WO2009155045A1 - New functional balloon with built in lubriciiy or drug delivery system - Google Patents

New functional balloon with built in lubriciiy or drug delivery system Download PDF

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Publication number
WO2009155045A1
WO2009155045A1 PCT/US2009/045462 US2009045462W WO2009155045A1 WO 2009155045 A1 WO2009155045 A1 WO 2009155045A1 US 2009045462 W US2009045462 W US 2009045462W WO 2009155045 A1 WO2009155045 A1 WO 2009155045A1
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WO
WIPO (PCT)
Prior art keywords
material
medical balloon
expandable medical
tube
tubular segment
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PCT/US2009/045462
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French (fr)
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WO2009155045A8 (en
Inventor
John Chen
Original Assignee
Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.
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Publication date
Priority to US12/141,606 priority Critical
Priority to US12/141,606 priority patent/US20090318863A1/en
Application filed by Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. filed Critical Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.
Publication of WO2009155045A1 publication Critical patent/WO2009155045A1/en
Publication of WO2009155045A8 publication Critical patent/WO2009155045A8/en

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Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M25/00Catheters; Hollow probes
    • A61M25/10Balloon catheters

Abstract

The present invention is directed to expandable medical balloons that have strips of lubricous material along their lengths. The expandable medical balloons are formed from extruded preform segments. The preform segments are coextrusions of a first material, which forms the tubular primary material of the preform segments, and a second material, which forms the strips of lubricous material.

Description

NEW FUNCTIONAL BALLOON WITH BUILT IN LUBRICIIY OR DRUG

DELIVERY SYSTEM

FIELD OF THE INVENTION In some embodiments, this invention relates expandable medical balloons that have stiips of lubricous material along theii lengths and methods of making such medical balloons

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Balloon catheters, having expandable balloon members located at the distal end of the balloon catheter, are employed in a variety of medical procedures including as dilatation devices for compressing atherosclerotic plaque which results in a narrowing of the arterial lining, and for delivery and expansion of prosthetic devices, such as stents, to a lesion site One medical procedure where balloon catheters are employed is percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, or balloon angioplasty, which is a minimally invasive, non-surgical means of treating peripheral and coronary arteries This technique consists of inserting an uninflated balloon catheter into the affected artery Dilation of the diseased segment of artery is accomplished by inflating the balloon which pushes the atherosclerotic lesion outward, thereby enlarging the arterial diameter Angioplasty has become recognized as an efficient and effective method of opening stenoses in the vascular system

In the most widely used form of angioplasty, a balloon catheter is guided through the vascular system until the balloon, which is carried at the distal end of a catheter shaft and which may cany an expandable stent, is positioned across the stenosis or lesion, i e , vessel obstruction The balloon is then inflated to apply pressure to the obstruction which is essentially remolded by pressing it against the inner wall of the vessel whereby the vessel is opened for improved flow Due to the expansion of the balloon, the stent, which is situated on the balloon, is also expanded and released to aid in support and/or repair of the vessel wall

A stent is typically crimped onto the balloon while the balloon is in a folded/wrapped configuration Once the site of deployment has been reached, the balloon is inflated, theteby expanding the stent The balloon is then deflated wheiein it lewiaps and is then removed fiom the body vessel

To facilitate advancement of the catheter assembly thiough the body vessel, lubiiciousness has been imparted to the catheter surfaces, including to the exterior surface of the expandable balloon member Increasing the lubriciousness of the balloon surface can also facilitate withdrawal of the balloon from a deployed, expanded stent

Balloons aie typically made of polymeric materials including nylon, Selar™, polyether -polyester block copolymers (e g Hyttel™ or Ainitel™), polyfamide- ether -ester) block copolymers such as Pebax™, polyethylene terephthalate, polytetiafluoroethylene, polyvinyl chloride, polyurethanes, polyetherurethanes, polyester methanes, polyurethane ureas, polyuiethane siloxane block copolymers, polyethylene, polypropylene or other similar extrudable thermoplastic, polymeric materials, or composites thereof Such materials are typically inherently nonlubricious making it necessary to add some type of lubricious coating to the surface in order to advance the device through the blood vessel more easily

Balloons will therefore typically have a lubricating portion and a non- lubricating portion to avoid what is referred to in the industry as the "watermelon seed" problem, wherein a balloon which is too lubricious shoots forward on inflation causing accidental slippage from the target site U S Pat No 5,503,631 to Onishi et al discloses a vasodilating catheter balloon whose body has a lubricating portion and a non- lubiicating portion The lubricious property of the balloon is created by applying a lubricious coating onto a non-lubricious substrate Only the tapered portions on opposite ends of the balloon were treated The present inventor has now found new methods for coating a balloon prior to formation of the balloon which can achieve a selective lubricious coating for the use of a balloon catheter The methods allow for flexibility in tailoring a desired balloon configuration for balloon catheters

The art referred to and/or described above is not intended to constitute an admission that any patent, publication or other information referred to herein is "prior art" with respect to this invention In addition, this section should not be construed to mean that a search has been made or that no other pertinent information as defined in 37 C F R §1 56{a) exists

All US patents and applications and all othet published documents mentioned anywhere in this application aie incoipoiated heiein by reference in their entirety Without limiting the scope of the invention a brief summary of some of the claimed embodiments of the invention is set forth below Additional details of the summarized embodiments of the invention and/or additional embodiments of the invention may be found in the Detailed Desciiption of the Invention below

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In at least one embodiment, the invention is directed to an expandable medical balloon The expandable medical balloon has an inflated configuration and a deflated configuration and is formed from an extruded tubular segment, wherein the tubular segment comprises a tube of a first material Fhe tubular segment further includes two or more strips of a second material embedded in the tube by coextrusion with the fust material The two or more strips are outwardly exposed and extend longitudinally relative to the longitudinal axis of the tube and are more lubricious than the fust material

In some embodiments of the invention, the second material is a hydrophilic material In some embodiments of the invention, the second material is a hydrophobic material

In some embodiments of the invention, the second material comprises a water swellable material, wherein the water swellable material can contain one or more therapeutic agents In at least one embodiment, the invention is directed to an expandable medical balloon The expandable medical balloon has an inflated configuration and a deflated configuration and is formed from an extruded tubular segment, wherein the tubular segment comprises a tube of a first material The tubular segment further includes two or more strips of a second material bonded to the tube, wherein the second material comprises a reactive group The second material is coextruded with the frrst material The expandable medical balloon further comprises a lubricous material, wherein the lubricous material is differentially bonded to the reactive groups of the second mateiial thiough covalent bonds oi ionic bonds and wheiein the lubricous material is more lubricous than the fust mateiial In some of the embodiment the reactive group is chosen from the group consisting of acids, alcohol, isocyanate, epoxy, amines and anhydrides in some embodiments of the present invention, the expandable medical balloon is made by foiming at tubular segment by coextruding a fust mateiial and a second material, wheiein the first material is formed into a tube and the second mateiial is formed into two oi moie outwardly exposed strips longitudinally embedded in the tube and wheiein the fust mater ial is less tubricious than the second mateiial Thereafter, the tubulai segment is expanded to form a medical balloon

In some embodiments of the present invention, the expandable medical balloon is made by forming at tubular segment by coextiuding a first material and a second material, wherein the fust material is formed into a tube and the second material is foimed into two or more outwardly exposed strips longitudinally on the tube A lubricous mateiial is thereafter applied to the tubular segment material The lubricous material, which is more lubricous than the first material, differentially bonds to the second material through covalent bonds or ionic bonds The tubular segment is then washed, removing the lubricous material from the first material

These and other embodiments which characterize the invention are pointed out with particularity in the claims annexed hereto and forming a part hereof However, for further understanding of the invention, its advantages and objectives obtained by its use, reference can be made to the drawings which form a further part hereof and the accompanying descriptive matter, in which there is illustrated and described an embodiments of the invention

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWING(S) A detailed description of the invention is hereafter described with specific reference being made to the diawings FIG 1 is a side view of a catheter that includes a coated balloon of the present invention

FIG 2 is a cross-section view of the balloon of FIG 1 at line 2-2 FIG 3 is a perspective view of a piefoim segment fiom which a balloon of the present invention is made

FIG 4 is an end view of the pi efoim segment of FIG 3 FIG 5 is a perspective view of a prefctm segment from which a balloon of the present invention is made

FIG 6 is an end view of the preform segment of FIG 5

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

While this invention may be embodied in many different forms, there are described in detail herein specific embodiments of the invention This description is an exemplification of the principles of the invention and is not intended to limit the invention to the particular embodiments illustrated

For the purposes of this disclosure, like reference numerals in the figures shall refer to ϋke features unless otherwise indicated Balloons of the invention are particularly suited to use in medical devices, for instance on balloon angioplasty catheters, in stent delivery systems, perfusion balloon devices, cutting balloon devices, cryoplasty devices, and the like Typically they will be mounted on a catheter or probe device

Referring to the drawing Figures 1-6, several aspects of the inventive processes are illustrated

A medical balloon catheter of the present invention, illustrated generally at 10 in FIG 1, includes an inflatable balloon 14 mounted at the distal end of an elongated flexible shaft 12 Except as noted herein, catheter 10 is conventional in its construction, providing a lumen communicating with the interior of the balloon for inflation and deflation of the balloon and other optional features conventional in the dilatation catheter art The balloon 14 has an inflated configuration, as illustrated in FIG 1, and is made up of a main body 15, a proximal cone 16, a distal cone 1 7, a proximal waist portion 18 and a distal waist portion 19

FIG 1 also illustrates strips 20 of lubricious material embedded in the primary balloon material 22 The strips 20 of lubricous material are shown to be linear and to extend the entire length of the balloon 14 The strips 20 can also be constructed to have lengths which vary The strips 20 can also spiral around the longitudinal axis of the balloon A "strip" is a naπow, compaiativeiy long piece of material In some embodiments, the width of the strip is uniform and in some embodiments, the width of the strip varies The width and length of the strips can be tailored to meet the intended purpose of the balloon FIG 2 represents a cross-section of the medical balloon along lines 2-2 in

FIG 1 As can be seen, the strips 20 are spaced around the circumference of the balloon 14 The strips 20 of lubricious material are embedded in the primary balloon material 22 In some embodiments of the present invention, the outwardly exposed portion 24 of the strips 20 is circumferentially flush with the outwardly exposed portions of the primary balloon material 22 In some embodiments, the outwardly exposed portion 24 of the strips 20 extend above the outwardly exposed portions of the primary balloon material 22

FIG 3 represents a perspective view of a preform segment 26 according to the present invention FIG 4 is an end view of the preform segment 26 from which the balloon 14 is blown The formation of a medical balloon from an extruded preform segment is well known

As can be seen, prior to the blowing and forming the balloon 14 from the preform segment 26, the preform segment 26 has a greater thickness than that of the blown balloon 14 The internal pressure of the blowing process thins the primary material 22 Because of the expansion, the balloon 14 contains a thinner and larger layer of functional material on its surface than that of the preform segment 26 The functional material can be the primary balloon material 22 and/or the strip 20 material depending upon the desired use

In the formation of the preform segment, an extrusion process is used The primary material 22 and the strips 20 of lubricous material are coextruded to form a tube A designated length of the tube is cut to form the preform segment 26 The preform segment is thereafter expanded in a conventional manner to form the balloon The balloon is thereafter mounted onto a catheter

As can be seen in FIGs 3 and 4, the coextruded strip 20 material is embedded in the primary material 22 In some embodiments, the outwardly exposed strip 20 material is circumfeientially flush with the outwardly exposed primary material 28 In some embodiments, the outwaidly exposed stiip 20 material extends iadially above oi beyond the outwaidly exposed piimaiy material 28

In one embodiment of the present invention, as shown in figure 5, the primary material 20 has a ciiculai circumference and the strips 20 aie coextrυded onto and bonded to, via the extrusion process, the outer surface of the primary material 22

In some embodiments, the coextruded strip 20 material contains reactive groups The resulting preform segment from the coextiusion has reactive groups, in the configuration of strips, exposed on the surface of the primary material 22 The specific pattern of the strip of reactive groups can vary depending on the intended purpose of the balloon

The formed preform segment 26 with the strips 20 of reactive groups is then coated with a lubricous coating The specific lubricous coating used is one that differentially bonds to the reactive groups That is the coating bonds to the reactive groups and does not bond to the piimary material 22 After the formed preform segment 26 is coated, the non-bonded lubricous coating material is washed away resulting in a preform segment 26 having strips 20 of a lubricous material which is more lubricous than the primary material 22

The lubricous coating which differentially bonds to the reactive groups is applied prior to blowing the balloon The lubricous coating is applied to the entire prefoim segment 26 at a constant and consistent coating thickness If the preform segment 26 is to be stretched, the coating can be applied before or after the stretching

The lubricous coating material and the material containing reactive groups chosen are compatible for covalent or ionic bonding to one another and, at the same time, the lubricous coating material that is chosen is not compatible for bonding with the primary material 22 The materials which include reactive groups include, but are not limited to, acids, alcohol, isocyanate, epoxy, amines and anhydrides

As an example, Pebax with stripes of functional ized polyolefln, such as anhydride modified, was coextruded into balloon tubing The lubricous molecules of polyethyleneoxide (PEO) with hydroxyl or amine chain ends were made ready to react with anhydride or caiboxylϊc groups on the surface to form partial lubricous balloon surface

Another example is to coextrude a strip containing double bonds, then giaft an initiator to the strip surface, and polymerization initiated by the grafted initiator to form poly(2-vinylpyiidine) chains

Another example is to graft Pebax balloon surface with diisocyanate, then couple with hydroxyl chain end PEO or other water soluble materials The pattern can be created with masking material to cover partial balloon surface in which the coating is not desired After the chemical reactions, the masking material is removed to expose the original substrate The masking material can be applied during extrusion or after balloon formation During extrusion, for example, very thin polyolefrn strips are coεxtruded on the top of Pebax balloon tubing Then the coextruded tubing is grafted with the functional group of isocyanate (through diisocyanate), and then coupled with water soluble molecules to form a partial lubrcous coating on the tube Other reactions can be found in US 4876126 and Progress in Polymer Science 28 (2003) 209-259 & 32 (2007) 698-725, both of which are incorporated by reference in their entireties

The primary material 22 of the balloon can be made of thermoplastic polymeric materials including general classes such as thermoplastic elastomers, i e block copolymers; homopolymers, copolymers and terpolymers of ethylene; homopolymers, copolymers and terpolymers of propylene; ethylene alpha -olefins; polyesters; polyamides; polyurethanes; polycarbonates, vinyl copolymers; ionomer materials and so forth More specifically, materials such as nylon, Selar™, poiyether- polyester block copolymers (i e Hytrel™), Pebax™ (polyether block amide copolymers), Surlyn™, polyethylene terephthalate, polytetrafluoroethylene, polyvinyl chloride, polyetherur ethanes, polyester ur ethanes, polyurethane ureas, polyurethane sitoxane block copolymers, silicone polycarbonate copolymers, ethylene vinyl acetate copolymers, acrylonitrile-butadrene-styiene copolymers; polyphenylene sulfides; copolyesters or other similar extrudable thermoplastic, polymeric materials, or composites thereof can be utilized in the present invention Thermosetting materials such as polyimides may also be utilized Other usable balloon primary material can be found in US 5135516; US 5026607; US 5304121; US 5576072; US 5503631; US 5509899; US 5693034; US 6110483; US 5702756; US 6528150; US 6673053; and US Publication 2007/0267128, al! of which are herein incorporated by reference in their entireties

In some embodiments of the present invention, the balloon primary material can include polyethei block amides, such as Pebax™ 7033 ot 7233; polyesterblock ethers such as Amitel™ EM 740; polyethylene teiephthalate; and nylon The formation of catheter balloons made of block copolymer elastomers wheie the hard segments are polyester or polyamide and the soft segments are polyether, is discussed in U S Pat No 5,556,383, issued Sep 1 7, 1996, to Wang et al , which is incorporated heiein by reference in its entirety

The lubricous coextiuded ship material chosen is a material that adheres to the balloon primary material In some embodiments, the lubricous strip material can be formed from any hydrophiiie compound or any low friction hydrophobic coating which imparts lubricity to the balloon materia! Examples of useful hydrophobic coatings include silicone lubricants or polymers and fluoropolymer coatings, which includes, but not limited to, PurSil 60 The method of the present invention for forming lubricity strips on the balloon itself is not dependent on the coating utilized Of course, some coatings are mote desirable than others There are many hydiophilic compounds that may be utilized in the present invention The water soluble lubricants useful herein include Pebax MV1074, polyalkylene glycols, alkoxy polyalkylene glycols, homopolymers and copolymers of (meth) acrylic acid, copolymers of methylvinyl ether and maleic acid, poly(vinylpyπolidone) homopolymers, copolymers of vinyl pyirolidone, poly(N- alkylacrylamide), polyvinyl alcohol), poly(ethyleneimine), polyamides, methyl cellulose, carboxymethylcellulose, polyvinylsulfonic acid, heparin, dextran, modified dextran, chondioitin sulphate and lecithin The polymers are typically chain-stiuctuied, non-crosslinked and water soluble having a hydrophiiie group such as -OH, -CONH2, - -COOH, -NH2, -COO-, -SO3, -NR3 + and so forth where R is alkyl or hydrogen Further useful hydrophobic and hydrophiiie materials are found in U S Publication No 2007/0129748, which is herein incorporated by reference in its entirety

In some embodiments, the lubricous strip material includes one or more therapeutic agents When a solution swellable lubricous strip material such as a water swellable material is used to create the functional strip surface, it can be loaded with therapeutic medicine by soaking it into the solution and drying out the solvent(s) afterwards In such cases, the lubricous material can be a water absorbable material such as, but not limited to, polyacrylates based materials, polyacrylamide, isobutylene maleic anhydride copolymers and polyvinyl alcohol) based materials The organic solvent can be the swelling agent and then the strip would not have to have lubricous function for drug caπying purposes

Balloon formation may be carried out in any conventional manner with conventional extrusion and blowing techniques, but basically there are three majoi steps in the process which include extruding a tubular preform, blow molding the balloon and annealing the balloon Depending on the balloon material employed, the preform segment may be axially stretched before it is blown Techniques for balloon formation are discussed in US 4490421, US 5348538, US 4,963,313, US 5,306,246, US 4,935, 190, US 5,714,110, US 4,906,244, US 5,328,468, US 4,950,239, US 5,500,180, US 5,556,383, US 6,146,356, US 6,270,522, US 5,344,400, US 5,833,657, US 5,250,069, US 5,797,877, US 5,270,086 and US 5,304,340, all of which are herein incorporated by reference in their entireties Various known methods of altering the properties of a radially expanded balloon such as heat-setting, heat shrinking, and/or radiation crosslinking may also be employed in forming the balloon (see US 5,403,340; EP 540858; and WO 98/03218, all of which are herein incorporated by reference in their entireties) As mentioned above, all of patents and publications mentioned above are incorporated herein by reference in their entireties After the balloon is formed, the assembled balloon can be folded preferentially either with the lubricous surface on the outside and exposed or with the primary material surface on the outside and exposed based on the desired needs Examples selective folding techniques are found in US Publication 2007/0129748, which is herein incorporated by refeience in its entirety

In some embodiments, a medical device can be mounted on the medical balloons of the present invention Such medical devices include stents, grafts, stent- grafts, vena cava filters, expandable frameworks, and simitar implantable medical devices These medical devices are radially expandable endoprostheses which are typically intravascular implants capable of being implanted transluminally and enlarged radially after being introduced percutaneously Stents may be implanted in a variety of body lumens or vessels such as within the vascular system, urinary tracts, bile ducts, fallopian tubes, coronary vessels, secondary vessels, etc They may be self-expanding, expanded by an internal radial force, such as when mounted on a balloon, or a combination of self-expanding and balloon expandable (hybrid expandable) In the embodiments that incoipoiate a therapeutic agent, the therapeutic agent may be a drug or othei pharmaceutical pioduct such as non-genetic agents, genetic agents, cellular material, etc Some examples of suitable non-genetic therapeutic agents include but are not limited to: anti-thrombogenic agents such as heparin, heparin derivatives, vascular cell growth promoters, growth factor inhibitors, Paclitaxel, etc Where an agent includes a genetic therapeutic agent, such a genetic agent may include but is not limited to: DNA, RNA and their respective derivatives and/or components; hedgehog proteins, etc Where a therapeutic agent includes cellular material, the cellular materia! may include but is not limited to: cells of human origin and/or non-human origin as well as their respective components and/ot derivatives thereof Whete the therapeutic agent includes a polymer agent, the polymer agent may be a polystyrene- polyisobutylene-polystyrene triblock copolymer (SIBS)1 polyethylene oxide, silicone rubber and/oi any other suitable substrate

The above disclosure is intended to be illustrative and not exhaustive This description will suggest many variations and alternatives to one of ordinary skill in this art The various elements shown in the individual figures and described above may be combined or modified for combination as desired All these alternatives and variations are intended to be included within the scope of the claims where the term "comprising" means "including, but not limited to" Further, the particular features presented in the dependent claims can be combined with each other in other manners within the scope of the invention such that the invention should be recognized as also specifically directed to other embodiments having any other possible combination of the features of the dependent claims Foi instance, for purposes of claim publication, any dependent claim which follows should be taken as alternatively written in a multiple dependent form from all prior claims which possess a!! antecedents referenced in such dependent claim if such multiple dependent format is an accepted format within the jurisdiction (e g each claim depending directly from claim 1 should be alternatively taken as depending fiom all previous claims) In jurisdictions where multiple dependent claim formats aie restricted, the following dependent claims should each be also taken as alternatively written in each singly dependent claim format which creates a dependency fiom a prioτ antecedent-possessing claim othet than the specific claim listed in such dependent claim below

This completes the description of the invention Those skilled in the ait may recognize othei equivalents to the specific embodiment described herein which equivalents are intended to be encompassed by the claims attached hereto

Claims

CLAIMS:
1 An expandable medical balloon, the expandable medical balloon having an inflated configuration and a deflated configuration and being formed from an extiuded tubular segment, wheiein the tubular segment has a longitudinal axis and comprises a tube of a fust material, wheiein the tube has a length and is circumferentially closed, and two or more strips of a second material embedded in the tube, the second material being a coextrusion with the fust material, wherein each of the two or more strips is outwardly exposed and extends longitudinally relative to the longitudinal axis of the tube and wherein the second material is more lubiicious than the fust material 2 An expandable medical balloon according to claim 1 wherein each of the two or more strips extend the length of the tube
3 An expandable medical balloon according to claim 1 wherein the tubular segment has a thickness and each of the two or more strips has a thickness, the thickness of the tubular segment being greater than the thickness of the two or more strips 4 An expandable medical balloon according to claim I5 the first material of the tube of the tubular segment being outwardly exposed in an alternating fashion, in a circumferential direction, with the outward exposure of the second material 5 An expandable medical balloon according to claim 1, wherein the second material is a hydrophilic material 6 An expandable medical balloon according to claim 1, wherein the second material is a hydrophobic material
7 An expandable medical balloon according to claim 1 , the second material comprising a therapeutic agent
8 An expandable medical balloon according to claim 4, wheiein the outwardly exposed first material of the tubular segment is circumferentially flush with the outwaidly exposed second material
9 An expandable medical balloon of claim 1, wherein, in a circumferential direction around the expandable medical balloon, outwardly exposed first material alternates with outwardly exposed second material 10 An expandable medical balloon of claim 1, wheiein, when the expandable medical balloon is folded and has an outwaidly exposed surface, the second material comprises a majority of the outwardly exposed surface 11 An expandable medical balloon of claim 1, wherein, when the expandable medical balloon is folded and has an outwardly exposed surface, the fust material comprises a majority of the outwardly exposed surface
12 An expandable medical balloon of claim 1, wheiein the second material compi ises a water swellable mater ial
13 An expandable medical balloon of claim 1, wherein the first material is a polyamide/polyether polyester
14. An expandable medical balloon, the expandable medical balloon having an inflated configuration and a deflated configuration and being formed from an extruded tubular segment, wherein the tubular segment has a longitudinal axis and comprises a tube of a first material, wherein the tube has a length and is circumferentially closed, and two or more strips of a second material bonded to the tube, wherein the second material comprises a reactive group, the second material being a coextiusion with the fust material, wherein each of the two or more strips is outwardly exposed and extends longitudinally relative to the longitudinal axis of the tube, the expandable medical balloon further comprising a lubricous material, wherein the lubr icous material is differentially bonded to the reactive groups of the second material, the lubricous material being more lubricous that the fust material
15. An expandable medical balloon according to claim 14 wherein each of the two or more strips extend the length of the tube
16. An expandable medical balloon according to claim 14 wherein the tubular segment has a thickness and each of the two or more strips has a thickness, the thickness of the tubular segment being greater than the thickness of the two or more strips
1 7. An expandable medical balloon according to claim 14 the first material of the tube of the tubular segment being outwardly exposed in an alternating fashion, in a circumferential direction, with the outward exposure of the second material
18. An expandable medical balloon according to claim 14, wherein the lubricous material is a hydrophilic material
19. An expandable medical balloon according to claim 14, wheiein the lubricous material is a hydrophobic material
20. An expandable medical balloon according to claim 14, the lubricous material comprising a therapeutic agent 21 An expandable medical balloon according to claim 14, wherein the reactive group is chosen fiom the group consisting of acids, alcohols, amines, isocyanates, epoxies, anhydrides and alkenes
22 An expandable medical balloon of claim 14, wherein, when the expandable medical balloon is folded and has an outwardly exposed surface, the lubricous material comprises a majority of the outwardly exposed surface
23 A method of making an expandable medical balloon, comprising the steps: forming at tubular segment by coextmding a first material and a second material, wherein the fust material is formed into a tube and the second material is formed into two ot more outwardly exposed strips longitudinally embedded in the tube, the first material being less lubricious than the second material; and expanding the tubular segment to form a medical balloon
24 A method of making an expandable medical balloon, comprising the steps: forming at tubular segment by coextruding a fust material and a second material, wherein the first material is formed into a tube and the second material is formed into two or more outwardly exposed strips longitudinally on the tube; and applying a lubricous material to the tubular segment, wherein the lubricous material differentially bonds to the second material and is mote lubricous than the first material 25 The method of claim 24, further comprising the step of washing the tubular segment, such that the lubticous mateiial is removed from the first material and left on the second material through covalent bonds or ionic bonds
PCT/US2009/045462 2008-06-18 2009-05-28 New functional balloon with built in lubriciiy or drug delivery system WO2009155045A1 (en)

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US12/141,606 US20090318863A1 (en) 2008-06-18 2008-06-18 Functional Balloon With Built in Lubricity or Drug Delivery System

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US8585959B2 (en) 2010-09-30 2013-11-19 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Balloon with integrally retained dilation element
US20140277071A1 (en) * 2013-03-12 2014-09-18 Acclarent, Inc. Features to enhance grip of balloon within airway
US10182841B1 (en) * 2015-06-16 2019-01-22 C.R. Bard, Inc. Medical balloon with enhanced focused force control

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US20090318863A1 (en) 2009-12-24

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