WO2000037680A1 - Method for the detection of specific nucleic acid sequences by polymerase nucleotide incorporation - Google Patents

Method for the detection of specific nucleic acid sequences by polymerase nucleotide incorporation Download PDF

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Publication number
WO2000037680A1
WO2000037680A1 PCT/US1999/028612 US9928612W WO0037680A1 WO 2000037680 A1 WO2000037680 A1 WO 2000037680A1 US 9928612 W US9928612 W US 9928612W WO 0037680 A1 WO0037680 A1 WO 0037680A1
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nucleotides
primer
target dna
rna
sequence
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PCT/US1999/028612
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French (fr)
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Alonso Castro
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The Regents Of The University Of California
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Priority to US60/113,139 priority
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    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C12BIOCHEMISTRY; BEER; SPIRITS; WINE; VINEGAR; MICROBIOLOGY; ENZYMOLOGY; MUTATION OR GENETIC ENGINEERING
    • C12QMEASURING OR TESTING PROCESSES INVOLVING ENZYMES, NUCLEIC ACIDS OR MICROORGANISMS; COMPOSITIONS OR TEST PAPERS THEREFOR; PROCESSES OF PREPARING SUCH COMPOSITIONS; CONDITION-RESPONSIVE CONTROL IN MICROBIOLOGICAL OR ENZYMOLOGICAL PROCESSES
    • C12Q1/00Measuring or testing processes involving enzymes, nucleic acids or microorganisms; Compositions therefor; Processes of preparing such compositions
    • C12Q1/68Measuring or testing processes involving enzymes, nucleic acids or microorganisms; Compositions therefor; Processes of preparing such compositions involving nucleic acids
    • C12Q1/6844Nucleic acid amplification reactions
    • C12Q1/686Polymerase chain reaction [PCR]

Abstract

A method for rapid and efficient detection of a target DNA or RNA sequence is provided. A primer having a 3'-hydroxyl group at one end and having a sequence of nucleotides sufficiently homologous with an identifying sequence of nucleotides in the target DNA is selected. The primer is hybridized to the identifying sequence of nucleotides on the DNA or RNA sequence and a reporter molecule is synthesized on the target sequence by progressively binding complementary nucleotides to the primer, where the complementary nucleotides include nucleotides labeled with a fluorophore. Fluorescence emitted by fluorophores on single reporter molecules is detected to identify the target DNA or RNA sequence.

Description

METHOD FOR THE DETECTION OF SPECIFIC NUCLEIC ACID SEQUENCES BY POLYMERASE NUCLEOTIDE INCORPORATION

RELATED APPLICATION This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application S.N. 60/113,139, filed December 18, 1999.

STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERAL RIGHTS

This invention was made with government support under Contract No. W- 7405-ENG-36 awarded by the U.S. Department of Energy. The government has certain rights in the invention.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates generally to detection of nucleic acid sequences, and, more particularly, to the selective incorporation of fluorescent markers to detect nucleic acid sequences.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The rapid and efficient detection of specific nucleic acid sequences in biological samples plays a central role in a variety of fields, including molecular biology, biotechnology, immunology, medical diagnosis, forensic analysis, and quality control of food products. One of the most commonly used techniques for the detection of specific nucleic acid sequences is the Southern blot. This is a hybridization technique in which the fragments to be interrogated have been size- separated by gel electrophoresis and transferred from the gel to a nylon nitrocellulose filter. A radioactive probe is then added to the filter so that hybridization takes place. After washing away the excess probe, the band containing the target nucleic acid is detected by exposing an x-ray film to the filter. Despite its popularity, Southern blotting suffers from some limitations: it involves a series of manually intensive procedures that cannot be run unattended and cannot be readily automated. The process for separating the fragments by gel electrophoresis and subsequently detecting the bands by autoradiography are time- consuming tasks that are susceptible to poor quantitative accuracy and poor reproducibility.

The use of radioactive probes brings up a set of safety and environmental concerns. The lack of adequate sensitivity is another limitation, which has been partially addressed by the development of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and related target amplification methods. The PCR consists of selectively amplifying a target DNA sequence in a sample. Amplification products are usually detected by dyes that stain nucleic acids or by hybridization with sequence-specific probes. Amplification methods, however, may introduce ambiguities resulting from contamination or from variability in amplification efficiency. Therefore, there is a need for robust analytical methods that provide accurate quantitation and molecular weight estimates for target DNA or RNA segments.

Various objects, advantages and novel features of the invention will be set forth in part in the description which follows, and in part will become apparent to those skilled in the art upon examination of the following or may be learned by practice of the invention. The objects and advantages of the invention may be realized and attained by means of the instrumentalities and combinations particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION To achieve the foregoing and other objects, and in accordance with the purposes of the present invention, as embodied and broadly described herein, the present invention includes a method for identifying a target DNA or RNA sequence. A primer having a 3'-hydroxyl group at one end and having a sequence of nucleotides sufficiently homologous to hybridize with an identifying sequence of nucleotides in the target DNA or RNA is selected. The primer is hybridized to the identifying sequence of nucleotides and a reporter molecule is synthesized on the target sequence by extending the primer by progressively binding nucleotides to the primer that are complementary to the corresponding nucleotides of the DNA or RNA sequence, where the complementary nucleotides include nucleotides labeled with a fluorophore. Fluorescence emitted by fiuorophores on individual reporter molecules is detected to identify the target DNA or RNA sequence.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS The accompanying drawings, which are incorporated in and form a part of the specification, illustrate embodiments of the present invention and, together with the description, serve to explain the principles of the invention. In the drawings: FIGURES 1A-1 E schematically depict the process of the present invention.

FIGURE 2 graphically depicts the experimental results for the detection of a specific sequence of pUC19 DNA at the single-molecule level of sensitivity according to one embodiment of the present invention.

FIGURE 3 graphically depicts results for a control experiment run under identical conditions as those corresponding to the experimental results shown in FIGURE 2, except that the target was replaced by lambda DNA.

FIGURE 4 graphically depicts a simulation of single molecule fluorescence signals from a reporter molecule according to a second embodiment of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION In accordance with the present invention, a new method enables the direct detection of specific nucleic acid sequences in biological samples. The basis of the approach is to monitor for the presence of a specific nucleic acid sequence of bacterial, human, plant or other origin. The nucleic acid sequence may be a DNA or RNA sequence, and may be characteristic of a specific taxonomic group, a specific physiological function, or a specific genetic trait.

The method consists of synthesizing in vitro a fluorescent nucleic acid reporter molecule using a relatively short sequence of the target as a template as shown in Figures 1 A-1 E. A DNA target (Figure 1 A) is denatured according to well known processes to form a single stranded DNA target (Figure 1 B). A short oligonucleotide primer that is specific and complementary to the target is then hybridized to the single stranded DNA target. A suitable polymerase and free nucleotides are added to the sample. One of these oligonucleotides is at least partially labeled with a fluorophore. If the target is present in the sample, the primer binds to an identifying sequence of the target, (Figure 1 C) and the polymerase will incorporate the labeled and unlabeled nucleotides (Figure 1 D) to reconstruct the target's complementary sequence as shown in Figure 1 E. If the labeled nucleotide concentration is kept below that of the unlabeled nucleotides, most of the labeled nucleotides will be incorporated into the reporter DNA molecule. Nonetheless, some free (i.e., unbound) labeled nucleotides will remain in the reaction mixture, but fluorescence from each synthesized reporter molecule will be much stronger than that of the free nucleotide background over the single-molecule detection time.

The sample is analyzed in a single molecule detection apparatus, as are well known and described in the art. Detection of the synthesized reporter molecule signifies the presence of the target being sought. The fluorescent signal from the reporter molecule is much larger than that of the background fluorescence originating from free labeled nucleotides, since the reaction is allowed to proceed until the reporter molecule is hundreds or thousands of bases long. The new method described here combines the advantages of flow-based analytical systems (system automation, speed, reproducibility) with the unsurpassed sensitivity of single-molecule detection. The sensitivity of this method allows for the direct detection of specific genes without the need for using amplification methods such as PCR and exhibits advantages over current methodologies in terms of sensitivity, speed and per-assay-cost. The non-radioactive approach for the ultrasensitive detection of specific sequences described here has applications in a wide variety of fields, such as gene identification, gene mapping, medical diagnostics, and biotechnology.

Exemplary Process As an example, experiments were performed for the detection of pUC19

DNA, (a 2686 base-pair plasmid). Prior to all experiments, pUC19 DNA was digested with the restriction endonuclease Bgl I, which yields two fragments, 1568 bp and 1118 bp in length. As a control, identical experiments were run except that pUC19 DNA was substituted with lambda DNA. A specific sequence of the 1568-bp pUC19 fragment was detected at the single-molecule level of sensitivity. The lambda DNA control yielded negative results.

a. Primer design. Primer sequences should be specific to the target being sought. Primers are typically 15-30 nucleotides long. Primer lengths greater than 15 nucleotides ensure that they will not anneal specifically to non-target nucleic acid. Generally, primer sequences have the following characteristics:

1. No internal secondary structures that impede hybridization and extension.

2. Balanced distribution of G/C and A/T rich domains (45-55%).

3. For the example experiment, we used the following 24-mer primer, which anneals to nucleotides 352-375 of pUC19: 5'-d(CGC-CAG-GGT-TTT-CCC-AGT-CAC-GAC)-3' (SEQ ID 1 ) b. Nucleic acid extraction and isolation. Common extraction methods, such as phenol extraction, can be used to isolate the DNA from the sample under investigation. See, for example, Reference 1 for nucleic acid extraction protocols.

c. Reporter synthesis, i. Reagents:

Figure imgf000008_0001
ii. Denature target DNA at 95°C for 5 minutes.

iii. Mix all reagents gently and thoroughly. Add enzyme last. Centrifuge briefly to collect sample at bottom of tube.

iv. Extension: Incubate at 72°C for 3 hours.

A proper temperature is selected for the hybridization of dNTP to extend the primer along the target DNA molecule. If the temperature is too low, nonspecific annealing will increase. An optimal hybridization temperature may be predicted for a given primer/target pair with available software routines, e.g., PRIMER, developed by The Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research. For this example, the optimal temperature for Taq DNA polymerase activity is 72° C.

v. Optional: Add "STOP" solution to terminate enzymatic activity. If the reaction is not stopped, and the target is of suitable size, the amount of incorporated dye and, therefore, the reporter fluorescence intensity, will be proportional to the size of the fragment. vi. Optional: remove free, unincorporated labeled nucleotides by physical means (e.g., precipitation, filtration, chromatography). In the exemplary results reported herein, a large fraction of the unincorporated labeled nucleotides were removed using a QIAquick Nucleotide Removal Kit (Quagen, Valencia, CA) following the manufacturer's protocols. Conversely, the primer can be labeled with a suitable immobilization group (e.g., biotin), which allows isolation of the reporter by physical means (e.g., solid support, magnetic beads). d. Analysis by single-molecule detection.

A single-molecule detection apparatus such as a variation of that described in References 2 and 3 or U.S. Patent 5,209,834, issued May 11 , 1993, is used to detect fluorescence from the reporter molecule. Suitable flow cytometer apparatus and methods for single molecule detection are found in U.S. Patent 5,558,998, issued September 24, 1996, and U.S. Patent Application 09/169,025, filed October 9, 1998, both incorporated by reference. Depending on reaction conditions, such as initial nucleotide concentration and temperature, it may or may not be necessary to remove unincorporated labeled nucleotide as explained in the Procedure section. In this example, the reaction mixture was diluted 1000-fold to 50 mL. This dilution yields a concentration of unincorporated nucleotide in the nanomolar range, and a concentration of reporter in the picomolar range. Therefore, when the sample is analyzed by single-molecule detection, the unincorporated nucleotide produces a constant background signal, and the reporter, which contains hundreds of labels, produces single fluorescence bursts with amplitudes well above that of the background. Figure 2 shows the experimental results for the detection of pUC19 in this example. Figure 3 shows the control experiments using lambda DNA as target.

If the reporter synthesis reaction is allowed to proceed to completion, the amount of labeled nucleotide that is incorporated will be the same for identical targets. Therefore, each single-molecule burst will present the same amplitude, as shown in the simulation of Figure 4. e. Analysis by single-molecule electrophoresis.

Another way to avoid detecting interfering free nucleotides is to perform "single-molecule electrophoresis" as described in Reference 3 and in

U.S. Patent 5,209,834, incorporated by reference. In this method, the electrophoretic mobility of fluorescently labeled molecules (free labeled nucleotides and reporter molecules in this case) can be determined with single-molecule sensitivity. Since single nucleotides exhibit an elecrophoretic mobility vastly different to that of nucleic acid targets, interference from free nucleotides is eliminated. Therefore, each single- molecule burst will present the same amplitude, as shown in the simulation of Figure 4. A histogram of burst amplitudes will reveal the size of the target being sought. This method also allows a determination of the size of the target, even if the reaction was not allowed to complete.

References (incorporated herein by reference)

1. "DNA Probes", G. Keller and M. Manak, Stockton Press, New York, 1993, section

2.

2. "Single-molecule detection of specific nucleic acid sequences in unamplified genomic DNA", A. Castro and J.G.K. Williams, Anal. Chem. 69, 3915-3920

(1997).

3. "Single-Molecule Electrophoresis". A. Castro and E. B. Shera, Anal. Chem. 67,

3181 (1995).

The foregoing description of the invention has been presented for purposes of illustration and description and is not intended to be exhaustive or to limit the invention to the precise form disclosed, and obviously many modifications and variations are possible in light of the above teaching.

The embodiments were chosen and described in order to best explain the principles of the invention and its practical application to thereby enable others skilled in the art to best utilize the invention in various embodiments and with various modifications as are suited to the particular use contemplated. It is intended that the scope of the invention be defined by the claims appended hereto.

Claims

WHAT IS CLAIMED IS:
1. A method for identifying a target DNA or RNA sequence comprising the steps of: selecting a primer having a 3'-hydroxyl group at one end and having a sequence of nucleotides sufficiently homologous to hybridize with an identifying sequence of nucleotides in the target DNA; hybridizing the primer to the identifying nucleotide sequences of the target DNA or RNA sequence; extending the primer along the target sequence by progressively binding nucleotides to the primer that are complementary to the corresponding nucleotides on the target sequence to form a reporter molecule, where the complementary nucleotides include nucleotides labeled with a fluorophore; and detecting fluorescence emitted by fiuorophores on individual reporter molecules to identify the target DNA or RNA sequence.
2. A method according to Claim 1 , wherein the primer is at least about 15 nucleotides to specifically hybridize to the identifying sequence of nucleotides for the target DNA or RNA.
3. A method according to Claim 1 , including the steps of: forming a mixture of dATP, dGTP, dCTP, and dUTP nucleotides, where at least one of the nucleotide types is at least partially labeled with a fluorescent label; denaturing the target DNA or RNA; adding a polymerase effective to catalyze the synthesis of the reporter molecule from the mixture of nucleotides; and incubating the mixture of nucleotides, target DNA or RNA, and polymerase for a time effective to extend the primer to a desired length.
4. A method according to Claim 3, wherein the concentration of nucleotides in the mixture of nucleotides having a fluorescent label is less than the concentration of nucleotides without a fluorescent label.
5. A method according to Claim 1 , further including the step of removing free, unincorporated nucleotides after the binding reaction is completed.
6. A method according to Claim 5, wherein the primer is at least about 15 nucleotides to specifically hybridize to the identifying sequence of nucleotides for the target DNA or RNA.
7. A method according to Claim 5, including the steps of: forming a mixture of dATP, dGTP, dCTP, and dUTP nucleotides, where at least one of the nucleotide types is at least partially labeled with a fluorescent label; denaturing the target DNA or RNA; adding a polymerase effective to catalyze the synthesis of the reporter molecule from the mixture of nucleotides; and incubating the mixture of nucleotides, target DNA or RNA, and polymerase for a time effective to extend the primer to a desired length.
8. A method according to Claim 7, wherein the concentration of nucleotides in the mixture of nucleotides having a fluorescent label is less than the concentration of nucleotides without a fluorescent label.
9. A method according to Claim 1 , further including the step of separating free, unincorporated nucleotides from reporter molecules by single-molecule electrophoresis.
10. A method according to Claim 9, wherein the primer is at least about 15 nucleotides to specifically hybridize to the identifying sequence of nucleotides for the target DNA or RNA.
11. A method according to Claim 9, including the steps of: forming a mixture of dATP, dGTP, dCTP, and dUTP nucleotides, where at least one of the nucleotide types is at least partially labeled with a fluorescent label; denaturing the target DNA or RNA; adding a polymerase effective to catalyze the synthesis of the reporter molecule from the mixture of nucleotides; and incubating the mixture of nucleotides, target DNA or RNA, and polymerase for a time effective to extend the primer to a desired length.
12. A method according to Claim 11 , wherein the concentration of nucleotides in the mixture of nucleotides having a fluorescent label is less than the concentration of nucleotides without a fluorescent label.
PCT/US1999/028612 1998-12-18 1999-12-03 Method for the detection of specific nucleic acid sequences by polymerase nucleotide incorporation WO2000037680A1 (en)

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CA002354682A CA2354682A1 (en) 1998-12-18 1999-12-03 Method for the detection of specific nucleic acid sequences by polymerase nucleotide incorporation
JP2000589733A JP2002533097A (en) 1998-12-18 1999-12-03 Detection of specific nucleic acid sequences by the polymerase nucleotide incorporation
EP99964072A EP1141402A4 (en) 1998-12-18 1999-12-03 Method for the detection of specific nucleic acid sequences by polymerase nucleotide incorporation
AU20385/00A AU2038500A (en) 1998-12-18 1999-12-03 Method for the detection of specific nucleic acid sequences by polymerase nucleotide incorporation

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Cited By (5)

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WO2002038806A2 (en) * 2000-11-13 2002-05-16 Gnothis Holding Sa Detection of nucleic acid polymorphisms
EP1548132A1 (en) * 2003-12-25 2005-06-29 Canon Kabushiki Kaisha Nucleic acid labeling method by PCR
US9012144B2 (en) 2003-11-12 2015-04-21 Fluidigm Corporation Short cycle methods for sequencing polynucleotides
US9096898B2 (en) 1998-05-01 2015-08-04 Life Technologies Corporation Method of determining the nucleotide sequence of oligonucleotides and DNA molecules
US9868978B2 (en) 2005-08-26 2018-01-16 Fluidigm Corporation Single molecule sequencing of captured nucleic acids

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US5518900A (en) * 1993-01-15 1996-05-21 Molecular Tool, Inc. Method for generating single-stranded DNA molecules
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US6004744A (en) * 1991-03-05 1999-12-21 Molecular Tool, Inc. Method for determining nucleotide identity through extension of immobilized primer
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Cited By (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US9458500B2 (en) 1998-05-01 2016-10-04 Life Technologies Corporation Method of determining the nucleotide sequence of oligonucleotides and DNA molecules
US10208341B2 (en) 1998-05-01 2019-02-19 Life Technologies Corporation Method of determining the nucleotide sequence of oligonucleotides and DNA molecules
US9957561B2 (en) 1998-05-01 2018-05-01 Life Technologies Corporation Method of determining the nucleotide sequence of oligonucleotides and DNA molecules
US9725764B2 (en) 1998-05-01 2017-08-08 Life Technologies Corporation Method of determining the nucleotide sequence of oligonucleotides and DNA molecules
US9540689B2 (en) 1998-05-01 2017-01-10 Life Technologies Corporation Method of determining the nucleotide sequence of oligonucleotides and DNA molecules
US9096898B2 (en) 1998-05-01 2015-08-04 Life Technologies Corporation Method of determining the nucleotide sequence of oligonucleotides and DNA molecules
US9212393B2 (en) 1998-05-01 2015-12-15 Life Technologies Corporation Method of determining the nucleotide sequence of oligonucleotides and DNA molecules
US10214774B2 (en) 1998-05-01 2019-02-26 Life Technologies Corporation Method of determining the nucleotide sequence of oligonucleotides and DNA molecules
WO2002038806A2 (en) * 2000-11-13 2002-05-16 Gnothis Holding Sa Detection of nucleic acid polymorphisms
WO2002038806A3 (en) * 2000-11-13 2004-02-19 Lars Edman Detection of nucleic acid polymorphisms
US9657344B2 (en) 2003-11-12 2017-05-23 Fluidigm Corporation Short cycle methods for sequencing polynucleotides
US9012144B2 (en) 2003-11-12 2015-04-21 Fluidigm Corporation Short cycle methods for sequencing polynucleotides
US7534566B2 (en) 2003-12-25 2009-05-19 Canon Kabushiki Kaisha Nucleic acid labeling method and liquid composition
EP1548132A1 (en) * 2003-12-25 2005-06-29 Canon Kabushiki Kaisha Nucleic acid labeling method by PCR
US9868978B2 (en) 2005-08-26 2018-01-16 Fluidigm Corporation Single molecule sequencing of captured nucleic acids

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EP1141402A1 (en) 2001-10-10
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JP2002533097A (en) 2002-10-08
EP1141402A4 (en) 2004-10-06

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