WO1999005996A1 - Method and apparatus for maintaining body temperature during surgery - Google Patents

Method and apparatus for maintaining body temperature during surgery Download PDF

Info

Publication number
WO1999005996A1
WO1999005996A1 PCT/US1998/016158 US9816158W WO9905996A1 WO 1999005996 A1 WO1999005996 A1 WO 1999005996A1 US 9816158 W US9816158 W US 9816158W WO 9905996 A1 WO9905996 A1 WO 9905996A1
Authority
WO
WIPO (PCT)
Prior art keywords
liquid
tubular member
lumen
source
distal end
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/US1998/016158
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
M. Andre Vasu
Original Assignee
Vasu M Andre
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US90366497A priority Critical
Priority to US08/903,664 priority
Application filed by Vasu M Andre filed Critical Vasu M Andre
Publication of WO1999005996A1 publication Critical patent/WO1999005996A1/en

Links

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, e.g. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F7/00Heating or cooling appliances for medical or therapeutic treatment of the human body
    • A61F7/12Devices for heating or cooling internal body cavities
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M25/00Catheters; Hollow probes
    • A61M25/0021Catheters; Hollow probes characterised by the form of the tubing
    • A61M25/0023Catheters; Hollow probes characterised by the form of the tubing by the form of the lumen, e.g. cross-section, variable diameter
    • A61M25/0026Multi-lumen catheters with stationary elements
    • A61M2025/004Multi-lumen catheters with stationary elements characterized by lumina being arranged circumferentially

Abstract

A device and method of prevention and treatment of hypothermia for a patient during surgery is provided. An elongated heat exchanger probe is inserted into the patient's esophagus immediately after general anesthesia has been induced, and prior to incision into the patient to maintain core body temperature of the patient, especially in a cool environment such as an operating room. The heat exchanger probe has at least two lumens and is connected at the proximal end to a source of heat exchange media, such as a liquid, kept at a preselected temperature. The distal end of the probe is inserted into the patient's esophagus. The heat exchange media is circulated to the distal end of the probe by a first lumen and returned to the source of media by a second lumen.

Description

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MAINTAINING BODY TEMPERATURE

DURING SURGERY

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for maintaining body temperature during surgery by heat transfer carried out internally of the patient, and more particularly to an apparatus adapted for insertion into the esophagus to provide heat transfer with the aorta and surrounding tissue and a method of use thereof .

2. Description of Related Art The health benefits of maintaining the body temperature of a patient during surgery to prevent hypothermia is known in the art, and is especially important during more extensive procedures performed on aged and debilitated patients. If hypothermia can be prevented, that is, if the patient's body temperature when departing the operating room can be approximately 37°C, rather than in the range of 34°C to 36° C as is more common, the time spent in the recovery room and in the hospital after surgery, can be reduced, the patient's well being markedly improved, and better outcomes obtained. Conventional techniques for maintaining body temperature during surgery include the external application of heat directly to the skin of the patient. However, external techniques cannot be applied to the entire surface of the patient during chest and abdominal surgery, and are often ineffective in maintaining a constant body temperature.

Also known are techniques of heat transfer carried out internally of the patient. Typically, catheters and similar devices have been utilized for internal heating or cooling applications. U.S. Patent No. 5,624,392 to Saab discloses a catheter intended for heat transfer to and from internal regions of the body. The Saab patent does not disclose the location within the body that the catheter should be inserted, but generally discloses insertion into body cavities, and specifically discloses insertion into blood vessels. While the Saab patent discloses a general statement about heat transfer, there is no reference to prevention or treatment of hypothermia, nor to placement of a heat transfer device in the region of the aorta.

U.S. Patent No. 5,269,758 to Taheri discloses a method of treatment of hypothermia by insertion of a device into the vascular system through an incision made in the patient's body. However, insertion of a device into the body through an incision is undesirably invasive and complicated to be accepted for general use. Several other patents disclose invasive insertion of devices. U.S. Patent No. 5,486,208 to Ginsberg discloses a device for controlling a patient's temperature that is inserted into a blood vessel. U.S. Patent No. 5,211,631 discloses a device used to mix warm fluids with the patient's blood, and is administered through an incision in the body. U.S. Patent No. 4,111,209 to Wolvek et al . discloses an invasive device used to cool the heart during surgery. And, U.S. Patent No. 5,281,213 to Milder et al . discloses an ablation device to apply cold to specific regions of the heart to destroy certain parts of the heart's conduction mechanism.

U.S. Patent No. 5,571,153 to Wallsten discloses a device and method for hyperthermia treatment of certain cancers . The device applies heat in excess of 42° C. in a limited and focused area of the body, and is disclosed as inserted into a body cavity or canal. U.S. Patent No. 5,549,559 to Eshel discloses a device for a similar application of thermal treatment of tissues.

None of the devices or methods heretofore disclosed are easy to use and effective to maintain body temperature during surgery. SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is to an apparatus and method for prevention and treatment of hypothermia for a patient during surgery. According to the present invention, an elongated heat exchanger probe is inserted into the patient's esophagus immediately after general anesthesia has been introduced, and prior to commencement of the surgical procedure . The purpose of the heat exchanger is to maintain a predetermined core body temperature of the patient, especially in a cool environment such as an operating room.

The heat exchanger probe, fully described hereinbelow, is connected at the proximal end to a source of heat exchange media kept at a preselected temperature. The heat exchange media used is preferably a liquid, and is preferably either water, saline, or other media that would be harmless if introduced directly into the esophagus . The heat exchange media is circulated to the distal end of the probe by a first lumen, and is returned to the source of heat exchange media by a second lumen which is preferably coaxially arranged within the first lumen. The timing of placement of the device, immediately after general anesthesia has been introduced and prior to incision into the patient, is important in order to combat hypothermia before it actually begins, and to maintain a steady body temperature during the entire operation. The placement of the device within the esophagus is also important. The esophagus is adjacent the aorta, which has a very high flow rate of cardiac output, typically 3 to 6 liters per minute for most patients. The esophagus is also adjacent the posterior aspect of the heart, creating an ideal heat exchange location with extremely high blood flow rates in close proximity to the heat exchanger probe. Therefore, very rapid and efficient exchange of calories is provided, even with very small temperature gradients .

Placement into the esophagus eliminates the necessity of making an incision into the patient to insert the probe. Furthermore, plastic tubes are routinely inserted into the esophagus in operating rooms around the world, and are considered safe, simple, and easy to use. For example, esophageal stethoscopes are in common use .

The heat exchanger probe can be a pliable, flexible tube that includes at least two lumens used to circulate the heat exchange media from the proximal end to the distal end of the probe. The proximal end of the probe is connectable to a source of heat exchange media that is maintained at a preselected temperature. The distal end of the probe is inserted into the esophagus .

In one embodiment, a first lumen supplies heat exchange media from the source of heat exchange media at the proximal end toward the distal end of the probe where heat is transferred directly into the patient at the aorta. A second lumen returns the heat exchange media from the distal end to the proximal end to be returned to the media source. In this manner, media at a constant temperature flows through the heat exchanger probe adjacent the aorta where efficient heat exchange with the patient takes place. The probe is preferably an elongated disposable catheter made of plastic or equivalent material known in the art, and can be approximately 12-15 mm in diameter and 20-25 cm long. The proximal end can include a quick disconnect fitting for attachment to the source of heat exchange media. The probe can include a temperature probe at the distal end to determine the temperature within the esophagus of the patient .

Accordingly, it is an objective of the present invention to provide a method to prevent and treat hypothermia during surgery by use of an esophageal heat exchanger. It is a further objective of the present invention to provide a catheter for insertion into the esophagus having at least two lumens to circulate heat exchange media at a preselected temperature to exchange heat with a patient .

In accordance with these and other objects which will become apparent hereinafter, the instant invention will now be described with particular reference to the accompanying drawings .

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Figure 1 is schematic view of the present invention. Figure 2 is a schematic view of the heat exchanger probe of the present invention.

Figure 3 is a cross-sectional view taken along line 3-3 of Fig. 2.

Figure 4 and 5 are schematic views of the heat exchanger probe inserted into an esophagus .

Figure 6 is schematic view of a portion of the human anatomy illustrating the esophagus and aorta.

Figure 7 is a cross-sectional view taken along line 6-6 of Fig. 5.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Referring to Fig. 1, the preferred embodiment of the present invention is illustrated including heat exchanger probe 1, heat exchange media storage tank 2, and heat exchanger 4. Heat exchange media storage tank 2 can contain a supply of heat exchange media 3, which is preferably a liquid and preferably water, saline, or other media that would be harmless if placed directly into the esophagus . Heat exchange media 3 exits tank 2 and enters heat exchanger 4 at exit fitting 8.

For treating hypothermia, heat exchange media 3 must be heated and maintained at a preselected temperature. To accomplish this, a heat exchanger 4 can be utilized to heat media 3. Heat exchanger 4 can be any suitable type of heat exchange device such as illustrated including heating element 10 with thermostat 12. Thermostat 12 can include a fail-safe shutoff set to a predetermined temperature to prevent overheating of heat exchange media 3. Coil 5 can wrap around element 10 for efficient heat transfer. Coil 5 can be made of metal such as stainless steel, or other equivalent metal that transfers heat well, and is corrosion resistant. Heat exchange media 3 must be maintained as close as possible to the desired temperature for heating or cooling the patient. For hypothermia treatment as described herein, or to maintain the patient's body temperature at a constant 37° celsius (C) for an entire procedure, heat exchange media 3 should be maintained in the range of approximately 37° to 41° C, and is preferably kept at a constant temperature of approximately 39° C. For cooling the patient, heat exchanger 4 would be replaced with a cooling element (not shown) . Heat exchange media 3 exits heat exchanger 4 at exit fitting 14, and enters quick disconnect fitting 17 through input conduit 19. Pump 18, which can be a suitable conventional pump, may be utilized to circulate media 3, as described herein. The preferred direction of media 3 flow is illustrated by the direction of the arrows in Figs. 1 and 2.

Referring to Figs . 2 and 3 , heat exchanger probe 1 can include at least two lumens 20 and 22. Lumens 20 and 22 are preferably concentric, with lumen 22 disposed within lumen 20. Lumen 20 is connected to quick disconnect fitting 16 at proximal end 21 of probe 1, as shown in Fig. 1. When quick disconnect fitting 16 is mated with quick disconnect fitting 17, lumen 20 is in fluid communication with input conduit 19.

Lumen 20 is the input lumen to probe 1. Heat exchange media 3 flows into input conduit 19, through fittings 17 and 16, and into lumen 20, and on to the distal end 23 of probe 1, as shown in Fig. 1. Media 3 can then flow through a plurality of return apertures 24 into lumen 22.

Lumen 22 is the output lumen to probe 1. Lumen 22 is connected at proximal end 21 of probe 1 to quick disconnect fitting 16. When quick disconnect fitting 16 is mated with quick disconnect fitting 17, lumen 22 is in fluid communication with output conduit 26. Output conduit 26 is connected to tank 2 at input fitting 28. Media 3 returning from apertures 24 at distal end 23 of probe 1, flows through lumen 22, through fittings 16 and 17, through conduit 26, and back to tank 2. Probe 1 can be made of plastic or equivalent material known in the art, and is preferably disposable from distal end 23 to quick disconnect fitting 16. Probe 1 preferably has at least two lumens , one for heat exchange media input and one for heat exchange media output, but could have any number of additional lumens . Probe 1 can be an elongated tubular member with any cross-sectional shape, with circular being the preferred embodiment .

To measure the temperature of the heat exchange media 3 , a temperature probe 6 can be placed within probe 1 at distal end 23, as shown in Fig. 1. Placing temperature probe 6 at distal end 23 of probe 1 ensures that media 3 is kept at the correct temperature while within the patient . Temperature probe 6 can include wire 7 which preferably connects directly to thermostat 12. Alternately, wire 7 can connect to a temperature probe indicator, as known in the art (not shown) .

Referring to Fig. 4, insertion of distal end 23 of probe 1 into esophagus 30 is illustrated along with the relationship to trachea 32, bronchi 34, stomach 36, and diaphragm 37. Fig. 4 also shows the relationship between the esophagus 30 and the aorta 38. Blood flows through the aorta at a rate of approximately 3 to 6 liters per minute in most patients. Because the esophagus is adjacent the aorta 38, heat is readily transferred from heat exchange media 3 in lumen 20, through esophagus 30 to aorta 38, to be circulated by blood flow in the patient .

Probe 1 is inserted into esophagus 30 after general anesthesia is induced and prior to making an incision into the patient. The length of distal end 23 of probe 1 must be long enough to be positioned as illustrated in Fig. 4, and still allow the proximal end 21 to be connected to quick disconnect fitting 16 which is connectable to fitting 17, as shown in Fig. 1. Preferably, distal end 23 of probe 1 is approximately 12-15 mm in diameter and 20-25 cm long. Fig. 5 illustrates why it is desirable that lumen 20 be the input lumen. Heat exchange media 3 flowing into lumen 20 places the heated media 3 adjacent esophagus 30 for more efficient heat exchange. Return lumen 22 then returns media 3 after heat has been transferred to the patient from lumen 20.

The instant invention has been shown and described herein in what is considered to be the most practical and preferred embodiment. It is recognized, however, that departures may be made therefrom within the scope of the invention and that obvious modifications will occur to a person skilled in the art.

Claims

CLAIMSWhat Is Claimed Is:
1. A heat transfer apparatus for insertion into an esophagus, comprising: an elongated tubular member having a first and a second lumen being defined by substantially coaxial outer and inner walls, respectively, of said tubular member, said first and said second lumens disposed substantially coaxial relative to each other and each extending from a proximal end to a distal end of said tubular member, said distal end insertable into the esophagus ; a plurality of apertures disposed in said inner wall of said tubular member at said distal end to place said first lumen and said second lumens in fluid communication with each other; a source of liquid at a preselected temperature, said source of liquid removably connectable to said tubular member at said proximal end, said source of liquid having a liquid outlet connectable in fluid communication to said first lumen and a liquid inlet connectable in fluid communication to said second lumen; and means for circulation of a liquid from said source of liquid at a preselected temperature through said first lumen to said distal end of said tubular member and through said second lumen back to said source of liquid.
2. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein said source of liquid at a preselected temperature includes means for heating and maintaining the temperature of liquid at the preselected temperature .
3. The apparatus of claim 2, wherein said preselected temperature is approximately 37┬░ to 41┬░ Celsius.
4. The apparatus of claim 3 , wherein said preselected temperature is approximately 39┬░ celsius.
5. The apparatus of claim 1, further including means for quick disconnection between said source of liquid and said proximal end of said tubular member, said tubular member being disposable between said distal end and said means for quick disconnection .
6. A method for prevention and treatment of hypothermia during surgery, comprising the steps of: a) providing: an elongated tubular member having a first and a second lumen being defined by substantially coaxial outer and inner walls, respectively, of said tubular member, said first and said second lumens disposed substantially coaxial relative to each other and each extending from a proximal end to a distal end of said tubular member, said distal end insertable into the esophagus, a plurality of apertures disposed in said inner wall of said tubular member at said distal end to place said first lumen and said second lumens in fluid communication with each other; a source of liquid at a preselected temperature in the range of approximately 37┬░ to 41┬░ celsius, said source of liquid removably connectable co said tubular member at said proximal end, said source of liquid having a liquid outlet connectable in fluid communication to said first lumen and a liquid inlet connectable in fluid communication to said second lumen; and means for circulation of a liquid from said source of liquid at a preselected temperature through said first lumen to said distal end of said tubular member and through said second lumen back to said source of liquid; b) inducing general anesthesia in a patient; c) inserting said distal end of said elongated tubular member into an esophagus of the patient so that at least a portion of said tubular member is adjacent the aorta,- and d) transferring heat from said liquid flowing in said tubular member to blood flowing in the patient.
7. The method of claim 6 further including the step of : e) performing a surgical procedure on the patient.
8. The method of claim 6 wherein said preselected temperature is approximately 39┬░ celsius.
PCT/US1998/016158 1997-07-31 1998-07-31 Method and apparatus for maintaining body temperature during surgery WO1999005996A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US90366497A true 1997-07-31 1997-07-31
US08/903,664 1997-07-31

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
AU86859/98A AU8685998A (en) 1997-07-31 1998-07-31 Method and apparatus for maintaining body temperature during surgery

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
WO1999005996A1 true WO1999005996A1 (en) 1999-02-11

Family

ID=25417887

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
PCT/US1998/016158 WO1999005996A1 (en) 1997-07-31 1998-07-31 Method and apparatus for maintaining body temperature during surgery

Country Status (2)

Country Link
AU (1) AU8685998A (en)
WO (1) WO1999005996A1 (en)

Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2006104837A1 (en) 2005-03-29 2006-10-05 Cryocath Technologies Inc. Extended treatment zone catheter
WO2007010073A2 (en) * 2005-07-22 2007-01-25 Universidad Politecnica De Valencia Apparatus and method for the thermal protection of the oesophagus
US8308787B2 (en) 2008-01-25 2012-11-13 Neurosave, Inc. Rapid cooling of body and/or brain by irrigating with a cooling liquid
JP2015051286A (en) * 2009-02-26 2015-03-19 アドバンスト・クーリング・セラピー,エルエルシー Device and method for controlling patient temperature
US9301871B2 (en) 2009-02-26 2016-04-05 Advanced Cooling Therapy, Inc. Devices and methods for controlling patient temperature
US9326890B2 (en) 2009-02-26 2016-05-03 Advanced Cooling Therapy, Inc. Devices and methods for controlling patient temperature
US9622909B2 (en) 2009-02-26 2017-04-18 Advanced Cooling Therapy, Inc. Devices and methods for controlling patient temperature
WO2018183278A1 (en) * 2017-03-27 2018-10-04 Advanced Cooling Therapy, Inc. Reinforced esophageal heat transfer devices

Citations (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4111209A (en) 1977-04-18 1978-09-05 Datascope Corporation Topical hypothermia apparatus and method for treating the human body and the like
US5211631A (en) 1991-07-24 1993-05-18 Sheaff Charles M Patient warming apparatus
US5269758A (en) 1992-04-29 1993-12-14 Taheri Syde A Intravascular catheter and method for treatment of hypothermia
US5281213A (en) 1992-04-16 1994-01-25 Implemed, Inc. Catheter for ice mapping and ablation
WO1994017842A1 (en) * 1993-02-04 1994-08-18 Cryomedical Sciences, Inc. Closed circulation tissue warming apparatus
US5486208A (en) 1993-02-10 1996-01-23 Ginsburg; Robert Method and apparatus for controlling a patient's body temperature by in situ blood temperature modification
US5531776A (en) * 1993-09-24 1996-07-02 The Ohio State University Non-invasive aortic impingement and core and cerebral temperature manipulation method
US5549559A (en) 1990-03-22 1996-08-27 Argomed Ltd. Thermal treatment apparatus
US5571153A (en) 1991-09-20 1996-11-05 Wallst+E,Acu E+Ee N; Hans I. Device for hyperthermia treatment
US5624392A (en) * 1990-05-11 1997-04-29 Saab; Mark A. Heat transfer catheters and methods of making and using same
US5624292A (en) 1996-03-05 1997-04-29 Wiseman, Jr.; John H. Ladder bridge mat

Patent Citations (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4111209A (en) 1977-04-18 1978-09-05 Datascope Corporation Topical hypothermia apparatus and method for treating the human body and the like
US5549559A (en) 1990-03-22 1996-08-27 Argomed Ltd. Thermal treatment apparatus
US5624392A (en) * 1990-05-11 1997-04-29 Saab; Mark A. Heat transfer catheters and methods of making and using same
US5211631A (en) 1991-07-24 1993-05-18 Sheaff Charles M Patient warming apparatus
US5571153A (en) 1991-09-20 1996-11-05 Wallst+E,Acu E+Ee N; Hans I. Device for hyperthermia treatment
US5281213A (en) 1992-04-16 1994-01-25 Implemed, Inc. Catheter for ice mapping and ablation
US5269758A (en) 1992-04-29 1993-12-14 Taheri Syde A Intravascular catheter and method for treatment of hypothermia
WO1994017842A1 (en) * 1993-02-04 1994-08-18 Cryomedical Sciences, Inc. Closed circulation tissue warming apparatus
US5486208A (en) 1993-02-10 1996-01-23 Ginsburg; Robert Method and apparatus for controlling a patient's body temperature by in situ blood temperature modification
US5531776A (en) * 1993-09-24 1996-07-02 The Ohio State University Non-invasive aortic impingement and core and cerebral temperature manipulation method
US5624292A (en) 1996-03-05 1997-04-29 Wiseman, Jr.; John H. Ladder bridge mat

Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US7591814B2 (en) 1997-02-27 2009-09-22 Cryocath Technologies Inc. Extended treatment zone catheter
WO2006104837A1 (en) 2005-03-29 2006-10-05 Cryocath Technologies Inc. Extended treatment zone catheter
WO2007010073A2 (en) * 2005-07-22 2007-01-25 Universidad Politecnica De Valencia Apparatus and method for the thermal protection of the oesophagus
ES2267396A1 (en) * 2005-07-22 2007-03-01 Fundacion De La Comunidad Valenciana Hospital General Universitario Apparatus and method for thermal protection of the esophagus, and use of the apparatus for thermal protection of the esophagus.
WO2007010073A3 (en) * 2005-07-22 2007-04-19 Univ Valencia Politecnica Apparatus and method for the thermal protection of the oesophagus
US8308787B2 (en) 2008-01-25 2012-11-13 Neurosave, Inc. Rapid cooling of body and/or brain by irrigating with a cooling liquid
JP2015051286A (en) * 2009-02-26 2015-03-19 アドバンスト・クーリング・セラピー,エルエルシー Device and method for controlling patient temperature
US9301871B2 (en) 2009-02-26 2016-04-05 Advanced Cooling Therapy, Inc. Devices and methods for controlling patient temperature
US9326890B2 (en) 2009-02-26 2016-05-03 Advanced Cooling Therapy, Inc. Devices and methods for controlling patient temperature
JP2017035518A (en) * 2009-02-26 2017-02-16 アドバンスト・クーリング・セラピー,エルエルシー Device and method for controlling patient's temperature
US9622909B2 (en) 2009-02-26 2017-04-18 Advanced Cooling Therapy, Inc. Devices and methods for controlling patient temperature
WO2018183278A1 (en) * 2017-03-27 2018-10-04 Advanced Cooling Therapy, Inc. Reinforced esophageal heat transfer devices

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
AU8685998A (en) 1999-02-22

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US6416533B1 (en) Indwelling heat exchange catheter and method of using same
US5713941A (en) Apparatus for inducing whole body hyperthermia and method for treatment utilizing said whole body hyperthermia inducing apparatus
US6962588B2 (en) Percutaneous pringle occlusion method and device
US6599312B2 (en) Isolated selective organ cooling apparatus
US5242390A (en) Endometrium coagulating surgical method for thermal destruction of the endometrium
US8672884B2 (en) Method and apparatus for peritoneal hypothermia and/or resuscitation
JP4474103B2 (en) The heat transfer device
US6206004B1 (en) Treatment method via the pericardial space
US6679907B2 (en) Method and device for applications of selective organ cooling
US7294142B2 (en) Selective organ cooling catheter with guidewire apparatus and temperature-monitoring device
US5683438A (en) Apparatus and method for core body warming of mammals experiencing hypothermia
US6719723B2 (en) Multipurpose catheter assembly
US6264679B1 (en) Heat exchange catheter with discrete heat exchange elements
CN1167394C (en) System and method for heat control of living body
EP1029520B1 (en) Central venous line catheter having temperature control system
US6576002B2 (en) Isolated selective organ cooling method and apparatus
US6685733B1 (en) Methods and systems for reducing substance-induced renal damage
US5954714A (en) Heated balloon having rotary fluid impeller
US6719724B1 (en) Central venous line catheter having multiple heat exchange elements and multiple infusion lumens
EP1389988B1 (en) Moving heat exchange catheter system
US20050027218A1 (en) Device for applying a pulsating pressure to a local region of the body and applications thereof
EP3434232A1 (en) Devices, systems and methods for rapid endovascular cooling
US6251130B1 (en) Device for applications of selective organ cooling
US6702846B2 (en) Urological stent therapy system and method
JP4738595B2 (en) System for controlling the temperature of the patient

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AK Designated states

Kind code of ref document: A1

Designated state(s): AL AM AT AU AZ BA BB BG BR BY CA CH CN CU CZ DE DK EE ES FI GB GE GH GM HR HU ID IL IS JP KE KG KP KR KZ LC LK LR LS LT LU LV MD MG MK MN MW MX NO NZ PL PT RO RU SD SE SG SI SK SL TJ TM TR TT UA UG UZ VN YU ZW

AL Designated countries for regional patents

Kind code of ref document: A1

Designated state(s): GH GM KE LS MW SD SZ UG ZW AM AZ BY KG KZ MD RU TJ TM AT BE CH CY DE DK ES FI FR GB GR IE IT LU MC NL PT SE BF BJ CF CG CI CM GA GN GW ML MR NE SN TD TG

121 Ep: the epo has been informed by wipo that ep was designated in this application
DFPE Request for preliminary examination filed prior to expiration of 19th month from priority date (pct application filed before 20040101)
NENP Non-entry into the national phase in:

Ref country code: KR

REG Reference to national code

Ref country code: DE

Ref legal event code: 8642

122 Ep: pct application non-entry in european phase
NENP Non-entry into the national phase in:

Ref country code: CA