head; and
wherein the first and second opposing heads are configured to grasp an abutment component of a dental implant.
2. The dental abutment tool of claim 1 , wherein the first and second opposing arms are configured to be depressible to bring the spaced apart first and second opposing heads closer together.
3. The dental abutment tool of any one of claims 1 to 2, wherein the first and second opposing arms are spring-loaded, wherein the first and second opposing arms are configured to return to an original position upon release of a depressible pressure on the opposing arms.
4. The dental abutment tool of any one of claims 1 to 3, wherein the cupped head comprises an outer wall defining a semi-circular cylindrical structure, and an inner surface of the outer wall, wherein the inner surface comprises a semi-cylindrical opening extending the length of the outer wall and a tapered semi-conical portion at a lower portion of the semi-cylindrical opening.
5. The dental abutment tool of any one of claims 1 to 3, wherein the cupped head comprises an outer wall defining a semi-circular cylindrical structure, and an inner surface of the outer wall, wherein the inner surface comprises a semi-cylindrical opening extending the length of the outer wall and one or more tapered planes at a lower portion of the semi-cylindrical opening.
6. The dental abutment tool of any one of claims 1 to 5, wherein the tapered semi-conical portion, the one or more tapered planes, and/or the semi-cylindrical opening is configured to apply a force to a cone portion of an abutment to be installed on a dental implant.
7. The dental abutment tool of any one of claims 1 to 6, wherein the cupped head further comprises a bead extending from the inner wall into an interior of the semi-cylindrical opening.
8. The dental abutment tool of any one of claims 1 to 7, wherein the bead is configured to engage a groove around an abutment cone.
9. The dental abutment tool of any one of claims 1 to 8, wherein the width of the cupped head between the bead extending from the inner wall into an interior of the semi-cylindrical opening is about 0.2 inches, wherein a bead depth is about 0.02 inches, wherein an included angle of the tapered semi-conical portion is about 17 degrees.
10. The dental abutment tool of any one of claims 1 to 9, wherein the cupped head is configured to securely hold an abutment in place in the dental abutment tool.
1 1 . The dental abutment tool of any one of claims 1 to 10, wherein the substantially flat head is configured to engage a flat portion of an abutment.
12. The dental abutment tool of any one of claims 1 to 1 1 , wherein the flat head extends from the second opposing arm in substantially a same vertical plane as the second opposing arm, wherein a lower portion of the flat head comprises an about 5° to about 20° inward bend configured to optimize a grip of the flat head on the flat portion of the abutment.
13. The dental abutment tool of any one of claims 1 to 1 2, further comprising a locking element configured to temporarily lock the opposing arms in a depressed state.
14. A method of installing a dental implant abutment,
surgically implanting a dental implant into a bone of a subject;
providing a dental abutment tool, comprising:
first and second opposing arms;
a first end from which the first and second opposing arms extend; and
first and second opposing heads attached to terminal ends of the first and second opposing arms, respectively;
wherein the first and second opposing heads are spaced apart; wherein the first opposing head comprises a cupped head; wherein the second opposing head comprises a substantially flat head; and
wherein the first and second opposing heads are configured to grasp an abutment component of a dental implant; and
using the dental abutment tool to align and secure an abutment to the implant.
15. The method of claim 14, wherein the subject is a human.
16. The method of any one of claims 14 to 15, further comprising attaching a dental prosthetic to the abutment.
17. The method of any one of claims 14 to 16, wherein the first and second opposing arms are spring-loaded, wherein the first and second opposing arms are configured to return to an original position upon release of a depressible pressure on the opposing arms.
18. The method of any one of claims 14 to 17, wherein the cupped head comprises an outer wall defining a semi-circular cylindrical structure, and an inner surface of the outer wall, wherein the inner surface comprises a semi- cylindrical opening extending the length of the outer wall and a tapered semi-conical portion at a lower portion of the semi-cylindrical opening.
19. The method of any one of claims 14 to 17, wherein the cupped head comprises an outer wall defining a semi-circular cylindrical structure, and an inner surface of the outer wall, wherein the inner surface comprises a semi- cylindrical opening extending the length of the outer wall and one or more tapered planes at a lower portion of the semi-cylindrical opening.
20. The method of any one of claims 14 to 19, wherein the tapered semi- conical portion, the one or more tapered planes, and/or the semi-cylindrical opening is configured to apply a force to a cone portion of an abutment to be installed on a dental implant.
21 . The method of any one of claims 14 to 20, wherein the cupped head further comprises a bead extending from the inner wall into an interior of the semi-cylindrical opening, wherein the bead is configured to engage a groove around an abutment cone.
22. The method of any one of claims 14 to 21 , wherein the width of the cupped head between the bead extending from the inner wall into an interior of the semi-cylindrical opening is about 0.2 inches, wherein a bead depth is about 0.02 inches, wherein an included angle of the tapered semi-conical portion is about 17 degrees.
23. A dental implant kit, comprising:
a dental implant;
an abutment component; and
a dental abutment tool, comprising: first and second opposing arms;
a first end from which the first and second opposing arms extend; and
first and second opposing heads attached to terminal ends of the first and second opposing arms, respectively;
wherein the first and second opposing heads are spaced apart; wherein the first opposing head comprises a cupped head;
wherein the second opposing head comprises a substantially flat head; and
wherein the first and second opposing heads are configured to grasp an abutment component of a dental implant.
24. The dental implant kit of claim 23, further comprising a dental prosthetic.
PCT/US2017/016019 2016-04-12 2017-02-01 Dental abutment tool WO2017180225A1 (en)

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Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5120221A (en) * 1989-12-29 1992-06-09 Orenstein Jonathan H Dental clamp for use in implant restorative dentistry
US20100092918A1 (en) * 2006-10-13 2010-04-15 Wam Forceps for gripping and transporting small objects, usable in particular in dental surgery
US20140329200A1 (en) * 2011-12-16 2014-11-06 Gregory Jay Mahl Device for Attaching or Removing Dental or Surgical Components

Patent Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5120221A (en) * 1989-12-29 1992-06-09 Orenstein Jonathan H Dental clamp for use in implant restorative dentistry
US20100092918A1 (en) * 2006-10-13 2010-04-15 Wam Forceps for gripping and transporting small objects, usable in particular in dental surgery
US20140329200A1 (en) * 2011-12-16 2014-11-06 Gregory Jay Mahl Device for Attaching or Removing Dental or Surgical Components

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