WO2001095813A1 - Methods, tools, and kits for subcutaneously implanting articles - Google Patents

Methods, tools, and kits for subcutaneously implanting articles Download PDF

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Publication number
WO2001095813A1
WO2001095813A1 PCT/US2001/018480 US0118480W WO0195813A1 WO 2001095813 A1 WO2001095813 A1 WO 2001095813A1 US 0118480 W US0118480 W US 0118480W WO 0195813 A1 WO0195813 A1 WO 0195813A1
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WO
WIPO (PCT)
Prior art keywords
blade
article
geometry
dissection tool
cutting edge
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/US2001/018480
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Hendrik K. Kuiper
Paul F. Marad
Original Assignee
Vasca, Inc.
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US59055300A priority Critical
Priority to US09/590,553 priority
Application filed by Vasca, Inc. filed Critical Vasca, Inc.
Publication of WO2001095813A1 publication Critical patent/WO2001095813A1/en

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Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/32Surgical cutting instruments
    • A61B17/3209Incision instruments
    • A61B17/32093Incision instruments for skin incisions
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M39/00Tubes, tube connectors, tube couplings, valves, access sites or the like, specially adapted for medical use
    • A61M39/02Access sites
    • A61M39/0208Subcutaneous access sites for injecting or removing fluids

Abstract

Methods, tools, and kits for subcutaneously implanting articles are described. The tools comprise a cutting blade (12) having a cutting edge (18) with a geometry corresponding to a geometry of the article (30) to be implanted. Methods comprise advancing the cutting blade through tissue so that the cutting edge defines a tissue pocket having a distal terminus with a geometry which corresponds to that of the article to be implanted. Kits comprise the dissection tool packaged together with the article (30) to be implanted, optionally with instructions for use setting forth methods for implantation.

Description

METHODS, TOOLS, AND KITS FOR SUBCUTANEOUSLY IMPLANTING ARTICLES

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention The present invention relates generally to medical devices and methods.

More particularly, the present invention relates to methods, tools, and kits for subcutaneously implanting articles, such as vascular access ports.

Access to a patient's vascular system can be established by a variety of temporary and permanently implanted devices. Most simply, temporary access can be provided by the direct percutaneous introduction of a needle through the patient's skin and into a blood vessel. While such a direct approach is relatively simple and suitable for applications, such as intravenous feeding, intravenous drug delivery, and other applications which continue over only a short time, they are not suitable for hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, hemofiltration, chemotherapy, drug delivery, and other extracorporeal procedures that must be repeated periodically, often for the lifetime of the patient.

For long-term vascular access suitable for hemodialysis, hemofiltration, and the like, the most common approach is to create a subcutaneous arteriovenous (A-N) fistula. The fistula is preferably created by anastomosing an artery, usually the radial artery, to a vein, usually the cephalic vein. The vein dilates and eventually arterializes, becoming suitable for repeated puncture using a needle for access. A-N fistulas may also be created using autologous or heterologous veins, by implanting synthetic blood vessels, typically PTFE tubes, and the like.

As an alternative to the use of an A-N fistula, a variety of implantable ports have been proposed over the years for use in hemodialysis, hemofiltration, drug delivery, and other treatments. Typically, the port includes a chamber having an access region, such as a septum or a valve aperture, and the port is attached to an implanted cannula which in turn is secured to a blood vessel. In the case of veins, the cannula is typically indwelling, and in the case of arteries, the cannula may be attached by conventional surgical technique. The present invention is particularly concerned with the manner of implanting such ports as well as other subcutaneously implantable devices. Prior to the present invention, ports were typically implanted by creating a large subcutaneous pocket into which the port was placed and usually connected to the vasculature by a cannula or other implanted conduit. As described in copending application no. 09/161,068, assigned to the assignee of the present application, and illustrated in Figs. 1A and IB herein, a port P may be implanted by creating a tissue pocket TP by making an incision in the skin S and forming the pocket laterally from the incision. Generally, it is desirable if not necessary to form the pocket by first creating a generally vertical incision and then extending the incision generally laterally so that the port may be placed in a pocket which is offset from the vertical incision. In this way, a needle or other access device which is percutaneously penetrated into the port will not pass through the vertical incision. The incision and laterally extending pocket were usually formed with a conventional surgical scalpel, and the surgeon would use her or his best judgment in determining the size of the pocket needed to accommodate a port P. While in some instances the surgeon would create an optimum size for the pocket, in many cases, the pocket initially created would either be too large or too small. If the pocket is too large, the patient might need additional suturing in order to close the pocket. Additionally, large tissue pockets increase the likelihood of hematoma and infection. If it is too small, the surgeon would have to take additional time to enlarge the pocket prior to implanting the port. While neither of these problems is of a great magnitude, they do make the procedure more difficult for the surgeon and expose the patient to a possibly lengthened procedure with additional (although minor) trauma and increased risk of infection.

For these reasons, it would be desirable to provide improved methods, tools, and kits for implanting subcutaneous devices, such as vascular access ports. In particular, it would be desirable to provide such methods, tools, and kits which reduce the time and skill required to form a subcutaneous tissue pocket for receiving the implantable device and/or which increase the accuracy of the size of the tissue pocket which is created. Preferably, the methods, tools, and kits will both reduce the time and increase the accuracy of tissue pocket creation. The tools should be of simple, low cost construction, and their use should be within the normal skills of a surgeon expected to perform the procedure. Preferably, the methods will comprise a minimum number of steps which, if performed according to a simple protocol, will, result in a tissue pocket having a size and depth which is both accurate and appropriate for the device to be implanted. At least some of these objectives will be met by the invention described hereinafter. 2. Description of the Background Art

Vascular access ports which can be implanted using the methods, tools, and kits of the present invention, are described in U.S. Patent Nos. 5,562,617; 5,713,859; 5,807,356; 6,042,569; and 6,007,516. Copending application no. 09/161,068, has been described above. The full disclosures of each of these patents and copending application are incorporated herein by reference.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention provides improved methods, tools, and kits for subcutaneously implanting articles in a patient. The invention is particularly suitable for creating a tissue pocket as part of a procedure for implanting a vascular access port, where the access port can be intended for anyone of a variety of purposes, such as hemodialysis, hemofiltration, hemodiafiltration, apheresis, peritoneal dialysis, chemotherapy, drug delivery, and the like. In addition, the present invention could be used for implanting a variety of other devices, such as cardiac pacemakers, implantable drug delivery pumps, and the like.

The present invention incorporates a unique dissection tool for forming a tissue pocket having dimensions which are chosen for the article to be implanted. The dissection tool will include a blade having a cutting edge with a geometry which corresponds to a geometry of the article. Usually, the cutting blade will be planar, and the cutting edge will have or define a line which corresponds to or matches a peripheral geometry or shape of the article to be implanted. By "corresponds to," it is meant that the shape of the line defined by the cutting edge may precisely match a peripheral geometry or shape of the article (usually a side of the article when viewed in a plan orientation). More usually, however, the geometry of the cutting edge will have the same shape but be slightly larger than the actual plan and dimensions of the article to be implanted.

In the exemplary embodiment, the article to be implanted is a vascular port having a circular base, and the cutting edge of the dissection tool blade is semicircular. In this way, as the blade is advanced through tissue, the cutting edge forms a pocket having a semicircular leading edge. Usually, the radius of the semicircular leading edge will be slightly larger than the radius of the base of the implanted article, allowing sufficient space for the article to be implanted without excess cutting of tissue.

Methods according to the present invention comprise providing a dissection tool including a blade with a cutting edge having a geometry corresponding to that of the article. The blade of the dissection tool is advanced through tissue to create a subcutaneous pocket having peripheral dimensions corresponding to the geometry of the blade. Usually, a generally vertical incision is first created through the skin to a desired depth and with a desired width corresponding to the width of the tissue pocket. The vertical incision may be made with the cutting tool but will more usually be made with a scalpel or other conventional surgical cutting instrument. Usually, it is desirable that the initial vertical incision will have a generally straight, horizontal distal edge to define the horizontal plane in which the tissue pocket is to be formed. Thus, use of a dissection tool having a non-linear cutting edge will usually not be preferred. Once the initial vertical incision has been created, the dissection tool is introduced vertically through the incision until the cutting edge of the blade reaches the desired depth of implantation. At that point, the blade is turned and the cutting edge advanced horizontally to create the pocket. Usually, the dissection tool will have a mark or other feature which indicates when the cutting edge has reached the desired depth. As the cutting edge is advanced horizontally, it will create a distal edge or wall of the tissue pocket having the desired shape which corresponds to the geometry of the article to be implanted.

While the use of the cutting tool having a semicircular cutting blade is useful for implanting circular articles, i.e., articles having at least one circular dimension such as a base dimension, the shape of the cutting edge may be varied to correspond to a variety of other regular and irregular shapes and geometries of other implantable articles. For example, the cutting edges may be polygonal, ovoid, zig-zag, serpentine, or have any other desired geometry.

Tools according to the present invention will be designed specifically for use in combination with a particular article to be implanted. Dissection tools will comprise a blade having a desired geometry, usually including a semicircular cutting edge. A handle will be attached to the blade on a side opposite to that of the cutting edge, and the plane of the blade will be at an angle relative to an axis of the handle in the range from 15° to 75°, usually from 30° to 60°, and preferably from 40° to 50°. In the preferred case of a semicircular cutting edge, the cutting edge will have a radius in the range from 1 cm to 6 cm, usually from 2 cm to 4 cm. The blade may further include other features, such as suture hole markers, radiopaque markers, depth gauge indicia, or the like. In other embodiments, the blade will incorporate a tab or other extension which defines the depth of insertion. The depth may be provided on a scale on the tab. Alternatively, the depth may be established by the point at which the handle is attached to the tab. The dissection tool may be formed from virtually any surgically acceptable material or materials. Usually, at least the cutting edge will be formed from the material that can be honed and remain sharp during use. Suitable materials include surgical stainless steel and a variety of hard plastics. Of course, different components of the tool may be formed from different materials which are permanently or removeably attached to each other. Depending on the particular materials, the tool can be sterilizable (reusable) or disposable. In some cases, it may be possible to form the blade or even the cutting edge of the blade from a disposable material, while the rest of the tool is sterilizable and reusable. Kits according to the present invention comprise an implantable article having a peripheral geometry, such as an implantable vascular port having a circular base. The kits further comprise a dissection tool having a blade with a geometry corresponding to the peripheral geometry of the article, e.g., a semicircular cutting edge corresponding to the circular geometry of the implantable vascular access port. The kits will still further include a container to hold the article and the dissection tool, typically a box, pouch, tube, tray, or other conventional medical device package. Conveniently, both the article to be implanted and the dissection tool will be maintained sterilely within the package. Usually, the kit will further comprise instructions for use setting forth any of the methods described above.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Figs. 1 A and IB illustrate prior art techniques for implanting vascular access ports.

Fig. 2 illustrates a dissection tool constructed in accordance with the principles of the present invention. Fig. 3 illustrates an exemplary vascular access port which may be implanted using the methods, tools, and kits of the present invention.

Figs. 4A-4E illustrate use of the dissection tool of Fig. 2 for subcutaneously implanting the port of Fig. 3 in a patient.

Fig. 5 is a plan view showing the geometry of the tissue pocket and the implanted port resulting from the implantation protocol of Figs. 4A-4E.

Fig. 6 illustrates a kit constructed in accordance with the principles of the present invention. DESCRIPTION OF THE SPECIFIC EMBODIMENTS A dissection tool 10 constructed in accordance with the principles of the present invention is illustrated in Fig. 2. The dissection tool 10 comprises a cutting blade 12 attached to a handle 14, usually by an intermediate section or connecting tab 16. The blade 12 has a cutting edge 18 which forms the leading edge of the dissection tool 10. That is, the handle 14 is attached to the blade on a side opposite to that of the cutting edge so that forward advancement of the tool using the handle 14 causes the cutting edge 18 to dissect tissue. It will be appreciated that the geometry of the cutting edge will thus be imparted to the tissue as it is cut. For tool 10, the cutting edge 18 is semicircular and has a radius which corresponds to (is slightly larger than) the diameter of a circular article to be implanted, such as implantable port 30 discussed below. The blade 12 will be attached to the intermediate section 16 at an angle alpha (α), typically in the range from 40° to 50°. This angle facilitates turning of the blade from vertical to horizontal, as will be described in more detail later. Preferably, handle 14 is attached to the intermediate section 16 at an angle beta (β) in the range from 0° to 60°, usually from 10° to 45°. Preferably, the alpha (α) and beta (β) angles will be equal so that the handle is generally parallel to the plane of cutting blade 12. In this way, there is an offset d between the plane of the cutting blade 12 and the handle, usually in the range from 0 cm to 6 cm, preferably in the range from 1 cm to 3 cm. Such an offset also facilitates the ability to first vertically introduce the tool and thereafter turn the tool horizontally to create the desired tissue pocket, as described in more detail below.

Referring now to Fig. 3, a vascular access port 30 includes a circular base 32 having a plurality of suturing holes 34 therein. The vascular access port includes a needle access aperture 36 with a connector 38 for attaching to a cannula which may in turn may be attached to the patient's vasculature. The construction of such a vascular access port is described in detail in U.S. Patent No. 6,007,516, the full disclosure which has previously been incorporated herein by reference. While the tools and methods of the present invention are particularly suitable for implanting such vascular access ports, it will be appreciated that they are also useful for implanting a wide variety of other implantable articles, such as those mentioned above. Usually, the base of the implantable article 30 will have a radius of about 3 cm. In such a case, it is desirable that the cutting edge 18 of the dissection tool 10 have a radius of about 3 cm. Referring now to Figs. 4A-4E, implantation of the vascular access port 30 using the dissection tool 10 will be described. In Fig. 4A, a section of patient tissue comprising an overlying skin or cutaneous layer S and the underlying subcutaneous layer Q is illustrated. It is desired to implant the access port 30 in a target region TR. In an exemplary method according to the present invention, a vertical incision VI is first made first through the skin S and into the subcutaneous layer Q to the depth of the target region TR, as shown in Fig. 4B. Usually, the incision will be made with a scalpel or other conventional surgical tool. While it is preferred that the incision be generally vertical, the actual angle relative to the plane normal to the tissue surface can vary somewhat, typically being between 0° to ±45°, usually from 0° to ±20°. Thus, as used herein, the phrase "vertical incision" is meant to describe an incision which is generally vertical within the range of angles set forth above.

After the vertical incision VI has been formed, the blade 12 of tool 10 is inserted downward in a generally vertical direction through the incision until it reaches a desired depth. As noted above, the depth is optionally determined with reference to an indicia or other feature on the handle itself. Once at the desired depth, the blade is turned in a horizontal direction, as indicated by arrow 28 in Fig. 4C. The blade is then advanced to form a generally horizontal incision HI, as shown in broken line in Fig. 4C and in full line in Fig. 4D. The implantable port 30 may then be introduced into the horizontal incision which defines the tissue pocket, the port sutured in place, and the vertical incision VI sutured closed, as shown in Fig. 4E. Advancement of the semicircular cutting edge 18 creates a vertical incision having a semicircular edge 40, as shown in broken line in Fig. 5. The semicircular edge 40 corresponds to, but may be slightly larger than, the diameter of base 32 of the implantable port 30. In this way, it can be seen that the size and shape of the tissue pocket created by the horizontal incision HI has been optimized for the implanted article.

Referring now to Fig. 6, a dissection tool according to the present invention, such as tool 10, an article to be implanted, such as vascular access port 30, may be packaged together in a kit. Usually, the kit will include a conventional package 100 for receiving and containing both the dissection tool and article to be implanted, and the package may be in a form of a pouch, tray, box, tube, or the like. Usually, both the dissection tool and article to be implanted will be maintained sterilely within the package 100, and optionally instructions for use (IFU) may also be provided. The instructions for use may set forth any of the methods for implanting the article using the dissection tool 10, as described generally above. The instructions for use will usually be set forth on a separate printed sheet, but may also be incorporated in whole in part on the packaging itself.

While the above is a complete description of the preferred embodiments of the invention, various alternatives, modifications, and equivalents may be used. Therefore, the above description should not be taken as limiting the scope of the invention which is defined by the appended claims.

Claims

WHAT IS CLAIMED IS:
1. A method for subcutaneously implanting an article in a patient, said method comprising: providing a dissection tool including a blade with a cutting edge having a geometry corresponding to that of the article; advancing the blade of the dissection tool through tissue to create a subcutaneous pocket having peripheral dimensions corresponding to the geometry of the blade; and implanting the article within the subcutaneous pocket.
2. A method as in claim 1, further comprising creating an initial generally vertical incision to a desired depth beneath the patient's skin, wherein advancing comprises introducing the blade of the dissection tool through the generally vertical incision, turning the device, and advancing the blade horizontally to create the pocket.
3. A method as in any of claims 1 and 2, wherein the blade of the dissection tool has a semicircular cutting edge so that advancement of the blade creates a pocket with a semicircular distal periphery.
4. A method as in claim 3, wherein implanting the article comprises implanting an article with a circular geometry.
5. A method as in claim 4, wherein the article is a port which is connected to the vasculature of the patient.
6. A dissection tool for use in combination with an article to be implanted, said dissection tool comprising: a blade having a semicircular cutting edge; and a handle attached to the blade on a side opposite to the cutting edge, wherein a plane of the blade is at an angle in the range from 15° to 75° relative to an axis of the handle.
7. A dissection tool as in claim 6, wherein the semicircular cutting edge has a radius in the range from 1 cm to 6 cm.
8. A kit comprising: an implantable article having a peripheral geometry; a dissection tool having a blade with a geometry corresponding to the peripheral geometry of the article; and a container which holds the article and the dissection tool.
9. A kit as in claim 8, further comprising instructions for use setting forth a method comprising: advancing the blade of the dissection device through tissue to create a subcutaneous pocket having peripheral dimensions corresponding to the peripheral geometry of the blade; and implanting the article within the subcutaneous pocket.
10. A kit as in claim 8, wherein the implantable article is a vascular access port having a circular peripheral geometry and wherein the blade of the dissection tool has a semicircular geometry.
PCT/US2001/018480 2000-06-09 2001-06-06 Methods, tools, and kits for subcutaneously implanting articles WO2001095813A1 (en)

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US59055300A true 2000-06-09 2000-06-09
US09/590,553 2000-06-09

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Cited By (24)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2007085904A2 (en) * 2005-08-04 2007-08-02 Marvao Medical Devices Ltd Surgical template
WO2009129474A1 (en) * 2008-04-17 2009-10-22 Allergan, Inc. Implantable access port device and attachment system
US20120283705A1 (en) * 2011-05-05 2012-11-08 Medtronic, Inc. Percutaneous delivery tool
US8858421B2 (en) 2011-11-15 2014-10-14 Apollo Endosurgery, Inc. Interior needle stick guard stems for tubes
US8882728B2 (en) 2010-02-10 2014-11-11 Apollo Endosurgery, Inc. Implantable injection port
US8882655B2 (en) 2010-09-14 2014-11-11 Apollo Endosurgery, Inc. Implantable access port system
US8905916B2 (en) 2010-08-16 2014-12-09 Apollo Endosurgery, Inc. Implantable access port system
US8992415B2 (en) 2010-04-30 2015-03-31 Apollo Endosurgery, Inc. Implantable device to protect tubing from puncture
US9023063B2 (en) 2008-04-17 2015-05-05 Apollo Endosurgery, Inc. Implantable access port device having a safety cap
US9079004B2 (en) 2009-11-17 2015-07-14 C. R. Bard, Inc. Overmolded access port including anchoring and identification features
US9089395B2 (en) 2011-11-16 2015-07-28 Appolo Endosurgery, Inc. Pre-loaded septum for use with an access port
US9125718B2 (en) 2010-04-30 2015-09-08 Apollo Endosurgery, Inc. Electronically enhanced access port for a fluid filled implant
US9192501B2 (en) 2010-04-30 2015-11-24 Apollo Endosurgery, Inc. Remotely powered remotely adjustable gastric band system
US9199069B2 (en) 2011-10-20 2015-12-01 Apollo Endosurgery, Inc. Implantable injection port
US9265912B2 (en) 2006-11-08 2016-02-23 C. R. Bard, Inc. Indicia informative of characteristics of insertable medical devices
US9474888B2 (en) 2005-03-04 2016-10-25 C. R. Bard, Inc. Implantable access port including a sandwiched radiopaque insert
US9579496B2 (en) 2007-11-07 2017-02-28 C. R. Bard, Inc. Radiopaque and septum-based indicators for a multi-lumen implantable port
US9603992B2 (en) 2005-03-04 2017-03-28 C. R. Bard, Inc. Access port identification systems and methods
US9603993B2 (en) 2005-03-04 2017-03-28 C. R. Bard, Inc. Access port identification systems and methods
US9642986B2 (en) 2006-11-08 2017-05-09 C. R. Bard, Inc. Resource information key for an insertable medical device
US9937337B2 (en) 2005-04-27 2018-04-10 C. R. Bard, Inc. Assemblies for identifying a power injectable access port
US10052471B2 (en) 2008-11-13 2018-08-21 C. R. Bard, Inc. Implantable medical devices including septum-based indicators
US10179230B2 (en) 2005-03-04 2019-01-15 Bard Peripheral Vascular, Inc. Systems and methods for radiographically identifying an access port
US10307581B2 (en) 2005-04-27 2019-06-04 C. R. Bard, Inc. Reinforced septum for an implantable medical device

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Cited By (39)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US9682186B2 (en) 2005-03-04 2017-06-20 C. R. Bard, Inc. Access port identification systems and methods
US9603992B2 (en) 2005-03-04 2017-03-28 C. R. Bard, Inc. Access port identification systems and methods
US10265512B2 (en) 2005-03-04 2019-04-23 Bard Peripheral Vascular, Inc. Implantable access port including a sandwiched radiopaque insert
US10238850B2 (en) 2005-03-04 2019-03-26 Bard Peripheral Vascular, Inc. Systems and methods for radiographically identifying an access port
US9603993B2 (en) 2005-03-04 2017-03-28 C. R. Bard, Inc. Access port identification systems and methods
US10179230B2 (en) 2005-03-04 2019-01-15 Bard Peripheral Vascular, Inc. Systems and methods for radiographically identifying an access port
US9474888B2 (en) 2005-03-04 2016-10-25 C. R. Bard, Inc. Implantable access port including a sandwiched radiopaque insert
US10052470B2 (en) 2005-04-27 2018-08-21 Bard Peripheral Vascular, Inc. Assemblies for identifying a power injectable access port
US9937337B2 (en) 2005-04-27 2018-04-10 C. R. Bard, Inc. Assemblies for identifying a power injectable access port
US10016585B2 (en) 2005-04-27 2018-07-10 Bard Peripheral Vascular, Inc. Assemblies for identifying a power injectable access port
US10183157B2 (en) 2005-04-27 2019-01-22 Bard Peripheral Vascular, Inc. Assemblies for identifying a power injectable access port
US10307581B2 (en) 2005-04-27 2019-06-04 C. R. Bard, Inc. Reinforced septum for an implantable medical device
WO2007085904A3 (en) * 2005-08-04 2007-11-29 Marvao Medical Devices Ltd Surgical template
WO2007085904A2 (en) * 2005-08-04 2007-08-02 Marvao Medical Devices Ltd Surgical template
US9265912B2 (en) 2006-11-08 2016-02-23 C. R. Bard, Inc. Indicia informative of characteristics of insertable medical devices
US9642986B2 (en) 2006-11-08 2017-05-09 C. R. Bard, Inc. Resource information key for an insertable medical device
US10092725B2 (en) 2006-11-08 2018-10-09 C. R. Bard, Inc. Resource information key for an insertable medical device
US9579496B2 (en) 2007-11-07 2017-02-28 C. R. Bard, Inc. Radiopaque and septum-based indicators for a multi-lumen implantable port
US10086186B2 (en) 2007-11-07 2018-10-02 C. R. Bard, Inc. Radiopaque and septum-based indicators for a multi-lumen implantable port
CN102099078A (en) * 2008-04-17 2011-06-15 阿勒根公司 Implantable access port device and attachment system
US9023063B2 (en) 2008-04-17 2015-05-05 Apollo Endosurgery, Inc. Implantable access port device having a safety cap
WO2009129474A1 (en) * 2008-04-17 2009-10-22 Allergan, Inc. Implantable access port device and attachment system
US9023062B2 (en) 2008-04-17 2015-05-05 Apollo Endosurgery, Inc. Implantable access port device and attachment system
US10052471B2 (en) 2008-11-13 2018-08-21 C. R. Bard, Inc. Implantable medical devices including septum-based indicators
US9248268B2 (en) 2009-11-17 2016-02-02 C. R. Bard, Inc. Overmolded access port including anchoring and identification features
US10155101B2 (en) 2009-11-17 2018-12-18 Bard Peripheral Vascular, Inc. Overmolded access port including anchoring and identification features
US9079004B2 (en) 2009-11-17 2015-07-14 C. R. Bard, Inc. Overmolded access port including anchoring and identification features
US9717895B2 (en) 2009-11-17 2017-08-01 C. R. Bard, Inc. Overmolded access port including anchoring and identification features
US8882728B2 (en) 2010-02-10 2014-11-11 Apollo Endosurgery, Inc. Implantable injection port
US8992415B2 (en) 2010-04-30 2015-03-31 Apollo Endosurgery, Inc. Implantable device to protect tubing from puncture
US9125718B2 (en) 2010-04-30 2015-09-08 Apollo Endosurgery, Inc. Electronically enhanced access port for a fluid filled implant
US9241819B2 (en) 2010-04-30 2016-01-26 Apollo Endosurgery, Inc. Implantable device to protect tubing from puncture
US9192501B2 (en) 2010-04-30 2015-11-24 Apollo Endosurgery, Inc. Remotely powered remotely adjustable gastric band system
US8905916B2 (en) 2010-08-16 2014-12-09 Apollo Endosurgery, Inc. Implantable access port system
US8882655B2 (en) 2010-09-14 2014-11-11 Apollo Endosurgery, Inc. Implantable access port system
US20120283705A1 (en) * 2011-05-05 2012-11-08 Medtronic, Inc. Percutaneous delivery tool
US9199069B2 (en) 2011-10-20 2015-12-01 Apollo Endosurgery, Inc. Implantable injection port
US8858421B2 (en) 2011-11-15 2014-10-14 Apollo Endosurgery, Inc. Interior needle stick guard stems for tubes
US9089395B2 (en) 2011-11-16 2015-07-28 Appolo Endosurgery, Inc. Pre-loaded septum for use with an access port

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