New! View global litigation for patent families

WO2008118629A1 - Dual identification layered golf balls - Google Patents

Dual identification layered golf balls

Info

Publication number
WO2008118629A1
WO2008118629A1 PCT/US2008/056445 US2008056445W WO2008118629A1 WO 2008118629 A1 WO2008118629 A1 WO 2008118629A1 US 2008056445 W US2008056445 W US 2008056445W WO 2008118629 A1 WO2008118629 A1 WO 2008118629A1
Authority
WO
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
ball
golf
identification
layer
clear
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/US2008/056445
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Kyle Matthews
Original Assignee
Southporte, Ent., Llc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B43/00Balls with special arrangements
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B37/00Solid balls; Rigid hollow balls; Marbles
    • A63B37/0003Golf balls
    • A63B37/0022Coatings, markings

Abstract

A dual sensory golf ball having two identification layers comprising a first exterior surface identification layer having at least one first identifier and a second clear coat identification layer comprising a polymer and a second identifier wherein the second identifier is an additive comprising an odorant and wherein the second clear coat identification layer is substantially transparent to allow recognition of the first identifier.

Description

Dual Identification Layered Golf Balls

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Field Of The Invention

[0001] This application claims benefit of, and priority to, U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/908,306 filed March 27, 2007. This prior application is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety.

[0002] This invention relates to dual identification layer golf balls that are useful as a means to identify and distinguish a golf ball. In one embodiment, the dual identification layer golf balls are comprised of two identification layers wherein the first exterior surface identification layer has at least one identifier and a second clear coat identification layer is comprised of a polymer and a second identifier comprising an odorant additive.

Background

[0003] The rules of golf are internationally standardized and are jointly governed by the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews (R&A), and the United States Golf Association (USGA). By agreement with the R&A, USGA jurisdiction on the enforcement and interpretation of the rules is limited to the United States and Mexico.

[0004] Both the R&A and the USGA have similar rules regarding when a player uses a wrong ball during the course of play. The USGA defines a wrong ball as any ball other than the player's: ball in play; provisional ball, or second ball played under Rule 3-3 or Rule 20-7c in stroke play; and includes another player's ball; an abandoned ball; and the player's original ball when it is no longer in play. A ball in play includes a ball substituted for the ball in play whether or not the substitution is permitted. In the United States Rule 15-3 of the USGA's The Rules of Golf, incorporated herein by reference, states that: [0005] 15-3. Wrong Ball

• a. Match Play

If a player makes a stroke at a wrong ball that is not in a hazard, he loses the hole.

There is no penalty if a player makes a stroke at a wrong ball in a hazard. Any strokes made at a wrong ball in a hazard do not count in the player's score. If the wrong ball belongs to another player, its owner must place a ball on the spot from which the wrong ball was first played.

If the player and opponent exchange balls during the play of a hole, the first to make a stroke at a wrong ball that is not in a hazard, loses the hole; when this cannot be determined, the hole must be played out with the balls exchanged.

• b. Stroke Play

If a competitor makes a stroke or strokes at a wrong ball that is not in a hazard, he incurs a penalty of two strokes.

There is no penalty if a competitor makes a stroke at a wrong ball in a hazard. Any strokes made at a wrong ball in a hazard do not count in the competitor's score.

The competitor must correct his mistake by playing the correct ball or by proceeding under the Rules. If he fails to correct his mistake before making a stroke on the next teeing ground, or in the case of the last hole of the round, fails to declare his intention to correct his mistake before leaving the putting green, he is disqualified.

Strokes made by a competitor with a wrong ball do not count in his score.

If the wrong ball belongs to another competitor, its owner must place a ball on the spot from which the wrong ball was first played.

[0006] Therefore, in match play where two golfers face each other to determine who can win the most holes out of an 18 hole match, the golfer playing the wrong ball would lose a hole if he played a wrong ball outside of a hazard. Even more draconian, is the outright disqualification of a player in stroke play for playing a wrong ball.

[0007] It is likely that every avid amateur golfer has at one time or another played a wrong ball during the course of play. This is typically because the amateur golfer fails to place a personal marking or denote his ball before teeing off for a round of golf. Often the golfer will come to a ball in play and remember that he failed to mark his ball and not know for certain whether the ball he has found is his or not. This is despite the fact that the golf ball manufacturer places the tradename of the manufacturer and typically a number on the golf ball.

[0008] Professional golfers are typically more diligent about knowing the identity of their golf balls before teeing off for a tournament round of golf. Tournaments are often won or lost by a stroke or less and a great deal of money can be earned or loss based on a one or two stroke difference in a golfer's score. However, it takes very little research to learn that professional golfers are not immune to playing the wrong ball during the course of a round of golf. [0009] In 1986 professional golfer, Wayne Grady, was disqualified twice in the same season for playing the wrong ball in both the 1986 Phoenix Open and the 1986 Los Angeles Open. [00010] More recently, on November 20, 2004, during the 2004 UBS Warburg cup, an international competition involving famous players from around the globe, in a match against Arnold Palmer and Jay Haas, professional golfer Mark McNulty mistakenly played his partner, Gary Player's, ball. McNulty explained that after scuffing his ball on the eighth hole his caddie gave him a Callaway No. 4 ball -- the same brand and number as that of Player's -- in replacement. McNulty had been using a Callaway No. 1 , but ran out and his caddie did not inform anyone of the numerical switch.

"When we got down to the balls (in the fairway), there was one six yards ahead of the other, and seeing that Gary had been slightly behind me most of the day, I presumed that the (forward) ball was mine," McNulty said.

"I looked at the back ball and it was a No. 4 and I just said, 'he didn't out-drive it,' and that was that. He went ahead and hit a fantastic shot. And it was my call, and it was only when I got to the green that I realized that it was the wrong ball."

[00011] In 1994, at the Las Vegas Invitational, all professional golfer Curt Byrum had to do was finish the tournament and he would have made enough money to retain his professional playing privileges for 1995. But, on the 16th hole of the final round, Byrum mistakenly played the wrong ball and teed off the next hole with it. When Byrum finished the round he discovered the mistake and paid the price by getting disqualified from the tournament.

[00012] Despite having every incentive not to play the wrong ball, golfers of all levels can and sometimes do play the wrong ball during the course of a round of golf. The present invention addresses this problem by providing a golf ball with two distinct golf ball layers each layer having an identifier. Collectively, the layers provide two separate sensory identification layers thereby increasing the recognition character of the ball so that the player or caddie upon receiving the ball will either: 1 ) remember to mark the ball; 2) remember to denote the tradename and number of the ball; or 3) remember the odorant smell contained within the clear coat identification layer of the golf ball so that the smell of the ball can be used to distinguish the ball from a second ball even if the second ball is of the same make and number as in the Player/McNulty confusion described above.

[00013] Finally, golf balls made according to the present invention are especially beneficial to visually handicapped golfers because it allows blind golfers, a group of golfers formally organized in the United States under the American Blind Golf Association, 7634 Benassi Drive Gilroy, CA 95020, to identify his or her ball without adding a physical identifier to the ball that may alter the aerodynamics of the ball.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[00014] The present invention is directed to golf balls with an improved recognition feature. One aspect of the present invention features a dual sensory golf ball having two identification layers comprising a first exterior surface identification layer having at least one first identifier and a second clear coat identification layer comprising a polymer and a second identifier wherein the second identifier is an additive comprising an odorant and wherein the second clear coat identification layer is substantially transparent to allow recognition of the first identifier.

[00015] In another embodiment the present invention is directed to a golf ball wherein the first exterior surface identification layer has identifiers selected from the group consisting of a letter, a number, a symbol, a color and combinations thereof.

[00016] In another embodiment the present invention is directed to a golf ball wherein the first exterior surface identification layer has identifiers selected from the group consisting of a letter, a number, a symbol, a color and combinations thereof.

[00017] In another embodiment the present invention is directed to a golf ball wherein the first exterior surface identification layer has at least two identifiers.

[00018] In another embodiment the present invention is directed to a golf ball wherein the odorant is encapsulated within the polymer of the clear coat identification layer and the dual sensory golf ball is therefore distinguishable from an otherwise identical second golf ball substantially free of said odorant.

[00019] In another embodiment the present invention is directed to a golf ball wherein the polymer of the clear coat identification layer is selected from the group consisting of, transpolyisoprene, polyurethane, polyurea, polyurethane/polyurea, ionomeric resin, castable thermoplastic polyurethanes, thermoset polyurethanes, cationic urethane ionomers, anionic urethane ionomers, urethane epoxies, polyurethane/polyurea ionomers, epoxy resins, polyethylenes, polyamides, polyesters, polycarbonates, polyacrylin, and mixtures thereof.

[00020] In another embodiment the present invention is directed to a system for improving the recognition character of a golf ball having a first exterior surface identification layer with at least one identifier and a second clear coat identification layer comprising adding to said clear coat identification layer a recognition character improving effective amount of an additive comprising an odorant, wherein said golf ball is distinguishable from an otherwise identical second golf ball substantially free of said odorant.

[00021] In another embodiment the present invention is directed to a method of improving the recognition character of a golf ball by using an effective amount of a clear coat comprising a mixture of a polymer, and a recognition character improving effective amount of an additive comprising an odorant, said golf ball comprising two identification layers having a first exterior surface identification layer having at least one identifier and a second clear coat identification layer comprising a polymer and a second identifier wherein said second identifier is an additive comprising an odorant encapsulated within said polymer and said golf ball is therefore distinguishable from an otherwise identical second golf ball substantially free of said odorant.

[00022] The term "odorant", as used herein, unless otherwise indicated, is a substance or combination of substances capable of eliciting an olfactory response whereas odor is the sensation resulting from stimulation of the olfactory organs.

[00023] The term "identifier", as used herein, unless otherwise indicated, is a numerical, alphabetical, alphanumerical, symbol, logo, particle, e.g., metallic glitter, colorant, odorant or combination thereof.

[00024] The term "recognition character", as used herein, unless otherwise indicated, is a scalable term where golf balls with more identifiers have a higher recognition character than golf balls with fewer identifiers. For example, a golf ball with both a numerical and an odorant identifier has a higher recognition character than a golf ball with only a numerical identifier.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[00025] Further features and advantages of the invention can be ascertained from the following detailed description that is provided in connection with the drawing described below: [00026] FIG. 1 is a cross-sectional view of a multi-component golf ball including a core, a first exterior surface identification layer, and a second clear coat identification layer, wherein the second clear coat identification layer is formed from the odorant containing clear coat polymer compositions of the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[00027] The golf ball of the present invention may generally be comprised of a one-piece construction or it may include several layers including a core and an outer cover, described herein as an exterior surface identification layer, surrounding the core. On the exterior surface identification layer of the golf ball is a polymer clear coat identification layer, for example, a polyurethane clear coat.

[00028] FIG. 1 is illustrative of a golf ball of the present invention having a core 10, an exterior surface identification layer 20, and an odorant-containing clear coat identification layer 30 disposed thereon. In particular, the core 10 may be formed of a polybutadiene reaction material, the exterior surface identification layer 20 formed of an ionomer blend, and the clear coat identification layer 30 formed of the odorant-containing clear coat polymer compositions of the invention, such as transpolyisoprene, polyurethane, polyurea, polyurethane/polyurea, ionomeric resin, castable thermoplastic polyurethanes, thermoset polyurethanes, cationic urethane ionomers, anionic urethane ionomers, urethane epoxies, polyurethane/polyurea ionomers, epoxy resins, polyethylenes, polyamides, polyesters, polycarbonates, polyacrylin, mixtures thereof or the like.

[00029] . The exterior surface identification layer 20 of the golf ball is preferably made of any number of materials that are based on ionomeric, thermoplastic, elastomeric, urethane, balata (natural or synthetic), polybutadiene or any combination of the above. Trademarks or other identifiers may be stamped, i.e., pad-printed, on the exterior surface identification layer 20. The golf balls of the invention may also be subjected to dye sublimation, wherein the exterior surface identification layer 20 is subjected to at least one sublimating ink that migrates at a depth into the exterior surface identification layer and forms an indicia.

[00030] It has been found that the above listed exterior surface identification layer chemistries, when used in connection with the polymer clear coat identification layer 30 of the present invention, provides superior golf ball character recognition profiles. In particular, an identifier such as a logo, trademark, lettering or the like (not shown) placed on the exterior surface identification layer 20 combined with a second odorant identifier introduced through the clear coat identification layer 30 presents the golfer with a ball that can be identified as his own using two separate senses thereby increasing the likelihood that the golfer will be able to identify the ball during the course of play. Importantly, the golf ball is able to accomplish the dual detection system without sacrificing payability or the cosmetics of the ball. [00031 ] Odorant Components

[00032] In the present invention odors are made detectable to the extent that a golfer or his caddie can identify the golf ball by the odor of the golf ball alone. The amount of fragrance can be varied over a wide range, depending on such factors as the intensity of the odor desired and the desired useful life of the fragrance-emitting clear coat identification layer. Generally, it will be desired to incorporate a high level of fragrance in order to obtain a long useful life, subject to the requirements of processability (i.e. curing) and strength of the clear coat identification layer. By way of illustration, we have found that the fragrance oil levels of from about 0.5% by weight to about 40% by weight of the clear coat composition are useable. [00033] Suitable odorant components include, but are not limited to, for example the catalog of fragrances available through Royal Aromatics, Inc., Neptune, NJ. The odorant may be incorporated with a premade colorant or tint, such as those commercially available from Polyone Corporation of Avon Lake, Ohio. These premade colorants or tints generally contain a pigment(s) dispersed in a grind vehicle, e.g., high molecular weight polyols.

[00034] Clear Coat Composition

[00035] As mentioned, the odorant polymer clear coat compositions of the invention may be based on any number of clear-curing polymers. Some of the more typical polymers are described more fully below. [00036] Polyurethane

[00037] One clear coat identification polymer is polyurethane-based, i.e., a product of a reaction between at least one polyurethane prepolymer and a curing or cross-linking agent, such as hydroxyl-terminated or amine-terminated curing agents, of which the polyurethane prepolymer is a product formed by a reaction between at least one polyol and at least one diisocyanate. [00038] Isocvanate Component

[00039] lsocyanates for use with the polyurethane prepolymer include aliphatic, cycloaliphatic, araliphatic, derivatives thereof, and combinations of these compounds having two or more isocyanate (NCO) groups per molecule. The isocyanates may be organic, modified organic, organic polyisocyanate-terminated prepolymers, and mixtures thereof. The isocyanate-containing reactable component may also include any isocyanate-functional monomer, dimer, trimer, or multimeric adduct thereof, prepolymer, quasi-prepolymer, or mixtures thereof. Isocyanate- functional compounds may include monoisocyanates or polyisocyanates that include any isocyanate functionality of two or more. Suitable isocyanate-containing components include diisocyanates having the generic structure: O=C=N-R-N=C=O, where R is preferably a cyclic or linear or branched hydrocarbon moiety containing from about 1 to 20 carbon atoms. The diisocyanate may also contain one or more cyclic groups. When multiple cyclic groups are present, linear and/or branched hydrocarbons containing from about 1 to 10 carbon atoms can be present as spacers between the cyclic groups. In some cases, the cyclic group(s) may be substituted at the 2-, 3-, and/or 4- positions, respectively. Substituted groups may include, but are not limited to, halogens, primary, secondary, or tertiary hydrocarbon groups, or a mixture thereof. [00040] Unsaturated diisocyanates, i.e., aromatic compounds, may also be used with the present invention. Examples of unsaturated diisocyanates include, but are not limited to, substituted and isomeric mixtures including 2,2'-, 2,4'-, and 4,4'-diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI), 3,3'- dimethyl-4,4'-biphenyl diisocyanate (TODI), toluene diisocyanate (TDI), polymeric MDI, carbodimide-modified liquid 4,4'-diphenylmethane diisocyanate, para-phenylene diisocyanate (PPDI), meta-phenylene diisocyanate (MPDI), triphenylmethane-4,4'-, and triphenylmethane-4,4"- triisocyanate, napthylene-1 , 5, -diisocyanate, 2,4'-, 4,4'-, and 2,2-biphenyl diisocyanate, polyphenyl polymethylene polyisocyanate (PMDI), and mixtures thereof. [00041 ] Polyol Component

[00042] Any polyol available to one of ordinary skill in the art is suitable for use in the polyurethane prepolymer. Exemplary polyols include, but are not limited to, polyether polyols, polycaprolactone polyols, polyester polyols, polycarbonate polyols, hydrocarbon polyols, and mixtures thereof. [000431 Curative

[00044] Saturated curatives that may be used in the present invention include, but are not limited to, hydroxy terminated curing agents, amine-terminated curing agents, and mixtures thereof. Depending on the type of curing agent used, the polyurethane composition may be thermoplastic or thermoset in nature. For example, polyurethanes prepolymers cured with a diol or secondary diamine with 1 :1 stoichiometry are thermoplastic in nature. Thermoset polyurethanes, on the other hand, are generally produced from a prepolymer cured with a primary diamine or polyfunctional glycol.

[00045] In addition, the type of curing agent used determines whether the polyurethane composition is polyurethane-urethane or polyurethane-urea. For example, a polyurethane prepolymer cured with a hydroxy-terminated curing agent is polyurethane-urethane because any excess isocyanate groups will react with the hydroxyl groups of the curing agent to create more urethane linkages. In contrast, if an amine-terminated curing agent is used with the polyurethane prepolymer, the excess isocyanate groups will react with the amine groups of the amine- terminated curing agent to create urea linkages.

[00046] Suitable saturated hydroxy-terminated curing agents include, but are not limited to, ethylene glycol; diethylene glycol; polyethylene glycol; propylene glycol; 2-methyl-1 ,3- propanediol; 2-methyl-1 ,4-butanediol; dipropylene glycol; polypropylene glycol; 1 ,2-butanediol; 1 ,3-butanediol; 1 ,4-butanediol; 2,3-butanediol; 2,3-dimethyl-2,3-butanediol; trimethylolpropane; and triisopropanolamine.

[00047] Suitable saturated amine-terminated curing agents include, but are not limited to, ethylene diamine; hexamethylene diamine; 1 -methyl-2,6-cyclohexyl diamine; aziridine-type compounds, e.g., pentaerythritol-tris-(B-(aziridinyl) propionate); and tetrahydroxypropylene ethylene diamine. [00048] Polvurea Composition

[00049] The odorant-containing clear coat compositions of the invention may also be polyurea- based, which are distinctly different from polyurethane compositions, but also result in desirable aerodynamic and aesthetic characteristics when used in dual sensory golf balls. [00050] Polyamine Component

[00051] Any polyamine available to one of ordinary skill in the art is suitable for use in the polyurea prepolymer. As used herein, "polyether amines" refer to at least polyoxyalkyleneamines containing primary amino groups attached to the terminus of a polyether backbone. In one embodiment, the polyether backbone is based on tetramethylene, propylene, ethylene, trimethylolpropane, glycerin, and mixtures thereof.

[00052] Suitable polyether amines include, but are not limited to, methyldiethanolamine; polyoxyalkylenediamines such as, polytetramethylene ether diamines, polyoxypropylenetriamine, and polyoxypropylene diamines; poly(ethylene oxide capped oxypropylene)ether diamines; propylene oxide-based triamines; triethyleneglycoldiamines; trimethylolpropane-based triamines; glycerin-based triamines; and mixtures thereof.

[00053] Isocvanate Component

[00054] Any isocyanate available to one of ordinary skill in the art is suitable for use in the polyurea prepolymer. lsocyanates for use with the present invention include aliphatic, cycloaliphatic, araliphatic, aromatic, any derivatives thereof, and combinations of these compounds having two or more isocyanate (NCO) groups per molecule. The isocyanates may be organic polyisocyanate-terminated prepolymers. The isocyanate-containing reactable component may also include any isocyanate-functional monomer, dimer, trimer, or multimeric adduct thereof, prepolymer, quasi-prepolymer, or mixtures thereof. Isocyanate-functional compounds may include monoisocyanates or polyisocyanates that include any isocyanate functionality of two or more.

[00055] Examples of diisocyanates that can be used with the present invention include, but are not limited to, substituted and isomeric mixtures including 2,2'-, 2,4'-, and 4,4'-diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI); 3,3'-dimethyl-4,4'-biphenylene diisocyanate (TODI); toluene diisocyanate

(TDI); polymeric MDI; and carbodiimide-modified liquid 4,4'-diphenylmethane diisocyanate.

[00056] Examples of saturated diisocyanates that can be used with the present invention include, but are not limited to, ethylene diisocyanate; propylene-1 ,2-diisocyanate; tetramethylene diisocyanate; tetramethylene-1 ,4-diisocyanate; 1 ,6-hexamethylene-diisocyanate (HDI); and octamethylene diisocyanate.

[00057] The polyether amine may be blended with additional polyols to formulate copolymers that are reacted with excess isocyanate to form the polyurea prepolymer. In one embodiment, less than about 30 percent polyol by weight of the copolymer is blended with the saturated polyether amine. In another embodiment, less than about 20 percent polyol by weight of the copolymer, preferably less than about 15 percent by weight of the copolymer, is blended with the polyether amine.

[00058] Curative [00059] The polyurea composition can be formed by crosslinking the polyurea prepolymer with a single curing agent or a blend of curing agents. Skilled artisians are aware that the various properties of an odorant-containing clear coat, e.g., hardness, may be controlled by adjusting the ratio of prepolymer to curing agent, which is a function of the NCO content of the prepolymer and molecular weight of the curing agent. For example, the ratio of a polyurea prepolymer with 6 percent unreacted NCO groups cured with 1 ,4-butanediol is 15.6:1 , whereas the ratio of the same prepolymer cured with 4,4'-bis-(sec-butylamino)-dicyclo- hexylmethane (Clearlink 1000) is 4.36:1 . [00060] Epoxy

[00061] The odorant-containing clear coat identification layer compositions of the invention may also be epoxy based, i.e., a product of a reaction between at least one epoxy prepolymer and a curing agent, such as aliphatic or aromatic diamine, which are distinctly different from polyurethane or polyurea compositions, but also result in desirable aerodynamic and aesthetic characteristics when used in dual sensory golf balls. [00062] Epoxy Compositions

[00063] The epoxy group-containing resin is a resin having an epoxy group in a molecular chain thereof, usually at the terminal of a molecule thereof. Examples of the epoxy group-containing resins are a bisphenol A epoxy resin resulting from a reaction between bisphenol A and epichlorohydrin, a bisphenol F epoxy resin resulting from a reaction between bisphenol F and epichlorohydrin, bisphenol AD epoxy resin resulting from a reaction between bisphenol AD and epichlorohydrin, a phenol novolac epoxy resin resulting from a reaction between phenol novolac and epichlorohydrin, a cresol novolac epoxy resin resulting from a reaction between cresol novolac and epichlorohydrin, a cyclic aliphatic epoxy resin resulting from epoxidization of the double bond of a cyclohexene ring through oxidation, a glycidyl ester epoxy resin resulting from a reaction between carboxylic acid and epichlorohydrin, and glycidylamine epoxy resin resulting from a reaction between a primary or secondary amine and epichlorohydrin. [00064] Diamine Compositions

[00065] Any number of diamine compounds may be used to crosslink the epoxy prepolymer compositions in order to make a suitable clear coat identification layer polymer. Non-limiting diamine examples include 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl ether, 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl methane, 3,3'- diaminodiphenyl methane, 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl sulfone, 3,3'-diaminodiphenyl sulfone, 3,3'- diaminobenzophenone, m-phenylendediamine, p-phenylenediamine, 4,4'- diaminnodiphenylpropane, 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl sulfide, 1 ,4-bis(p-aminophenoxy)benzene, 1 ,4- bis(m-aminophenoxy)benzene, 1 ,3-bis(m-aminophenoxy)benzene, 1 ,3-bis(p- aminopheoxy)benzene, 4,4'-bis(3-aminophenoxy)diphenyl sulfone, and trimethylene glycol di-4- aminobenzoate. [00066] EXAMPLES [00067] A non-limiting description of dual sensory layered golf balls now follows. The following examples are set forth to demonstrate the efficacy of the present invention, and such examples should not be used to limit the claims set forth below. Examples are prophetic with the exception of those Examples disclosed in Table I below.

[00068] Example I

[00069] Oligoether acrylate (Laromer LR 8967, BASF) 30 wt.%; Urethane acrylate oligomer (BR-

5824, Bomar Specialties) 59 wt.%; black coffee fragrance oil 5 wt.%; mono-aryl ketone photoinitiator (Vicure 55, Akzo Nobel) 1 wt.%; carbodiimide (Union Carbide) 3.0 wt.%, was mixed together and applied to a Bridgestone S-B330 Tour golf ball. The golf ball was then exposed to visible light for 12 hours.

[00070] Example Il

[00071] A polyol component comprising ethyl acetate, 39 wt.%; black coffee fragrance oil 15 wt.%; neopentyl glycol polyester polyol resin 40 wt.%; dibutyl tin dilaureate 2.0 wt.%; was mixed with a polyisocyanate component comprising ethyl acetate 44 wt.% and hexamethylene diisocyanate 56 wt.% and applied to a Bridgestone S-B330 Tour golf ball. The clear coat layer on the golf ball cured by heating the balls within the range of 55 - 125 degrees F.

[00072] Example III

[00073] Superflex R-5000 (aqueous urethane emulsion, Dai-lchi Kogyo Siyaku Co., Ltd.) 100 parts by weight; Chemitite PZ-33 (ethyleneimine crosslinker, Nippon Shokubai Co., Ltd.) 10 parts by weight; lrgacure 184 (photoinitiator, Ciba Specialty Chemical) 0.8 parts by weight; water 20 parts by weight; black coffee fragrance oil 20 parts by weight; was applied to a Bridgestone S-

B330 Tour golf ball and exposed to visible light for 12 hours.

[00074] Example IV

[00075] Epoxy resin 50 wt.% mixed with an alkyl diamine crosslinker and nonyl phenol solvent 40 wt.% and black coffee fragrance oil 10 wt.% was applied to a Bridgestone S-B330 Tour golf ball and allowed to cure at room temperature for 12 hours (Ex. IV A). The same epoxy clear coat was also applied to a Maxfli Noodle Ice and allowed to cure at room temperature for 12 hours (Ex. IV

B).

[00076] Example V

[00077] A polyurethane dispersion component 78.4 wt.%, (comprising a linear polyurethane polyester waterborne resin, 40 wt.%, n-methyl pyrrolidone 5 wt.%, glycol ether DE Acetate, 5 wt.%, propylene glycol 5 wt.%) is mixed with a black coffee fragrance oil 20 wt.%. The fragrance urethane is mixed with a crosslinker solution, 1 .6 wt.%, (comprising pentaerythritol-tris-(B-

(aziridinyl) propionate) 70 wt.%, diethylene glycol monoethyl ether acetate, 30 wt.%). The fragranced urethane dispersion is applied to the cover of a Bridgestone S-B330 Tour golf ball and allowed to cure at room temperature for 12 hours (Ex. V A). The same fragranced urethane dispersion was also applied to a Maxfli Noodle Ice and allowed to cure at room temperature for

12 hours (Ex. V B).

[00078] Comparative Example I

[00079] Comparative Example I is a Bridgestone S-B330 Tour golf ball having a polyurethane cover.

[00080] Comparative Example Il

[00081] Comparative Example Il is a Maxfli Noodle Ice golf ball, having a Surlyn cover.

[00082] Comparative Example III

[00083] Comparative Example III is a Bridgestone S-B330 Tour golf ball with a polyurethane cover and the ball was submerged in an oil based coffee fragrance for 12 hours. Prolonged exposure (120 days) caused the ball to rupture.

[00084] Comparative Example IV

[00085] Comparative Example IV is a Maxfli Noodle Ice golf ball, with a Surlyn cover and the ball was submerged in an oil based coffee fragrance for 12 hours.

[00086] The clear coat identification layer may be applied to the golf ball by any number of methods commonly known in the art. For example, the clear coat can be directly applied to golf balls, by submersion, using a spray gun or some other atomizing device. Typically after applying the clear coat the balls are cured by either light (UV) and/or heating the balls at a temperature within the range of about 70 degrees F. to about 150 degrees F. Complete curing of the balls results in about 72 to about 144 hours after the initial cure. Because the odorant additive compositions are often sensitive to higher temperatures it is often desirable to limit curing to the application of UV light.

TABLE I

[00087] The clear coat identification layer of the present invention was applied to two different multiple piece golf balls one having a Surlyn exterior surface identification layer having a numerical identifier and the other a polyurethane exterior surface identification layer also with a numerical identifier, each ball was then compared to the Bridgestone S-B330 Tour golf ball (a polyurethane covered golf ball) and Maxfli Noodle Ice (a Surlyn covered ball) with and without fragrance submersion. The Bridgestone B330 and Maxfli Noodle Ice golf balls with fragrance submersion were immersed in the same odorant additive solution as used in the dual sensory balls (100 percent concentration) for a period of 12 hours. The balls were tested for dual sensory identification and payability after the application and curing (48 hours) of the clear coat identification layer, Examples IV A, B and V A, B and odorant submersion, Comp. Ex. IV and V at 1 , 30 and 60 days. The balls were tested for payability by subjecting each ball to a gravity drop test of ten feet and recording the average recoil height in feet (ft) over 10 drops after hitting a level and smooth concrete floor. The top of the balls were leveled at 10 feet and dropped and the distance the top of the ball reached on recoil was measured as the recoil height. As shown in Table I, the Surlyn, Comp. Ex. Il and IV, and Surlyn dual sensory ball, Examples IV and V B performed best, as expected having a distance oriented cover. The dual sensory polyurethane balls IV and V A and B330 balls, Comp. Ex. I and III performed comparably. However, the performance of the submerged B330 ball, Comp. Ex. Ill, suffered initially perhaps due to additional weight or tackiness. However, payability returned over time. The balls were tested for dual sensory identification by observation of both the numerical identifier in the exterior surface identification layer and the detection of odorant in the clear coat identification layer using three independent observers to score the golf balls from 1 to 5, with 5 being excellent and 1 being poor and O indicating that no odorant was applied or detected as in Comp. Ex. I. The balls were tested at 1 , 30 and 60 days using a field test where the balls were subjected to play over nine simulated holes, where a single ball was hit 36 times on a grass range. The results are shown in Table I. [00088] As shown in Table I all golf balls provide acceptable identification of the numerical identifier on the exterior surface identification layer with, Comp. Ex. II, the submerged Bridgestone B330 performing poorest due to yellowing. The dual sensory golf balls of the present invention, Ex. IV and V, scored high in both identification of the numerical identifier on the exterior surface identification layer and odorant detection from the clear coat identification layer. The high score was maintained for both identifiers after simulated play. In contrast, the odorant submerged balls, Comp. Ex. Ill and IV, deteriorated with respect to their odorant recognition character and lost odorant recognition character after simulated play regardless of how soon the balls were played after submersion. This indicates that a golfer, to maintain odorant recognition character over the course of play, would have to reapply the odorant requiring the player to carry an odorant and an odorant applicator during play. In addition, golfers could expect some decrease in ball payability particularly while using polyurethane covered balls. On the other hand dual sensory golf balls of the present invention are able to maintain both payability and odorant recognition character for the length of the round.

[00089] From the foregoing it is believed that those skilled in the pertinent art will recognize the meritorious advancement of this invention and will readily understand that while the present invention has been described in association with particular embodiments thereof, and other embodiments illustrated in the accompanying drawings, numerous changes, modifications and substitutions of equivalents may be made therein without departing from the spirit and scope of this invention which is intended to be unlimited by the foregoing except as may appear in the following appended claims. Therefore, the embodiments of the invention in which an exclusive property or privilege is claimed are defined in the following appended claims.

Claims

1 . A dual sensory golf ball having two identification layers comprising a first exterior surface identification layer having at least one first identifier and a second clear coat identification layer comprising a polymer and a second identifier wherein said second identifier is an additive comprising an odorant and wherein said second clear coat identification layer is substantially transparent to allow recognition of said first identifier.
2. The dual sensory golf ball of claim 1 wherein said first exterior surface identification layer has identifiers selected from the group consisting of a letter, a number, a symbol, a color and combinations thereof.
3. The dual sensory golf ball of claim 1 wherein said first exterior surface identification layer has at least two identifiers.
4. The dual sensory golf ball of claim 1 wherein said odorant is encapsulated within said polymer and said dual sensory golf ball is therefore distinguishable from an otherwise identical second golf ball substantially free of said odorant.
5. The dual sensory golf ball of claim 1 wherein the polymer is selected from the group consisting of, transpolyisoprene, polyurethane, polyurea, polyurethane/polyurea, ionomeric resin, castable thermoplastic polyurethanes, thermoset polyurethanes, cationic urethane ionomers, anionic urethane ionomers, urethane epoxies, polyurethane/polyurea ionomers, epoxy resins, polyethylenes, polyamides, polyesters, polycarbonates, polyacrylin, and mixtures thereof.
6. The dual sensory golf ball of claim 1 wherein said golf ball has a Gravity Drop Test Recover Ht. (ft) of at least 7.0 feet.
7. A system for improving the recognition character of a golf ball having a first exterior surface identification layer with at least one identifier and a second clear coat identification layer comprising adding to said clear coat identification layer a recognition character improving effective amount of an additive comprising an odorant, wherein said golf ball is distinguishable from an otherwise identical second golf ball substantially free of said odorant.
8. A method of improving the recognition character of a golf ball by using an effective amount of a clear coat comprising a mixture of a polymer, and a recognition character improving effective amount of an additive comprising an odorant, said golf ball comprising two identification layers having a first exterior surface identification layer having at least one identifier and a second clear coat identification layer comprising a polymer and a second identifier wherein said second identifier is an additive comprising an odorant encapsulated within said polymer and said golf ball is therefore distinguishable from an otherwise identical second golf ball substantially free of said odorant.
9. A system for playing golf comprising: a. improving the recognition character of a golf ball having a first exterior surface identification layer with at least one identifier and a second clear coat identification layer comprising adding to said clear coat identification layer a recognition character improving effective amount of an additive comprising an odorant, wherein said golf ball is distinguishable from an otherwise identical second golf ball substantially free of said odorant; b. striking the golf ball; and c. recognizing said golf ball by the odor of the ball.
10. A method for playing golf comprising: a. improving the recognition character of a golf ball having a first exterior surface identification layer with at least one identifier and a second clear coat identification layer comprising adding to said clear coat identification layer a recognition character improving effective amount of an additive comprising an odorant, wherein said golf ball is distinguishable from an otherwise identical second golf ball substantially free of said odorant; b. striking the golf ball; and c. recognizing said golf ball by the odor of the ball.
1 1 . A system for recognizing a golf ball comprising: a. improving the recognition character of a golf ball having a first exterior surface identification layer with at least one identifier and a second clear coat identification layer comprising adding to said clear coat identification layer a recognition character improving effective amount of an additive comprising an odorant, wherein said golf ball is distinguishable from an otherwise identical second golf ball substantially free of said odorant; and b. smelling said ball.
12. A method for recognizing a golf ball comprising: a. improving the recognition character of a golf ball having a first exterior surface identification layer with at least one identifier and a second clear coat identification layer comprising adding to said clear coat identification layer a recognition character improving effective amount of an additive comprising an odorant, wherein said golf ball is distinguishable from an otherwise identical second golf ball substantially free of said odorant; and b. smelling said ball.
PCT/US2008/056445 2007-03-27 2008-03-10 Dual identification layered golf balls WO2008118629A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US90830607 true 2007-03-27 2007-03-27
US60/908,306 2007-03-27

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12593611 US20100087273A1 (en) 2007-03-27 2008-03-10 Dual Identification Layered Golf Balls

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
WO2008118629A1 true true WO2008118629A1 (en) 2008-10-02

Family

ID=39476030

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
PCT/US2008/056445 WO2008118629A1 (en) 2007-03-27 2008-03-10 Dual identification layered golf balls

Country Status (2)

Country Link
US (1) US20100087273A1 (en)
WO (1) WO2008118629A1 (en)

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2011090860A1 (en) * 2010-01-20 2011-07-28 Nike International Ltd Golf ball with cover having varying hardness
EP2481450A1 (en) * 2010-01-20 2012-08-01 Nike International Ltd. Golf ball with cover having varying hardness
US8529375B2 (en) 2010-01-20 2013-09-10 Nike, Inc. Golf ball having increased moment of inertia
US8568250B2 (en) 2010-07-07 2013-10-29 Nike, Inc. Golf ball with cover having zones of hardness
US9320942B2 (en) 2010-01-20 2016-04-26 Nike, Inc. Golf ball with cover layer having zones of differing materials

Families Citing this family (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US9283443B1 (en) * 2014-10-13 2016-03-15 Callaway Golf Company Method for printing an image at multiple locations on a golf ball

Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JPH0449984A (en) * 1990-06-13 1992-02-19 Eiko Shioda Golf ball
US20020147053A1 (en) * 2001-04-09 2002-10-10 Chrisman John W. Scented bowling balls and methods
US6838513B2 (en) * 2001-06-28 2005-01-04 Sumitomo Rubber Industries, Ltd. Ink for golf ball
US20070219019A1 (en) * 2006-03-16 2007-09-20 Kyle Benjamin Matthews Odorant Golf Balls

Family Cites Families (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1664397A (en) * 1925-02-14 1928-04-03 Samuel J Bens Lost-ball indicator
JPS59140764A (en) * 1983-02-01 1984-08-13 Nec Corp Audible sound control system

Patent Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JPH0449984A (en) * 1990-06-13 1992-02-19 Eiko Shioda Golf ball
US20020147053A1 (en) * 2001-04-09 2002-10-10 Chrisman John W. Scented bowling balls and methods
US6838513B2 (en) * 2001-06-28 2005-01-04 Sumitomo Rubber Industries, Ltd. Ink for golf ball
US20070219019A1 (en) * 2006-03-16 2007-09-20 Kyle Benjamin Matthews Odorant Golf Balls

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2011090860A1 (en) * 2010-01-20 2011-07-28 Nike International Ltd Golf ball with cover having varying hardness
EP2481450A1 (en) * 2010-01-20 2012-08-01 Nike International Ltd. Golf ball with cover having varying hardness
US8529375B2 (en) 2010-01-20 2013-09-10 Nike, Inc. Golf ball having increased moment of inertia
US8556750B2 (en) 2010-01-20 2013-10-15 Nike, Inc. Golf ball with cover having varying hardness
US9320942B2 (en) 2010-01-20 2016-04-26 Nike, Inc. Golf ball with cover layer having zones of differing materials
US8568250B2 (en) 2010-07-07 2013-10-29 Nike, Inc. Golf ball with cover having zones of hardness

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
US20100087273A1 (en) 2010-04-08 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US6267694B1 (en) Multi-piece solid golf ball
US7118496B2 (en) Golf ball
US5692974A (en) Golf ball covers
US6528578B2 (en) Golf ball covers including polyurethane and optical brighteners
US6267692B1 (en) Multi-piece solid golf ball
US6518358B1 (en) Golf balls comprising saturated polyurethanes and a UV absorber
US6688991B2 (en) Golf ball with foam core and filled cover
US6193619B1 (en) Golf balls having inner layers formed with cationic ionomers
US6435987B1 (en) Golf ball having a polyurethane cover
US6762273B2 (en) Thermosetting polyurethane material for a golf ball cover
US6903178B2 (en) Acid-functional polyurethane and polyurea compositions for golf balls
US20060025238A1 (en) Golf ball
US20070142127A1 (en) Golf ball and process for preparing the same
US6392002B1 (en) Urethane golf ball
US20040010096A1 (en) Multilayered golf ball and composition
US7481956B2 (en) Method for molding castable light stable polyurethane and polyurea golf balls
US6210294B1 (en) Polyurethane golf ball with improved resiliency
US20090111614A1 (en) Golf ball
US6645091B2 (en) Thermoplastic polyurethane golf ball with improved resiliency
US6867279B2 (en) Golf ball comprising saturated polyurethanes and methods of making the same
US20090143169A1 (en) Golf ball
US6702695B1 (en) Multi-piece solid golf ball
US6592472B2 (en) Golf ball having a non-yellowing cover
US7278930B2 (en) Golf ball
US20090286624A1 (en) Castable Hydrophobic Polyurea Compositions for Use in Golf Balls

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
121 Ep: the epo has been informed by wipo that ep was designated in this application

Ref document number: 08731850

Country of ref document: EP

Kind code of ref document: A1

NENP Non-entry into the national phase in:

Ref country code: DE

122 Ep: pct app. not ent. europ. phase

Ref document number: 08731850

Country of ref document: EP

Kind code of ref document: A1