WO2003024598A1 - Functional unit enabling controlled flow in a microfluidic device - Google Patents

Functional unit enabling controlled flow in a microfluidic device

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Publication number
WO2003024598A1
WO2003024598A1 PCT/SE2002/001701 SE0201701W WO2003024598A1 WO 2003024598 A1 WO2003024598 A1 WO 2003024598A1 SE 0201701 W SE0201701 W SE 0201701W WO 2003024598 A1 WO2003024598 A1 WO 2003024598A1
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WO
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Patent type
Prior art keywords
flow
microconduit
microcavity
microchannel
restriction
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/SE2002/001701
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Gunnar Kylberg
Per Andersson
Gunnar THORSÉN
Original Assignee
Gyros Ab
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
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Publication date

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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B01PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES OR APPARATUS IN GENERAL
    • B01JCHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL PROCESSES, e.g. CATALYSIS OR COLLOID CHEMISTRY; THEIR RELEVANT APPARATUS
    • B01J19/00Chemical, physical or physico-chemical processes in general; Their relevant apparatus
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B01PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES OR APPARATUS IN GENERAL
    • B01LCHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL LABORATORY APPARATUS FOR GENERAL USE
    • B01L3/00Containers or dishes for laboratory use, e.g. laboratory glassware; Droppers
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B81MICROSTRUCTURAL TECHNOLOGY
    • B81BMICROSTRUCTURAL DEVICES OR SYSTEMS, e.g. MICROMECHANICAL DEVICES
    • B81B1/00Devices without movable or flexible elements, e.g. microcapillary devices
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01NINVESTIGATING OR ANALYSING MATERIALS BY DETERMINING THEIR CHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL PROPERTIES
    • G01N37/00Details not covered by any other group of this subclass

Abstract

A micro fluidic device which comprises two or more micro channel structures (201.301) (set 1), each of which comprises a structural unit which comprises (i) one or more inlet microconduits (102,103,202,203, 302,303), and (ii) an outlet microconduit (105,205,305) downstream said one or more inlet microconduits, and (iii) a flow path for a liquid passing through either of said inlet microconduits and said outlet microconduit. The device is characterized in that each outlet microconduit (105,305) in said two or more microchannel structures (201,301) is a restriction microconduit (105,205,305). There may also be a microcavity between the inlet microconduit(s) and the restriction micro conduit in each microchanel structure. Typically common flow control is used for driving a liquid flow within the device. The innovative design is useful for creating flow with low inter-channel variation with respect 15 to the microchannel structures of the device.

Description

FUNCTIONAL UNIT ENABLING CONTROLLED FLOW IN A MICROFLUIDIC DEVICE

TECHNICAL FIELD The present invention relates a microfluidic device which comprises two or more microchannel structures (201,301) (set 1), each of which comprises (a) one or more inlet ports (230,307,310), (b) one or more outlet ports (225,316,325), and (c) a structural unit which is located between an inlet port and an outlet port. The structural unit comprises (i) one or more inlet microconduits (102,103,202,203,302,303), each of which communicates with an inlet port, and (ii) an outlet microconduit (105,205,305) which communicates with an outlet port, and (iii) an microcavity (104,204,304) which is located between said inlet port and said outlet port.

The structural unit starts at the inlet ends of the inlet microconduits and ends at the outlet end of the outlet microconduit and includes valves and anti-wicking means that may be present at the end parts. The microcavity (104,204,304) may be infinitesimal, i.e. this microcavity may or may not be present.

In use a liquid aliquot passes through the structural unit via at least one of the inlet microconduits, the microcavity (if present) and the outlet microconduit of the structural unit.

The microchannel structures of a set are identical in the sense that corresponding parts in the individual microchannel structures are essentially identical. The microfluidic device may also comprise one or more additional sets of identical microchannel structures that are not identical to microchannel structures of set 1.

Reactions may be performed in the microcavities (104,204,304) or downstream, for instance in and/or downstream the outlet microconduit (105,205,305).

Patent and patent applications referenced in this specification are incorporated in their entirety by reference. BACKGROUND TECHNOLOGY

Typically microfluidic devices that comprise the above-mentioned structural unit have not comprised any means that will secure parallelity with a low inter-channel variation in flow rate between individual microchannel structures. The residence time for reactants within the individual microcavities and elsewhere in the microchannel structures has typically varied in an unintended manner within wide limits. Depending on kind of reactants, for instance, this may heavily influence the results obtained.

Magnus Gustavsson et al (Gyros AB) have presented experiments comprising parallel reaction (adsorption) in a microfluidicdevice (^Integrated sample preparation and MALDI MS on a microfluidic compact disc (CD with improved sensitivity", ASMS 2001). This presentation describes a MALDI MS integrated microfluidic affinity system based on adsorbing a protein digest to a reverse phase matrix and subsequent desorption and transport of peptides to a combined outlet port/MALDI MS target. The demands on reproducibility in binding, the control of liquid flow rate, and the residence time were low. Harrison et al (WO 0138865, University of Alberta) have described a solid phase extraction method in a singular microchannel structure by affinity binding under flow conditions.

Eteshola et al (Sensors and Actuators B 72 (2001) 129-133), Sato et al (Anal. Chem. 72 (2000) 1144-1147); and Mian et al (WO 9721090, Gamera Biosciences), for instance, have described performing affinity reactions under non-flow conditions in microcavities.

Centrifugal force for moving liquids in micofluidic devices

The use of centrifugal force for moving liquids within microfluidic systems has been described for instance by Abaxis Inc (WO 9533986, WO 9506870, US 5,472,603); Molecular devices (US 5,160,702); Gamera Biosciences/Tecan (WO 9721090, WO 9807019, WO 9853311), WO 01877486, WO 0187487; Gyros AB/Amersham Pharmacia Biotech (WO 9955827, WO 9958245, WO 0025921, WO 0040750, WO 0056808, WO 0062042, WO 0102737, WO 0146465, WO 0147637, WO 0147638, WO 0154810, WO 0241997, WO 0241998, PCT/SE02/00531, PCT/SE02/00537, PCT/SE02/00538, PCT/SE02/00539 and PCT/SE02/01539. See also presentations made by Gyros AB at various scientific meetings: (1) High-through put screening SNP scoring in microfabricated device. Nigel Tooke (September 99);

(2) Microfluidics in a rotating CD (Ekstrand et al) MicroTAS 2000, Enschede, The Netherlands, May 14-18, 2000. (3) (a) SNP scoring in a disposable microfabricated CD device (Eckersten et al) and

(b) SNP scoring in a disposable microfabricated CD device combined with solid phase Pyrosequencing™ (Tooke et al) Human Genome Meeting, HGM 2000, Vancouver, Canada, April 9-12, 2000, (4) Integrated sample preparation and MALDI MS on a microfluidic compact disc (CD with improved sensitivity (Magnus Gustavsson et al) ASMS 2001 (spring 2001).

Documentation on Gyros' presentations can be found on www.gyros.com. The publications above in the name Gyros AB or Amesham Pharmacia Biotech primarily concerns nl-volmes and problems associated therewith while the other publications primarily aims at μl- volumes or larger.

OBJECTS

A first object is to provide a fluidic function that when incorporated into a set of microchannel structures of a microfluidic device will standardize the flow rate through the microcavity, if present, and the outlet microcounduit (105,205,305) of the microchannel structures of the set, i.e. to control the flow rate such that the inter-channel variation in flow rate is reduced to an acceptable level.

A second object is to provide a robust microfluidic system that can be used for performing a plurality of experiments in parallel for determining reaction variables, e.g. as described in PCT/SE02/00537. Typically the determination concerns finding the content of analytes in samples and new and/or optimal binder-ligand combinations, and/or to grade affinity for a range of affinity complexes, ligands and binders, and/or to optimize processes involving formation or dissociation of immobilized affinity complexes under flow conditions.

A third object is to provide a device and a method for creating a parallel liquid flow with a low intra-channel variation in flow rate through a set of microchannel structures of a microfluidic device. A fourth object is to provide a structural unit that enables a microfluidic device which comprises two or more sets of microchannel structures which permits parallel liquid flow with a low interchannel variation within the individual sets and well defined differences in flow rates between the sets. One set, for instance, may represent a particular liquid flow rate in a particular step of an application carried out within the structures, while another set represent another different flow rate for the corresponding step. This object also includes a microfluidic device comprising this kind of structural units

FIGURES Figure 1 illustrates the key part of a structural unit that comprises a microcavity and means for creating a pressure drop. Figures 2a and 2b illustrate a variant of a preferred microchannel structure that has a narrow microconduit that create a significant pressure drop. This variant has been used for the model study presented in the experimental part. Figures 2a and 2b are identical except that figure 2a gives the dimensions and figure 2b hydrophobic surface breaks and their dimensions. Figure 3 illustrates a set of microchannel structures of the same kind as used in the experimental part. The structures are linked together by a common distribution channel and a common waste channel. The structures shown in figures 2-3 are intended for a circular disc in which the microchannel structures are placed around its axis of symmetry that also can be used as a spin axis. The arrow shows the direction towards the centre of the disc. Note the arc-like configuration. Figures 2 - 3 show the dimensions in micro-metre of various parts of the structures.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present inventors have recognized that a) the presence of means for creating a significant pressure drop (pressure drop means, flow restriction means) in the outlet microconduit (105,205,305), possibly combined with pressure drop means in the microcavity (104,204,304), if present and b) common flow control for the liquid flow in the different microchannel structures/structural units will be of benefit for controlling the liquid flow in the microchannel structures/ structural units of the microfluidic device. Significant pressure drop contemplates that the pressure drop at these locations is larger than the total inter-channel variation in flow resistance emanating from positions upstream and downstream the locations concerned in the structural units (primarily upstream the outlet microconduit). The term "restriction microconduit" will designate outlet microconduits that comply with this criterion.

The inventors have also recognized that further benefits may be accomplished if one or more of the following features are complied with: (a) A porous matrix is placed in the microcavity (104,204,304) or immediately downstream this microcavity for creating a significant pressure drop along the matrix, (b) A packed bed of monosized particles instead of polysized particles in the microcavity

(104,204,304) will lower the inter-channel variation in pressure drop along the microcavity. (c) A pulse giving increased flow will assist in over-coming inter-channel variations in flow resistance of the individual microchannel structures. This in particular applies when initiating flow and or when the liquid is to pass through branchings and curvatures.

(d) Anti-wicking means (133) in inner edges downstream and in close proximity to the outlet end of the outlet microconduit (105,205,305) which leads waste liquids from the microcavity (104,204).

The microcavity (105,205) may contain a solid phase with an immobilized affinity reactant, which is to react with an affinity counterpart that is present as a solute in the liquid flow. The product obtained is an immobilized affinity complex. For these variants the inventors have recognized benefits for:

(e) Excess of solid phase affinity reactant (immobilized reactant) in the reaction microcavity.

(f) Selecting flow rates that accomplish residence times > 0.010 seconds for the formation of complex in the reaction microcavity.

It is believed that similar effects will be accomplished also for other immobilized reactants and heterogeneous reactions. Residence time refers to the time it takes for a liquid aliquot to pass through the microcavity (e.g. comprising a solid phase). DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The first aspect of the invention thus relates to a structural unit and a microfluidic device comprising the unit as defined in the introductory part in each of said two or more microchannel structures. The structural unit and also the microfluidic device are characterized in that there are means for creating a significant pressure drop in the outlet microconduits (105,205,305) (restriction microconduit) and possibly also in the microcavities (104,204,304), if present. The flow through the individual microchannel structures, in particular the inventive structural units, on a microfluidic device is preferably under common flow control.

A generalised view of the innovative structural unit is given in figure 1.

Means for creating pressure drop.

In addition to levelling out the above-mentioned intra-channel variation in flow resistence, these means may also create a pressure drop that is larger than the total resistance to flow upstream the location comprising the pressure drop means, for instance upstream the microcavity (104,204,304) or restriction microconduit (but within the structural unit). Typically the microchannel structures are designed such that the flow resistance and inter- channel variations in flow resistance at the end of the restriction microconduits (206,306) and/or in other downstream positions are insignificant compared to the upstream part of a structural unit.

The inter-channel variations in flow resistance and pressure drop for the structural unit of different microchannel structures primarily depend on (a) variations in inner surface characteristics upstream the microcavity (104,204,304), (b) variations in the solid phase used (for instance the packing geometry may differ), and (c) design around the outlet end (206) and surface variations in other positions downstream the restriction microconduit (205).

Significant pressure drop and/or significant flow resistance in positions upstream and downstream the restriction microconduit are only at hand in parts that contain liquid. This means that the pressure drop upstream the inlet microconduit(s) is negligible, for instance.

The pressure drop means in the outlet microconduit (restriction microconduit) and/or in the microcavity should give an inter-channel variation in residence time for a liquid aliquot within the intervals of mean residence time ± 90 %, such as ± 75 % or ± 50 % or ± 25% for essentially identical microchannel structures for which the driving force for the liquid flow is essentially the same.

The appropriate flow rate through and residence time in the reaction microcavity depends on a number of factors which among others are determined by the purpose of the passage through the microcavity, for instance kind of reaction to take place, the volume of the microcavity, possible presence and form of a the solid phase etc. The flow rate applied should in most cases give a residence time of > 0.010 seconds such as > 0.050 sec or > 0.1 sec with an upper limit that typically is below 2 hours such as below 1 hour. Illustrative flow rates are within 0.01-100 nl/sec, typically 0.1 - 10 nl/sec. The same ranges of flow rate also apply to the flow in the restriction microconduit but the residence time may be different.

Guidelines for calculating the proper pressure drop means for a liquid of a particular viscosity may be obtained from the formula for Hagen-Poisseuille flow (fully developed laminar flow in a pipe/microconduit):

Q=π (pl-p2) Dh4/(128 η L) where Q is the flow, pl-p2 is the pressure drop along the microconduit, Dh is the hydraulic diameter (= 4 x (cross-sectional area)/(wet perimeter), η is the viscosity of the liquid and L is the length of the microconduit. Hydraulic diameter = hydrodynamic diameter of a microconduit in the priority application.

Values obtained by application of this formula are only guidelines and typically requires testing before useful values for the pressure drop means can be accomplished.

Based on the fonnula the general guidelines given below are applicable.

For a microcavity (104,204,304) the pressure drop means may be a porous material through which the liquid flow has to pass. See below.

For the restriction microconduit (105,205,305) the pressure drop means typically contemplates that the largest cross-sectional area of this microconduit is less than the largest cross-sectional area of the inlet microconduits (102,103,202,203,302,303) or the microcavity (104,204,304) with preference for < 0.25, such as < 0.10. Preferentially these ranges apply for >10%, such as in > 50 %, of the length of a restriction microconduit, often with absolute preference for > 90 % or the whole length of the restriction microconduit. The restriction microconduit typically ends when its cross-sectional area becomes larger than the smallest cross-sectional area of the shortest inlet microconduits (102,103,202,203,302,303) or the microcavity (104,204,304), for instance > 4 times or 10 times larger. Other kinds of pressure drop means are also possible in the outlet microconduits (105,205,305): a) the inner surface of the restriction microconduit, for instance, may be rougher than the inner surfaces upstream the restriction microconduit, such as upstream the microcavity, and/or b) the length of the restriction microconduit (105,205,305) may be greater, such as > 5 times or > 10 times, the length of the shortest inlet microconduit, possibly plus the length of the microcavity.

The term "length" of a microcavity or a microconduit refers to the distance inside the microchannel structure between the most downstream and the most upstream position of a microcavity/microconduit, or the difference in radial distance for these two positions. An inlet microconduit typically stretches from the restriction microconduit, or from the microcavity (if present) to and also encompasses the closest valve function, anti-wicking function or branch in the upstream direction, or if none of these functions are present to the closest inlet port.

The pressure drop in the restriction microconduit (105) is proportional to its length and inversely proportional to its hydraulic cross-sectional area. An increase in length of the restriction microconduit may thus compensate for an increase in its cross-sectional area and vice versa.

The invention is particularly adapted to liquids that have a viscosity that is within the range of 10-1000 % of the viscosity of water, i.e. 10"4 - 10"2 Ns/m2. The liquids are typically aqueous.

COMMON FLOW CONTROL. The term "common flow control" means that when a driving force for a liquid flow is applied in one part of a microchannel structure, there will also be applied a driving force for liquid flow in the corresponding part of each of the other microchannel structures of the device. The driving force in the individual microchannel structures derives from the same source, e.g. spinning the device if centrifugal force is the driving force. Moreover, an increase or a decrease in driving force in one microchannel structure is paralleled with an increase or a decrease in the other microchannel structures. The size of the force (and the liquid flow rate) may differ between different microchannel structures for which common flow control is applied. In centrifugal based systems, for instance, the designs of the microchannel structures may differ and/or the microchannel structures may be placed at different radial distances.

Common flow control primarily refers to the flow through the microcavity (104,204,304). This in particular applies when a reaction is to take place locally in the microcavity, for instance when a solid phase that exhibits an immobilized reactant that is to interact with a reactant which is present in the liquid flow passing the solid phase/microcavity. See further elsewhere in this specification. Common flow control may be less critical in other parts of the structures and/or for other steps of a method performed in the innovative microfluidic device.

The liquid flow may be driven by distinct means that either is present in or external to the device. Thus, liquid flow may be created by electroosmosis, micropumps, expanding gas etc. Another alternative is to use forces such as capillary force and inertia force including gravitational force and centrifugal force to drive the liquid, i.e. forces that do not require any means on the microfluidic device. Capillary flow is typically not under common flow control since it depends on local surface characteristics.

According to a preferred variant of the invention, common flow control is accomplished by spinning a microfluidic device in which the microchannel structures are oriented from an inward position to an outward position in relation to an axis of symmetry (spin axis) of a substrate comprising the device. Typically the spin axis coincides with an axis of symmetry of the device as discussed below. Common flow control also includes that centrifugal force is used to create a sufficient local hydrostatic pressure within a structure to drive a liquid aliquot through an outward (downward) and/or an inward (upward) bent of a microchannel structure. See for instance WO 0146465. The use of centrifugal force for driving a liquid flow has been described in the publications in the name of Gyros, Gamera Biosciences and Abaxis that are referenced above. Typical spinning speeds are within the interval 50-25000 rpm, such as 50-15000 rpm. The spinning speed within a given protocol may vary, for instance comprise sequences with individual ramps of acceleration, deceleration, and constant spinning. It may be beneficial to include a pulse of increased spinning at certain positions. See above.

MICROFLUIDIC DEVICE

A microfluidic device comprises at least one, two or more enclosed microchannel structure through which liquid flow is used for the transport of reactants

The terms "micro format", "microchannel" etc contemplate that a microchannel structure comprises one or more cavities and/or channels that have a depth and/or a width that is < 10 μm, preferably < 102 μm. The volumes of microcavities are typically < 1000 nl (= nl-range), such as < 500 nl or < 100 nl or < 50 nl, but may also be larger, i.e. in the interval 1-1000 μl, such as 1-100 μl or 1-10 μl.

Liquid aliquots used in the invention typically have volumes in the range < 5000 nl, such as < 1000 nl or < 500 nl or < 100 nl or < 50 nl, but may also be in other intervals, such as 1-1000 μl, or 1-100 μl or 1-10 μl. Dispensed aliquots are typically sucked completely into the microchannels by capillarity before some other driving force is applied to transport them downstream in the microchannel structures, typically stepwise with one step for each functional unit.

Cross-sectional areas are perpendicular to the intended flow direction.

The present invention is primarily intended for geometric arrangements in which the microchannel structures are present in a substrate (e.g. a microfluidic device) that has an axis of symmetry that may be used as a spin axis. The substrate in this context may be the microfluidic device as such or a disc holder on which a microfluidic disc comprising the microchannel structures may be placed. The innovative structural unit is in the upstream direction communicating with a unit, which delivers liquid to the unit via the inlet microconduit (302,303) and communicates with or comprises an inlet port. In the downstream direction the innovative structural unit communicates with an outlet port via the restriction microconduit (205,305). Each microchannel structure is oriented either fully or partly in an outward direction relative to the axis of symmetry (spin axis) thereby enabling centrifugal force to be used for driving liquid flow.

The microchannel structures and microconduits may or may not be oriented in a plane perpendicular to the axis of symmetry (spin axis).

In centrifugal systems a "higher" or an "upper" level/position (inner position) will be at a shorter radial distance (inner position) compared to a "lower" level/position (outer position). Similarly, the terms "up", "upward", "inwards", and "down", "downwards", "outwards" etc will mean towards and from, respectively, the spin axis. This applies if not otherwise is specified. With respect to other arrangement/substrates and conventional driving forces, i.e. gravity force, externally applied pressure, electro-osmotically driven flows etc, these terms have their conventional meaning.

Axes of symmetry are n-numbered (Cn) and may coincide with a spin axis, n is an integer between 2 and ∞, preferably 6, 7, 8 and larger, for instance ∞. In preferred cases microfluidic device as such may have a circular, cylindrical, spherical or conical symmetry (C).

The preferred devices are typically disc-shaped with sizes and forms similar to the conventional CD-format, e.g. in the interval from 10% up to 300 % of the conventional CD- radii.

Figures 2a-b and 3 illustrate a microchannel structure (201,301) of the invention adapted for a heterogeneous reaction. The structure comprises a microcavity (204,304) (reaction microcavity) in which there may be an immobilized reactant (reactant 1) that is to react with a reactant (reactant 2) that is present in a liquid flow passing through the microcavity. As already discussed for the general innovative concept (figure 1), the microcavity (204,304) is connected to one or more inlet microconduits (202,203) each of which communicates with an inlet port (208,308,310), and a restriction microconduit (205,305) with an outlet end (206,306) which in turn communicates with an outlet port (216,316).

The inlet port (208,307,308) may be located at a shorter radial distance (higher level) and the outlet port (216,316) at a larger radial distance (lower level) than the microcavity (204,304). By utilizing capillary force and/or other non-centrifugal forces for the introduction of a liquid into a microchannel structure, inlet ports may be located at in principle any radial distance (level) (e.g. more remote from the axis of symmetry (spin axis) than an outlet port and/or than the microcavity (not shown). Outlet ports may be located at a shorter radial distance (higher 5 level) than the microcavity (204,304) as illustrated by port (225,325).

If there are two or more inlet microconduits (202,203 and 302,303), they typically merge at the start of the restriction microconduit or before the microcavity (204,304) if it is present. In the case the microcavity (204,304) contains a solid phase in form of particles, the trespass into 10 the restriction microconduit (205,305) typically is a sharp drop in the cross-sectional area that prevents the particles from passing into the restriction microconduit.

For centrifugal systems, two inlet microconduits (202,203 and 302,303) typically form a downward bent (207,307) with shanks corresponding to the inlet microconduits (202,203 and 15 302,303). The restriction microconduit (205,305) is connected to the lower part of the bent, for instance as illustrated in figures 2-3 via the microcavity (204,304).

An inlet microconduit (202,302) may be connected to an inlet port (208,308) via a volume- defining unit (211) that comprises a metering microcavity (212,312) connected to one of the 0 inlet microconduits (202,302), an overflow channel (213,313) that starts in a narrow conduit part between the metering microcavity (212,312) and the inlet unit (214) and ends in a waste function, for instance comprising a common waste reservoir/channel (215,315). The waste function may have one or more outlet ports (216,316). The volume-defining unit (211) typically comprises valve functions (217,218,317,318) that are associated with the overflow 5 channel (213,313) and with the outlet end of the metering microcavity (212,312), respectively. For centrifugal systems these valve functions are typically passive and are preferably based on local changes in surface characteristics. The valve function (218,318) is at a larger radial distance than the valve function (217,317). This means that the positions of these valves are selected to support that liquid in the overflow channel (213,313) is passed

30 into the waste function at a lower spinning speed than liquid in the metering microcavity (212,312) is passed into the inlet microconduit (202,303). A volume-defining unit of this kind (211) is primarily intended for liquid aliquots that are to be introduced with high accuracy with respect to volume. This means liquid aliquots that contain (a) an analyte and/or (b) any other reagent that has to be delivered with a high accuracy. See PCT/SE02/531 (Gyros AB) and PCT/SE02/01539 (Gyros AB).

An alternative functional unit that may be connected to one of the inlet microconduits (203,303) is a unit for simultaneously distributing liquid aliquots to several separate microchannel structures. The unit maybe in the form of a distribution channel (219,319) that is common for several microchannel structures (201,301). For centrifugal system the channel may have alternating upper and lower parts (220,320 and 221,321, respectively) with an inlet vent (222,322) (top vent) to ambient atmosphere in each upper part (220,320) and a liquid communication with a valve function (223,323) in each lower part (221,321) to one of the inlet conduits (203,303) of a microchannel structure (201,301). The top vents (222,322) may communicate with ambient atmosphere via a common venting channel (224,324). The distribution channel may have one or more inlet ports (307,310) and one or more outlet ports (225,325) (only one shown) connected to separate upper parts. Several units may be linked together in series via ending upper parts as illustrated in figure 3. Each of the top vents may be combined or replaced with anti-wicking means in the lower wall of the upper part connected to the top vent concerned. This kind of distribution system typically is used when identical liquids are to be distributed as separate aliquots to different microchannel structures. Typical liquids are buffers, reagents, washing liquids, samples etc. By utilizing distribution systems in which the lower parts (221,321) differ in volume, the volume of the aliquots will differ between the microchannel structures. See PCT/SE02/531 (Gyros AB) and PCT/SE02/01539 (Gyros AB).

The outlet end (206,306) of a restriction microconduit (205,305) may mouth into a microconduit (226,326) with enlarged cross-sectional area and communicating with ambient atmosphere as is illustrated with a waste function in figures 2-3. This enlarged microconduit may also have other functions, for instance as microchamber/microcavity for controlled mixing and addition of reactants such as in microtitration, organic microsynthesis etc.

In the case a waste function is linked directly to the restriction microconduit, the waste function may comprise a waste microconduit (226,326) (belonging to the microchannel structure), which in turn may mouth into a common waste microconduit/reservoir (215,315). Alternatively, the outlet end (206,306) may open directly into a common waste microconduit/reservoir, or into ambient atmosphere (not shown). The cross-sectional area, typically the largest cross-sectional area, of the waste function in the proximity of the outlet opening (206,306) should be larger than the cross-sectional area of the restriction microconduit (205,305) at its outlet end (206,306), e.g. > 4 or > 10 times larger. These ranges also apply for enlarged microconduits (microcavities) that are located to this position but have other functions. The outlet end (206,306) of the restriction microconduit (205,305) typically is at the same or at a higher level than the joint between an inlet microconduit and the restriction microcavity, or than the microcavity (204,304) (if present) (preferably its top part). What has been said above in particular applies to centrifugal system that utilizes passive valves at the inlet ends of the innovative structural unit.

A waste function typically has anti-wicking means (233,235,333,335) in close proximity to the outlet end (206,306) in one or more edges extending from the restriction microconduit (205,305) into the waste function, typically in edges that have a downward direction. In close proximity contemplates that these anti-wicking means always are above the lowest part of the restriction microconduit including within in the outlet end (206,306) (not shown). In the case the restriction microconduit (205,305) is connected to a waste microconduit (226,326), there is preferably a vent (227,327,235,335) to ambient atmosphere in the waste microconduit (226,326). This vent typically is at approximately the same level as or at a higher level than the outlet end (106) of the restriction microconduit (105) and may contain anti-wicking means (235,335).

The positioning of anti-wicking means in the waste function also applies if the enlarged microconduit (226,326) does not comprise a waste function.

The principles outlined for pressure drop in the microchannel structures have lead to the design of the microchannel structures given figures 2-3:

(a) Reaction microcavities (204,304) with a depth of 100 μm and width of 250 μm,

(b) Restriction microconduits (205,305) with a depth of 10 μm, a width of 20 μm and a length of 4.56 mm.

Other parts of the microchannel structures have a depth of 100 μm. For the proper balancing out of inter-channel variations in flow resistance there are hydrophobic surface breaks (233,333 and/or 235,335) and a vent (227,327) to ambient atmosphere. The inlet ports (208,308) are preferably connected to an inlet microcavity (228,328), which typically is narrowing inwards the microchannel structure and has longitudinal projections (ridges) (229) in the flow direction. These ridges will facilitate quick transport of a dispensed liquid aliquot into the interior of an inlet unit. The inlet ports also may have a non-wettable area (typically hydrophobised) (230, cross-hatched) that will direct a dispensed liquid into the inlet unit (214). The same applies also to the other inlet ports (307,310).

The microchannel structures may be equipped with anti-wicking means at selected positions in form of changes in surface characteristics that typically local and may be related to geometric surface characteristics (231) and or chemical surface characteristics (232,233,235)(cross-hatched area). For aqueous liquids this means that the change is from hydrophilic to hydrophobic (hydrophobic surface breaks). The inlet vents (234,334,235,335) and the passive valves (217,223,317,323) comprise anti-wicking function. See WO 9958245, Amersham Pharmacia Biotech AB), WO 0185602 Amic AB & Gyros AB and

PCT/SE02/00531, PCT/SE02/01539 (plus the corresponding US application filed in parallel).

Valves are preferably passive (217,223,218,318,317,323), i.e. passage of a liquid will depend on the applied driving force and the physicochemical match between a liquid and the inner surface at the valve position. No movable mechanical parts are needed. Examples are capillary valves that are based purely on a change in geometric surface characteristics (WO 9615576 (David Sarnoff Res. hist.) and WO 9807019 (Gamera). Preferred passive valves are based on a change in chemical surface characteristics, e.g. non-wettable surface breaks (hydrophobic surface breaks), possibly combined with changes in geometric surface characteristics. Other kinds of valves may also be used.

More details about inlet units, distribution units, volume-defining units, waste conduits, anti- wicking means and valves, in particular for centrifugal systems, are given in PCT/SE02/00531 and PCT/SE02/01539 (plus the US application filed in parallel).

Suitable microfluidic devices may be manufactured from a planar substrate surface comprising a plurality of uncovered microchannel structures that in a subsequent step are covered by another planar substrate (lid). See WO 9116966 (Pharmacia Biotech AB) and WO 0154810 (Gyros AB). At least one of the substrates maybe transparent, e.g. the second substrate (lid). Both substrates are preferably fabricated from plastic material, e.g. plastic polymeric material.

Different applications require different surface characteristics, e.g. inner surfaces of the microchannel structures may require hydrophilization for transport of aqueous liquids and the like. See for instance WO 0056808 (Gyros AB) and WO 0147637 (Gyros AB). Typically an essential part of the inner surfaces should have water contact angles < 90°, such as < 40° or < 30° or < 20° at the temperature of use, e.g. at least the surfaces of two or three of the inner walls enclosing a channel should comply with this range. Surfaces in passive valves, anti- wicking means etc are excluded from these general rules.

Microcavity (104,204,304).

The microcavity (104,204,304) is preferably a straight microchannel that may be continuously widening and/or narrowing. At least a part of the wall of the microcavity may be transparent to allow for measuring of events taking place within the microcavity. Transparency is with respect to the principle used for measuring.

The microcavity (104,204,304) may comprise a solid phase, which may have either one or both of the functions: (a) carrying an immobilized reactant for a reaction to take place within the microcavity and (b) providing pressure drop means in the microcavity. Different reactants are discussed below. Additional functions for the solid phase are as a separation medium in size exclusion separation (gel chromatography, gel electrophoresis etc), support medium to reduce convection and/or diffusion (electrophoresis such as isoelectrophoresis), support medium in affinity-based separations (often included in the function of item (a)), etc.

In the preferred variant the solid phase is a population of porous or non-porous particles that are packed to a bed, or a porous monolith that wholly or partly will occupy the interior of the reaction microcavity. In the case the solid phase comprises particles there should be a retaimng means associated with the downstream end of the reaction microcavity. This means is preferably in the form of a constriction, e.g. in the form of a barrier, that prevents the particles from leaving the microcavity. The particle diameter/size should at least be of the same size as or larger than the smallest dimension of the opening in the constricted part. Another kind of retaining means is magnetic particles combined with an externally applied magnetic field.

A porous monolith may be fabricated in one piece of material or may comprise particles that are attached to each other.

The term "porous particles" contemplates that the particles can be penetrated by a particular reactant that is present in a liquid flow passing through a packed bed of the particles. This typically means Kav values within the interval of 0.4 -0.95 for the reactant concerned. Non- porous particles have a Kav- value below 0.4 with respect to the same reactant. A porous monolith has pores that are large enough to permit mass transport of a reactant that is present in a liquid flow passing through monolith.

The particles may be spherical or non-spherical. With respect to non-spherical particles, diameters and sizes refer to the "hydrodynamic" diameters.

The particles are preferably monodisperse (monosized) by which is meant that the population of particles placed in a reaction microcavity has a size distribution with more than 95 % of the particles within the range of the mean particle size + 5 %. Populations of particles that are outside this range are polydisperse (polysized).

The solid phase may or may not be transparent.

The material in the solid phase, e.g. the particles, is typically polymeric, for instance a synthetic polymer or a biopolymer. The term biopolymer includes semi-synthetic polymers comprising a polymer chain derived from a native biopolymer. The solid phase is typically hydrophilic in the case the liquid flow is aqueous. In this context hydrophilic encompasses that a porous solid phase, e.g. a packed bead, will be penetrated by water. The term also indicates that the surfaces of the particles shall expose a plurality of polar functional groups in which there is a heteroatom selected amongst oxygen, sulphur, and nitrogen. Appropriate functional groups can be selected amongst hydroxy groups, straight eythylene oxide groups ([-CH2CH2O-]n, n an integer > 0), amino groups, carboxy groups, sulphone groups etc, with preference for those groups that are essentially neutral independent of pH, for instance within the interval of 2-12. A hydrophobic particle maybe hydrophilized, for instance by introducing hydrophilic groups. See for instance the experimental part. The coating technique is similar to the technique presented in WO 9800709 (Pharmacia Biotech AB, Arvidsson & Ekstrδm).

The solid phase may also be the inner surfaces of the microcavity, but then its main function will be to provide support for an immobilized reactant.

The reactant that may be immobilized to the solid phase depends on the application to be performed in the microchannel structure. It may for instance be a reactant participating in an organic, an inorganic, a biochemical reaction etc.

The reactant may thus be a catalytic system or a part of a catalytic system, such as a catalyst as such, a cocatalyst, a cofactor, a substrate or cosubstrate to the catalyst, an inhibitor, a promotor etc with specific emphasis to the corresponding parts of enzymatic systems (enzyme, cocatalyst, cofactor, coenzyme, substrate, cosubstrate etc). The term "catalytic system" also includes linked catalytic systems, for instance a series of systems in which the product of the first system is the substrate of the second catalytic system etc and whole biological cells or part of such cells.

The reactant may be a so-called affinity reactant i.e. an affinity reactant that together with its affinity counterpart (affinity pair) is capable of forming an affinity complex held together by affinity bonds. Affinity bonds typically are based on: (a) electrostatic interaction, (b) hydrophobic interaction, "(c) electron-donor acceptor interaction, and/or (d) bioaffinity binding.

Bioaffinity binding typically is complex in nature and comprises e.g. a combination of interactions selected amongst variations of items (a)-(c).

An affinity reactant may thus: (a) be electrically charged or chargeable, i.e. contains positively charged nitrogen (e.g. primary, secondary, tertiary or quaternary ammonium groups, and amidinium groups) and/or negatively charged groups (e.g. carboxylate groups, phosphate groups, phosphonate groups, sulphate groups and sulphonate groups); (b) comprise hydrocarbyl groups and other hydrophobic groups; (c) comprise heteroatoms, possibly linked to hydrogen, and/or sp2- and/or sp3-hybridised carbon, or (d) comprise in combination variations of items (a)-(c).

A bioaffinity reactant is a member of a bioaffinity pair. Typical bioaffinity pairs are antigen/hapten and an antibody or an antigen binding fragment of the antibody mimetic of an antibody; complementary nucleic acids; immunoglobulin-binding protein and immunoglobulin (for instance IgG or an Fc-part thereof and protein A or G), lectin and the corresponding carbohydrate, biotin and (strep)avidin etc. The term "bioaffinity pair" includes affinity pairs in which one or both of the members are synthetic, for instance mimicking a native member of a bioaffinity pair.

The term "affinity reactant" includes a reactant that is capable of reversible covalent binding, for instance by disulfide formation. Typical such reactants exhibit a HS- or a -S-SOn- group (n = 0,1 or 2, free valences bind to carbon). See US 5887997 (Batista), US 4175073 (Axen et al), 4563304 (Axen et al) and US 4647655 (Axen et al).

The term "affinity reactant" also includes a reactant that is capable of binding via chelate formation, i.e. a reactant that exhibits a chelating group, possibly in chelate form with remaining chelating ability.

Affinity reactants typically exhibit amino acid structure including peptide structure such as poly and oligopeptide structure, carbohydrate structure, nucleotide structure including nucleic acid structure, and lipid structure such as steroid structure, triglyceride structure etc.

The techniques for immobilization of a reactant may be selected amongst techniques that are commonly known in the field. The linkage to the solid phase may be via covalent bonds, affinity bonds (for instance biospecific affinity bonds), physical adsorption (mainly hydrophobic interaction) etc. Examples of biospecific affinity bonds that can be used are bonds between strepavidin and a biotinylated affinity reactant (or vice versa), between an antibody and a haptenylated affinity reactant (or vice versa), etc. Other functional units

A microchannel structure may also comprise additional units with separate or combined functions enabling e.g.:

(1) separation of particulate matter from a liquid aliquot introduced via an inlet port , (2) mixing of two liquid aliquots, and

(3) detection of (a) a reactant that has passed through the microcavity (104,204,304), or (b) a component formed in the microcavity (104,204,304).

Except for unit 3, these functional units, if present, may be present upstream the microcavity (104,204,304).

A unit for separation of particulate matter is typically positioned upstream a volume metering unit or the two units are combined in a common unit.

Preferred separation units, volume metering units and mixing units are given in

PCT/SE02/00531 and PCT/SE02/01539 (including the US application filed in parallel).

A separation unit is typically combined with or present upstream a volume-metering unit. A mixing unit, if present, is typically present downstream a volume metering step.

MicroChannel structures that differ with respect to having restriction microconduits

(105,205,305) providing different pressure drops.

The microfluidic device may contain microchannel structures that are essentially equal. The term equal in this context means that the structures are essentially identical except for differences in design of the restriction microconduits (105,205,305) in order to allow them to provide different pressure drops.

In one variant of the innovative microfluidic devices, the microchannel structures is grouped into sets, each of which contains restriction microconduits which are designed for essentially the same pressure drop, e.g. have the same length and cross-sectional area. In other words the intended pressure drop vary between the sets but is essentially the same within a set. A particular interesting variant is a microfluidic device which a) utilizes spinning and centrifugal force as discussed above to drive liquid flow, b) has the restriction microconduits within a set at the same radial distance relative to the spin axis of the device but at other radial distances if they belong to other sets, c) has the restriction microconduits designed for a lower pressure drop at a shorter radial distance than the restriction microconduits designed for a higher pressure drop, and d) has the radial distance for the restriction microconduits of different sets adjusted to provide the same flow rate through the restriction microconduit (102,103,202, 203,302,302,303) and microcavity (104,204,304) (if present) of all the microchannel structures of the microfluidic device.

An innovative centrifugal microfluidic device may thus comprise microchannel structures that are grouped into sets that differ with respect to the length and/or cross-sectional area of their restriction microconduits. Each of these sets may be arranged in an annular zone or sector thereof, that is concentric with the spin axis, for instance with restriction microconduits that are shorter and/or have a larger cross-sectional area at a shorter radial distance than restriction microconduits that are longer and/or have a smaller cross-sectional area. One advantage of this is that the same controlled flow rate and residence time easily can be accomplished in parallel within all the restriction microconduits/microcavities (105,205,305)/(104,204,304) of microchannel structures that are essentially equal in the device by poperly adapting the radial distance between the annular zones and/or between the sectors of such zones. This is based on the fact that the centrifugal force (driving force) increases with an increase in radial distance.

In a second variant of a centrifugal microfluidic device, there are restriction microconduits, which are designed for different pressure drops and located at the same radial distance, i.e. in an annular zone concentric with the spin axis, or a sector of such a zone. In other words the same annular zone or sector may comprise restriction microconduits of different length and/or cross-sectional areas. In a third variant, there are restriction microconduits, which are designed for the same pressure drop but located at different radial distances, i.e. in different annular zones that are concentric with the spin axis, or in sectors of such zones. In the second variant, the flow rate will differ between restriction microconduits/microcavities in the same annular zone. In the third variant, the flow rate will differ between restriction microconduits/ microcavities of different annular zones. These two variants and also other variants that are based on properly combining restriction microconduits designed for different pressure drops with selected combinations of radial distances for the restriction microconduits will enable performing experiments on a microfluidic device in parallel under different controlled flow conditions (flow rates and/or residence times).

The use of the microfluidic device One of the uses of the innovative device is a method for creating a controlled liquid flow in parallel through a plurality of microchannel structures of a microfluidic device. The method comprises the steps of i) providing a microfluidic device which comprises two or more microchannel structures

(201,301) each of which is defined in under "Technical field"; ii) providing a liquid aliquot in one of the one or more of the inlet microconduits (202,203,302,303) in each of the microchannel structures (201,301); iii) applying a driving force that creates a liquid flow that transport said aliquot through the outlet microconduit (205,305), possibly via the microcavity (204,304) (if present), of each of the microchannel structures (201,301). Step (ii) includes among others that a larger aliquot is dispensed to a common inlet port and portioned into individual microchannel structures via a distribution unit, and/or that an aliquot is dispensed directly to each microchannel structure as illustrated in figures 2 and 3.

The method is characterized in that A) the outlet microconduits (105,205,305) are restriction microconduits as defined above, B) the liquid flow created in step iii) is under common flow control, and C) the driving force is adjusted to give the flow rate that is required by the restriction microconduits (105,205,305), i.e. a flow rate within the interval given above that will give the pressure drop that the microconduits (105,205,305) are designed for.

The various features of the microfluidic device discussed elsewhere in this specification and defined in claims further characterize sub-aspects of the method. This includes the characteristics of the liquid as such and of the liquid flow, e.g. viscosity, flow rate, residence time, inter-channel variation. The device utilizes in preferred variants spinning and centrifugal force for common flow control and for creating the liquid flow in step (iii).

Other uses of the device relate to applications carried out within the microchannel structures. Synthetic, analytical, preparative etc applications within chemical and biological sciences such as organic and organic chemistry, biology, medicine, diagnosis, molecular biology etc are typical examples.

In many cases the applications includes that one or more reactions are carried out within each of the microchannel structures, for instance with at least one reaction within the microcavity (104,204,304) or within a reaction microcavity in a downstream position (not shown), for instance linked directly to the outlet end of the restriction microconduit (205,305) but upstream the waste function, if present. The reactions, e.g. within the microcavity (104,204,304), maybe: (a) homogeneous, i.e. between reactants (e.g. solutes) that are passing through the microcavity in a liquid flow, or (b) heterogeneous, i.e. between a reactant that is immobilized within the microcavity and a reactant (e.g. a solute) that is passing through the microcavity in a liquid flow. Typically the liquid flow is controlled and under common flow control as described elsewhere in this specification.

An application may comprise a separation that may or may not comprise a reaction, for instance adsorptions that are based of an affinity reaction as defined herein, and size exclusion separations and electrophoresis that do not need to involve any reaction as such.

In general the innovative microfluidic device is well adapted to applications in which controlled mixing or controlled addition of reagents are needed, for instance microtitration and inorganic and organic chemical synthesis in the microformat. Microtitration and controlled addition of reagents may for instance take place in a separate reaction microcavity linked directly to the outlet end of the restriction microconduit (and upstream a waste function).

An important class of reactions that can be performed in the innovative microfluidic device comprises formation or dissociation of an affinity complex. Formation comprises that an affinity reactant that is immobilized to a solid phase (capturing reactant) is introduced into the microcavity prior to the reaction. During the reaction a liquid flow comprising an affinity counterpart to the immobilized reactant is passed through the microcavity. Dissociation comprises that an immobilized form of an affinity complex is introduced into the microcavity prior to the desired reaction is taking place. During the reaction a liquid flow providing conditions for dissociation is passed through the microcavity.

Typically the result of the reaction is followed as the formation of a product, as the formation or disappearance of an intermediate or as the consumption of a reactant etc. Various detector systems/reactions may be used, and measurement may be carried in reaction microcavity, e.g. microcavity (104,204,304), and/or in one or more detection microcavities downstream the microcavity in which the desired reaction is taking place. Measurements are typically made through a transparent "window". Alternatively, a product (including intermediate) and/or a remaining part of a reactant is transferred via an outlet port to an external instrument for measurement.

Important reaction and detection systems as well as important applications are described in PCT/SE02/0537 (Gyros AB) that also contains experiments verifying the usefulness of the innovative microfluidic device.

The invention is defined in more details in the appending claims. Modifications based on the invention as defined in the claims and detailed in the specification are possible without departing from the teachings advised herein. The appended claims shall however be construed to incorporate any and all of such modifications to the invention, that will become apparent for the man of ordinary skill in this art when studying the disclosure given herein.

Claims

C L A I M S
1. A microfluidic device which comprises two or more microchannel structures (201.301) (set 1), each of which comprises a structural unit which comprises (i) one or more inlet microconduits (102,103, 202,203, 302,303), and (ii) an outlet microconduit (105,205,305) downstream said one or more inlet microconduits, and (iii) a flow path for a liquid passing through either of said inlet microconduits and said outlet microconduit, characterized in that each outlet microconduit (105,305) in said two or more microchannel structures (201,301) is a restriction microconduit (105,205,305).
2. The microfluidic device of claim 1, characterized in that a) there is a microcavity (104,204,304) between said one or more inlet conduits (102,103, 202,203, 302,303) and said restriction microconduit (105,205,305) in each of said two or more microchannel structures, and b) there are pressure drop means in this microcavity.
3. The microfluidic device of any of claims 1 -2, characterized in that the pressure drop along each of the restriction microconduits (105,205,305) levels out intra-channel variations in flow resistance in upstream positions.
4. The microfluidic device of any of claims 1 -3, characterized in that the pressure drop along each of the restriction microconduits (105,205,305) levels out intra-channel variations in flow resistance in upstream and downstream positions of the structural unit comprising the restriction microconduit.
5. The microfluidic device of any of claims 1 -4, characterized in that the pressure drop means in the restriction microconduit (105,205,305) and the microcavity (104,204,304), if present, in each of the microchannel structures (201,301) are capable of giving an intra- channel variation in residence time in the microcavities (104,204,304) which is within the mean residence time ± 90% for a flow rate within the interval 0.01-100 nl sec of a liquid having a viscosity within the interval of 10"4 - 10"2 Ns/m2.
6. The microfluidic device of any of claims 1 -5, characterized in that said pressure drop means comprises that cross-sectional area of the restriction microconduit (105,205,305) is 302,303) or of the microcavity (104,204,304) in each of said microchannel structures (201,301).
7. The microfluidic device of any of claims 1-6, characterized in that the length of the restriction microconduit (105,205,305) > 4 times the length of the inlet microconduit
(102,103, 202,203, 302,303) and/or the microcavity (104,204,304) in each of said microchannel structures (201,301).
8. The microfluidic device of any of claims 1-7, characterized in that (a) said microcavity (104,204,304) is present in each of said two or more microchannel structures (201,301) and (b) pressure drop means is present in each of said microcavities (104,204,304) and comprises a porous bed, which preferably is comprises beads that are porous or non porous, or monosized or polysized, or is monolithic.
9. The microfluidic device of any of claims 1 -8, characterized in that the outlet end (206,306) of the restriction microconduit (105,205,305) is in registry with an enlarged microconduit (microcavity) (226,326), which (a) in the downstream direction communicates with ambient atmosphere via at least one of said outlet ports (116,216) and (b) has a cross-sectional area that is > 4 times larger than the cross-sectional area of the restriction microconduit (105,205,305) at its joint (outlet end, 206,306) to the restriction microconduit (105,205,305).
10. The microfluidic device of any of claims 1-9, characterized in that the device is designed for utilizing centrifugal force created by spinning the device around a spin axis for creating said liquid flow.
11. The microfluidic device of claim 10, characterized in that the joint between said restriction microconduit (204,304) and said enlarged microconduit (226,326) is at least at the same level as (a) the connection between said one or more inlet microconduits and the restriction microconduit, or (b) the top part of the microcavity (204,304), and said enlarged microcoduit (226,326) preferably has an inlet vent (227+235, 327+335) for ambient atmosphere at its upper part.
12. The microfluidic device of any of claims 10-11, characterized in that the enlarged 5 microconduit (226,326) has anti-wicking means (233,333,235,335) at least in edges coming from the restriction microconduit (205,305) and in close proximity to the outlet end (206.306) of the restriction microconduit (205,305), preferably in the form of hydrophobic surface breaks.
10 13. The microfluidic device of any of claims 1-12, characterized in that at least one of said inlet microconduits (202,203,302,303) is connected to a volume-defining unit (211,119+121,319+321).
14. The microfluidic device of any of claims 1-13, characterized in that said microcavity 15 (104,204,304) has a volume within the interval of 1 - 1000 nl.
15. The microfluidic device of any of claims 1-14, characterized in that a) the device is adapted for using centrifugal force for driving a liquid flow by spinning the device around a spin axis, and 20 b) the restriction microconduits (205,305) of said two or more microchannel structures (set 1) are located at the same radial distance relative to the spin axis.
16. The microfluidic device of any of claims 1-14, characterized in that a) the device is adapted for using centrifugal force for driving a liquid flow by 25 spinning the device around a spin axis, and b) the device comprises additional microchannel structures (set 2), each of which has the structural unit but with a restriction microconduit of a length and/or a cross- sectional area that are/is different from the length and or cross-sectional area of the restriction microconduits (205,305) of set 1 and possibly of at least one of the
30 other restriction microconduits of set 2..
17. The microfluidic device of claim 16, characterized in that one, two or more up to all of the restriction microconduits of the microchannel structures of set 2 are located at the same radial distance as the restriction microconduits (205,305)of set 1.
18. The microfluidic device of any of claims 15-17, characterized in that the device comprises additional microchannel structures (set 3), each of which has the structural unit but with a restriction microconduit of the same length and/or cross-sectional area as the restrition microconduit (205,305) of set 1, and that one, two or more of the restriction microconduits of set 3 are located at a radial distance that is different from the radial distance of the restriction micronconduits (205,305) of set 1.
19. The microfluidic device of any of claims 1-18, characterized in that the restriction microconduits (105,205,305) and the microcavity (104,204,304), if present, are designed for a liquid flow rate in the interval of 0.01-100 nl/sec and/or a residence time in the microcavity (104,204,304) > 0.010 sec, if present.
20. A method for creating a controlled liquid flow in parallel through a plurality of microchannel structures (201,301) of a microfluidic device, said method comprises the steps of: (a) providing a microfluidic device which comprises said plurality of microchannel structures, each of which comprises a structural unit which comprises (i) one or more inlet microconduits (102,103, 202,203, 302,303), and (ii) an outlet microconduit (105,205,305) downstream said one or more inlet microconduits, and (iii) a flow path for a liquid passing through either of said inlet microconduits and said outlet microconduit;
(b) providing a liquid aliquot in at least one of said one or more inlet microconduits (202,203,302,303) in each of the microchannel structures (201,301); and
(c) applying a driving force that creates a liquid flow that transport each of said aliquot through the outlet microconduit (205,305) in each of the microchannel structures (201,301); characterized in that A) the outlet microconduits (105,205,305) are restriction microconduits, B) the liquid flow created in step (c) is under common flow control, and C) the flow rate created in step (c) for each of the structural units is adjusted to give the pressure drop in the restriction microconduits (105,205,305) that they are designed for.
PCT/SE2002/001701 2001-03-19 2002-09-17 Functional unit enabling controlled flow in a microfluidic device WO2003024598A1 (en)

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