WO2000026838A1 - Home point of sale (pos) terminal and electronic commerce method - Google Patents

Home point of sale (pos) terminal and electronic commerce method Download PDF

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Publication number
WO2000026838A1
WO2000026838A1 PCT/US1999/025584 US9925584W WO0026838A1 WO 2000026838 A1 WO2000026838 A1 WO 2000026838A1 US 9925584 W US9925584 W US 9925584W WO 0026838 A1 WO0026838 A1 WO 0026838A1
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WIPO (PCT)
Prior art keywords
processor
interface
personal computer
card
terminal
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/US1999/025584
Other languages
French (fr)
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WO2000026838A9 (en
Inventor
Raymund Eisele
Original Assignee
Smartdisk Corporation
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Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US18435098A priority Critical
Priority to US09/184,350 priority
Application filed by Smartdisk Corporation filed Critical Smartdisk Corporation
Publication of WO2000026838A1 publication Critical patent/WO2000026838A1/en
Publication of WO2000026838A9 publication Critical patent/WO2000026838A9/en

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Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06KRECOGNITION OF DATA; PRESENTATION OF DATA; RECORD CARRIERS; HANDLING RECORD CARRIERS
    • G06K7/00Methods or arrangements for sensing record carriers, e.g. for reading patterns
    • G06K7/0013Methods or arrangements for sensing record carriers, e.g. for reading patterns by galvanic contacts, e.g. card connectors for ISO-7816 compliant smart cards or memory cards, e.g. SD card readers
    • G06K7/0056Methods or arrangements for sensing record carriers, e.g. for reading patterns by galvanic contacts, e.g. card connectors for ISO-7816 compliant smart cards or memory cards, e.g. SD card readers housing of the card connector
    • G06K7/006Methods or arrangements for sensing record carriers, e.g. for reading patterns by galvanic contacts, e.g. card connectors for ISO-7816 compliant smart cards or memory cards, e.g. SD card readers housing of the card connector the housing being a portable casing

Abstract

A home point of sale (POS) terminal device provides for enhanced security of electronic commerce transactions.

Description

HOME POINT OF SALE (POS) TERMINAL AND ELECTRONIC COMMERCE METHOD

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application is related to the following application and patent, the subject

matter of both being hereby incorporated by reference:

5 pending application 09/086,677 (Atty Dkt. SMD-0011 ) filed May 29, 1998,

entitled "SMART-CARD AND MEMORY MODULE ADAPTER"; and

U. S. Patent 5,584,043 entitled "APPARATUS HAVING A SMART CARD

ACCOMMODATED BY A DISKETTE FRAME CONTAINING PROCESSOR

MEMORY AND BATTERY POWER FOR INTERFACING WITH A STANDARD

10 DISKETTE DRIVE."

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of The Invention

The present invention relates generally to the field of computer devices, and

if in particular, to a home point of sale (POS) terminal which is operational -to facilitate

electronic commerce in conjunction with a personal computer (PC) over the Internet,

for example.

2. Background Information

o SmartCards and the like are known and have been used for some time in

electronic financial transactions, such as making purchases at store-based point-of-

sale (POS) terminals, or obtaining cash from automatic teller machines (ATM's). To

provide a degree of security, personal identification numbers (PIN's) are generally required to use such SmartCards. The term SmartCard or "smart-card" as used

herein refers to a generally business-card-sized device having a plastic or otherwise

semi-rigid/semi-flexible carrier substrate with data storage capability, and which may

have processing electronics disposed thereon, such as an ATM card, a patient

information card, an electronic cash card, a bank debit card, a FlashPROM card, a

credit card, or the like. Sometimes the storage capabilities of such cards are limited

to a magnetic strip, while other cards may have several megabytes of electronic

memory storage. Such cards are sometimes referred to generically as transaction

cards herein. There are also a number of known card communication standards and

interfaces to which many cards and associated reading/writing devices adhere.

Some cards use electrical contacts while others use magnetic or electrostatic means

of communication with associated reading/writing devices. Suffice it to say that

there are a variety of cards and devices for reading and/or writing data thereon in

usage today.

The variety of transaction cards and associated read/write devices is

exemplified by the following publications, the subject matter of which is hereby

incorporated by reference. Ishii et al. (5,541 ,985) disclose a portable electronic

device having an external input/output unit and power source integral therewith. An

IC card is read from and/or written to with the device which is provided with a control

terminal through which power can be turned on/off based on a signal from a portable

phone unit. Marceau et al. (5,491 ,326) disclose a vend card transaction terminal

and an associated computer device for implementing inventory and accounting

functions. Roberts et al. (5,438,184) disclose a paystation device adapted to be coupled to a transaction terminal (POS) for carrying out a transaction between a

seller and a buyer using a smart card having a cash token value stored therein.

Takahashi (5,406,604) discloses an IC card and a portable terminal. Oogita

(5,227,615) disclose a portable terminal device having a first interface for a first

information exchanging card and a second interface for a second information

exchanging card. Johnson et al. (5,149,945) disclose a method a coupler for

interfacing a portable data carrier with a host processor, such as a personal

computer or point of sale device. Hoppe (5,068,894) discloses a method of

generating a unique number for a smart card and its use for the cooperation of the

card with a host system. Masuzawa et al. (5,015,830) disclose an electronic card

reading device. Hirokawa (4,672,182) disclose a memory card. Dreifus (4,575,621 )

discloses a portable electronic transaction device and terminal therefore. DE

35281 99 discloses a check card system. Oki Electric Industry Co., Ltd. ("OAP

Releases Valu-Checker PLUS™ ") announces a personal smart card reader with

optional PC Connect adapter to connect to a personal computer through a serial

port.

Recently, information exchange and commerce using personal computers ,

has become increasingly popular, in particular, over the Internet connecting through

a network of other computers to a business' World Wide Web (WWW) site. As

generally understood by those skilled in the art, the Internet is a global network

connecting millions of computers. An internet (lowercase "i") is a network of

computers, usually a collection of networks interconnected with routing computers.

The Interne: (uppercase "I") is the largest internet in the world. It has a three-level hierarchy composed of backbone networks, mid-level networks, and stub networks.

The Internet is a multi-protocol internet using packet-switching between host

computers/nodes. Computers on the Internet have an Internet address that uniquely

identifies them. The World Wide Web (WWW) is a system of Internet servers that

support specially formatted documents, i.e., formatted in a language called

HyperTex Markup Language (HTML), that supports links to other documents, as

well as graphics, audio and video files. There are several application programs

called Web browsers which facilitate access to the WWW, e.g. , Netscape Navigator

and Microsoft's Internet Explorer.

Unfortunately, computer viruses and so-called "Trojan horse" programs can

be spread easily and rapidly through this relatively new communications medium,

and this presents significant security problems for internet commerce. A computer

virus is a program which hides inside another computer program and waits for an

opportunity to carry-out its nefarious mission. In general, a Trojan horse program is

a program that carries within itself a means to allow the creator of the program

access to the system using it. Such a program could, for example, watch for secret

information, such as a PIN number entered on a keyboard during an internet credit-

card transaction, capture it, and e-mail it to the program's originator for misuse.

Further, when one communicates with a business' Web site, referred to

herein as a "virtual shop" on the Internet, there is the question: Is the dealer with

which one is communicating really the one which is shown on the personal

computer's (PC) display, or an imposter? To be sure of communicating with the

correct dealer, encryption and decryption technology has been used to provide a digital signature of the dealer with a certificate of authenticity from a Certificate

Authority. However, a rogue computer program running on the personal computer

could deceive a user. In addition, if a users wants to sign a message, there is the

question of whether the message being signed is really the message being

displayed on the personal computer screen. Again, a rogue program on the

personal computer could deceive the user.

Therefore, a need exists for a solution to the security risks and problems

caused by rogue programs, such as viruses and Trojan horse programs, in

electronic internet commerce.

There is known a so-called "smart-diskette," which is a device having the

external shape of a diskette, for example, a standard 3-1/2 inch diskette, and which

contains therein, instead of and/or in addition to a magnetic medium (magnetic disk),

interface and processing circuitry for providing particular functionality to the device.

The circuitry includes an interface for transferring data between other components

provided on the device and/or inserted into the device, and a magnetic head of a

standard floppy disk drive into which the device can be inserted.

In various forms, the smart-diskette device may include a microprocessor for

controlling the device and performing various tasks, such as data encryption and/or

compression. On-board memory may be provided as well in the form of, for

example, dynamic RAM (random access memory), ROM (read only memory),

EEPROM (electronically erasable/programmable read only memory), and/or Flash

memory, for storing programs and/or data. The device circuitry may be provided in the form of discrete components or,

advantageously, as a single integrated circuit (IC), in particular, as an application

specific integrated circuit (ASIC).

U. S. Patent No. 5,159,182, and copending application S. N. 08/420,796 (Atty

Docket No. LWBR 0006C1 ) hereby incorporated by reference, disclose

embodiments of a smart-diskette insertable element with magnetic interface,

processor, power supply and optional display and keypad, designed to be inserted

into a standard 3-1/2 inch floppy disk drive of a host computer, i.e., electronic data

processing (EDP) equipment, such as a desk-top personal computer (PC) or

notebook computer, for example.

An exemplary embodiment of the smart-diskette insertable element disclosed

in the above-mentioned patent and application, has a processor with some built-in

program/data memory, additional memory for storing data and/or programs, and an

interface designed to facilitate the exchange of data between the device and a

floppy disk drive read/write head. A driver and coil of the interface convert signals

from the processor into the required magnetic form and provide them to the

read/write head of a floppy disk drive, and likewise convert signals received from the

floppy disk drive read/write head into the required form for use by the processor.

An advantage of the smart-diskette insertable element is that, by virtue of its

insertability into the standard and ubiquitous (Bill: i.e., universal, omnipresent,

prevalent, extremely common, pervasive, found everywhere, proliferated) floppy disk

drive of a personal computer, and its interfaceability therewith, it is possible to carry-

out a wide variety of operations with the processor and/or memory on the element, and interactively with the personal computer. These include but are not limited to

encryption and decryption of data and/or verification of user identity. Such

operations are accomplished without requiring any specially designed interface or

plug-in boards which might be suitable only for use with a limited number of

computer systems.

Another advantageous feature of the smart-diskette insertable element is its

ability to store additional data and/or programs in on-board and/or add-on memory

connected with the on-board processor. This considerably increases the potential

areas of application for the element.

The smart-diskette element disclosed in the above patent and application

may be equipped with a battery power source supplying power to the electronic

components within the element, and/or a generator/alternator, with associated

regulator circuitry, driven by the rotation of a floppy disk drive spindle.

As mentioned, the interface of the smart-diskette insertable element is

designed to allow data to be exchanged with the read/write head of a floppy disk

drive. One way this can be achieved is by locating an electromagnetic component

on the element, e.g., one or more coils, to be in the vicinity of the read/write head of

the floppy disk drive when the element is inserted into the drive, and which

generates magnetic field information functionally the same as that generated by a

magnetic disk of a standard floppy diskette. In this way, the interface simulates a

magnetic floppy diskette. This property of the interface allows data to be transferred

under control of the on-board processor to the EDP equipment (e.g., a personal

computer), such as data which enables user identification to be verified, thereby providing security to the EDP equipment, or any of a number of other operations, as

would be recognized by one skilled in the art.

As processor capabilities expand and memory devices with increasing

capacity become smaller, the smart-diskette device takes on the potential for more

and more useful and varied applications.

Related U. S. Patent 5,471 ,038, hereby incorporated by reference, discloses

a special read/write unit with a read/write head and optional electrical contacts, but

without the standard disk driving and head moving parts, for use in a desk-top PC or

notebook computer to communicate with a smart-diskette. By eliminating the drive

motor and moving read/write heads, a significant amount of energy which would

otherwise be expended by the use of such moving parts is conserved.

Further, such a read/write unit, since it eliminates bulky drive and head

motors, can be made more compact than a standard floppy disk drive, thereby

reducing the overall size and weight requirements for the computer in which it is

installed.

Related copending application 08/514,382, hereby incorporated by reference,

discloses a pocket interface unit (PIU) for use with a smart-diskette. Pocket

calculators and diary devices are known and have gained acceptance with busy

executives, for example. However, such devices have numerous limitations and

disadvantages. For example, although such devices can interface with a desk-top

computer to download application programs and/or data, for example, or to upload

data entered on the pocket device to the desk-top computer, to do so currently

requires inconvenient cabling, and/or a special interface unit, e.g., PCMCIA, with associated costs. Some devices use infra-red beams to communicate between the

device and the PC, but these are subject to atmospheric and distance limitations, or

may be subject to errors due to dust or dirt on a lens, for example.

In addition, such pocket devices are generally limited to a single special

application, such as a phone directory, or a golf-handicap calculator, and do not

generally provide the range of capabilities of a notebook computer, for example.

Pocket-sized pagers and cellular telephones are also known. However, these

respective devices do not generally have the capability of functioning as anything

except a pager or telephone, that is, they are generally devices which are dedicated

to a single function. Therefore, the fully-equipped, fully-functional executive may be

burdened by having to carry around a variety of separate devices, which further

disadvantageously cannot readily interface with one another.

The PIU, disclosed in the copendiπg application, for use with a smart-diskette,

overcomes these and other problems, and provides other advantages over existing

technology.

Related U. S. Patent 5,584,043, incorporated by reference, discloses a smart-

diskette adapted to receive at least one memory and/or processor card, generically

referred to herein as a "smart-card," such as an ATM, patient information, electronic

cash card, bank debit card, FlashPROM card, credit card, or the like. For example,

Figure 5a of that patent illustrates an embodiment adapted for receiving at least one

mini-chip card. This patented device can be used with the recently developed MMC

(MultiMediaCard made by Siemens/SanDisk), or the SSFDC also called a

SmartMediaCard (SMC, made by Toshiba). These compact memory cards are referred to generically herein as "memory modules" because of their modular

configuration.

The so-called MultiMediaCards (MMC's) provide small, transportable

audio/video media storage in the form of a modular card substrate carrying a

memory, and an optional processor in some cases, which can be inserted into a -

number of different media recording/playback devices specifically adapted to receive

the MMC's. The MMC memory currently can store, for example, about 16

megabytes of digitized video and/or audio signals, however memory capacities are

growing almost daily. Typically, contacts on the MMC are be used to connect and

transfer the digitized video/audio to a media recorder or playback device.

Although MMC's and the like are a remarkable technological development,

until the advent of the smart-diskette embodiment disclosed in the above mentioned

patent, which is adapted to receive at least one modular memory card, such as an

MMC, a special add-on device would have been required to load data onto an MMC

from a personal computer or vice versa. The smart-diskette provides a convenient

low-cost alternative to the special add-on device.

A variety of Flash memory devices (e.g., FlashPROM's) have also become

known and are more and more widely used, for example, in digital cameras. The

above-mentioned SMC's and other memory modules may use Flash memory or any

other type of non-volatile memory available.

Further, to use the MMC's as proposed for storing and playing back high-

fidelity musical compositions, a user would need an entirely new recording/playback

device designed with a port for interconnecting with the MMC's to make use of them in their home. In other words, the existing conventional user playback/recording

equipment, such as an audio cassette player, does not generally interface with the

newly developed MMC's. Therefore, a need existed for an adapter device which

could permit use of the new MMC's with the existing conventional electronic

equipment, such as home/auto recording/playback equipment. Copending

application 09/013,036 (Atty Dkt. SMD-0008), hereby incorporated by reference,

meets this need and discloses an adapter for use in adapting a conventional

cassette tape playback/recording device with a plurality of Flash memory devices,

MMC's, or the like, which store digitized audio, for example. The adapter provides a

way of adapting one or more MMC's to conventional recording playback devices,

such as a conventional audio or video cassette player. The adapter inserted into a

conventional tape device interfaces the tape device with one or more removable

storage circuits (e.g., MMC's) which store digital audio and/or video data. By

accommodating a number of MMC's at once, a user can advantageously record

and/or playback an extended audio or visual work with the adapter.

Of course, MMC's, Flash-memory devices, and the like, can be put to other

uses besides storing audio and/or video/image data for use in a home or automobile

system. They can be used to store any type of digital data imaginable. The

inventive adapter disclosed in the copending application is in the form of a tape

cassette, i.e., audio, video, or digital (e.g., DAT). While digital tape drives are

available as relatively expensive add-on devices for personal computers, these tape

drives are not in as widespread use as the floppy disk drives which are provided with

practically every personal computer as a standard feature. To take further advantage of some of the other possibilities of MMC's, Flash-

memory devices, and the like, and to overcome problems in the art, an improved

adapter element in the shape of a diskette for insertion into a floppy disk drive, which

is designed to receive a plurality of memory modules or cards therein, was

developed and is disclosed in copending application 09/021 ,986 (Atty Dkt. SMD- .

0010), hereby incorporated by reference.

According to an aspect of that disclosed adapter device, up to 5 MMCs can

be inserted at once into respective sockets. Two modules are insertable (which also

means removable) at the left edge of the adapter, two at the right of the adapter, and

one at the rear (outer) edge of the adapter. The adapter with one or more memory

modules is insertable into a floppy disk drive front edge (inner edge) first. Further,

the adapter provides for playback of music and/or image data, for example, from one

or more memory modules, via the floppy disk drive of a personal computer. Music

and/or image data, for example, can be recorded on one or more memory modules

via the personal computer floppy disk drive.

Further, the inventor realized that there may be times when it would be

advantageous to have a single adapter which could accommodate both a smart-card

and at least one memory module simultaneously. For example, should a personal

computer user wish to purchase a music selection or picture image, for example,

over the Internet using their bankcard (smart-card) for payment, they could do so

with a smart-diskette adapter described above which interfaces their personal

computer with their bankcard. If the user wanted to download the music or image

purchased into a memory module, they could do so with another different smart- diskette adapter, described above, which interfaces their personal computer with an

MMC through the floppy drive.

Related co-pending application 09/086,677 (Attorney Docket SMD-001 1 ),

provides a method and apparatus for an adapter which can accommodate both a

smart-card and at least one memory module at the same time, and thereby provide

the functionality of two different adapters in one, as well as a synergistic

enhancement of functionality, thereby providing advantages over the prior adapters.

This adapter includes a frame having the shape of a diskette, the frame having at

least one first recess for receiving an insertable memory module, and a second

recess for receiving an insertable smart-card, the frame having therein interface

circuitry providing an interface with a read/write head of a floppy disk drive, the

memory module, and the smart-card, when inserted in the respective recesses. The

frame has the shape and size of a 3-1/2 inch floppy diskette. The at least one first

recess is adapted to receive at least one of a plurality of standard memory modules,

the plurality of standard memory modules including multi-media cards (e.g., MMC's),

and smart media cards (e.g., SMC's or SSFDC's). The interface circuitry includes

respective contacts disposed in respective ones of the first and second recesses

which couple with corresponding respective contacts on a respective memory

module and smart-card when inserted in the respective recesses; a magnetic

interface which is adapted to magnetically couple with a read/write head of a floppy

disk drive when the adapter is inserted in the floppy disk drive, and a processor,

coupled to the contacts, which is operable to receive and transmit signals to and from the respective memory module and smart-card through the respective contacts,

and to receive and transmit signals to and from the magnetic interface.

That adapter further includes a memory connected to the processor which

stores data and/or programs used by the processor, and the magnetic interface

includes a magnetic transducer which is operable to send and receive magnetic .

signals to and from a floppy disk drive read/write head, and a driver/converter

connected to the transducer and the processor which is operable to convert signals

from the transducer to a form useful to the processor, convert signals from the

processor to a form used by a floppy disk drive, and to drive the transducer with the

converted signals from the processor. At least one battery is provided on the

adapter which is connected to provide power to the interface circuitry, at least one

memory module, and at least one smart-card. The memory for the processor stores

programming enabling the processor to perform at least one of encryption of data,

decryption of data, compression of data, and decompression of data. The processor

includes programming to perform interactive password checking to verify authorized

use of the adapter and/or the at least one memory module and/or the at least one

smart-card.

According to that application (09/086,677, Attorney Docket SMD-001 1 ), a

method of purchasing data, making payment with a smart-card and storing the data

to a memory module, via a terminal having a direct access storage device, e.g., a

floppy disk drive, includes utilizing the adapter according to the invention having the

smart-card and the memory module inserted therein. The terminal is a personal

computer which is connected to the Internet for receiving the data therefrom and making the payment thereto. Electronically purchasing data is facilitated using the

disclosed adapter device which is insertable into a terminal direct access storage

device, and which accommodates an electronically readable card and at least one

memory module therein. In an exemplary method, an electronically readable card

and at least one memory module are inserted in the adapter, and the adapter is

inserted into a terminal direct access storage device. Upon selecting with the

terminal data to purchase having an associated purchase price, a payment amount

corresponding to the purchase price is debited from the electronically readable card,

and the data to be purchased is stored in the memory module. The terminal device

comprises a personal computer, and the method further includes establishing a

communications path between the personal computer and a remote location where

the data to be purchased is pre-stored. An anti-piracy mechanism to prevent piracy

of copyrighted material is included. Encryption, decryption, compression or

decompression on the data to be purchased can be performed before storing the

data to the memory module. User identification and user authentication prior to

debiting a payment amount from the electronically readable card are provided for as

well. The electronically readable card may be an electronic cash card having stored

thereon an electronic representation of a cash value, and the debiting includes

electronically reducing the stored cash value by the payment amount. The

electronically readable card may be a credit card, and the debiting including

communicating with the credit card issuer to establish a credit card purchase.

That application (09/086,677, Attorney Docket SMD-001 1 ) further discloses a

method of access security using an adapter device which is insertable into a terminal direct access storage device, and which accommodates an electronically readable

card and at least one memory module therein, including pre-storing first user data in

a memory module, pre-storing second user data in an electronically readable card,

inserting the memory module and the electronically readable card into the adapter,

inserting the adapter into a terminal direct access storage device, verifying the user

data pre-stored in the memory module and the electronically readable card, and

permitting or denying access to the terminal device based on a result of the

verifying. The permitting access includes permitting an access level corresponding

to the user data.

However, the inventor has recognized that, because of the Trojan Horse type

of security issues, for example, a need exists for further improvements in this field to

overcome a number of issues related to secure use of SmartCards, especially in

internet commerce applications. Some applications require that the SmartCard PIN

be entered before communicating with the SmartCard chip. If the PIN is entered via

the personal computer's keyboard, then there is the possibility that a Trojan horse

program with a keyboard grabber could read the secret PIN.

In order to overcome the problems of ensuring against unauthorized

discovery of and misuse of PIN's, as well as other security access information

related issues, the present invention provides novel solutions in the form of a Home

POS Terminal for smart card use and electronic commerce methods, exemplary

embodiments of which are described in detail below. SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

It is, therefore, a principle object of this invention to provide a secure method

of electronic commerce and an apparatus for implementing a Home POS Terminal.

It is another object of the invention to provide a method and apparatus that

solves the above mentioned problems so that electronic commerce can be

conducted in a more secure fashion.

These and other objects of the present invention are accomplished by the

method and apparatus disclosed herein.

The present invention provides an enhancement of the functionality as is

described in the related SmartDiskette patent 5,584,043, and in copending

application 09/086,677 (SMD 001 1 ). In addition, the present invention provides

advantageous new functions, as will be described below.

As mentioned above, some applications require that a user's SmartCard PIN

be entered before permitting communication with the SmartCard chip. However, as

mentioned earlier, if the PIN is entered via a personal computer (PC) keyboard, then

there is the possibility that a Trojan horse program with a keyboard grabber will read

the secret PIN. Therefore, according to an aspect of the invention, it is proposed to

provide for the entering of the PIN at the Key Pad of a Home POS Terminal

connected to the personal computer, and showing the result of PIN verification at the

display of the Home POS Terminal.

According to another aspect of the invention, as mentioned above, when

communicating with a virtual shop on the Internet, there is the question of whether

the dealer or business with which one is communicating is really the dealer or business which is shown on the PC's display, or an imposter. To be sure of

communicating with the correct dealer or business, one requests a digital signature

of the dealer with a certificate of authenticity from a Certificate Authority. According

to an aspect of the invention, the certificate and dealer signature are advantageously

decrypted in a digital signature processor provided in the Home POS Terminal, and "

the dealer's real identity is shown on the Home POS Terminal display.

According to another aspect of the invention, when one wants debit a certain

amount from, e.g., a stored value on a SmartCard, there is the question of whether

the debit amount which is shown on the PC's display is really the amount which will

be debited from the SmartCard. According to the invention, the amount that will

actually be debited from the SmartCard is displayed on the Home POS Terminal

display. The user is able to confirm the amount to be debited, with an "OK." Key on

the Home POS Terminal, for example, or to reject the amount, with a not OK key, for

example.

According to another aspect of the invention, when a user wants to sign a

message to be sent, there is again the question of whether the message shown on

the personal computer display is really the one which will be signed, in the

SmartCard processor or in the digital signature processor, for example. Therefore,

according to an aspect of the invention, the message which will actually be signed

will advantageously be displayed on the display of the Home POS Terminal. If it is a

long message, for example, which cannot be shown in full on the display of the

Home POS Terminal, the user can use page-up/page-down keys advantageously provided thereon. To confirm the message, the user hits an "OK" key and can

thereby be sure that "what you see is what you sign" (wysiwys).

Advantageously, protected functions of the Home POS Terminal, such as

communication with the Home POS Terminal display and keypad can be "hard

coded" in a display driver and key pad driver, respectively. Other functions, such as

for an interface driver, can be down-loaded from the personal computer to the Home

POS Terminal.

Advantageously, according to another aspect of the invention, there are

provided multiple interfaces to connect a Home POS Terminal to a personal

computer (PC). Such interfaces may include parallel and serial interfaces, PCMCIA,

USB, mouse and keyboard interfaces.

Connector cables with Υ" plugs, for example for the mouse or keyboard of

the personal computer, can be used if there are no other connections available.

According to an aspect of the invention, a modified keyboard or mouse driver is

installed. Usually, such drivers provide for communication between the personal

computer and the keyboard or the mouse. However, with the modified drivers, when

there is a message to the Home POS Terminal, then according to the invention,

communication will be temporarily switched to be set up through the "Y" plug to the

Home POS Terminal.

These and other objects of the present invention are accomplished by the

method and apparatus disclosed herein. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The above and other features and advantages of the invention will become

apparent from the following detailed description taken with the drawings in which:

Fig. 1 illustrates a Home POS Terminal according to an exemplary

embodiment of the invention.

Fig. 2 illustrates the Home POS Terminal according to Fig. 1 , as seen

from the back.

Fig. 3 illustrates a SmartDisk (SmartDiskette) with insertable

SmartCard and MemoryCard.

Fig. 4 shows an alternative embodiment of the Home POS Terminal

with connection to the SmartDisk of Fig. 3.

Fig. 5 is a block diagram of the functional component provided in a

Home POS Terminal according to an exemplary embodiment of the invention.

Figs. 6a, 6b, and 6c depict a flow chart illustrating the operation of an

exemplary embodiment of a Home POS Terminal according to the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT(S)

The invention will now be described in more detail by example with reference

to the embodiment(s) shown in the Figures. It should be kept in mind that the

following described embodiment(s) is only presented by way of example and should

not be construed as limiting the inventive concept to any particular physical

configuration. Referring to Fig. 1 , shown is a Home POS Terminal according to an

exemplary embodiment of the invention. The housing 1 of the Home POS Terminal

is shown having a generally rectangular shape, however, the invention is not limited

to a rectangular housing but can be any shape able to accommodate the constituent

components. Mounted at an upper surface of the housing 1 for easy observation is

a display 2 which may be any suitable type, for example, a liquid crystal display

(LCD) or a plasma-type display, having one or several columns and rows of isplay

elements for displaying alpha-numeric characters, and symbols, or the like. A group

of numerical keys 3 is also provided on the upper surface of the housing as shown.

Numerical keys 3 include the numbers 0 through 9 as is apparent. Additional keys

may also be provided, in particular, page-up and page-down keys 4, an "OK" key 5,

and a not OK "NK" key 6, in order to facilitate easy operation of the terminal.

As will be described in more detail later, the page-down and page-up keys 4

are useful for reading messages to be signed, for example, which have more

characters than can be displayed at one time on display 2. The functions of the OK

key 5 and the NK (not ok) key 6 are to indicate acceptance (OK) or non-acceptance

(NK) of a displayed message/operation/quantity, such as a debit amount, for

example, during operation.

A slot 7 for a smart-card is provided on a side of the housing as illustrated, for

example, or in any other convenient location, and, of course, a smart-card socket or

other means (not shown) is disposed within the slot 7 for establishing a

communication path between internal circuitry of the Home POS Terminal and a

smart-card when inserted therein. While such a means would typically be a number of mechanical contacts which mate with corresponding contacts on a smart-card to

establish an electrical coupling, other types of coupling are possible, e.g., optical,

electro-static, or magnetic-based coupling. For the purposes of this disclosure,

mechanical contacts are illustrated, but the invention is not limited to such a

configuration, and any number of equivalent structures/means for establishing a

communication path between the terminal and an inserted card are possible within

the spirit and scope of the invention, as would be apparent to one skilled in the art.

Similarly, a slot 8 for a memory card is also provided disposed, for example,

on the same side of the housing as the smart-card slot 7, and having a memory card

socket or other means (not shown) disposed within the slot 8 for establishing a

communication path between internal circuitry of the Home POS Terminal and a

memory-card 11 when inserted therein. As with a smart-card mentioned above, a

memory-card could be coupled in any number of ways within the scope and spirit of

the invention.

A power on/off switch 9 is shown on a front face of the housing 1 of the Home

POS Terminal. Power for the Home POS Terminal could be derived from internal

batteries, or from an external power supply, for example. As can be imagined,

photo-voltaic cells (not shown) could be provided on the top surface of the housing

for charging internal batteries, as are often used with pocket calculators, and other

compact electronic devices, for example.

At the right-side of Fig. 1 , adjacent to the smart-card slot 7, is shown a

representation of a typical smart-card 10. Adjacent to memory-card slot 8 is shown

a representation of a typical memory card 1 1 . The smart-card 10 is shown having smart-card contacts 12, while the memory-card 1 1 is shown having memory-card

contacts 13, as examples of ways to establish communication with the terminal. The

smart-card 10 and memory-card 1 1 are shown in schematic form and, as is known in

the art, may have any number of shapes and sizes or configurations. A number of

these have become "standard" as would be appreciated by one skilled in the art.,

and the Home POS Terminal would be designed and built to accommodate one or

more of these "standard" configurations.

Fig. 2 is a drawing of an exemplary embodiment of a Home POS Terminal,

such as is shown in Fig. 1 , as seen from the back. The Home POS Terminal

housing 1 is advantageously provided with a number of different interface

connectors, examples of which include a connector 14 for a USB (Universal Serial

Bus) interface, a connector 15 for a Serial Port (e.g., RS-232), a connector 16 for a

Parallel Bus Port (e.g., PCI), a connector 17 for a Mouse Port with a "Y" plug cable

to connect to a Mouse cable of a personal computer (not shown), reference numeral

18 being the Y-connector portion leading to the Mouse 19, a connector 20 for a

Keyboard 22 of a personal computer with a "Y" plug cable to connect to a Keyboard

cable, reference numeral 21 representing the Y-connector portion leading to the

Keyboard 22, and a connector 23 for a PCMCIA card. The Mouse Port "Y" plug

cable, and likewise the Keyboard "Y" plug cable, would be configured to be

switchable, under control of modified drivers, between communication with the

mouse (Keyboard) and with the Home POS Terminal, as is within the skill of one

well-versed in the art. A connection for an optional battery Power Charger 24 is also

conveniently provided for at the back of the housing 1 , for charging a Battery 25 which powers the circuitry (described later) in the Home POS Terminal housing 1 .

Of course, other types of power supply configurations are possible, as would be

apparent to one skilled in the art.

A connection line (37) leading to a SmartDiskette 26 (also referred to as a

SmartDisk herein), such as has been described in the Background section above, is

also shown in Fig. 2 and will be described in more detail with reference to Figs. 3

and 4. In particular, Fig. 3: illustrates a representative SmartDiskette 26 which can

accommodate an insertable SmartCard 10 and/or MemoryCard 1 1 , and Fig. 4 shows

the Home POS Terminal connected thereto. In this alternative embodiment of the

terminal, slots for the SmartCard 10 and MemoryCard 1 1 are provided in the

SmartDisk 26 rather than, or in addition to, being provided in the terminal housing 1 .

As should be apparent, the SmartDisk 26 might be configured differently such that it

only accommodates the SmartCard 10, or a MemoryCard (or MemoryCards) 1 1.

The SmartCard 10 and the MemoryCard 1 1 shown in Fig. 3 have SmartCard

contacts 12 and MemoryCard contacts 13 respectively, which mate with

corresponding contact sockets 27 and 36 in the SmartDisk 26. A SmartCard recess

28 is provided for aiding insertion and removal of the SmartCard 10. A MemoryCard

recess 30 is likewise provided for aiding insertion and removal of the MemoryCard

1 1 . The SmartDisk 26 has a spindle recess 29 for accommodating a disk drive

spindle when the SmartDisk 26 is itself inserted into such a drive. Likewise provided

is a slot 31 for the read/write head of such a drive. The SmartDisk 26 may have an

cptional battery 32 and a power on/off switch 33 which is designed to turn on power to the SmartDisk circuitry when it is inserted into a disk drive, and turn off power

when it is removed from the disk drive.

A transducer 34 is shown adjacent to the slot 31 for receiving and sending

magnetic signals with the head of a disk drive. A "MaglC" (Magnetic Interface Chip)

35 is likewise provided which is, for example, an Application Specific Interface Chip

(ASIC) custom designed to provide the SmartDisk interface functions. Such a

SmartDisk 26 is the subject of the related copending applications mentioned and

incorporated herein, and a detailed description thereof is not necessary here for a

complete understanding of the invention.

Fig. 4. Shows an embodiment of the Home POS Terminal with a connection

37 to the SmartDisk 26 of Fig. 3. In this illustrated embodiment of the Home POS

Terminal, the SmartCard and MemoryCard interfaces are not provided in the

terminal housing 1 , but are provided instead in the SmartDisk 26. The connector

cable 37 between Home POS Terminal housing 1 and the SmartDisk 26 may

contain, for example, connections to the socket 27 for the SmartCard contacts 12,

the MaglC (Magnetic Interface Chip) 35, the socket 36 for the MemoryCard contacts

13, and the power on/off switch 33. However, instead of a cable 37, the connection

could also be established via free-space transmission of information encoded

infrared light or radio frequency waves (e.g., microwaves), for example, as indicated

by lines 371 . Of course in that case, the Home POS Terminal housing 1 and the

SmartDisk 26 would be provided with respective free-space transceiver circuitry, as

would be apparent to one skilled in the art. Fig. 5 illustrates a block diagram of exemplary components which would be

disposed inside the housing 1 of a Home POS Terminal made according to an

embodiment of the invention. This figure also shows schematically the functional

connections between the different components. Some of the components illustrated

5 here have already been described in detail with respect to the previous figures, and

may only briefly be mentioned again. An interface driver 39 is provided which drives

the USB 14, the parallel port 16, the serial port 15, the PCMCIA interface 23, the

SmartCard socket 27, the MemoryCard (MC) socket 36, the Keyboard port 20, the

MaglC interface 35, and the mouse port 17, as illustrated by the lines connecting

io these to the interface driver 39. Of course, the block labeled interface driver 39

could be implemented by a single special purpose integrated circuit, a number of

integrated circuits, or a combination of discrete interface logic circuits, for example.

It should be apparent that the interface driver block 39 could alternatively represent

a program module of a microprocessor or microcontroller, for example.

i-ς A display driver 40 for display 2, and a keypad driver for the keypad keys 3, 4,

5, 6, are likewise provided, and may be implemented in any of the above described

ways. The Interface driver 39, the display driver 40 and the keypad driver 41

provide a connection to the main processor 38, which controls the overall operation

of the Home POS Terminal. Power is provided by battery 25, for example, and the

0 SmartDisk switch 33 (see Fig. 3) may be bypassed to provide power to a SmartDisk

26 as indicated by "(33)" at the line between the battery 25 and the processor 38.

As described, the switch 33 is configured to power the SmartDisk when it is inserted in a ubiquitous floppy drive, so in the Fig. 3/4 embodiment, it is bypassed by the

signal/connection (33) of Fig. 5.

Associated data and/or program storage 43 is provided in the form of

RAM/ROM or other memory, coupled to the processor 38. A digital signature

processor 42 is also provided for processing digital signatures, as is understood in

the art. Key storage 44 is associated with the digital signature processor 42, as

shown. The digital signature processor 42 operates to process digital signatures

and certificates in order to verify the authenticity and origination of messages, for

example, displaying the result on display 2 by way of the processor 38 and the

display driver 40. As is known in the art, digital signal processors (DSP's), for

example, are used for the function of digital signature processing. As mentioned

earlier, display and key pad drivers (40, 41 ) may be advantageously hard-coded in

the terminal to prevent their compromise by nefarious programs.

Figs. 6a, 6b, and 6c illustrate a Flow Chart of the operation of an exemplary

embodiment of the invention. In particular, the flow chart shows the functional flow

involved in reading a customer PIN from PIN Pad 3, PIN verification in SmartCard

10, and display of the result on display 2.

In more detail with reference to Fig. 6a, the routine starts with power on 601 .

At this point 602, the SmartCard (SC) is reset and the ATR (Answer To Reset) is

obtained. Next at block 603, the ATR is then checked for protocol, and the protocol

information is stored. Flow then proceeds to the decision point 604 where it is

determined whether a PIN is required. If the answer is YES, flow proceeds to block

605, where the PIN is requested and read into the terminal. Next, at block 606, the PIN is sent to the SmartCard (SC) and a response is read. If the response indicates

that the PIN is correct (OK) at decision point 607, then flow proceeds to block 608 to

display a PIN "OK" message, after which flow goes to entry point "1 ". If at decision

point 607 it is determined that the PIN is not OK, then flow proceeds to block 609 to

display a PIN wrong message, after which flow goes to entry point "3" to ask for the

PIN again (605). Of course, although not shown, after a certain number of wrong

PIN entries, the device could stop and execute additional security routines under the

assumption that a security breach is being attempted.

If no PIN is required at decision point 604, or after the PIN has been correctly

entered and flow has gone to entry point "1 ", then the routine proceeds to block 610

to wait for messages from the personal computer (PC) application and test for a

reset message at 61 1 . If no reset message is detected at 61 1 , flow proceeds to

entry point "2" in Fig. 6b. However, if a reset message is detected at 61 1 , flow

proceeds to block 612 where the SmartCard (SC) is reset, and the ATR is obtained

and sent to the PC application, after which flow returns to entry point "1 ".

Shown in Fig. 6b is the flow of operation if the received message is not a

reset, i.e., it is a digital signature of a dealer for example. That is, flow has

proceeded from decision point 61 1 in Fig. 6a to entry point "2". Decision point 613

tests for a dealer's signature at 613, and proceeds to 614 if it has determined there

is a dealer's signature. In block 614 the certificate will be decrypted (i.e., in Digital

Signature Processor 42) to receive the dealer's public key which is then used to

decrypt the dealer's signature, and then in block 615, the result (dealer's name) is

displayed on display 2, and a user response is awaited, i.e., either an "OK" or a not OK "NK", as tested at decision point 616. If not OK (NK) then flow returns to entry

point "1 " in Fig. 6a.

If the result of test 616 is an "OK" response, then flow proceeds to block 617

to store the "dealer OK" result, after which flow returns to entry point "1 ". The user

response of OK or not OK (NK) is conveniently entered with the OK key 5 and the •

NK key 6, as previously described with respect to Fig. 1.

Continuing in Fig. 6b, if the decision at 613 determines the message is not a

dealer's signature, then the message is tested at 618 to see if the received message

is a debit message, and if not (no) then flow proceeds to other processing at 619

and entry point "4" leading to Fig. 6c. However, if the test at 618 determines that the

message is a debit message (yes), then flow proceeds to block 620 where the

amount to be debited from the SmartCard is shown on the terminal display 2, and a

user response is awaited, i.e., an OK/NK key press as tested at 621. If the user

presses the NK key indicating the debit amount is not correct, then a response is

sent to the PC at block 622, and flow returns to entry point "1 ". However, if the user

response is "OK", then flow proceeds to block 623 where the debit message is sent

to the SmartCard so that the displayed debit amount will be debited from the

SmartCard. A response from the SmartCard is awaited, after which the response

from the SmartCard is sent to the PC at block 624, and flow proceeds back to entry

point "1 ".

If the message was not a dealer signature or a debit message, as determined

in tests 613 and 618 in Fig. 6b, then flow has proceeded to entry point "4" in Fig. 6c.

In this figure, a test is made to determine if the message is a message to be signed at block 625, and if not, flow proceeds to entry point "1 " in Fig. 6a. However, if the

message is to be signed, then flow proceeds to block 626 where the message is

displayed on the terminal display and a response from the user is awaited. The

response is tested at 627, and if it is a not OK, then flow proceeds to block 628 to

send the response to the personal computer and return to entry point "1 " in Fig. 6a.

However, if the response is OK, the flow proceeds to block 629 to sign the message

and have it sent to the personal computer. Afterwards, flow returns to entry point "1 "

in Fig. 6a. During the time the message is being displayed, the user can operate

page-up and page-down keys where the message is larger than can be displayed at

once on the terminal display, however, the associated process flow has been

omitted from the diagrams for the sake of simplicity.

Flow for a credit operation (not shown), i.e., where an amount is to be added

to a SmartCard, would be substantially similar to flow for a debit from the

SmartCard, the user being shown the amount on the terminal display and a

response awaited before either applying the credit or rejecting it and notifying the

PC.

It will be apparent to one skilled in the art that the manner of making and

using the claimed invention has been adequately disclosed in the above-written

description of the preferred embodimeπt(s) taken together with the drawings.

It will be understood that the above described preferred embodiment(s) of the

present invention are susceptible to various modifications, changes, and

adaptations, and the same are intended to be comprehended within the meaning

and range of equivalents of the appended claims. Further, although a number of equivalent components may have been

mentioned herein which could be used in place of the components illustrated and

described with reference to the preferred embodimeπt(s), this is not meant to be an

exhaustive treatment of all the possible equivalents, nor to limit the invention defined

by the claims to any particular equivalent or combination thereof. A person skilled in

the art would realize that there may be other equivalent components presently

known, or to be developed, which could be used within the spirit and scope of the

invention defined by the claims.

Claims

What is claimed is:
1. A terminal device for use at home in conjunction with a personal
computer to facilitate electronic transactions, comprising:
a housing;
a plurality of user-actuable keys, including numeric keys and at least one
function key, disposed at a surface of the housing;
a display disposed at a surface of the housing;
a first processor disposed in the housing, operatively coupled to the display
and the plurality of keys;
data/program memory disposed in the housing, coupled to the first processor;
at least one interface disposed in the housing, which couples the first
processor to a personal computer and to at least one additional external device, and
which facilitates an exchange of data between the first processor, the personal
computer, and the at least one additional external device; and
a second processor disposed in the housing, the second processor coupled
to the first processor, the second processor performing digital signature processing.
2. The terminal device according to claim 1 , wherein the at least one
interface disposed in the housing, which couples the first processor to at least one
additional external device and facilitates an exchange of data between the first
processor and the at least one additional external device, comprises an electronic
card interface which interfaces the first processor with an electronic card.
3. The terminal device according to claim 1 , wherein the at least one
interface disposed in the housing, which couples the first processor to at least one
additional external device and facilitates an exchange of data between the first
processor and the at least one additional external device, comprises a memory card
interface which interfaces the first processor with a memory card.
4. The terminal device according to claim 1 , wherein the at least one
interface disposed in the housing, which couples the first processor to at least one
additional external device and facilitates an exchange of data between the first
processor and the at least one additional external device, comprises a smart diskette
interface which interfaces the first processor with a smart diskette device.
5. The terminal device according to claim 4, wherein the smart diskette
interface comprises a connector cable.
6. The terminal device according to claim 4, wherein the smart diskette
interface comprises a wireless transceiver.
7. The terminal device according to claim 6, wherein the wireless
transceiver uses electromagnetic waves encoded with information comprising one of:
infra-red light waves; radio frequency waves; or
microwaves.
8. The terminal device according to claim 1 , wherein the at least one
interface disposed in the housing, which couples the first processor to at least one
additional external device and facilitates an exchange of data between the first
processor and the at least one additional external device, comprises:
an electronic card interface which interfaces the first processor with an
electronic card;
a memory card interface which interfaces the first processor with a memory
card; and
a smart diskette interface which interfaces the first processor with a smart
diskette device.
9. The terminal device according to claim 1 , wherein the at least one
interface disposed in the housing, which couples the first processor to the personal
computer and to at least one additional external device and facilitates an exchange of
data between the first processor, the personal computer, and the at least one
additional external device, comprises at least one of:
an electronic card interface;
a memory card interface;
a smart diskette interface; o5
a serial bus interface;
a parallel bus interface;
a keyboard interface;
a magnetic integrated circuit interface;
a mouse device interface;
a USB interface; and
a PCMCIA interface.
10. The terminal device according to claim 1 , further comprising memory
storing key information.
1 1. The terminal device according to claim 1 , wherein the first processor is
operational to perform at least one of the following interactive functions:
personal identification number processing;
crediting cash value to an electronic card; and
debiting cash value from an electronic card;
and wherein the second processor is operational to process certificates of authenticity
and digital signatures.
12. The terminal device according to claim 1 , wherein protected functions
of the terminal device, including communication with the terminal device display and
keypad are hard-coded in a display driver and key pad driver, respectively.
13. A method of electronic commerce using a personal computer
interfaced with a home point of sale terminal device, the method comprising utilizing
the terminal device according to claim 1.
14. A method of electronic commerce using a personal computer
interfaced with a home point of sale terminal device, the method comprising:
establishing a connection between the personal computer and a remote
computer over a communications medium;
receiving with the personal computer from the remote computer transaction
information which may or may not include a digital signature with a certificate of
authenticity;
if the transaction information includes a digital signature with a certificate of
authenticity, then transferring the digital signature and certificate of authenticity to the
home point of sale terminal from the personal computer and decrypting the certificate
of authenticity and digital signature in the home point of sale terminal and displaying
the identity of the originator of the digital signature and certificate of authenticity.
15. The method of claim 14, wherein the communications medium
comprises the Internet, and wherein the remote computer comprises a web site on the
world wide web.
16. The method of claim 14, further comprising:
receiving an OK/not OK input from a user on a keypad of the home point of
sale terminal about the displayed identity of the originator of the digital signature and
certificate of authenticity.
17. The method of claim 14, further comprising:
displaying a message to be signed and sent from the personal computer to a
remote computer on the display of the home point of sale terminal;
receiving an input from a user on a keypad of the home point of sale terminal
about the displayed message;
if the input received is an OK input, then signaling the personal computer with
the home point of sale terminal to effect signing the message and sending the signed
message from the personal computer to the remote computer;
otherwise, if the input received is a not OK input, then signaling the personal
computer with the home point of sale terminal to prevent signing of the message or
sending of the message from the personal computer to the remote computer.
18. The method of claim 14, further comprising:
displaying an amount to be credited to or debited from a transaction card
coupled to the home point of sale terminal, on a display of the home point of sale
terminal;
receiving an input from a user on a keypad of the home point of sale terminal
about the displayed amount; if the input received is an OK input, then crediting or debiting the transaction
card by the displayed amount;
otherwise, if the input received is a not OK input, then signaling the personal
computer with the home point of sale terminal that the amount is not accepted.
19. The method of claim 18, further comprising:
prior to crediting or debiting any amount to or from the transaction card,
checking the transaction card and determining whether or not a personal identification
number is required;
if a personal identification number is required, then receiving the personal
identification number on the keypad of the home point of sale terminal, and checking
the personal identification number for authorization.
20. The terminal device according to claim 1 , further comprising:
at least one connector cable having a "Y" plug, for coupling to the home point
of sale terminal, a mouse or a keyboard of the personal computer, and the personal
computer;
wherein a modified keyboard or mouse driver is provided that is operational to
provide for communication between the personal computer and the keyboard or the
mouse, and further to provide that, when there is a message to the home point of sale
terminal from the personal computer or vice versa, then communication is temporarily set up through the "Y" plug between the home point of sale terminal and the personal
computer.
21. The terminal device according to claim 1 , wherein the at least one
interface disposed in the housing, which couples the first processor to at least one -
additional external device and facilitates an exchange of data between the first
processor and the at least one additional external device, comprises a smart diskette
interface which interfaces the first processor with a smart diskette device;
wherein the smart diskette device is adapted to receive a transaction card
therein, and includes electronic circuitry for interfacing with a transaction card to
establish communication therewith.
22. The terminal device according to claim 21 , wherein the smart diskette
device is further adapted to receive a removable memory device therein, and includes
electronic circuitry for interfacing with a removable memory device to establish
communication therewith.
23. The method according to claim 14, wherein a smart diskette device,
which can accommodate a transaction card, a removable memory device, or both, is
interfaced with the home point of sale terminal device, the method further comprising:
establishing communication between the home point of sale device and the
smart diskette device to perform at least one of the following: reading an electronic cash token amount from the transaction card;
changing an electronic cash token amount of the transaction card;
checking a personal identification number; and
reading/writing data from/to the removable memory device.
PCT/US1999/025584 1998-11-02 1999-11-01 Home point of sale (pos) terminal and electronic commerce method WO2000026838A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US18435098A true 1998-11-02 1998-11-02
US09/184,350 1998-11-02

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Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
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