WO2008096912A1 - Method for allowing a family-based address in a wireless sensor network, and method for hierarchical routing a path setting using the same - Google Patents

Method for allowing a family-based address in a wireless sensor network, and method for hierarchical routing a path setting using the same Download PDF

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Publication number
WO2008096912A1
WO2008096912A1 PCT/KR2007/000594 KR2007000594W WO2008096912A1 WO 2008096912 A1 WO2008096912 A1 WO 2008096912A1 KR 2007000594 W KR2007000594 W KR 2007000594W WO 2008096912 A1 WO2008096912 A1 WO 2008096912A1
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node
address
nodes
method
child
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PCT/KR2007/000594
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French (fr)
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Ki-Hyung Kim
Waleed Mansoor
Chae-Seong Lim
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Ki-Hyung Kim
Waleed Mansoor
Chae-Seong Lim
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L45/00Routing or path finding of packets in data switching networks
    • H04L45/04Interdomain routing, e.g. hierarchical routing
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L45/00Routing or path finding of packets in data switching networks
    • H04L45/46Cluster building
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS
    • H04W40/00Communication routing or communication path finding
    • H04W40/24Connectivity information management, e.g. connectivity discovery or connectivity update
    • H04W40/32Connectivity information management, e.g. connectivity discovery or connectivity update for defining a routing cluster membership
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS
    • H04W40/00Communication routing or communication path finding
    • H04W40/02Communication route or path selection, e.g. power-based or shortest path routing
    • H04W40/04Communication route or path selection, e.g. power-based or shortest path routing based on wireless node resources
    • H04W40/10Communication route or path selection, e.g. power-based or shortest path routing based on wireless node resources based on available power or energy

Abstract

A method for assigning a family-based address in a wireless sensor network is disclosed. The method comprises: (a) comparing the maximum number of child nodes that are extracted from the network information base with the number of current child nodes that are extracted from an adjacent node table; (b) when the number of current child nodes and the maximum number of child nodes are identical to each other, rejecting an address assignment request; and (c) when the number of current child nodes is substantially smaller than that maximum number of child nodes, increasing the number of one's address by a single digit and assigning its child nodes addresses by increasing addresses by a single digit. Therefore, a parent node dynamically assigns a child node address reflecting its own address in response to an address assignment requested from a child node, so that a routing path setting may be easily performed.

Description

METHOD FOR ALLOWING A FAMILY-BASED ADDRESS IN A

WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORK, AND METHOD FOR HIERARCHICAL ROUTING A PATH SETTING USING THE SAME

Technical Field

The present invention relates to a wireless sensor network, and more particularly, to a method for assigning a family-based address in a wireless sensor network and a method for setting a hierarchical routing path by using the method for assigning a family-based address.

Background Art

A general mobile telecommunication system receives and transmits data between a mobile element and a base station. The mobile element and the base station receive and transmit data, not via other mobile elements or nodes, but directly. However, a sensor network uses other sensor nodes when transmitting data of a sensor node to a sink node.

The structure of a general sensor network will be described with reference to FIG. 1. As shown in FIG. 1, the sensor network has a sink node and a plurality of sensor nodes. Although FIG. 1 shows only one sink node, the sensor network can be composed of 2 or more sink nodes.

The sensor node collects data on target areas set by a designated user. Information on target areas collected by the sensor node may include, for example, ambient temperature or humidity, object movement, and gas leakage.

The sensor node transmits data of collected information at the target area to the sink node. The sink node receives data sent by sensor nodes of the sensor network. A sensor node within a predetermined distance of the sink node directly transmits data to the sink node. However, a sensor node that is beyond a predetermined distance transmits collected data to the adjacent sensor nodes, instead of directly sending the data to the sink node. As described above, a sensor node that is not within a predetermined distance transmits data using adjacent sensor nodes, to minimize power consumption for data transmission. That is, the distance between the sink node and the sensor node, and the power needed for the sensor node to transmit data to the sink node, are generally proportional to each other.

Accordingly, a sensor node that is not within a predetermined distance from the sink node transmits collected data using a plurality of sensor nodes, to minimize power consumption required for data transmission. Hereinafter, a node performing a role of relaying data of another sensor node will be referred to a relay node. Alternatively, the relay node may also transmit self-collected data to the sink node using another relay node or directly.

As described above, the sensor node collects information of a target to deliver to the sink node. Generally, the target node and the sink node are not fixed, and may be in a mobile state. FIG. 2 is a schematic diagram illustrating a target that is moving in a wireless sensor network. In FIG. 2, temperature information regarding a predetermined area is transferred to a moving car and so on. Thus, the moving car may receive the temperature information regarding the predetermined area in real-time. FIG. 3 is a schematic diagram illustrating a sink node that is moving in a wireless sensor network. In FIG. 3, information regarding a moving object is transferred to the sink node.

FIG. 4 is a schematic diagram illustrating a process that sets a routing path in a wireless sensor network. Hereinafter, a process that the first sensor node ' 1 ' sets a routing path as a sink node will be described using FIG. 4. The first sensor node ' 1 ' generates a routing request (RREQ) message including information such as its own address (or a source address) and a sink node address (or a destination address). The first sensor node ' 1 ' broadcasts the generated RREQ message to adjacent sensor nodes.

In FIG. 4, sensor node 2, a fourth sensor node '4' and a fifth sensor node '5' receive the RREQ message. The sensor nodes receiving the RREQ message compare a destination address with their own addresses. When the destination address and their own addresses are different from each other, the sensor nodes renews the received RREQ message to broadcast to adjacent nodes. The renewed information includes a hop count.

Moreover, the sensor node receiving the RREQ message generates a routing table using the received RREQ message. The routing table may include a source node address, a destination node address, the hop count, a sensor node address that broadcasts the RREQ message, etc. The RREQ message broadcasted by the first sensor node ' 1 ' is transferred to the sink node via various paths. The sink node sets a routing path using the hop count included in the transferred RREQ message. That is, the sink node sets a routing path as a short path that has the smallest hop count. Therefore, the sink node transfers a routing reply (RREP) message to the fourth sensor node '4'. The fourth sensor node '4' transfers the RREP message to the first sensor node T using a routing table that is stored therein. As the above-described processes are performed, a routing path is set between the first sensor node ' 1 ' and the sink node. The first sensor node ' 1 ' transfers collected information to the sink node using the routing path.

Disclosure of the Invention Technical Problem

The present invention provides a method of assigning a family-based address that a parent node address is reflected to a parent node address in a wireless sensor network.

The present invention also provides a method for setting a hierarchical routing path by using the method of assigning a family-based address in a wireless sensor network.

Technical Solution In one aspect of the present invention, there is provided a method for assigning a family-based address in a wireless sensor network. The method comprises: (a) as assigning an address is requested from a node, comparing the maximum number of child nodes that are extracted from the network information base (NWK IB) with the number of current child nodes that are extracted from an adjacent node table; (b) when the number of current child nodes and the maximum number of child nodes are identical to each other, rejecting an address assignment request; and (c) when the number of current child nodes is substantially smaller than that maximum number of child nodes, increasing the number of one's address by a single digit and endowing its child nodes with addresses by increasing addresses by a single digit.

In another aspect of the present invention, there is provided a method for setting a hierarchical routing path. The method comprises: (a) in a wireless sensor network comprising a plurality of nodes and transmitting packets among the nodes, as one or more descendant nodes request to affiliate to a plurality of ancestor nodes, assigning an address for parent node address to be reflected in child node address to the family-base; and (b) as a routing starts in the wireless sensor network, setting a hierarchical routing path by using the address reflected to the family-base. Advantageous Effects

As described above, according to the present invention, a parent node dynamically assigns a child node address that is reflected to own address in response to an address assignment that is requested from a child node in the wireless sensor network, for example, a low-power personal area network (LoWPAN) based on Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) (6LoWPAN), so that a routing path setting may be easily performed.

Brief Description of the Drawings

The above and other advantages of the present invention will become more apparent by describing in detail example embodiments thereof with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a schematic diagram illustrating the structure of a wireless sensor network; FIG. 2 is a schematic diagram illustrating a target that is moving in a wireless sensor network;

FIG. 3 is a schematic diagram illustrating a sink node that is moving in a wireless sensor network;

FIG. 4 is a schematic diagram illustrating a process that sets a routing path in a wireless sensor network;

FIG. 5 is a schematic diagram illustrating the structure of a wireless sensor network that is used in the present invention;

FIG. 6 is shows an example of a wireless sensor network protocol stack that is suited to the present invention; FIG. 7 is a figure of a head format of a conventional IPv6;

FIG. 8 shows an example of a media access control (MAC)/physical (PHY) layer data frame format as shown in FIG. 6;

FIG. 9 is a schematic diagram illustrating a multi-hop tree according to the present invention; FIG. 10 is a block diagram illustrating a sensor node having an address that is assigned by a method of assigning a family-based address according to the present invention;

FIG. 11 is a schematic diagram showing a method of assigning a family-based routing address according to an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 12 is a schematic diagram showing a routing process by the method of assigning a family-based routing address as shown in FIG. 11 ;

FIG. 13 is a flowchart showing a method of assigning a family-based address according to an embodiment of the present invention; and FIG. 14 is a flowchart showing a method for setting a hierarchical routing path according to an embodiment of the present invention.

Best Mode for Carrying Out the Invention It should be understood that the example embodiments of the present invention described below may be varied modified in many different ways without departing from the inventive principles disclosed herein, and the scope of the present invention is therefore not limited to these particular following embodiments. Rather, these embodiments are provided so that this disclosure will be through and complete, and will fully convey the concept of the invention to those skilled in the art by way of example and not of limitation.

Hereinafter, the present invention will be described in detail with reference to the accompanying drawings.

Prior to describing the preferred embodiments, the following definitions are provided to clarify terms used throughout this specification.

- A current node represents a predetermined node, that is, an Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 802.15.4 device receives an Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) packet in a wireless sensor network.

- A depth represents a hop distance between a coordinator of a wireless sensor network and a predetermined device. For example, the depth of the coordinator may be zero.

- A maximum number of children (MC) represents the maximum number of children that a predetermined device (i.e., a node) can have.

- A neighbor table represents that a table having information of a plurality of neighboring devices within a personal operating space (POS). The neighbor table includes a plurality of fields such as a personal area network ID (PAN ID: 16 bits), a neighbor short address (Neighbor.16-bit short address: 16 bits), an EUI-64 address of a neighbor (Neighbor.IEEE EUI 64-bit address: 64 bits), a neighbor device type (Neighbor.Device type: 2 bits), a neighbor relationship (Neighbor .Relationship: 2 bits), a neighbor depth (Neighbor. Depth: 8 bits), etc. In the neighbor table, when the field of the neighbor device type is '00,' Ol ' and ' 10,' the neighbor device may be a coordinator, a router and an end device, respectively. A field of the neighbor device type which corresponds to ' 11 ' is reserved. In the neighbor table, when the field of the neighbor relationship is OO' and "01,' the neighbor device may be a parent node, and a child node, respectively. A field of the neighbor relationship corresponding to ' 10' and ' 11 ' is reserved.

- A personal area network identification (PAN ID) represents a wireless sensor network 16-bit identifier for managing. Here, a personal operation space

(POS) represents an area within a sensing range of a wireless transmission of an IEEE 802.15.4 packet.

- A reduced- function device (RFD) represents an IEEE 802.15.4 device of a wireless sensor network having not a routing function. The RFD does not transfer a plurality of IPv6 packets to a next hop device. That is, the RFD only performs as an end device in a wireless sensor network.

- A router represents an FFD capable of routing a packet to the next hop device in a wireless sensor network, and a short address is a 16-bit address that is dynamically assigned to a device from a parent node. A wireless sensor network based on IPv6 that is suitably adapted to the present invention will be described in FIG. 5. In this exemplary embodiment, the wireless sensor network may be a low-power wireless personal area network (which will be referred to as "LoWPAN").

FIG. 5 is a schematic diagram illustrating the structure of a wireless sensor network that is used in the present invention.

Referring to FIG. 5, a wireless sensor network includes one PAN coordinator 10, a plurality of routers 20a, 20b and 20c and a plurality of terminal devices 30a, 30b, 30c, 3Od and 3Oe.

According to the IEEE 802.15.4 standard, the wireless sensor network devices include a full-function device (which will be referred to as an FFD device) for realizing a full protocol set of the IEEE 802.15.4, and a reduced-function device (which will be referred to as an RFD device) not having a function of a router. For example, the PAN coordinator 10 and the routers 20a, 20b and 20c may be the FFD device, and the terminal devices 30a, 30b, 30c, 30e and 3Oe may be the RFD device.

The FFD may support almost all network types that are supported in the IEEE 802.15.4 standard, and may transmit and receive a packet between the FFD and the RFD. The FFD may perform the role of a PAN coordinator, and may perform almost all functions that are described in the IEEE 802.15.4.

On the other hand, the RFD is designed to be suitable for a small and light device. The RFD may minimize an energy consumption ratio due to simple functions and simple operation, and minimize resource usage to reduce chip manufacturing costs so that the cost of the device may be decreased. The RFD may be used for an end device in all network types. That is, the RFD does not have a routing function, so that it means that the RFD cannot transfer peer-to-peer data and the RFD cannot perform the role of a PAN coordinator.

A star topology configured by an RFD and an FFD may solve inefficient wireless interfaces, such as home networks, personal computer (PC) peripheral devices, toys, game devices, health-related machines, etc. Peer-to-peer communication may utilize an ad-hoc routing function that is provided from a network layer. That is, the peer-to-peer communication may be applied to a sensor network, remote control, an actuator and so on. A plurality of devices of a wireless sensor network according to the IEEE

802.15.4-2003 standard is connected to each other as a parent device and a child device in a wireless sensor network. The child device is dynamically assigned a 16-bit short address from a parent device through an association.

That is, an IEEE 802.15.4 device may be dynamically assigned a 16-bit short address during an association operation with an adjacent device (or a router) that is to be a parent device. Communication between a parent and a child may be made possible through the assigned short address. A disassociation is a process that an association with an adjacent device is removed. A PAN coordinator 10 is an FFD, which is a main manager of a wireless sensor network, may initiate a synchronization of an entire wireless sensor network by transmitting a beacon.

The terminal devices 30a, 30b, 30c, 30d and 30e are connected to one of the routers 20a, 20b and 20c to communicate to another terminal device connected to the corresponding router. The routers 20a, 20b and 20c route a packet received from at least one of the terminal devices 30a, 30b, 30c, 30d and 30e or another router in accordance to a hierarchical routing path setting method of the present invention.

FIG. 6 is shows an example of a wireless sensor network protocol stack that is suited to the present invention.

Referring to FIG. 6, a wireless sensor network stack includes a physical layer Ll, a media access control (MAC) layer L2, an adaptation layer L3 and an IPv6 layer L4. A transmission control protocol (TCP), a user datagram protocol (UDP) and an Internet control message protocol (ICMP) are positioned on the IPv6 layer L4, and an application layer is positioned on the TPC, UDP and ICMP.

The physical layer Ll and the MAC layer L2 are standardized in accordance with IEEE 802.15.4-2003, the adaptation layer L3 is standardized in accordance with IETF Internet draft (montenegro-lowpan-ipv6-over-802.15.4), and the IPv6 layer L4 is standardized in accordance with RFC 2460 and related specifications.

An IPv6 head format that is adapted to the present invention will be described with reference to FIG. 7.

FIG. 7 is a figure of a head format of a conventional IPv6. FIG. 8 shows an example of a MAC/PHY layer data frame format as shown in FIG. 6.

Referring to FIG. 7, a head format of an IPv6 may have a size of 40 octets as defined by 10 columns x 32 bits, and may include a version, a priority, a flow level, a pay load length, a next header, a hop limitation, a 128-bit source address and a 128-bit destination address.

Moreover, a frame according to the IEEE 802.15.4-2003 standard includes a beacon frame for transmitting a beacon by a coordinator, a data frame for transmitting data, a response frame for informing when the data frame is received and a MAC command frame. Referring to FIG. 8, a data frame of MAC/PHY layer includes a packet format of a physical layer and a packet format of a MAC layer.

A packet format of the physical layer includes a preamble sequence, a start-of-frame delimiter (SFD), a frame length and a MAC layer data unit (MPDU). A packet format of the MAC layer includes a frame control, a sequence number, an addressing field, a data payload and a frame check sequence (FCS).

Each devices of a wireless sensor network adapted to the present invention may be represented as a node of a tree having a multi-hop, as shown in FIG. 9. FIG. 9 is a schematic diagram illustrating a multi-hop tree according to the present invention. For ease of description, the same reference numerals will be used to refer to the same or like parts in the structure of a wireless sensor network as illustrated in FIG. 5.

Referring to FIG. 9, in a tree structure, a node 'A' corresponding to a root represents a PAN coordinator, and a depth of the node 'A' is O'. Nodes 'B', 'D' and 'F' represent a router, and nodes 'C\ 'E', 'G', Η' and T represent a terminal device.

The nodes are communication devices which have mobile communication functions and use low power. The nodes may be a source node generating data, a destination node receiving the data, or an intermediate node disposed between the source node and the destination node to relay the data. Moreover, each of the nodes may be connected to another node in a hierarchical structure. FIG. 10 is a block diagram illustrating a sensor node having an address that is assigned by a method of assigning a family-based address according to the present invention.

Referring to FIG. 10, a sensor node that performs a hierarchical routing path setting method according to the present invention includes a logical processing part 100, a hardware processing part 200 and an antenna 300.

The logical processing part 100 includes an application module 110, a sensing processing module 120, an Internet Protocol (IP) processing module 130, an adaptation layer packet processing module 140, a routing processing module 150, a neighbor node information managing module 160, and a MAC layer module 170. In this exemplary embodiment, elements of the logical processing part 100 are separately described in logical terms for ease of understanding regardless of whether or not they are separate physical hardware elements.

The hardware processing part 200 includes a sensing device 210 observing an environment, a central processing unit (CPU) 220, a memory 230, a network device 240 performing a communication, and a flash memory 250 storing data for a long time.

Conventionally, in a wireless sensor network, for example, a ZigBee network, information for managing and maintaining a network by each node is stored in a table type. The information stored in the table names with a network information base (NWK IB). The NWK IB may be stored in the memory.

The NWK IB includes the maximum number of children, the maximum depth of a network tree, the maximum number of ZigBee routers that may be used as children, information related to a broadcast transmission, a neighbor table which has information of a neighbor node, a path table, security-related information and so on.

Information such as a PAN identifier, a 16-bit address of a parent or a child of oneself, a 16-bit network address, a device type, a relationship between oneself and a neighbor node and so on is stored in the neighbor table. Moreover, information such as a status of an activation period of a neighbor node, 64-bit addresses of all neighbor, a beacon order, an authority that is able to approve network participation requests, a transmission failure ratio, a latent parent, a link quality indicator, a logical channel value, a beacon frame arrival time, a beacon transmission time offset, etc., may be optionally stored in the neighbor table.

Information, which is used for searching a path in order to transmit data from a multi-hop network to a destination, is stored in the path table.

The memory 230 stores a neighbor node address. The neighbor node information may be provided through a MAC layer module 170. A service of the MAC layer module 170 includes beaconing. The neighbor node information is used for a routing processing module process in order to search a short path.

The sensing device 210 may include a temperature sensor, a moisture sensor, an illumination sensor, an ultraviolet ray sensor, etc. The network device 240 may perform bidirectional communication with another node having a predetermined identification. For example, Bluetooth, IEEE 802.15.4, ZigBee, etc., are mounted to the network device 240.

Packet information arrived at the network device 240 is processed through the MAC layer module 170, and then provided to the adaptive layer packet processing module 140. The adaptive layer packet processing module 140 may perform a packet processing process. The packet processing process may include header parsing, packet fragmentation (separation/reassembling), header compression, etc.

A packet arrived at the adaptive layer packet processing module 140 is provided to the application module 110 via the IP processing module 130. The IP processing module 130 perform a routing process when the packet will be routed.

The sensor node may be operated as a source node which is a packet is transmitted, a next hop node (or a relay node) which transmits the packet, or a destination node which receives the packet.

FIG. 11 is a schematic diagram showing a method of assigning a family-based routing address according to an embodiment of the present invention. Particularly, it is shown that an address is assigned by a family-based address assigning method, a maximum child (MC) is '3', and an address is defined as a ternary.

Referring to FIG. 11, a node '0' is positioned at the top layer, and the node '0' is connected to a node ' 1 ', a node '2' and a node '3' as a child node.

In FIG. 11, for ease of description, a node address is described within a circle defining a node. Thus, the nodes ' 1', '2' and '3' are connected to the node ' 1 ' as a parent node.

The child node represents a node that is connected to a lower layer node of the corresponding node with respect to a predetermined node in a hierarchical structure. The parent node, in contrast with the child node, represents a node that is connected to a higher layer node of the corresponding node with respect to a predetermined node. Here, the connection represents a logical connection or a wireless connection may include a physical connection, a wireless connection without a physical connection, or a wire connection.

The node ' 1 ' is connected to a node ' 10', a node ' 11 ' and a node ' 12' as a child node, and the node ' 10' is connected to a node ' 100', a node ' 101 ' and a node ' 102' as a child node. Moreover, the node ' 11' is connected to a node ' 110', a node ' 111' and a node ' 112' as a child node.

A node assigning an address is a parent node. Thus, when an address assignment is requested from a new node, it is checked whether its own child exists or not. When its own child does not exist, order digits of its own address is shifted by one digit and the number of first order digits is sequentially increased to assign an address as a child node. Moreover, when the number of its own children is smaller than that of the maximum number of children, an extra address is assigned. Here, a first order digit that has been previously assigned is added by 1 to assign an address to a child node.

When the number of current own children is equal to that of the maximum number of children, an address assigning request may be rejected.

Hereinafter, a method for assigning an address of a family-based hierarchical routing path setting method will be described.

An address may use a numbering system in which an odd number is used as the number of maximum children (which will be referred to as 'MC). For example, when MC is 3, a ternary may be used in an address numbering system.

An order digit of a parent node address is shifted by one digit, and then the last order digit is sequentially increased, so that a child address may be assigned. Here, '0' is assigned to a root node (or the top layer node) address of a tree different from a conventional hierarchical routing path setting method. A node having a depth of 2 may be configured to (MC-I), which is a plurality of child nodes of a root node. In the case of using the above method, a depth of a node is set to be [a order digit of a node address + 1] (wherein nodes having a depth of 1 and 2 are excluded), and a parent node address is set to be [a child node address/MC].

As described above, according to a method for setting a hierarchical routing path, a method for assigning an address is changed, so that it is possible to assign an address to a plurality of new nodes through a simple calculation. Moreover, it is possible to perform a routing by using a simple method.

FIG. 12 is a schematic diagram showing a routing process by the method of assigning a family-based routing address as shown in FIG. 11. Particularly, it is shown that a source node address and a destination node address are 100(3), 112(3), respectively.

Referring to FIG. 12, when a packet is transmitted from a node 100(3) to a node 112(3), a Path setting and a packet transmitting are identical to a conventional hierarchical routing path setting. However, a family-based routing according to the present invention may determine whether a current node is included in an ascendant group or a descendant group of a destination node or not, so that the complexity of a calculation may be decreased. For example, the digit number of a node 112(3)is equal to that of a node 100(3), so that a depth of the node 112(3) is equal to that of the node 100(3). Moreover, an end digit is removed from each of the source node address and a destination node address to obtain a parent node address.

In FIG. 12, a parent of node 112(3) that is a destination node is a node

Ho), and a parent node 100(3) that is a source node is a node 10(3). Thus, a parent node of a source node is different from a parent node of a destination node, so that the hop count being increased may be easily checked in order to transmit a packet.

FIG. 13 is a flowchart showing a method of assigning a family-based address according to an embodiment of the present invention.

Referring to FIG. 13, as a new node request an assigning of an address (step S 105), the maximum number of child nodes and the number of current child nodes are extracted (step Sl 10). The maximum number of child nodes is extracted from a network information base (NWK IB). The number of current child nodes is extracted from a neighbor node table.

Then, it is checked whether the maximum number of child nodes is equal to the number of child node or not (step S 115).

In step Sl 15, when the maximum number of child nodes is equal to the number of current child nodes, an address assignment request is rejected (step S 120), and then is ended.

In step Sl 15, when the number of child node is not equal to the number of current child nodes, it is checked whether the current child node exists or not (step S 125).

In step S 125, when the current child node does not exist, a child node is newly generated, so that order digits of its own address is shifted by one digit (step S 130). Its own address is stored in MAC information base (MIB). The own address may include a data type of bit units, for example, 16 bits. When the address is stored in the bit units, a calculating process for routing is simple.

Alternatively, its own address may be stored in byte units. When the address is stored in the byte units, the stored address the byte units may be alternated with a MAC address.

Then, a first order digit of its own address is increased to assign a child node address (step S 135). Here, when the child node is a first child node, '0' is assigned to a first order digit of the child node address. Moreover, when the child node is a second child node, ' 1 ' is assigned to a first order digit of the child node address. Furthermore, when the child node is a third child node, '2' is assigned to a first order digit of the child node address.

In step S 125, when a current child node exists, a child node address is assigned through adding ' 1 ' to the assigned first order digit (step S 140).

FIG. 14 is a flowchart showing a method for setting a hierarchical routing path according to an embodiment of the present invention.

Referring to FIG. 14, a family-based address is assigned (step S205). Step S205 is described in FIG. 15, thus a detailed description will be omitted.

When the family-based address is assigned, as a hierarchical routing is started (step S210), the depth of each corresponding node is determined based on a source node address and a destination node address (step S215). Here, the depth of a node is set to be a relationship of [an order of a node + I]. However, nodes having depths of 1 and 2 are excluded. For example, when a node address is '101 ', a depth of the node is 4. When a node address is ' 10310', a depth of the node is 6. Then, a corresponding parent node address is obtained by removing a 10N order digit (wherein 'N' is 0 and a natural number) from a source node address and a destination node address (step S220).

Then, a path which connects corresponding parent nodes to each other is set to be a routing path (step S225).

This invention has been described with reference to the example embodiments. It is evident, however, that many alternative modifications and variations will be apparent to those having skill in the art in light of the foregoing description. Accordingly, the present invention embraces all such alternative modifications and variations as fall within the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

Industrial Applicability

According to the present invention, a parent node dynamically assigns a child node address that reflects its own address in response to an address assignment that is requested from a child node in the wireless sensor network, for example, a low-power personal area network (LoWPAN) based on Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) (6LoWPAN), so that a routing path setting may be easily performed.

Claims

1. A method for assigning a family-based address in a wireless sensor network, the method comprising: (a) as an address assignment is requested from a node, comparing the maximum number of child nodes that are extracted from the network information base (NWK IB) with the number of current child nodes that are extracted from an adjacent node table;
(b) when the number of current child nodes and the maximum number of child nodes are identical to each other, rejecting an address assignment request; and
(c) when the number of current child nodes is substantially smaller than that maximum number of child nodes, increasing the number of one's address by a single digit and assigning its child nodes addresses by increasing addresses by a single digit.
2. The method of claim 1, wherein step (c) comprises: (c-1) checking whether the current child node exists or not;
(c-2) when the current child node does not exist, increasing the number of one's address by a single digit and endowing its child nodes with addresses by sequentially increasing addresses by a single digit; and
(c-3) when the current child node exists, endowing its child nodes with address by adding ' 1 ' to the single digit that is predetermined set, and the process feeds back to step (a).
3. The method of claim 1, wherein each depth of the nodes is identicalo the order of the corresponding node.
4. The method of claim 1, wherein each parent node address of the corresponding nodes is calculated through removing a 10N (wherein 'N' is zero) order from the corresponding node address.
5. The method of claim 1 , wherein an address of the most significant node of the nodes is zero.
6. The method of claim 5, wherein the most significant number of the remaining nodes except for the most significant node is greater than or equal to T.
7. A method for setting a hierarchical routing path, the method comprising:
(a) in a wireless sensor network comprising a plurality of nodes and transmitting packets among the nodes, as one or more descendant nodes request to be affiliated to a plurality of ancestor nodes, assigning an address for a parent node address to be reflected in a child node address as family-based; and
(b) as a routing starts in the wireless sensor network, setting a hierarchical routing path by using the address reflected as family-based.
8. The method of claim 7, wherein step (b) comprises:
(b-1) checking a depth of a corresponding node based on a source node address and a destination node address;
(b-2) obtaining a corresponding parents node address through removing a 10N (wherein, 'N' is zero) order in the source node address and the destination node address; and
(b-3) setting a connecting path as a routing path, which connects the corresponding parents nodes with each other.
9. The method of claim 7, wherein a depth of the node is identical to the order of the node.
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