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Personal communications internetworking

Info

Publication number
WO1997033421A1
WO1997033421A1 PCT/US1996/003064 US9603064W WO1997033421A1 WO 1997033421 A1 WO1997033421 A1 WO 1997033421A1 US 9603064 W US9603064 W US 9603064W WO 1997033421 A1 WO1997033421 A1 WO 1997033421A1
Authority
WO
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
subscriber
pci
message
server
profile
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/US1996/003064
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
David Matthew Pepe
Lisa B. Blitzer
James Joseph Brockman
William Cruz
Dwight Omar Hakim
Michael Kramer
Dawn Diane Petr
Josefa Ramaroson
Gerardo Ramirez
Yang-Wei Wang
Robert G. White
Original Assignee
Bell Communications Research, Inc.
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L51/00Arrangements for user-to-user messaging in packet-switching networks, e.g. e-mail or instant messages
    • H04L51/06Message adaptation based on network or terminal capabilities
    • H04L51/066Message adaptation based on network or terminal capabilities with adaptation of format
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L51/00Arrangements for user-to-user messaging in packet-switching networks, e.g. e-mail or instant messages
    • H04L51/36Unified messaging, e.g. interactions between instant messaging, e-mail or other types of messages such as converged IP messaging [CPM]
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M3/00Automatic or semi-automatic exchanges
    • H04M3/42Systems providing special services or facilities to subscribers
    • H04M3/42229Personal communication services, i.e. services related to one subscriber independent of his terminal and/or location
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M3/00Automatic or semi-automatic exchanges
    • H04M3/42Systems providing special services or facilities to subscribers
    • H04M3/4228Systems providing special services or facilities to subscribers in networks
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M3/00Automatic or semi-automatic exchanges
    • H04M3/42Systems providing special services or facilities to subscribers
    • H04M3/50Centralised arrangements for answering calls; Centralised arrangements for recording messages for absent or busy subscribers ; Centralised arrangements for recording messages
    • H04M3/53Centralised arrangements for recording incoming messages, i.e. mailbox systems
    • H04M3/5307Centralised arrangements for recording incoming messages, i.e. mailbox systems for recording messages comprising any combination of audio and non-audio components
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M3/00Automatic or semi-automatic exchanges
    • H04M3/42Systems providing special services or facilities to subscribers
    • H04M3/50Centralised arrangements for answering calls; Centralised arrangements for recording messages for absent or busy subscribers ; Centralised arrangements for recording messages
    • H04M3/53Centralised arrangements for recording incoming messages, i.e. mailbox systems
    • H04M3/537Arrangements for indicating the presence of a recorded message, whereby the presence information might include a preview or summary of the message
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04QSELECTING
    • H04Q3/00Selecting arrangements
    • H04Q3/0016Arrangements providing connection between exchanges
    • H04Q3/0029Provisions for intelligent networking
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M2201/00Electronic components, circuits, software, systems or apparatus used in telephone systems
    • H04M2201/60Medium conversion
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M2203/00Aspects of automatic or semi-automatic exchanges
    • H04M2203/10Aspects of automatic or semi-automatic exchanges related to the purpose or context of the telephonic communication
    • H04M2203/1091Fixed mobile conversion
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M2203/00Aspects of automatic or semi-automatic exchanges
    • H04M2203/45Aspects of automatic or semi-automatic exchanges related to voicemail messaging
    • H04M2203/4536Voicemail combined with text-based messaging
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M2203/00Aspects of automatic or semi-automatic exchanges
    • H04M2203/65Aspects of automatic or semi-automatic exchanges related to applications where calls are combined with other types of communication
    • H04M2203/658Combination of voice calls and paging
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M2207/00Type of exchange or network, i.e. telephonic medium, in which the telephonic communication takes place
    • H04M2207/20Type of exchange or network, i.e. telephonic medium, in which the telephonic communication takes place hybrid systems
    • H04M2207/206Type of exchange or network, i.e. telephonic medium, in which the telephonic communication takes place hybrid systems composed of PSTN and wireless network
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M3/00Automatic or semi-automatic exchanges
    • H04M3/42Systems providing special services or facilities to subscribers
    • H04M3/42136Administration or customisation of services
    • H04M3/42153Administration or customisation of services by subscriber
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M7/00Interconnection arrangements between switching centres
    • H04M7/12Interconnection arrangements between switching centres for working between exchanges having different types of switching equipment, e.g. power-driven and step by step, decimal and non-decimal, circuit-switched and packet-switched, i.e. gateway arrangements

Abstract

A personal communications internetworking (40) provides a network subscriber with the ability to remotely control the receipt and delivery of wireless and wireline voice and text messages. The network operates as an interface between various wireless (39) and wireline (29) networks, and also performs media translation, where necessary. The subscriber's message receipt and delivery options are maintained in a database which the subscriber may access by wireless or wireline communications to update the options programmed in the database. The subscriber may be provided with CallCommand service which provides real-time control of voice calls while using a wireless data terminal or PDA (30).

Description

PERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS INTERNETWORKING

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is directed to an internetwork for personal communications and, more particularly, to a network which allows a mobile communications subscriber to remotely control personal communications delivery options.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The use of messaging as a means of day-to-day communications continues to grow and evolve, particularly in a business context. Messaging includes electronic mail (e-mail), facsimile transmissions (fax), paging, voice mail, and telephone communications. The introduction of the cellular phone and other wireless communications facilitated the advent of the "mobile office". The mobile office allows an employee, for example, to work away from the office on a portable computer and be in constant touch with the office via a cellular phone.

The messaging options described above are available to businesses of all sizes, as well as individual users, from a variety of service providers. Many offices have some or all of the messaging options described above. The office may have certain messaging equipment (referred to as "consumer premises equipment" or "CPE") connected to one or more wireline networks. That is, the office may have telephones, fax servers, and voice mail systems connected to phone lines, and computers having modems for e-mail connected to packet networks which are connected via phone lines. The mobile employee may have certain wireless messaging equipment, such as a pager, a cellular telephone, or a personal digital assistant ("PDA"), which is typically a notebook computer connected to a wireless co rni nication network.

One important goal of personal communication services is to allow users to communicate from anywhere to anywhere at any time. Such personal commiinication services generally involve multiple service providers including local and long distance telephone companies and cellular telephone companies. An example of a personal communication service is as follows: A personal communication service provider (e.g., a cellular telephone company) enables traveling users to rent a wireless portable phone from a rental phone company (e.g., from an airline or car rental company). Using the rental phone, the user is provided with basic mobile phone service from the personal communication service provider. In addition, the user would like the following features:

1) The user wants calls directed to his/her office or home to be automatically forwarded to the rental portable phone, without informing anyone that he/she is traveling. 2) To avoid unimportant incoming calls (and corresponding incoming call charges), the user would like to restrict the number of people who can call the rented portable phone.

3) It is important to the user that the rental phone features be activated instantly, so that calls can be made immediately upon the user's arrival at the visiting location.

This kind of personal communication service involves a plurality of service providers. These providers are (a) the local telephone company at the home location, (b) a long distance telephone company, (c) the local telephone company at the visiting location, and (d) the personal communication service provider (i.e., the cellular telephone company) at the visiting location. All of these are referred to herein as "service providers".

To enable this kind of personal communication service, involving multiple service providers, interoperability problems among the different service providers must be resolved. The interoperability problems can be divided into two categories: (a) location tracking and (b) service management.

The interoperability problem for location tracking has been addressed by adopting signaling protocols used by the mobile phone industry. Location tracking functions are implemented using two location registers. One of the registers, maintained by the local telephone company of the user's home location, is called the Home Location Register (HLR). The other register, maintained by the local telephone company of the visiting location, is called the Visiting

Location Register (VLR). The HLR stores customer profile data and the location of the VLR of the user. The customer profile data contains important information such as the user's name, address, preferred long distance carrier, service features (e.g., call forwarding and call restriction), billing, and other adrninistrative related inforrnation. When the user travels to a new visiting location, a new VLR is created in the new location. A part of the profile data stored in the HLR is transmitted and loaded into the VLR such that the service provider at the visiting location can implement service features for the visiting user. When the user travels to a new visiting location the location of the VLR stored in the HLR is changed to the new VLR location, and the VLR in the previously visited location is deleted. The process of creating a new VLR, loading profile data to the VLR, and updating the visiting location of a user in the HLR is called "automatic roamεr registration".

The interoperability problem for service management is much more complex than that for location tracking. Service management refers to a collection of functions required to enable a personal communication service user to subscribe to, modify, and activate service features anywhere and at any time. Examples of service management functions include phone number administration, customer profile data management, service activation, and security administration. The phone number adrninistration function is important for maintaining the uniqueness of phone numbers. The customer profile data management function provides customer profile databases and user interfaces for creating, modifying, or transferring such databases. The service activation function extracts part of the data specifying service features from the profile data and loads this data into physical communication systems that process calls. The service activation function also controls the activation and deactivation of the service features. The security adrninistration function prevents or detects unauthorized uses of services and service management functions. Service management functions of this type are needed to provide personal communication services involving multiple service providers. Such service management functions generally require interactions between application software and various databases owned and operated by the different service providers. Consider an application which enables a nomadic user to subscribe to a personal cornmunication service from any service provider at any location. An example of such a service is call forwarding to a temporarily rented portable phone. The application may, for example, need to perform the following database access operations at databases maintained by various different service providers: x check credit databases owned by credit card companies or phone companies to determine whether the user is able to pay for the service; x check the customer profile database in the user's HLR to determine whether the user is currently located in a place other than the visiting location currently stored in the HLR; x check the credit and network databases of long distance phone companies specified by the user to determine whether the user can use a particular long distance carrier in the visiting location; x load profile data into the VLR at the visiting location and update the HLR with the location of the VLR if necessary; and x load the profile data to the call processing systems and activate the service. The user may need to send or receive messages from any or all of the messaging options described above at a visiting location. That is, the user may want to receive or receive notification of e-mail, faxes, phone calls, or voice mail at a visiting location or to send e-mail or faxes from a wireless terminal. The need to integrate these various types of messaging options and to interconnect the many service providers has, until now, been largely unaddressed.

It is also desirable for the mobile employee to be able to limit the messages sent to the wireless messaging equipment, so that only urgent messages are received when away from the office and unwanted in-coming calls are avoided. The mobile employee may also wish to route certain incoming wireless messages and phone calls to other destinations, such as an office fax machine or a colleague's telephone.

Therefore, it is an object of the present invention to provide a mobile service subscriber the ability to control and integrate a plurality of messaging options.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a mobile service subscriber with the ability to remotely control the addressability, routing, accessibility, and delivery of messaging options.

It is yet a further object of the present invention to provide an internetwork which interconnects messaging services with both wireless and wireline networks.

It is yet a further object of the present invention to provide a subscriber with real-time control of voice calls while using a wireless data terminal or PDA. It is yet a further object of the invention to provide a control over the messages routed to wireless messaging options.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

These objects are obtained by a personal communications internetwork providing a network subscriber with the ability to remotely control the receipt and delivery of wireless and wireline voice and text messages. The network operates as an interface between various wireless and wireline networks, and also performs media translation, where necessary. The subscriber's message receipt and delivery options are maintained in a database which the subscriber may access by wireless or wireline communications to update the options programmed in the database. The subscriber may be provided with CallCommand service which provides real-time control of voice calls while using a wireless data terminal or PDA. WRIFF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

These and other objects and features of the invention will become apparent from the following drawings, wherein:

Fig. 1-3 are overviews of the PCI networks; Fig. 4 is an overview of one node of the PCI network according to the present invention;

Fig. 5 is a block diagram of an exemplary PCI server according to the present invention;

Fig. 6 is a block diagram of an exemplary embodiment of a PCI database according to the present invention;

Fig. 7 is a block diagram of the logical connections between the PCI server and PCI database according to the present invention;

Figs. 8-11 illustrate exemplary message flows between a server and a database according to the present invention; Fig. 12 is a block diagram of a personal digital assistant according to the present invention;

Figs. 13-20 illustrate exemplary message flows between a PDA and PCI server;

Fig. 21 is a block diagram of a text messaging portion of a PCI network;

Fig. 22 is a block diagram of a voice messaging portion of a PCI network; Fig. 23 is a block diagram of a facsimile messaging portion of a PCI network;

Fig. 24 is a diagram illustrating an exemplary CallCommand service network;

Figs. 25-27 illustrate exemplary message flows in the PCI network; and Figs. 28-45 illustrate exemplary screens displayed to a PCI subscriber using a wireless PDA.

n TAflJ nESCRIPTIONS OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

For clarity of presentation, the detailed description is set out in the following subsections: I. PCI Overview

The overall network is illustrated in Figs. 1-4 The network is an interface between a plurality of wireless and wireline networks, providing a subscriber with a variety of wireless and wireline message and voice delivery and receipt options. LI. The PCI Server

The PCI Server is illustrated in Fig. 5. The PCI server is a peripheral which performs messaging and call redirection functions and interfaces with the PCI database to update the subscriber profile. H3. The PCI Database

The PCI Database is illustrated in Fig. 6. The PCI database maintains the subscriber profile, controls CallCommand functions, and handles DTMF-based subscriber profile updates.

IV. The Server Database Interface

The Server/Database interface is illustrated in Figs. 7 - 11. The PCI server/PCI database interface provides for the transfer of information regarding the subscriber profile and the CallCommand services.

V. The PDA/PCI Interface

The PDA/PCI interface is illustrated in Figs. 12 - 20. The PDA/PCI interface provides for the transfer of information between a remote wireless subscriber and the PCI. VI. Services

A. E-Mail Messaging

E-Mail messaging in the PCI is illustrated in Fig. 21. The PCI network provides the subscriber with a variety of e-mail delivery, receipt, and notification options, including screening and selective destination delivery of incoming e-maiL B. Voice Messaging

Voice messaging in die PCI is illustrated in Fig. 22. The PCI provides the subscriber with a variety of voice mail delivery, receipt, and notification options, including screening and selective destination delivery of incoming voice mail

C. Facsimile Messaging Facsimile messaging in the PCI is illustrated in Fig. 23. The PCI provides the subscriber with a variety of facsimile delivery, receipt, and notification options, including screening and selective destination delivery of incoming faxes.

D. CallCommand

The CallCommand service is illustrated in Fig. 24. CallCommand service provides real-time control of voice calls while using a wireless data terminal or PDA. Vπ. Message Flows

Certain message flows for wireless messaging in the PCI are illustrated in Figs. 25 - 27. The three message flows illustrated are sending a message from one subscriber to another, receiving a message regardless of whether the subscriber is using a wireless or wireline terminal, and sending a message to a non-subscriber. VLTJ. The PDA Application

The application residing in the PDA is described in Figs. 28 - 45, which illustrate exemplary screens displayed to- a PCI subscriber using a wireless PDA. LX. Billing Billing procedures for a PCI network use is briefly described.

X. Conclusion A glossary of acronyms used in this specification is attached as Appendix A.

I. PCI Overview Fig. I is a simplified overview of a personal communications internetworking ("PCI") according to the present invention. A consumer, an office for example, has various messaging equipment, such as a voice mail system 20, an e-mail terminal 22, fax machines 24, and telephones 26. These are all connected to wireline networks 29. For example, the fax 24, phone 26, and voicemail system 20 may be connected to a Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN), part of which belongs to a particular local phone service company, and part of which belongs to a particular long distance service provider. The e-mail terminal 22 may be connected to a data packet network, such as Internet, whose packets are carried over phone lines.

A mobile communications subscriber (for example an employee who works at the office described above and travels frequently) has various portable messaging equipment, such as a PDA 30, a cellular phone 32, and a pager 34. These are connected to wireless networks 39. These wireless messaging options may be provided by different service providers. That is, the cellular phone may be connected to a wireless network of a cellular phone service provider, the pager may be connected to a different wireless network maintained by a pager service provider, and the PDA may be connected to a third wireless communications network maintained by yet another service provider.

A Personal Cornmunications Internetworking ("PCI") 40 according to the present invention is connected between the wireless 39 and wireline networks 29. The PCI 40 permits the mobile communications subscriber to send and receive messages between disparate networks and messaging systems and a variety of service providers. The mobile communications subscπber can receive e-mail, fax, pages, and voice messages under a single phone number while using either a wireless or wireline network. The subscnber may also select the media format and serving network used to receive messages. The subscπber may also select cross-media notification of incoming messages, (ι.e., the subscπber may receive notification from a pager message that a voice mail message was received).

The subscπber selects the wireline or wireless network and media format to be used for delivering messages or notification of message receipt. The PCI 40 will perform a media conversion to allow, for instance, an e-mail message to be delivered to a fax server. The PCI 40 may also include accessibility controls which allow the user to screen messages by selected cπteπa such as media type (e.g., e-mail, fax, etc.), message length (e.g., voice mail messages less than three minutes), or sender (e.g., only messages from the office and a certain client are to be forwarded)-

For example, the subscriber may have notification of a voice mail or fax message receipt directed to a wireless PDA in the form of e-mail messages. If the subscriber's wireless PDA is not turned on or otherwise not operating, the notification may be routed to an alternate wireless or wireline network. Notification to the subscriber that a voice mail message was received may be, for example, rerouted to the subscriber's pager, and notification that a fax has been received may be rerouted to the wireline e-mail Fig. 2 is a simplified version of the interconnections between vanous messaging systems and a PCI. As shown in Fig. 2, a subscriber provides the network with message routing and delivery instructions. These instructions are received by a PCI database 44 and stored in a "subscriber profile" for that subscriber. This database controls the delivery of outgoing messages and the routing of incoming messages and message notification. (In Fig. 2, wireline commβjnications are indicated with solid line connections and wireless communications are indicated with dashed line connections. The instructions to the PCI are shown with a solid line, but as will be explained in greater detail below, the instructions may be sent either by a wireline or wireless network.)

The PCI database 44 supports access to information authenticating the subscnber's identity and validating the types of services subscribed to, die subscriber's message delivery (lTKorning messages) options and origination (outgoing messages) options and voice (telephone call and voice mail) options. For origination, the subscriber may select message distribution lists with specific media delivery options. The database 44 also supports access to the portions of the subscriber profile that the subscriber may control.

The subscriber may use a personal telephone number to register at alternate wireline and wireless terminals while maintaining use of the message screening and delivery options selected and stored in a subscriber's profile. This is called "personal mobility". Information about the location of a wireless or wireline network location to which the subscriber's terminal is connected automatically registers and deregisters a subscriber's terminal. This is called "terminal mobility."

Fig. 3 shows the PCI 40. The CPE (voice mail 20, e-mail 22, fax 24, and phone 26) are connected to wireline networks 29. The mobile subscriber equipment (PDA 30, cellular phone 32, and pager 34) are connected to wireless networks 39. Both the wireline and wireless networks

29, 39 are connected to a PCI 40 at a service provider. The networks 29, 39 are connected to a local exchange carrier (LEC) 42 for the personal communications internetworking.

A PCI database 44 is a physical communication system which provides call processing functions for a collection of central office switches. The PCI database 44 includes the mobile subscriber's profile, including message sending, message receiving, and service control options.

The PCI database 44 may be a service control point or a network adjunct. The PCI database may be connected via a service management system (SMS) interface to a service integrator 46. The service integrator 46 allows the service provider to update subscriber data and create and modify subscriber profiles. The PCI database 44 preferably stores and updates the subscriber profiles. The profiles contain service related information for mapping services to subscribers (e.g., screening, routing, terminal selection by subscriber selected parameters, custom calling features, and the like); subscriber authentication data (e.g., password and user I.D.); user status (registered or not registered); generic service profile for non-call associated service, such as subscriber address or social security number, specific profile for a non-call service (based on subscriber selected parameters); wireless data providers identification (e.g., what cellular phone provider is used); and specific profile for call associated services (e.g., call forwarding), based on user selected parameters.

Fig. 4 is a more detailed depiction of the one node 43 of the PCI. The PCI has a plurality of nodes and is preferably built on the Advanced Intelligent Network (AIN) architecture.

Other network architectures may be used, but for illustrative purposes, the description is directed to an AT -based network. A PCI server 48 is a peripheral which performs messaging and call redirection functions and interfaces with the PCI database 44 to update the subscriber profile. The PCI server may be an AIN Intelligent Peripheral, such as a Bellcore Intelligent Services Peripheral, or a network adjunct. The PCI server is connected to a switch 50. In the AIN architecture, this switch is a Service Switching Point Access Tandem (SSP AT), but may be any suitable switch, depending on the architecture. The SSP AT 50 connects wireline networks to the CPE. The SSP AT 50 also connects the PCI server 48 with a central office (CO) 52. The SSP AT 50 also connects to the SCP 44. The PCI database 44 and the PCI server 48 are directly connected. The LEC of Fig. 3 is part of a large network and includes the PCI database 44, the PCI server 48, and the SSP AT 50. The PCI database may be connected to an SMS interface to a system integrator 46, as descπbed above.

The PCI server 48 is also connected to various wireless and wireline networks 49 via signaling connections in these networks to transmit and receive information for all of the messaging options. Illustratively, the PCI server provides access to Public Packet Switched Networks (PPSN), Public Switched Telephone Network, (PSTN), Integrated Signaling Digital Networks (ISDN), X.25 networks and TCP/IP networks and may include access to asynchronous transfer mode (ATM), Switched Multimegabit Digital Service (SMDS), and Frame Relay networks.

The mobile subscriber may access his or her subscriber profile to change message sending, message receiving, and service control options. These option changes are sent to the PCI database 44 to be stored in the subscriber profile. Fig. 4 shows, for example, a PDA 30 connected to the PCI server 48 by a wireless network, but the subscriber may also use wireline e-mail, or wireless or wireline telephones (using DTMF signals) to access the subscriber profile. The messages from the PDA, for example, are sent by a wireless network 54 to the PCI server 48 using, for example, an X.25 transport.

Delivering PCI service to a subscriber who may be present on a number of different systems requires storage, movement and caching of the service profile associated with that subscriber. A mobility controller 49, located in the PCI server 48, is a controller and data store, which dynamically maintains service control information for a Message Transfer Agent (MTA), described below, in die PCI server 48, which connects the PCI server 48 to wireless data networks.

Data storage functions are handled by two tiered entities. The subscriber profile is preferably located in the PCI database 44 and is the top of the hierarchy where permanent records such as service profile, authentication and validation information, and the like of the subscriber or device are maintained and performing status and location management and mapping are performed. A service profile cache 51 is preferably located in the PCI server 48 and is a local cache entity which stores on a "needs basis" information such as service profiles and validation status and maintains a local repository for the service recipient. It also administers information necessary to serve the wireless data network entity, as well as sending updates to the permanent storage entity PCI database. The service profile cache 51 maintains the personal data associated with the processing of the mobility controller 49. The mobility controller 49 interacts with the PCI database-based subscriber profile (or third party data base) on behalf of the cache to obtain service profiles and location information related to wireless terminals.

PCI may also provide directory services as a value-added component. The X.400 MTA can query a local directory serving agent in the PCI server 48 for addressing and routing information. If the information is not local, the PCI server 48 will need to get the addressing information from another PCI server 48 at another PCI node or an interconnected private directory serving agent which maintains a separate information base. By using the existing standard, the PCI network and mail PCI servers message handling can independently manage the networks without interfering with the PCI service.

II. The PCI Server The PCI server is a peripheral which performs messaging and call redirection functions and interfaces with die PCI Database to update the subscriber profile. The PCI server performs a variety of functions. For example, an illustrative PCI server: x is an X.400 Gateway, x routes messages using the X.400 messaging protocol; x connects proprietary messaging protocols into X.400 protocol; x interfaces with wireless data networks; x interfaces with messaging systems; x interfaces with the PCI database to access subscriber profiles information; x processes messages as specified by the user in the service profile; x provides media conversion such as text to fax or fax to text; x provides access to an X.500 directory to determine addressing schemes for packet data; x supports signaling between wireless data networks for management functions such as registration; and x maintains a service profile cache.

Fig. 5 is a detailed illustration of a preferred embodiment of a PCI server 48 according to the present invention. The PCI server 48 includes three main elements: a call processor 1 10, a data messaging peripheral 112, and a shared disk memory 113.

The call processor 110 comprises a plurality of interconnected computers. The messaging peripheral 112 maybe implemented by a computer such as a DEC XAP system The call processor 110 includes a PCI applications server 114. The application server is the central decision making point of the wireless messaging service described below in Section VI. Thus, the server 114 controls message routing, screening, and notification for the wireless messaging service.

The application server 114 is connected to a PDA protocol handler 115. The protocol handler is the interface to the wireless network 54, for example the RAM wireless network. This handles messages to be sent to and from the subscribers PDA 30. A plurality of personal digital assistants (PDA) 30 are connected to the wireless network 54.

The application server 114 also manages a PCI database protocol handler 126. The protocol handler 126 is die interface between die call processor 110 and die PCI database 44. The application server 114 also manages a Service Profile Cache 51. The Service Profile Cache 51 is maintained in the memory of the application server 11 . The cache 51 stores a subset of the data in the subscriber profile stored in the PCI database 44. This subset is subscriber profile information which currently needs to be accessed frequently by the PCI server 48.

The Service Profile Cache 51 stores and accesses data related to access systems such as wireless data providers and messaging services, and subscriber location. The Service Profile Cache 51 may store and update data related to the subscriber location such as routing address for subscribers specific wireless terminals; store and updates services related data for a particular terminal type (such as uni- or bi- direction); maintain a list of the subscribers wireless data provides and message services; track die subscribers terminal status (registered or not registered); provide a generic service profile for non-call messaging service; and provide a specific profile for a non-call associated service based on subscriber selected parameters. The application server 114 also manages the registration status of each application on each PDA 30 and controls customer profile information via each PDA 30.

The call processor 110 also includes an IP Functions Server 130. The IP Function

Server 130 manages CallCommand applications. This server is also connected to the PCI database protocol handler 126 for communication with the PCI database 44 and the PDA protocol handler

115 for communication with the wireless network 54. The PCI database protocol handler 126 handles both interfaces between the PCI database and the PCI server, as described below.

Thus, the two main application servers in the call processor 110 are the IP Function server 130 for CallCommand applications and the PCI applications server 114 for wireless messaging services.

The call processor 1 10 also includes a plurality of communication interfaces. The protocol handlers 115 and 126 have already been discussed. The alphanumeric paging server (APS) 132 gives the call processor 110 the ability to provide alphanumeric paging services. The APS 132 includes one or more modems to communicate with terminal equipment of a network 134 maintained by a paging service provider. The APS communicates with the paging service provider using, for example, the TAP protocol (Tetocator Alphanumeric Protocol).

The call processor 110 also includes a plurality of control processes which control peripheral equipment external to the call processor 110. These controllers are as follows:

A message controller 136 controls d e data messaging peripheral 112 and controls the sending of messages between the call processor 110 and the data peripheral 112.

The mobility controller 49 comprises the PCI database protocol handler 126, the IP function server 130, die service profile cache 51, and die PCI application server 114. The mobility manager provides control logic for user authentication, service request validation, location management, user access to service profile, access registration, and communication management such as routing to user-specified destinations. The mobility controller 49 contains the service logic and handles service related processing for personal data and service access such as service feature analysis; access system mapping relationship information; identity management; subscriber vaJviation and authentication; billing information based on the subscriber; wireless data specific routing information for message delivery and subscriber paging; subscriber service validation; and subscriber review and modification of the subscriber's profile.

A transaction controller 150 controls a switch controller 152 and a voice peripheral controller 154. The switch controller 152 controls the digital switch 156 which connects to the public switched telephone network 58. The voice peπpheral controller 154 controls the voice peπpherals 160, which are for example text-to-speech conveners.

The switch 156 and me voice peπpheral 160 are also connected by a TI line 161. The digital switch 156 is connected to the public switched telephone network by a plurality of transmission media such as TI lines 162, fax lines 163, and ADSI lines 164.

The data messaging peπpheral 112, which is optional, is now discussed ui greater detail. The data messaging peripheral is the gateway to the wireline electronic mail network, which network is designated 170. The data messaging peπpheral has a message transfer agent 158 for transferring messages between the call processor 110 and die data networks 170, 54 either directly or through the PDA protocol handler 115. The messaging peπpheral 112 also includes a POP (post office protocol) server 190 and associated memory 192 for providing a message storing capability. The message directory 194 is used for storing a subset of service profile cache 51 relating to the routing of e-mail messages.

The messaging peπpheral 112 includes the message gateway 140 The message gateway 140 has the following capabilities:

1) Notifying the PCI application server 114 in the call processor that e- mail has arπved from the wireline e-mail network 170 for a subscriber.

2) Accept a request from d e PCI application server 114 to send an e-mail message to a wireline address. 3) Accept a request from the application server 114 to provide all unread messages stored in die server 190 which would have been sent to a primary destination if the subscriber had been registered.

4) Accept a request from the application processor 114 to rewπte to the message store server 190 or back to the sender.

Using the call processor 110 and its associated peripherals, a wide variety of services may be performed. These have been discussed above briefly and are described in detail in Section VI below. However, to understand how d e call processor 110 operates to provide these services, some exemplary descriptions for certain services is provided. For example, when a wireline e-mail message arrives at the PCI server's Data

Messaging Peripheral 112, the messaging gateway 140 and messaging Controller 136 send notification to the PCI application server 114 of die e-mail arrival. The PCI application server 114 will query the profile cache 51, or if necessary, the PCI database 44. Driven by data in the subscriber's profile, the PCI application server 114 executes service logic to determine where to forward die e-mail (i.e., forward to PDA 30 or to POP server 190 depending on screening outcome), and what media, if any, to use to send notification of the e-mail arrival. For another example, when a CallCommand call arrives at the PCI server 48, the procedure is as follows. The switch controller 152 and transaction controller 150 forward the call to the IP Functions Server 130 based on the dialed number. The IP functions 130 sends a provide_instructions 1129+ message to the PCI database 44 to determine how to handle the call. The PCI database 44 and IP functions applications servers 130 begin a conversation of messages which perform a sequence of functions which play an announcement to the caller, send notification to the PDA, etc. When a response arrives from die PDA 30, the IP functions server 130 forwards the response to die PCI database 44. The PCI database 44 will then direct LP functions server 130 to forward the call to a routing number and/or play a synthesized message to the caller.

If a subscriber wishes to update the subscriber profile by DTMF, the procedure is as follows. A call arrives at die PCI server 48. The switch controller 152 and transaction controller 150 forward the call to the BP functions server 130 based on the dialed number. The EP functions server 130 sends a provide_instructions 1129+ message to the PCI database 44 to determine how to handle the calL The PCI database 44 sends a request to play an announcement and collect digits ("please enter PEN", collect PEN). The EP functions server 130 returns the result of this request to the PCI database 44. Again die PCI database 44 sends a request to the EP functions server 130 to play an announcement and collect digits ("voice menu", menu selection). The EP functions server 130 returns the result of this request to the PCI database 44.

This process repeats as users are guided through menus and change profile elements. The PCI database 44 interprets die collected DTMF tones and updates the subscriber's profile accordingly.

When a PDA 30 sends an e-mail message addressed to a wireline address the procedure is as follows. The PDA 30 sends a UDP send_mail message to the PCI application server 114. The PCI application server 114 detects die message is not destined for another PCI subscriber and forwards the request to the messaging controller 136, which forwards it to the messaging gateway 140 which is in d e Data and Messaging Peripheral 112. The messaging gateway 140 interfaces with the MTA 158 to send the e-mail to the wireline network 170, using, for example, the Simple Messaging Transfer Protocol (SMTP). The PCI server 48 may be based, for example, on either an X.400 MTA or an SMTP router and can convert between both protocols. The PCI server 48 may receive text messages from a variety of different text messaging systems such as Internet mail, third party messaging systems, or propπetary messaging systems. In the example where PCI routes messages using an X.400 MTA, these messages must be converted to conform with X.400 protocol before they can be routed. Thus, an exemplary messaging gateway is an X.400 gateway, which can be designed and built by a person of ordinary skill in the art.

II. The PCI Database A PCI Database 44 maintains the subscriber profile, controls the Call Command functions, and handles DTMF-based subscriber profile updates.

The PCI database architecture shown in Fig. 6 comprises several application and support components. The application components include Multiple Services Application Platform (MSAP) 202; Service Provisioning and Creation Environment (SPACE) 204; and Data and Report Subsystem (DRS) 206.

The service components include the Maintenance and Operation Console (MOC) 208; the Intelligence Peripheral Interface (EPI) 210; the Generic Data Interface (GDI) 212; the Service Network Interface (SN ) 214; and the Data and Report database (D&R) 218.

The service network interface (SNT) 214 provides a communication interface to external systems such as switch 50 and PCI server 48. These interfaces include the EPI 210 and GDI 212 which connect the PCI database to the PCI server via the TCP IP network 213. The GDI 212 is used for uploading and downloading a subscriber profile to die PCI server 48. The EPI 210 is used for transmitting DTMF commands from a user via the PCI server 48. For redundancy, each intelligent peripheral interface (DPI) and generic data interface (GDI) processor preferably requires two logical connections to d e PCI server.

The Multiple Services Application Platform (MSAP) 202 includes a call processor 220, a first call process request (CPR) database 222, an MSAP common 224, a shared memory 226, ar^ a call contact database (CCDB) 228. The call processor 220 receives messages from and sends messages to a message distributor 219 in the SNI 214. The message distributor determines whether d e message received from the call processor 220 is to be sent to the EPI 210 or the GDI 212. The call processor receives messages from the message distributor and sends them to ύhe first CPR database, die CCDB 228, and/or d e shared memory 226. The first CPR database 222 stores the subscriber profiles. The MSAP 224 connects the first CPR database 222 with the second CPR 230, which resides in SPACE 204. MSAP common 224 updates one of the CPR databases 222, 230 when changes have been made to the other CPR database. The CCDB 228 is a temporary, dynamic storage for storing subscriber profiles, and related data during profile update procedures. The shared memory 226 allows different processors to use the same data.

SPACE 204 is a service provider-operated module through which new PCI database applications are created and new subscriber profiles are initiated. SPACE 206 includes the second CPR database 230 which contains the identical information as the first CPR database 222 in MS P 202. When a new subscriber profile is to be created, a service provider uses a display terminal 232 in SPACE to provision a new service profile including certain subscriber information. The subscriber profile is activated through MSAP when the user initially registers. Service provider changes made to the second CPR database 230 are transmitted to the first CPR database 222 in MSAP via the MSAP common 224. Changes made to the second CPR database 230 by a service provider are not transmitted to the service profile cache 51 in the PCI server 48 until a later time. That is, the PCI database 44 does not send data to die PCI server 48 unless requested by the server 48. The server profile cache 51 will be updated with this new information the next time the PCI server 48 requests a profile download, for instance when the subscriber next registers. SPACE 204 provides a function parallel to the Service Management System described above.

The Data and Report Subsystem (DRS) 206 collects data about the PCI database 44 usage which may be helpful to the service provider. For example, errors made by the subscriber when updating die user profile are noted. The types of alterations made, times such alterations are made, and the like are also stored for future use by the service provider.

MOC 110 is a network maintenance support system which monitors the status of the network and checks for system failures and the like. When a subscriber wishes to update the subscriber profile using a PDA 30, the procedure is as follows. The PDA 40 communicates with the PCI server 48. The PCI server 48 sends a GetData message having a "Service Key", which is a preferably a ten digit PCI subscriber number (e.g., a telephone number), to the PCIdatabase 44 over the GDI 212. The GDI 212 translates the GetData message into a format understandable by the PCI database 44. The message is sent through the message distributor 219 and call processor 220 to die first CPR database 222 where the subscriber profile resides. The Service Key is used to obtain the correct subscriber profile and die profile is sent through the call processor 220 to die message distributor 219. The message distributor determines that this message is to be sent to the PCI server 48 via the GDI 212. (The reason for this is discussed below.) The GDI 212 translates the data into a format suitable for the TCP/EP network and is transmitted to the PCI server 48. The requested changes are performed in the PCI server 48 and the updated profile is sent back to the PCI database 44 through the TCP EP network, the GDI 212, message distributor 219, call processor 220 and to the first CPR database 222. The call processor 220 also sends a message through the GDI 212 to the PCI server 48 which will be sent a wireless transmission to the PDA 30 acknowledging the subscriber profile update. The changes are also sent to the MSAP common 222 where they are sent to the second CPR database 230 in SPACE 204. During this process, information may be temporarily stored in the Call Contact

Database (CCDB) 228. The CCDB database 228 provides temporary storage for subscnber profile updates that are suspended because they are waiting for action by a subscriber or waiting for data from an external system, such as the PCI server 48. During the time intervals between action by the user or delays in receiving data from an external system, the call processor 220 stores the information in the CCDB database 228 and processes other calls.

When a subscriber desires to update his or her subscriber profile using a touch tone phone, the procedure is as follows. The subscriber calls, for example, a service number provided by the service provider. The call is routed to the PCI server 48. The PCI server 48 sends a message to the PCI database 44 via the EPI 210 that the DTMF commands are present. The message is sent through die message distributor 219 to the call processor 220. The appropriate subscriber profile is retrieved from the first CPR database 222 in the MSAP 202.

The call processor 220 instructs the PCI server 48 to play a voice announcement instructing die caller to enter die subscriber ED and password, by pressing die appropriate digits on the touch-tone phone. The information is entered by d e caller, and the PCI database 44 validates this infoπnation. If die validation determines that the caller is an authorized subscriber, the PCI database 44 instructs the PCI server 48 to ask die subscriber to select which subscriber profile information is to be modified. Only two fields are modifiable using DTMF messaging: changing a wireline registration or recording a personalized greeting. The subscriber selects either registering at a wireline phone or recording a personalized greeting. If wireline registration is selected, the PCI database 44 instructs die PCI server 48 to prompt a ten digit telephone number to which all incoming calls will be routed. If die subscriber selects to record a personalized greeting, the PCI database 44 instructs die PCI server 48 to prompt die subscriber for a new greeting. If invalid information is entered at any time, the PCI server 48 plays an error message to the subscriber and die subscriber retries the modification. If die retry fails, the call is terminated.

Otherwise, the subscriber's profile is updated according to the modification, data synchronizing the messages are sent to the PCI server 48 and the call processor 220 instructs the PCI server 48 to inform the subscriber that the PCI service profile was updated.

The call processor 220 also sends a message through the message distributor 219 to the GDI 212 and to die PCI server 48 which updates die service profile cache 51 in the PCI server 48. The changes stored back in the first CPR database 220 are sent to the MSAP common 224 where they are sent to the second CPR database 230. Note that DTMF function signals, which use the 1129+ protocol, are routed ύ rough die EPI 210 and the subscriber profile data, which uses the GDI protocol, are routed through the GDI 212.

IV. The PCI Server Database Interface

The interface between the PCI server 48 and the PCI database 44 is based on two protocols. The first protocol is 1129+. This protocol will be used to support the PCI Call

Command feature and for subscriber initiated profile manipulation using DTMF. The second protocol is Generic Data Interface. The GDI is used for subscriber profile management, specifically downloading a subscriber profile from the PCI database 44 to the PCI server 48 and for applying updates to die profile stored in the PCI database 44. Fig. 7 shows d e logical links from d e PCI database 44 to d e PCI server 48. The PCI database 44 consists of a mated pair of PCI databases 44a, 44b, each containing three call processors 220 which each share the load. The links 250 are TCP/IP links between Intelligent

Peripheral Interface (EPI) 210 and die Generic Data Interface (GDI) 212 processors on the PCI database 44 to de PCI server call processor. Two logical connections are made from each EPI 210 and GDI 212 processors to the PCI server for redundancy. Thus, a full SCP configuration supporting PCI would preferably require 24 logical links, as shown in Fig. 7. The PCI database initiates the opening of the logical links.

In ϋ is illustrative embodiment die CallCommand feature employs die 1129+ protocol. For the wireless messaging feature, PCI uses die GDI protocol. The GDI tag EDs assigned for die PCI subscriber profile elements are provided in Appendix B.

Appendix B also shows the PCI profile data, including die profile elements, their data types, maximum lengths, and GDI tag Ds. An * indicates elements which were shortened to 32 bytes because of GDI byte limitations. The description of the types and lengths of these elements is as follows: dN BCD-encoded digits. The number N represents the maximum number of BCD digits, not octets. cN Up to N ASCII characters. cN Binary integer N bytes in length, in network byte order (highest order bit transmitted first).

Because the portion of the PCI subscriber profile downloaded to the PCI server is large (preferably approximately 1,000 bytes), and a maximum Transaction Capable Application Program (TCAP) message size is 256 bytes, the profile must be managed in segments. The service profile is divided into six segments as shown in Table 1. Each segment is assigned a unique numeπc identifier.

PCI Profile Segment Segment ID (decimal)

Personal data 1

CC service profile 2

E-mail routing 3

E-mail subject screening 4

E-mail from screening 5

Voice mail profile 6 |

Certain data in a subscriber profile provides a subscriber's preferred media for messages delivery and notification. The encoding for tiiese types are given in Table 2.

Media Type Code

Alphanumeric Pager A

E-mail message store S

Fax F

PDA P

Voice mail V

Wireline e-mail E

Null Z

For example, if the subscriber prefers to receive e-mail which passes screening via the PDA 30, then the "primary destination one" profile element will contain a "P".

Fig. 8 illustrates a message flow for profile retrieval using the GDI protocol. A subscriber attempts to register with the PCI server either explicitly or implicitly (registration is discussed in detail below). The PCI server 48 send a GDI GetData query to the PCI database 44 over one of the GDI links (line 260). The PO server 48 may send one GetData data query for each PCI profile segment. Each query will be processed by die PCI database 44 as an independent transaction with a unique TCAP transaction ED. Each GetData query sent by the PCI server 48 will include a "Service Key" parameter which is a ten-digit PCI subscriber number (e.g., a telephone number). This key should be used by the PCI database 44 to identify the subscriber. In each GetData is a list of tag EDs listed in the profile elements to be retrieved. The PCI database 44 responds to d e GetData data query with a GetData response (line 262). The response contains a return code and data for each element requested in the GetData data query.

Fig. 9 provides a message flow between die PCI server 48 and die PCI database 44 for a profile update originating from a wireless PDA 30. This wireless profile update uses the GDI protocol. A subscriber performs a profile manipulation activity, and the PDA 30 sends a profile data message to the PCI server 48. The PCI server 48 sends a GDI SendData query to the PCI database 44 over one of the GDI links (line 264). The PCI server 48 may send one SendData query for each PCI profile segment for which a profile element was updated. Each query will be processed by the PO database 44 as an independent transaction with a unique TCAP transaction ED. Each Send Data query sent by the PO server 48 will include a "Service Key" parameter which is- the ten digit PCI subscriber number. This key should be used by the PCI database 44 to identify the subscriber. Each SendData query contains a list of tag EDs provided in Appendix B and data for the profile elements to be updated. Not all tags in this segment may be included in the SendData query; only those profile elements which are actually updated by the subscriber will be sent. The PCI database 44 should not update data for which no tag was included in the SendData query.

The PO database 44 responds to the SendData query with a Send Data response (line 266). The response contains a return code for each element requested in the SendData query. Fig. 10 is an illustrative example of one possible CallCommand message flow between the PO server 48 and the PCI database 44. (CallCommand is discussed in more detail in section VI D.) The exact call flow for CallCommand depends upon the implementation of the service logic by the service designer, and upon options selected by the CallCommand subscriber. The CallCommand functions illustratively use the 1129+ protocol and die EPI 210 (see Figs. 6 and 7). As illustrated in Fig. 10, a CaUCommand call arrives in the PCI server 48. The PCI server 48 sends a provide_instructions query to die PO database over one of the 1129+ links (line 268). A TCAP transaction ED is generated for the query. The dialed number digits parameter contains the personal numbers of the PO subscriber (Le., Service Key). The ANI digits contain the automatic number identification, if any, of the caller (ANI is a telephone network capability). The PO database sends a 1129+ send_to_resource command to the PO server 48 to play an announcement and collect digits (line 270). The PO server 48 plays the announcement, collects the digits, and sends a response containing a return code and the digits collected (line 272).

PCI database 44 sends a 1129+ play_application command to die PO server 48 to notify the PDA 40 of the incoming call (line 274). The PO server 48 responds witii a return code and a destination number (entered by the subscriber at d e PDA 30) to which d e call is routed (line 276). Tbe PO database 44 sends a 1129+ switch_to_resource command to the PO server 48 instructing the PO server 48 to route the call to a destination number (line 278). The PO server responds widi the return code executing diat request (line 280).

Fig. 11 is an illustrative example of one possible message flow between die PO server 48 and die PO database 44 for a DTMF profile manipulation message. The DTMF profile manipulator uses the 1129+ protocol through the EPI 210. The exact call flow for DTMF profile manipulation depends upon the implementation of service logic by the service designer, and upon options selected by the PCI subscriber.

As shown in this illustrative example, when a call arrives at the PO server, the PCI server sends an 1129+ provide_instructions query to the PCI database (line 282). The called number contains a dialed number (i.e., the service number for a DTMF updates), while the ANI field contains the ANI, if . The PCI DTMF profile manipulations Call Process Request CPR is triggered by the dialed service number. The CPR 222 instructs the PCI server to play announcements and collect digits, guiding the subscriber through voice menus and prompts (lines 284, 288). The PCI server responds to each request with digits collected (lines 286, 290, 294). The CPR updates subscriber's profile with data collected via DTMF.

V. PDA/PCI Interface

Communication between the PDA and PCI use, for example, an X.25 transport using the UDP EP protocol. A brief discussion of the PDA structure is provided. The PDA 30 is preferably a notebook or palm top computer having a wireless network interface. The PDA may be, for example a Hewlett Packard Omnibook 300 notebook computer running a PO application. Fig. 12 illustrates an exemplary PDA. The PDA 30 has a central processing unit 295 connected to a bus B. The central processing unit ("CPU") 295 performs most of the computing and logic functions of the PDA 30. A memory 295 is connected to the bus B, which stores information to be provided to the CPU 295 or otherwise used by the PDA 30. An input/output device 297, such as a keyboard, is also connected to the bus B which allows a user to input data for storage in memory

296 or for use by CPU 295. A display 298 is connected to the bus B. The PDA 30 also has a wireless corπrniinication interface 299 for communication with a wireless communication network.

The PDA PO interface involves six types of message flow. These messages are: (1) registration/deregistration; (2) wireless messaging; (3) retrieving E-Mail; (4) cross-media notification; (5) CallCommand; and (6) profile management.

There are two types of registration and deregistration: explicit and implicit. Explicit registration occurs when a PO subscriber starts the PO application software on the PDA 30 (this is called start-up registration) or when die subscriber clicks a status check button or one of the service registration request buttons on the PDA 30 either for the CallCommand or wireless messaging service. Once successfully registered, if d e subscriber's profile is not already present in the service profile cache 51 maintained by the PO server 48, die PO server 48 will request a download of die subscriber's profile from die PCI database 44 to the service profile cache 51. The PO server 48 sets the subscπber's registration status in the cache 51 to match those requested by the subscriber for the wireless messaging service for the call command service.

Fig. 13 illustrates one example of the message flow between the PDA 30 and PCI server 48 duπng explicit registration. This flow is also used by a subscriber to check registration of CallCommand or wireless messaging services. A subscnber starts the PCI application software on the PDA or clicks the service status check, CallCommand registration, or wireless messaging registration buttons on the PDA. The PDA sends a registration request to the PCI server 48 with the subscπber's validation information (subscriber ED and password (line 300)). The PDA 30 also starts a timer duπng which the PDA 30 will wait for a response from the PO server 48. The PCI server 48 server receives the registration request and checks if the subscriber is provisioned and if the subscriber ED and password are correct. The PCI server then sends a registration acknowledgement (line 302). If the subscriber is not provisioned, no service profile exists and the acknowledgement includes an "unrecognized subscπber" response. If the subscπber ED and password are invalid, the acknowledgement includes an "incorrect password/PEN" response. Otherwise, the PO server acknowledgement includes a "success" response. If the PDA 30 does not receive an acknowledgement from the PO server within a predetermined time, it aborts the registration attempt and tells the subscriber to try again later.

Implicit registration automatically registers a subscnber for the wireless messaging service when the subscriber is currently not registered and wishes to send or fetch E-Mail from or to a PDA 30. Implicit registration is done as follows. The PO server receives a fetch or send request from a subscriber who is not registered for die wireless messaging service. The PCI server 48 retrieves a copy of the subscriber's service profile from the PO database 44, if necessary, and validates die subscriber's ED and password. The PO server 48 validates the profile contents to make sure tiiat subscriber may use the wireless messaging service. If wireless messaging is permitted, the PCI server 48 processes die request. Odierwise, it sends an acknowledgement indicating the reason why the subscriber is not permitted to use the wireless messaging service. The message flow is the same as illustrated in Fig. 13.

Once the subscriber is registered for either the CallCommand service or the wireless messaging service, the subscriber remains registered until the subscriber explicitly deregisters by either quitting die application or clicking the deregistration button on the PDA 30. The subscriber can also be implicitly deregistered for the wireless messaging service by die PO server 48 provided the PO did not detect any wireless messaging activities to or from that subscriber for a given duration of time. Although the subscriber is deregistered, the subscriber's service profile will remain in the service profile cache 51. The profile remains in the cache as long as the PCI server has some activity for the subscriber, such as incoming e-mail messages within a predetermined time, such as four hours.

No PDA-to-PO server messages may be sent be the subscriber to implicitly register for CallCommand, thus, a subscriber should not be implicitly deregistered from this service. Implicit registration and deregistration occurs only for the wireless messaging service, and not for CallCommand. A subscriber remains registered for CallCommand as long as he or she is running the CallCommand software application on the PDA.

Explicit deregistration occurs when a subscriber quits the PCI application software on the PDA (this is called exit deregistration) or when the subscriber clicks one of the service deregistration request buttons on the PDA for the CallCommand or wireless messaging services. Fig. 14 is an illustrative embodiment of a message flow between the PDA 30 and PCI server 48 for explicit deregistration. A subscriber quits die PO application software on the PDA or clicks a deregistration button on the PDA. The PDA 30 sends a deregistration request to the PCI server 48 with die subscriber's validation information (the subscriber ED and password) (line 304). The PDA 30 also starts a timer during which the PDA will wait for a response from the PO server 48. The PCI server 48 sends an acknowledgement (line 306). The PO server 48 receives de deregistration request and checks if the subscriber ED and password are correct. If the subscriber ED and password are not correct, die acknowledgement includes an "incorrect password/P N" response. Otherwise, the acknowledgement includes a "success" response. If the PDA 30 does not receive an acknowledgement from the PO server 48 after a predetermined time, d e PDA 30 assumes that it is out of radio coverage and informs the subscriber to retry later. Implicit deregistration occurs when the PO does not detect any wireless messaging activity from or to the subscriber for a given duration of time, for example four hours. The PCI will also try to implicitly deregister a subscriber from die wireless messaging service in the middle of die night in die event that die subscriber inadvertently left die PDA 30 turned on. The PCI server 48 keeps a time-stamp of die most recent wireless messaging activity for each registered subscriber in the subscriber's service profile maintained in the service profile cache 51. Wheneve the PO server 48 detects any wireless messaging activities to or from a particular subscriber, the time-stamp is updated to the current time. The stored time-stamp of a registered subscriber is peπodically compared to the current time. When a predetermined time elapses, the PO server 48 assumes tiiat the subscπber is out of radio coverage or has quit the PCI application.

For implicit (or automatic) deregistration, the message flow is the same as illustrated in Fig 14 The PCI server 48 sends to the PDA 30 a deregistration request containing registration information about the subscnber. The PCI server 48 also sets a timer duπng which it will wait for a response from the PDA 30. When the PDA 30 receives the deregistration request, it responds with registration acknowledgement which contains the registration information currently known to PDA. When the PO server 48 receives the registration acknowledgement, it updates the subscπber's registration status based on information in the acknowledgement. The PCI server 48 also updates the wireless messaging time-stamp associated with die subscπber to the current time If the PCI server 48 does not receive an acknowledgement within a predetermined time as descπbed above, the PO server 48 assumes that the subscriber is no longer registered and removes all references to the subscπber from the service profile cache 51.

Sending and receiving e-mail wireless messages involves two types of message flows sending messages from the PDA 30 to the PO server 48 and from the PO server 48 to the PDA 30.

Fig. 15 is an illustrative example of a message flow sending an E-mail from a PDA 30 to an PO server 48. When a subscriber sends an E-Mail notification from the PDA 30, the PDA 30 forwards d e E-Mail notification to the PO server 48. The body of the E-mail contains, for example, "to;from;subject;cc" information (line 308). The PO server acknowledges this notification (line 310). If die E-mail is longer tiian can be transmitted in a single message, the PDA 30 segments the E-mail into multiple, sequentially numbered messages and sends them to the PCI server (lines 312, 316, 320). Each message sent from die PDA is responded to with an acknowledgement containing die reception status of the message and the sequence number it is acknowledging (lines 314, 318, 322). The PDA 30 and PO server 38 use die sequence number to maintain a sequential flow of packets. Out of sequence messages are discarded. Once all of the packets are received, the PO server 48 puts them into tiieir original order using the sequence number and forwards the now assembled E-mail to a message transfer agent, which then forwards the E-mail to its intended destination. The PDA 30 starts a timer each time it sends out an E-maiL If the PDA 30 does not receive an acknowledgement after a predetermined time (for example ten seconds), the send operation is aborted and die E-mail is stored in a local outbound queue for redelivery in the future. When an E-mail is being delivered from an PO server 48 to a PDA 30, a similar message flow is used. The only difference is diat the PO server 48 initiates die flow and sends the initial messages instead of the PDA 30.

Retrieving E-mail involves two types of message flows: retrieving undelivered E-mail addressed to de PDA 30 and retrieving E-mail delivered a messaging system, such as a wireline e- mail system. When a subscriber is out of radio coverage or is not registered with PCI, the PCI sends E-mails addressed to be delivered to the PDA (PDA-bound E-mail) to an external mail storage system The PCI server will also send certain E-mail directly to an external mail storage system (MS-bound E-mail), such as the subscriber's wireline E-mail connected to his or her personal computer, according to the subscriber profile stored in the PO database 44.

A registered subscriber can retrieve PDA 30 bound E-mail at any time by starting "FETCH" operation. The PCI will send the PDA bound mail from the external mail storage and will also summarize MS-bound E-mail.

An illustrative example of the message flow between the PDA and the PCI server for retrieving undelivered PDA bound E-mail is shown in Figs. 16a and (b). If there are no MS-bound messages, an illustrative message flow is shown in Fig. 16(a). The PDA 30 sends a fetch request to the PO server 48 (line 324) and starts a timer, which waits for an acknowledgement. If no acknowledgement is received within a predetermined time, for example twelve seconds, the PDA 30 assumes it is out of radio coverage and informs die subscriber to try again later. In response to the request, the PO server 48 logs into an external mail storage system specified in die subscriber's profile. If any PDA- bound E-mail is stored in die external storage system, the PO server 48 will (a) move the PDA bound E-mail from the external mail storage system into a pending area in the PO server, (b) send an acknowledgement to the PDA indicating die number of PDA bound E-mail now residing in de pending area and (c) initiate delivery of these PDA bound E-mail from the pending area to die PDA (line 326).

If there are MS-bound E-mail messages, an illustrative message flow is shown in Fig. 16(b). The PDA sends a fetch request (line 328) and starts a timer. Whenever die PO server sends a summary message, it starts a timer. If the PO server 48 does not receive an acknowledgement witiiin a certain predetermined time, for example ten seconds, it will assume tiiat the PDA 30 is out of radio coverage, abort the send operation and discard the summary information. In response to the request, the PO server 48 will (a) send an acknowledgement to die PDA indicating die number of MS-bound E-mail present (line 300); (b) extract summary information from those messages; and (c) send the summary to the subscriber's PDA (line 332). When the PDA receives an acknowledgement from the PO server, it informs the subscriber based on the contents.

Summary information for the MS-bound E-mail is formatted into one ASOI text per E-mail and sent to the PDA. If the summary information, or the number of summarized E-mail require more than one message, the PCI server 48 splits the summary information into multiple sequentially numbered segments and sends each segment in a separate message (lines 336, 340). Each message from die PCI server 48 is responded to by die PCI server with an acknowledgement containing the reception status^ of the message and the sequence number it is acknowledging (lines 334, 338, 342). Out of sequence messages are discarded. Once all of the packets are received, the PDA 30 puts them into their original order using the sequence number.

Once die summary information describing die MS-bound E-mail messages is reviewed, tbe subscriber may start a FETCH operation to retrieve mese MS-bound E-mail messages. Fig. 17 is an illustrative example of a message flow between the PDA 30 and the PO server 48 retrieving MS-bound E-mail. The subscriber selects an MS-bound E-mail message to be received. The PDA 30 sends a retrieve request to the PO server 48 containing the message selected by the subscriber (line 344). The PO server 48 responds with an acknowledgement (line 346). The PCI server 48 logs into the external message storing system specified in die subscriber's service profile and moves the MS-bound E-mail specified in die request out of the storage system into a pending area in the PO server 48. The PO server 48 initiates a send operation which delivers the E-mail in the same manner as discussed above.

Cross media notification (e.g., PDA notification of voice mail message receipt) is sent to the PDA 30 using the same delivery as a wireless E-mail message to the subscriber. The PCI server 48 originates the notification E-mail and the e-mail subject is "message notification ". The body of die notification E-mail contains the message sender's address (Le., the phone number for a voice mail), the date and time de message arrived at the PO; the type of media, (i.e., voice mail FAX, E-mail or other); whed er d e message is marked urgent (if detectable); the length of the message (for example, in minutes for a voice mail message); and, if appropriate, die subject of the message.

CallCommand allows a PO subscriber to reroute or direct calls in real time. The subscriber may receive notification on d e PDA 30 diat a call is waiting. Using the PDA 30, the subscriber may instruct the PO to route the call to specified destination number or have die PCI server play a message entered by die subscriber using synthesized speech. When a call is made to a CallCommand subscriber's number, it is routed to an PO server 48. The PCI server 48 queries the PCI database 44 to determine how the subscriber's profile has directed die call to be processed. If the subscriber is registered at a known telephone number, the PCI database 44 instructs the PCI server 48 to route the incoming call to the given telephone number (assuming that the call meets any screening requirements). If the subscriber is not registered at a known telephone number, the PCI database 44 will provide a default routing number and a timer value instructs the PO to play an announcement customized by the subscriber to the caller and start collecting DTMF digits within that time period. The PCI plays the announcement and starts the timer provided by the PO database 44 and then begins collecting DTMF digits entered by the caller. If no digits are collected within a predetermined time period, the PO routes die call to a default number indicated by the subscriber's profile in the PCI database 44. If DTMF digits are collected, the PO puts the caller on hold determines if the caller meets screening requirement, and handles the call accordingly. If the call is to be directed -to the subscriber, die PO attempts to contact the subscriber. Fig. 18 is an illustrative example of the message flow between the PDA 30 and PCI server 48 for a CallCommand call The PO server 48 sends a notification message to the subscriber's PDA 30 to notify die subscriber diat a call is waiting (line 348). The message contains the DTMF digits entered by the caller. The PO server 48 starts two timers, which are the time interval die PO server 48 expects to receive an acknowledgement from the PDA 30 and the time interval the PO server 48 expects to receive a response from the PDA 30, respectively. The typical values for these timers are ten and forty seconds, respectively. The time to receive an acknowledgement should be less tiian die time for the response.

After receiving a notification message, die PDA sends an acknowledgement to die PO (line 350). This informs die PO server 48 that die PDA 30 is within radio coverage and that the subscriber has been notified about die incoming call Once die acknowledgement is received, it cancels the acknowledgement timer, but leaves d e response timer ticking, waiting for a response to come from the PDA 30. If die PO server 48 does not receive an acknowledgement within the predetermined time, it assumes d at the PDA is either out of radio range or is turned off and cancels die response timer and routes the call to a default number programmed into die user profile in the PO database 44. The subscriber is notified of d e incoming call by die CallCommand interface on die PDA 30. The DTMF digits entered by the caller provide the subscriber with the name and or telephone number of the incoming caller. The subscriber can decide to route de call to directory number or voicemail, enter a text message to be played to the caller, or both. The PDA will send a response to the PCI server 48, which carries die number to which the call should be routed, a short text message to be played to the caller through synthesized voice, or both (line 352). When the PCI server receives the response, it cancels the response timer and executes the subscriber's decision in the response and sends an acknowledgement which contains how the subscriber's decision is to be carried out (line 354).

If the response timer expires before the PCI server 48 receives a response, the PCI server 48 routes the call to a default number obtained from the PO database 44 and send a status message to the PDA 30 to inform the subscriber that the caller is no longer waiting (line 356). Also, if the caller decided not to wait any longer (that is hangs up or presses "*", which allows the caller to go to the default number) die PCI sends a status message providing this information. The PDA acknowledges the status message (line 358).

Profile management allows the subscriber to modify wireless messaging and Call Command services by updating certain elements in die subscriber's service profile stored in the PCI database 44 and d e service profile cache 51 in die PO server 48. Profile information is not stored locally on a PDA 30. Updating the subscriber's profile using a PDA 30 always requires the subscriber to have a profile download from the PO.

Profile management involves two types of message flows, profile download and profile upload. Fig. 1 is an illustrative example of the message flow between the PDA 30 and the PCI server 48 for a profile download. As indicated above, any profile change requires a profile download because die profile is never stored in the PDA 30. A subscriber starts a profile management application on a PDA 30 and requests a profile download. The PDA 30 sends a download request to the PO server and requests a copy of the subscriber's modifiable profile elements to be downloaded to the PDA 30 (line 360). The PO validates the identity of the subscriber through its subscriber ED and password. If die subscriber's identity is not validated, the PO sends an acknowledgement and an error code and terminates d e profile update session. If the subscriber's identity is validated, d e PO downloads the subscriber's modifiable profile elements (lines 362, 366, 370). Attached as Appendix C is a list of tags for modifiable profile elements. The PDA 30 acknowledges die received data (lines 364, 368, 372). The PDA starts a timer after sending d e download request. If die PDA does not receive an acknowledgement or data from the PO server witiiin a predetermined amount of time, for example, ten seconds, it assumes that it is out of radio coverage and informs the subscriber to try again later. The PO server 48 starts a timer each time it sends out data to the PDA 30. If the PO server 48 does not receive an acknowledgement from the PDA 30 within a predetermined time, for example ten seconds, it will abort the profile download operation. Once the subscπber finishes editing the profile on the PDA, a profile upload request is issued. An illustrative example of the message flow between the PDA 30 and the PCI server 48 for a profile upload is shown in Figs. 20(a) and (b). After the subscπber issues a profile upload request, the PDA 30 sends an upload request to the PCI server 48 requesting permission to send the updated profile elements (step 374). The PO server 48 validates the identity of the subscπber, for example by checking the subscπber ED and password, and checks if there is an associated download request issued by the same subscriber. The check for an associated previous download request is necessary so that the PCI server 48 is sure that the profile the subscπber wants to change is the profile that the PO server 48 has just sent. If the subscnber's identity is not validated, or there is no associated download request packet, die PO server sends an error code to the PDA 30 and terminates the profile update session. If the subscriber's identity is validated and there is an associated download request, the PO server 48 honors die request by sending an acknowledgement and a status code of "OK" to the PDA 30 (line 376). When the PDA 30 receives the OK, it formats the updated profile elements and sends diem to the PO server 48 in the same way the profile was sent to the PDA 30 during the download phase (lines 378-386). If no error is detected, the PO server 48 sends the updated profile elements to the PO database 44 to commit the change. After a corifirmation is received from the PO database 44, the PO server 48 sends an acknowledgement with status code of "OK" to the PDA to confirm and conclude the profile update session (line 388), as shown in Fig. 20(a).

Fig. 20(b) is an illustrative message flow when the PO server 48 detects errors in an uploaded profile. The upload proceeds as above (lines 390-398). If the PO server 48 detects errors in the updated profile elements it responds witi an error message to notify the subscnber about the invalid profile element (line 400). The PDA acknowledges receipt of die error message (line 402). The PO server 48 sends die invalid profile elements in a similar way as the profile was sent to the PDA 30 duπng die download phase (lines 404, 406). The PDA 30 starts a timer when its sends out an upload request or sends out data.

If the PDA 30 does not receive an acknowledgement from the PO server 48 within a certain predetermined time, it will abort the profile upload operation and inform die subscriber to retry at a later time.

VI. Services A. Wireless E-mail Messaging

PO includes several wireless text message sending, receiving, arid service control features. PO's wireless text messaging services are based on three network-based capabilities: x message integration combining voice message notification, voice mail, telephone calls, e-mail, and fax; x message routing and delivery, i.e., the PO is a wireless and wireline network gateway; x database access, i.e., subscriber profile, authentication, and validation.

The PCI uses personal communications service-integration capabilities to integrate the wireless service capabilities available to the subscriber. This is accomplished by providing the subscriber with control over die message routing and delivery by d e subscriber accessible "subscriber profile" stored in die PO. The subscriber profile contains subscriber programmed instructions on message receipt, origination, and notification. Thus, PO operates as a messaging gateway for providing access to multiple wireline and wireless networks, while using subscriber profile information to control sending and receiving options. PO allows wireless service providers to integrate the voice messaging, e-mail, and fax message services for one subscriber through a single telephone number. Thus, one phone number may provide a single link between the service provider and the subscriber's voice and data communications lines.

The message sending features include communications across disparate networks and broadcast communications. A subscriber may send voice mail, e-mail, and fax messages between different service providers and networks. A subscriber may also send broadcast e-mail and fax messages, which broadcasts may mix e-mail and fax messages witiiin a single distribution list. For example, the subscriber may type a message on a PDA and send it to a distribution list over a wireless network. The distribution list may direct die PO to deliver the message to the office as an e-mail and to a client as a fax. The message receiving features include personal number addressing, selection of message receipt media format, selection of cross-media message notification, and selection of message screening and delivery options. A subscriber may receive voice (e.g., phone), voice mail notification, e-mail, and fax communications under a single personal telephone number. A subscriber may direct e-mail and fax delivery based on selected parameters, such as time-of-day, day-of-week, etc. A subscriber's media message notification, voice mail notification of e-mail or fax messages, e-mail notification of voice mail or fax messages, and fax notification of e-mail or voice mail messages may be delivered to the subscriber based on selected options and parameters. Alternatively, if the subscriber's wireless terminal is not activated, e-mail messages may be automatically routed to alternate destinations as defined by the subscriber's profile. For example, the subscriber may not want to receive all telephone calls at a visiting location to avoid unnecessary interruptions and unwanted incoming call charges. The subscriber directs the PCI to send notification of phone calls to the pager and to route the call to voice mail. Once notified, the user can determine from the phone number included in the pager notification whether to call the person directly, check voice mail, or ignore the call until a later time. The subscriber may also direct which messages are to be routed to die subscriber's current serving network, which are to be sent to another network, and what media is to be used to receive certain messages. The subscriber may also designate, for example, that if the wireless terminal is off, all text messages to be sent to e- mail and all voice messages are to be sent to voice mail.

The PO service control features include supporting subscriber profile management, supporting personal mobility across wireless and wireline networks, and supporting wireless teιτninal mobility. A subscriber's profile may be updated by sending text messages from a PDA over a wireless network or DTMF (touch-tone) messages from either a wireline or wireless terminal The subscriber may program the profile to select media for receiving and sending information; select cross media for message notification; select message screening and delivery options; select single voice mailbox storage (for subscriber's with more than one voice mailbox); and select a PO service password. All of these options may be maintained over wireless or wireline terminals. The subscriber may automatically register and deregister a wireless terminal thus updating die subscriber's profile to receive or reroute messages as preprogrammed in the profile.

The wireless data network provides data transport between the PO server 48 and the subscriber using a wireless data terminal, such as a PDA 48. The wireless data network may connect to the PO server in a variety of ways, using a variety of protocols. For example, the wireless data network may connect to die PO using a leased line and run a proprietary protocol to connect the PO server via standardized protocols such as TCP/IP. Text messaging systems may be connected to the PO server through for example, Frame Relay, SMDS, ISDN, leased line interface, or other transport mechanism effective for supporting data communications may be used. An inter-message handling system protocol, such as X.400 (in which case X.400 gateway conversion is needed), or Internet SMTP or other protocols supported by an interworking unit terminating the data transport interface, may be used to forward messages between the PCI server 48 and the system accessing the PCI.

The PCI server will preferably support sending and receiving faxes in the T.434 format. The PCI server may also preferably support sending and receiving faxes using the simple mail transfer protocol (SMTP) supported by the TCP/EP transpoπ protocol. Fig. 21 shows an illustrative embodiment of a PCI service supporting text messaging systems. In this example, a subscriber has a personal computer 402 at the office connected to a local area network (LAN) 4 4 and an enteφrise text messaging system (for example, a local network e-mail) 413, a personal computer at home 416, and a wireless terminal, such as PDA 30 that may send and receive messages. All of these devices are connected to the PO. For example, the subscriber's home personal computer 416 may be connected to the PCI 40 via a modem and a wireline data network 418 over either a PSTN or ISDN.

Persons connected to the LAN may send text messages to the subscriber by using the local text messaging system without using die PO. That is, die user of computer 420 can send an e-mail to the subscriber's office computer 412 without entering the PO node 40. Because the enterprise text messaging system 413 is connected to PO, all enteφrise messaging users may send messages to and receive messages from all PO subscribers (including those not connected to the local text messaging system 413) by using an appropriate PO address.

A person connected to a different enteφrise messaging system, such as text message handling system 2422, can send messages to the subscriber on message handling system 1 413 by routing die message dirough die PO Server 48.

PO subscribers are assigned a single personal telephone for both voice and data communication. For example, an E.164 address (Le., a telephone number) may be assigned to a PCI subscriber to use as the single PO address. These phone numbers may be geographically based according to current PSTN architecture, but it is also possible to use portable universal numbers. Fifteen digit number formats may be desirable to permit sub-addressing. For example, a message destined for a PO subscriber may be addressed to die subscriber's telephone number, e.g., 201-555-5555. If an originating mail system such as a LAN mail system or third party message handling system requires a domain identifier, the originator may have to specify 201-555-5555 @ PO, or on die Internet 201-555-5555 @ pci.net. When the PO server 48 receives the message, it will look at the subscriber's profile stored in call process request database 222 stored in an PCI database 44 to determine how to handle the incoming message. An example of a few of the options that PO may provide for the subscriber are to: x send the message to the subscriber's wireless PDA; x send the message to the subscriber's wireline computer at home; x send the message to the destination text messaging system at the office; x send a notification of an incoming message to the wireless data terminal and the actual message to the text messaging system. x send the message to any or all of the above;

The subscriber may send text messages over the wireless data network or wireline data network to the PO server 48. The PCI server 48 consults with the subscriber's profile at -the PO database 44 and forwards the message to the appropriate destination, depending on the routing destination found in die profile. Text messaging systems not connected to the PCI 40 may send text messages to PO subscribers by using another network connected between the sender's text messaging system and the PO subscriber's text messaging system, for example, the non- connected text message may be connected to a PO over the Internet.

The flow for wireless messaging is now described. The flow for a PO subscriber receiving an e-mail message to a wireless PDA 30, for example, is as follows. An e-mail message is sent from a wireline or wireless sender to a PCI subscriber and arrives at the PO server 48. The incoming e-mail contains a recipient address in the format of "201-555-5555 @ pci.net" where 201-555-5555 is the subscriber's ten-digit personal number and pci.net is the PO server's domain name in the Internet. The PO server 48 checks the subscriber's service profile, either from the profile service cache 51 in die PO server or by downloading die subscriber profile from the PO database

44 into the cache 51 to determine how to process the e-mail message. The profile contains screening and routing information and cross media notification information. The PO server 48 uses this information to send incoming e-mail to an actual destination address that can be a wireless, wireline, or paging address using, for instance, the UDP/ P protocol over a wireless data network; the Internet SMTP protocol over the Internet wireline network; or the Telocater Alpha

Numeric Protocol (TAP), respectively. In this case, the subscriber has programmed into the subscπber profile to have the e-mail sent to a PDA 30. The PO server 48 receives the e-mail message and forwards it to the wireless data network programmed into the profile. The e-mail is transmitted over a wireless data network 39 for receipt by the PDA 30.

If the e-mail cannot be delivered, the PCI server returns the e-mail to the oπginal sender with a short descπption of why the delivery was unsuccessful, using the SMTP protocol

If an e-mail message is to be delivered to an alphanumeπc paging address, the PCI server translates the e-mail message into a paging message and sends the paging message to the paging network specified in the subscπber profile. The protocol between the PCI server and the paging network is the Telocater Alpha Numeπc Protocol (TAP). The PCI server formats the paging message into a maximum page limit with a maximum number of characters per page For example, the page limit may be two pages and a maximum of 256 characters per page. The PCI server does not verify whether a paging message is actually delivered by the paging service provider. It will, however, verify that the message was successfully sent to the paging service provider. Because the PO server does not provide diis verification, it is under the assumption that messages sent to a pager arrive successfully at the pager.

If the subscnber profile contains an option for voice message notification of e-mail messages, the PO server generates and sends a digitized prerecorded voice announcement to the address specified in the subscriber service profile. The protocol used to deliver the voice message notification is the AMIS- Analog Protocol. In this illustrative embodiment, a preferred PO server node functions as an X.400 message transport agent or SMTP router and routes messages destined for PO subscπbers and to those destined for users connected on other systems. In the case of an X.400 message transfer agent (MTA), X.400 addresses are used to internally represent subscriber addresses. The translation from die "user friendly" subscriber addresses such as E.164 numbering to the X.400 address would be done via a look-up table (ROM or other memory device) at the PO access module or d e X.400 gateway. Destination or source addresses from users on other networks are not converted to X.400 addresses, but are left in the native address format of the sending or receiving system. An X.400 gateway address may be added to the message header, however, to allow PO to route the message to an appropriate gateway. The PO server 48 is responsible for delivering a message to die subscriber listed in the destination field of the message. In a simple case, the subscriber has an X.400 or Internet mailbox accessible to the PO via one of its access connections. Akematively, the subscπber profile may contain forwarding addresses which route the message for delivery to unusual destinations. For example, the subscπber's mailbox may reside on another message handling system, a wireless data network, wireline data network, or PSTN destination associated with a fax machine. The delivery of such a message to a final destination is handled by an lnterworking unit which is responsible for doing address translation and, if necessary, format translation as defined by the subscriber profile entry.

For subject e-mail screening, the subject field is analyzed to determine if a match exists before comparing the address field. If the subject field matches an entry on the screening list, the treatment for a matched entry will occur. That means, in this illustrative embodiment, that subject screening takes precedence over address sender screening. That is, if e-mail oπginated from an address that is excluded from the e-mail screening address list, the e-mail will still be delivered according to the screening criteria.

If the PDA 30 is not registered for the wireless messaging service or if the PDA 30 is out of radio coverage at the time the message arrives at die PCI server 48, the message will be sent to the subscπber's external message storage system, such as the text message system 413.

B. Voice Messaging

Fig. 22 shows an illustrative ernbodiment of a PO service for voice mail system The voice mail systems 430 may use the public telephone network 432 and Audio Messaging Interface Specification (AMIS) - Analog Protocol to connect analog voice messages to the PCI. Alternatively, the voice mail system may use a modem 434, a private line 436, or an ISDN BRI AMIS - Digital Protocol 438 to connect digital voice mail signals to the PO.

Voice messaging systems on the PO must be able to send a message to the PCI server 48 providing notification that the subscriber has received a voice message. The voice mail system may send this text message using, for example, by asynchronous interfaces with a modem;

X.25; ISDN BRI, or TCP/EP interfaces. Preferably, the PO server 48 supports the AMIS Analog and Digital interfaces.

The PO voice messaging call flow is as follows. Using the AMIS-Analog

Protocol die system originating die voice message sends message information to die PO server 48 specifying the type of message to be delivered, the message length (in minutes), the originator's mailbox number, and the recipient's mailbox number. When the message arrives at the PO server

48, d e originator's mailbox is extracted from AMIS-Analog Protocol and is compared to the subscnber's voice mailbox number stored in the subscπber profile. If the two values match, the voice message is already in the mailbox designated by the subscπber In this case, the PCI server 48 sends a bogus error code to the oπginating voice messaging system using the AMIS-Analog protocol so diat the voice message is rejected and is not forwarded to the PCI server 48 The PCI server 48, however, has header information needed to send a notification message to the subscπber, if such notification is required by the subscπber profile.

If the oπginator's mailbox does not match the subscnber's voice mailbox number, the PO server 48 analyzes the message length parameter. If this parameter exceeds a certain predetermined length, for example three minutes, the PCI server 48 sends a response message to the oπginating voice messaging system with an error code specifying that d e message is too long No further processing of the voice message occurs If the message length is not longer than the predetermined time, the PCI server 48 sends a response message to the oπginating voice messaging system accepting the message The oπginating voice messaging system will then forward the voice message to the PCI server. When the voice message arnves at the PCI server 48, the PO server 48 attempts to route the voice message according to the screening, registration, and routing options contained in the subscriber profile. Using AMIS-Analog Protocol, the PO server 48 sends message information to the subscπber's destination voice messaging system, specifying the type of message to be delivered, length of the message in minutes, the oπginator's mailbox number, and the recipient's mailbox number.

For voice messages that cannot be delivered to die destination, for example if the mailbox is full, the destination system sends a non-delivery notification message to the PCI server 48 specdying die reason why the message is undeliverable. The PO server 48 retπes delivering for up to a system defined time period. If all of die retπes fail, the PO server 48 uses the AMIS- Analog Protocol to return the voice message to the onginating voice messaging system with an appropriate non-delivery notification. A pre-recorded non-delivery announcement is sent to notify the message originator that the message was undeliverable. No further processing occurs. If the destination system accepts the message, the PO server 48 forwards the voice message to the destination system. If the subscriber chooses e-mail notification of incoming voice messages, the notification is sent via wireless or wireline network to die subscnber as specified in the subscπber profile. If de subscπber selected page notification, die notification will be sent through the paging network according to the profile. Either notification contains the mailbox number that originated the voice message, the date and time the message was received, and the length of the voice message in minutes.

In another example, a user having a digital voice mail system creates a voice mail message and addresses it to a user of analog voice mail system The destination telephone number indicates that the message must be routed to the PCI server 48. The PCI server 48 checks the recipient's user profile and determines that the destination recipient has an analog voice mail system The message is then passed into the analog voice mail system via the AMIS - Analog Protocol. The subscriber will receive all of the voice mail messages at the voice mail system, if that is what is selected in the subscriber's profile. The subscriber may also set up the profile to receive at a wireless data terminal a text message that provides a notification of a voice mail message and envelope information of the message. Alternatively, a recipient voice mail system may send a text message containing a notification and envelope information of the message. One feature of the AMIS-Digital Protocol is that if the original voice message is marked urgent by the sender, the AMIS-Digital Protocol includes as priority status information in the message sent from the voice messaging system to the PO server. Using tiiis information, the PO can screen priority messages.

The voice messaging gateway converts vendor proprietary voicemail format to the X.400 format and vice versa, thus bridging different messaging formats. It is responsible for voice transcoding from proprietary to or from X.400 form. It also maps options to or from the X.400 protocol as specified in AMIS.

C. Facsimile Messaging Fig. 23 illustrates a PO service for fax messaging. The PO server 48 is connected to public switch telephone networks 432 via analog lines 444 or a TI trunk 445. Fax machines 440 and fax servers 442 are connected to die PSTN 432. The PO server 48 may also be connected to fax machines 440 and fax servers 442 by private lines 446 or an ISDN 438. For a subscriber to receive faxes, the fax machine telephone number must be supplied to the subscriber profile. The PO will send a fax to the designated number and may send a text notification message or take other action as die user has selected in d e profile. If the user has specified a wireless data terminal to receive d e fax, the PO server 48 will perform the necessary wireless adaptation and send a fax through a wireless data terminal.

A fax may be sent to a PO subscriber by routing the fax to the PCI node, the user must dial the telephone number of the PCI server 48 to send the fax to the subscriber. The PCI server 48 will send the fax to the subscriber's telephone number. The PCI server will check the subscriber's user profile to determine how the fax should be delivered. In this example, the fax message is sent to a fax machine at a designated telephone number.

Fax users having existing fax machines 440 must place a call over the PSTN network in order to access the PCI. This is because existing fax machines 420, unlike fax servers 422, are designed for point - to -point communication, not fax network communication. Users of the existing fax machine 420 can access the PCI in two ways. One way is by two stage dialing. The sender first dials the PCI 48 and then dials the recipient's number after receiving a prompt from the PCI. Alternatively, the user can dial *FX+destination address. The fax machine user can directly dial from me fax terminal me recipient telephone number proceeded by *FX, which signals the switch to automatically forward the fax call through the PO server.

Fax servers that support X.400 messaging will include the personal number in the X.400 address field and diere is no reason for die PO to prompt die user for the personal number.

D. CaUCommand

PO CallCommand (CC) service provides subscribers real-time control of voice calls while using a wireless data terminal or PDA. CC is designed to enhance personal number services (Le., HLR), by providing real time call management capabilities to nomadic users. CC provides the subscriber with four call management options: x location independence (supplementing personal number/HLR applications); x real-time call screening (using ANI and/or prompting the caller to enter a number); x real-time call redirection (routing calls to any telephone number based on the calling party); and x real-time short messaging (inputing or selecting a short message to be played to the caller). When a caller dials a PCI subscπber's telephone number, the caller's telephone number is entered for screening. After the caller's number is entered, the PDA 30 can map the railing number to a name and alert the subscnber of an incoming call. The PDA 30 visually displays the name and/or number of the caller. The subscπber can then use the PDA 30 to accept the call by entering the telephone number of a nearby telephone to which the call will be routed The subscnber can alternatively have the call forwarded to another number, such as a colleagues phone or a voice mailbox. If the subscnber decides not to respond to the caller, the caller is played an announcement and forwarded to a pre-determined default telephone number, such as a voice mail box or secretary. CC allows d e subscπber to send a bπef message to the caller. Upon being alerted to an incoming call, the subscπber can select from a pre-defined list of messages, or type a new message, on the PDA 30. The message is transmitted to me PO server 48 which converts the text message into speech and plays the message to the waiting caller. The caller receives the message and can leave voice mail for the subscπber, or be forwarded by the subscπber to an alternate telephone number.

Call command enables nomadic subscπbers to manage, in real time, incoming calls using screening, rerouting and messaging to the caller. Call command subscπbers having a PDA 30 are visually informed of the name and or number of the caller. The subscriber can elect to either accept the call, routing it to a specified number, such as the number of a nearby telephone, route the call to an alternate number, such as a voice mailbox, colleague phone number or secretary phone number, or respond to the caller with a brief keyed in message, which is played back to the caller in synthesized speech. The service also provides a number of non-real time call management features including predetermined screening lists, day of week\tιme of day routing schedules; and location sequencing. Call command allows mobile subscribers to manage and receive telephone calls using a personal digital assistant.

Call command users pre-subscπbe to a wireless data service such as Ardis or RAM mobile data for E-mail call management, and other wireless data applications. The wireless data provider provides a radio interface to die subscπber's PDA 30. A local exchange carrier interfaces with d e wireless data provider over a PO interface. When a caller enters his or her number the local exchange carrier forwards a data message containing the caller party information. The wireless data provider locates die subscriber and forwards the calling party information to the subscriber's PDA 30 where the subscriber is alerted of the call The subscriber then forwards the data packet containing a routing number to the PCI. The PO reroutes the call accordingly.

Fig. 24 is an illustrative example of a CallCommand service network. A caller, Joe 450, wishes to speak with Mary. Mary, who is away from the office, is a PCI subscriber having the CallCommand service. She has a PDA 30, which is turned on and registered at a visiting location. Joe dials Mary's office phone number. This phone number connects Joe's call to the PCI server 48. The PO server 48 network instructs Joe to type in his telephone number. The PCI server 48 puts Joe on hold and plays back a message using synthesized speech informing Joe that the network is trying to locate Mary. The network recognizes that Mary is registered at a visiting location and sends a phone notification over a wireless data network 39. Mary is notified on a PDA 30 that a phone call is coming from a particular phone number. If Mary has already programmed a name corresponding to that phone number in a directory on her PDA 30, that name will also appear. Therefore, she is aware that she has a phone call from Joe Smith. Mary has several options. She may type or select a preselected message to be sent from the PDA 30 to the PCI network which converts the message into synthesized speech and play it back to Joe; she may forward the call to a nearby telephone, such as a cellular phone or a nearby pay phone 452 or forward the call to her secretary or colleagues's phone number; she may send a message and forward the call; or she may direct the call to her voice mail In this illustration, Mary selects that the call be routed to a local public pay telephone 452. The call is routed over public switched telephone networks 432 to the selected telephone and Mary and Joe speak.

CallCommand has several advantageous features. Call command includes real time call screening which allows the subscriber to direct calls in a predetermined fashion based on the caller, the time or date, etc. Call command also has real time call rerouting which allows the subscriber to reroute calls to any phone number on a per call basis. That is, when a call is received, the subscriber may enter a phone number to which she wishes the call to be routed. For example, it may be a phone in an office she is visiting, a rented cellular phone, or a public telephone. In the event that a subscriber cannot respond to a caller because PDA is out of range, the subscriber is preoccupied, die PDA is turned off, etc., die subscriber may select a default routing number. Such a default number could be a voice mailbox, secretary, colleague, or other phone number. Call command also has a call messaging option. This allows die subscriber to send a brief message to a calling party. The message is typed on the PDA 30 and sent by wireless means to the PO. The PO converts the signal into synthesized speech and plays it to the caller. For example, a subscriber may be on an important customer call when his supervisor calls, expecting a response. The call command subscriber can send a message to the manager ("Talking to customer, call you back"), while still communicating with the customer.

The call messaging feature has two aspects. The first is the wireless messaging from the PDA 30 to the PCI. The second is the text to speech translation. The subscriber may type in a message on the PDA 30. The message originates as a data message from the wireless data provider network and is forwarded to a local exchange carrier network over the PCI interface.

The PCI server 48 translates the wireless text message into speech and plays it back to the caller.

Call command also has a predetermined call management option. This feature allows a subscriber to have unanswered calls sent to predetermined default telephone numbers. For example, in die event a call cannot be answered, it is first routed to, for example, a service hotline; if the service hotline does not answer, it is forwarded to a secretary; and if the secretary does not answer, then it is forwarded to voice maiL Each time the call is forwarded to the next number a message is played back to the caller. The routing numbers and sequence order may be altered by updating the subscriber profile in the PO database.

This feature also allows the subscriber to predeteπriine the management of certain numbers. For an example, a subscriber may want to be notified in real time only if a calling party number matches that of an immediate family member, supervisor, or important client. In other cases, the subscriber may wish to have calls automatically rerouted to a default number, such as a voice mailbox or secretary. For a company which does business over a large geographic area, the subscriber may wish to have the phone call routed to different places based on the geographic origin of the call For example, calls originating from New York or New Jersey may be routed to a sales representative for that area and calls originating from California are routed to a sales representative for that geographic area. The call management feature allows the subscriber to predetermine call routing based on die time of day. For example, a subscriber may wish to have calls forwarded to a customer service staff during business hours and be personally notified of calls during non-business hours.

Wireless technologies make subscribers constantly available, therefore it is important to give diem die ability to accept or decline communication attempts at their discretion. While delivering the calling number to die PDA 30 allows a subscriber to locally screen each attempt as they occur, the subscriber may be in an environment where distractions are unacceptable such as an important meeting. Therefore, the subscriber is able to create lists against which callers are screened by the network delivering the service. These network resident lists reduce die number of call attempts to the subscriber's remote wireless device. The CallCommand service allows subscribers to turn screening on and off and add or remove numbers and names from these lists. Like the wireless data services, CallCommand service profile management allows subscribers to modify or update their subscriber profiles which preferably reside in a PCI database 44. Profiles are created and deleted by the service integrator controlled by the service provider. A subscriber may modify the profile by either wireless or wireline messaging using DTMF tones or data. The subscriber profile can be updated by a wireless device such as a PDA 30. A subscriber profile may be modified by wireline communications as well. A subscriber may use a telephone or wireline data terminal to contact an PCI database 44. The PCI server 48 acts as a mediation device between wireless terminals and an PCI database 44 for DTMF profile updates-. It is preferable that the wireline network be supported by a service management operating system capable of prompting subscribers using a DTMF telephone for a profile update that is completed when the service management operating system makes the appropriate changes in the subscriber's profile in the PO database 44. When a service management operations system is used to modify the profile in the PO database 44, die changes should also be reported to PO server 48 so that the service profile cache 51 may be modified accordingly. Call command has its locus of control in service logic in the PO database 44. The

PO database 44 service logic provides (1) service status maintenance, which maintains the status of the subscriber as registered or deregistered; (2) call screening, which provides network based screening of incoming calls; (3) call routing, which provides routing destinations for each call; this information is based on information received from the subscriber in real time via the PO server 48 or by preprogrammed instructions in the subscriber profile in die PO database 44; (4) profile management support, which is service logic in die PO database which permits "downloading" of the subscriber's profile to the PO server 48 for presentation to an update by die subscriber through the PDA 30; (5) security, wherein subscriber authentication and validation must be supported to safeguard the subscriber's personal information and status such as location; and (6) accounting management, the PO database 44 collects accounting parameters to support service provider billing. The subscπber profile in the PO database 44 must contain certain u formation. This type of information includes a subscπber identifier; subscπber authentication information; wireless data provider parameters; registration status; service mode (default, overπde, or command); screening lists; and routing tables (including day of week and time of day parameters) The application supporting the CallCommand server in the PCI server 48 includes a mobility management function The mobility management function provides status location information to a database in the PCI database 44 and is responsible for delivering a Temporary Location Destination number on request from the PO database 44 To do this, the PCI server 48 is responsible for (1) location registration, the PCI server 48 updates the PCI database 44 with the subscπber's PDA 30 status (for example, registered on a wireless data network or registered on a wired telephone); (2) play announcements and digit collection for caller information and presentation to the subscπber; (3) remote alerting, such as formatting and sending call information through a wireless data network to the PDA 30 for presentation to the subscnber, (4) profile management support (the PCI server 48 must support the "downloading" of the subscπber's profile and packaging for presentation to update by the subscπber through the PDA 30), (5) secunty (the subscπber authentication invalidation information must be supported to safeguard the subscriber's personal information and status such as location); and (6) account management, the PCI server should collect accounting parameters for presentation to the service provider for billing.

VTJ. Message Flows

PO wireless messaging involves three types of message flow. The first is sending a message from one subscnber to another, the second is receiving a message regardless of whether the subscriber is using a wireless or wireline terminal and the third is sending a message to a non- subscriber. Fig. 25 is an illustrative example of the message flow of a PO wireless subscπber sending a message. The PO user submits a message 502. The message is received by a message transfer agent in the PO server. The MTA copies and temporanly stores the oπginating and destination addresses 504. The MTA sends to the mobility manager function in the PO server a request to validate the sending user as a PO subscπber 506. The mobility manager sends this validation request to die PO database and waits for a response 508. Upon receφt of an affirmative validation from the PO database, die mobility manager sends die validation response to the MTA 510, 512. The MTA then sends the mobility manager a request for the address of the user's home MTA 514. The mobility manager routes this request to the PO database 516. Upon receipt of a response from die PO database, the mobility manager routes the home MTA address to the MTA 518, 520. The MTA then routes the message to the home MTA 522. If a third party PCI database must be consulted, the home MTA request will be directed from the PCI database to a third party PCI database 524, 526.

Fig. 26 illustrates an example of the message flow of a wireless PCI user receiving a message. When the PCI receives a message from a subscriber, the MTA in the PCI server copies and temporarily stores the destination address and the message 530. The MTA sends to the mobility manager function in the PCI server a request for the PCI subscriber's user profile 532. The mobility manager will retrieve this profile request from the PO database 534 (If third party PCI database is involved, the local PCI database contacts the third party PCI database through a switch transfer point 536, 538.) Upon receipt of the subscriber's profile from the PCI database 540, die mobility manager requests the message from the MTA using a "message forward request" message 542. When the mobility manager receives the message from the MTA 544, the mobility manager processes the message as indicated by the subscriber's profile, which may involve media conversion or screening 546. After processing the message, the mobility manager sends the message to the MTA for delivery 548, 550. Alternatively, the PO server mobility manager function may directly deliver the message to the termination receiver 552.

Fig. 27 illustrates an example of a message flow from a PO wireless subscriber to a non-subscriber. When the MTA receives a message from a PO subscriber 560, the MTA copies and temporarily stores the originating addresses and the message 562. The MTA sends the mobility manager a request to validate the originating address as a PO subscriber 564. The mobility manager will send this validation request to die PO database and wait for a response 566.

When die mobility manager receives an affirmative validation response from the PO database 568, the mobility manager sends the validation response to die MTA 570. Next, die mobility manager sends to the PO database a request for the PO subscriber's profile 572. Upon receipt of the subscriber's profile from the PO database 574, die mobility manager requests the message from the Mi A using a "message forward request" 576. Upon receipt of the message from the MTA 578, the mobility manager processes the message as indicated by the user's profile, which may require media conversion or obtaining the addresses for the distribution list for the message 580. After processing the message, the mobility manager sends the message to the MTA for delivery 582, 584. Alternatively, the MTA may directly deliver die message 586. VIII The PDA Application

To better understand the capabilities of PCI and PDA/PCI server interface, a discussion of the PDA user interface is helpful. The user interface is application software residing in the PDA. This software is descnbed by descπbing the screens displayed on a PCI subscπber's PDA screen. The following discussion is for an illustrative embodiment of die PDA user interface A person skilled in the art recognized that the interface may be implemented in a myriad of ways

Fig. 28 is an illustrative example of a PDA user interface main menu. The menu allows the user to enter the CallCommand or wireless messaging services, update the user profile, or check the status of the system by clicking on buttons 610, 612, 614, 616, respectively.

Fig. 29 shows a computer screen after "status request" 616 is selected. The status request screen shows that there are five local originating messages (waiting to be sent by the PDA) and three outgoing messages (waiting to be retrieved) in boxes 618, 620, respectively. The vaπous services' status is also displayed. As seen in Fig. 29, this subscriber's wireline registration is on, as seen in box 622. This registers the subscriber on a particular wireline telephone, seen in box 624. This registration will direct calls to this phone number. The status request also advises this subscriber about the status of the CallCommand and wireless messaging features, as seen in boxes 626, 628.

Fig. 30 illustrates an exemplary screen if d e subscriber clicks "Call Command" 610 on the main menu (Fig. 28). If the subscriber clicks on "YES" 630, a screen such as Fig. 31 appears. The screen includes a window 632 which shows the status of vaπous received telephone calls. The status indicates whether an incoming call was answered, forwarded to another number, was hung up before being answered; unanswered; or forwarded to voice maiL The phone number and receipt time and date of each call are displayed. The subscriber may save or delete any entry the subscriber by clicking box 634 or 636, respectively, The subscriber may also connect or disconnect the CallCommand service by clicking box 638, 640, respectively.

Fig. 32 is an illustrative example of a screen if the subscriber selected "Wireless Messaging" 512 on the main menu (Fig 28). The subscπlser will be connected to the wireless messaging service if "YES" 642 is clicked. Fig. 33 is an example of a screen which may appear if the subscriber selected

"Profile" 614 from die main menu (Fig. 28). If die subscπber selects "Fax" 644 from this screen, a screen such as that shown in Figure 34 may appear, which allows the subscriber to enter a phone number into box 646 to which faxes will be directed. Turning on e-mail screening activates both the subject and address screening. Subject screening takes pnonty over address screening parameters.

If the subscπber selected "e-mail" 648 on the screen Fig. 33, a screen such seen in Fig 35 appears. The subscπber can select where e-mail messages should be delivered (destination screening) 650, where notification of e-mail receipt should be delivered (notification screening)

652, whether messages should be screened at all 654 and, if so, how they should be screened 656,

658

The destination 650 allows the subscnber to select destinations for incoming e- mail. Messages that satisfy the screening requirement may be sent to two destinations (match A, match B). As shown in this illustrative example, e-mail received which match the subscπber's preprogrammed screening cntena are to be delivered only to a wireline e-mail such as the subscnber's personal computer at the office, because match A 660 and match B 662 designate the same destination. All received e-mail messages which do not meet either cntena ("not matched") are sent to a selected fax machine 664, for example, the fax machine at the subscnber's office.

The subscπber also indicates where notification of a received e-mail should be sent 652. Notification for all e-mail messages meeting the screening requirement should be sent to a selected fax machine 666. The PO network will select information about the e-mail oπgination such as the author, recipient, and subject matter and convert it to a facsimile format and send the message to a fax machine. Notification of all e-mail that does not meet the screening cntena are sent to a pager 668. The PO network will take the originating message information and turn it into alphanumeric information according to die TAP protocol and send it to the subscriber's pager If the screening option is turned off, notification of all incoming e-mail is sent to voicemail 670. The PO network will convert the oπgination informauon from text to synthesized speech and send the information to a selected voice mailbox.

The user may also select whether to screen incoming e-mail messages at all 654. If the screening is on, the user may screen e-mail based on the originating address 656 or subject matter 658.

Fig. 36 is an illustrative screen which the subscriber may use to edit e-mail screening according to address by clicking box 656 (Fig. 35). The subscriber may put new e-mail addressees into box 672 and add diem to a list by clicking a box 674 or select addresses already entered to be included in a screening cntena as seen in box 676. For example, the user may want e-mail messages oπginating from the ollowing addresses to be routed according to the screening cntena: cclstanp, cclrizzo, and cclrupin. E-mail messages oπginating from ese addresses will be routed and notified according to the cntena selected on the screen illustrated in Fig. 35

If the user selected to edit the "subject" a screening cntena based on "subjects" by clicking box 658 (Fig. 35), a screen such as that illustrated in Fig. 37 is presented The user may type in to boxes 678 particular subjects which should be routed according to a screening cntena. The subject will search the incoming e-mail origination information to determine the subject of the e-mail. Subjects may include "urgent", "personal", the name of a client or project, etc

If the subscnber viewing the "profile menu" (Fig. 33) clicked "voice mail" 680, a screen such as that illustrated in Fig. 38 is presented. The subscnber can type into a box 682 in the destination voice mail system phone number. The subscπber may also select notification based on certain screening cntena 684. If the incoming voice mail message matches the screening cntena, the subscnber has selected to be notified by a message sent to the PDA 686. If the voice mail message does not match a screening parameter, the subscπber has selected to not be notified 688 If the screening option is turned off, die subscπber has decided to not be notified of any voice mail messages 690.

The user has the option of turning the screening on or off 692. If the screening is on, die messages are screened by caller 694. If die user decides to screen by caller by clicking box 694, a screen such as illustrated in Fig. 39 is displayed. The user may type into boxes 696 certain incoming phone number which meet the screening parameters.

If the subscriber viewing the "profile menu" (Fig. 33) clicked "Call Command ", 698 a screen such as illustrated in Fig. 40 is displayed. The subscriber may type in a box 700 a wireline registration telephone number, which is a number to which incoming calls may be forwarded. The subscriber has de option to edit screening criteria phone numbers or to edit reply messages to be sent to die caller.

If the subscriber wishes to edit forwarding call numbers box 702 is clicked and a screen such as illustrated in Fig.41 is displayed. The user may type into boxes 704 or select certain phone numbers which are to be forwarded to a preselected phone number if screening is on.

If the subscriber viewing the "Call Command" screen (Fig. 39) clicked "edit messages" 706, a screen such as illustrated in Fig. 42 is displayed. The user may compose a unique message in box 708 or edit one already on a list shown in box 710. If the subscriber has connected the Call Command and an incoming call is received, a screen such as that illustrated in Fig. 43 is displayed. This screen displays in a box 712 the number from which the incoming call originates. The user has the option of sending a message and forwarding the call by clicking box 714, forwarding the call without a message by clicking box 716, sending a message and not forwarding the call by clicking box 718, or routing the call to voice mail by clicking box 720.

If either the "message and forward" or "forward" 716 option is selected, a screen such as that illustrated in Fig: 44 is displayed. This allows the subscriber to select one of several the preselected phone numbers 722-728 to forward, or select another phone number, such as a nearby telephone to which the call is to be forwarded. This phone number may be typed into a box 730.

If the user selected the "message and forward" 714 or "message only" 718 selections, a screen such as that shown in Fig. 45 is displayed. This allows the subscriber to type in a message into a box 732 or select a predetermined message shown in box 4134 to be sent to the incoming caller. This message is sent by wireless communications to the PO network where the ISP converts the message into synthesized speech and plays it for the caller. For example, if the subscriber desires to call back the incoming caller as soon as possible, the message "will call back ASAP" is selected. This message is transmitted from the PDA by wireless communications to the PO network. The ISP will receive the message and convert it to synthesize speech and send the synthesize speech message to the incoming caller.

EX. BjUjng

Billing operations is supported by an Automatic Message Accounting Network Function. The automatic network accounting measures, collects, formats and outputs network usage information to upstream billing and other operation application and service purposes. Preferably, automatic message accounting data is collected at various stages of service flows across network equipment and services. X. Conclusion

A system has been described which enables a wireless PDA user to remotely control a large number of messaging and call handling options. While the invention has been described by the reference to specific embodiments, this was for purposes of illustration only and should not be construed to limit the spirit or the scope of the invention.

Claims

We claim
1. A personal cornmunication internetworking for sending and receiving wireless and wireline messages:
( 1 ) a server, including : (a) a message transfer agent interfaced with at least one wireline data network;
(b) a wireless data network protocol handler connected to die message transfer agent and interfacing with at least one wireless data network;
(c) a mobility controller, including i. a subscriber profile cache; ii. a message router responsive to message routing parameters in the subscriber profile; iii. an interface connected to exchange message routing parameters between the subscriber profile and the at least one wireless network; iv. an interface connected to exchange message routing parameters between the subscriber profile and a personal communication control point; and v. an interface with at least one of a telephone network, an alphanumeric pager network, and a voice peripheral; and
(2) the personal communication control point connected to the server, including:
(a) a first interface connected to exchange DTMF message routing parameter signals with the server;
(b) a second interface connected to exchange generic data message routing parameter signals with d e server;
(c) a subscriber profile connected to receive and maintain message routing parameters; and (d) a call processor connected between the subscriber profile and the first and second interfaces.
2. The personal commiinication internetworking of claim 1, wherein the internetworking is built on an Advanced Intelligent Network architecture, the server is an Intelligent Peripheral, and the control point is a Service Control Point.
3 The personal communication internetworking of claim 1, further including a personal digital assistant having a wireless data network interface connected to exchange message routing parameters and an application designed to communicate with the interface to receive, update, and transmit the message routing parameters.
4. The personal communication internetworking of claim 1, wherein the server further comprises: a message converter connected to receive from an interface a message in a first format and output to another interface the message in second format.
5. A method for personal communications internetworking, comprising the steps of:
(a) storing a subscriber profile containing message routing commands for a subscriber;
(b) receiving any of an electronic mail, a facsimile, and a voice mail message addressed to the subscriber from either of a wireless and a wireline network; (c) consulting the subscriber profile for instructions for routing the received message; and
(d) routing die received message to any of a wireless or wireline network according to the instructions in the subscriber profile.
6. The method of claim 5, further comprising the step of converting d e received message into a different format if the subscriber profile instructs routing the received message in the different format.
7. The method of claim 5, further comprising the step of remotely updating the routing commands in die subscriber profile via one of a wireless and a wireline data network.
8. The method of claim 5, wherein the received message is addressed to a single subscriber telephone number regardless of format.
9. The method of claim 5, further comprising die step of sending a message notifying the subscriber of the received message.
10. A method for routing incoming telephone calls, comprising the steps of.
(a) storing a subscπber profile containing telephone, routing, and screening parameters including at least one of incoming telephone call oπgin, time of day, and day of week,
(b) receiving a telephone call directed to the subscnber; (c) consulting the subscnber profile to determine where to route the received telephone call; and
(d) routing the telephone call according to the subscπber profile
11. The method of claim 10, further comprising the step of remotely updating the subscnber profile via a wireless data network
12. The method of claim 10, further comprising the step of remotely updating the subscnber profile via either a wireless and a wireline telephone network.
13. The mediod of claim 10, further comprising the steps of:
(a) if the subscπber profile so instructs, notifying the subscπber of the received telephone call via a wireless data network message; and
(b) the subscnber selecting one of:
(I) forwarding the call to a subscnber selected telephone number; (ii) selecting a text message to be transmitted over the wireless data network and converted into synthesized speech and played to die incoming telephone call; and
(iii) forwarding the call and selecting a text message.
14. A communication apparatus, compπsing: a personal communications internetworking: (i) having a number of subscribers, each subscnber having a single address to which all incoming communications are addressed;
(ii) being connected to receive and transmit communications from a plurality of wireless and wireline commumcations networks;
(iii) having a profde configured to store communication forwarding options for each subscriber, and
(iv) having a communicauon router connected to receive die received commumcations from die plurality of wireless and wu-eline networks and being responsive to the profile for transmitting the received communications according to the stored communication forwarding options.
15. The communications apparatus of claim 14, wherein the communication information includes incoming communication delivery and outgoing communication origination information.
16. The communication apparatus of claim 14, wherein the profile is connected to receive and store revised communication forwarding options from a subscriber.
17. The communication. apparatus of claim 16, wherein the profile is connected to receive the revised communication forwarding options from one of a wireless and a wireline network.
18. The communication apparatus of claim 17, wherein the profile is connected to receive revised communication forwarding options in the form of dual tone modulated frequency signals from a telephone.
19. The communication apparatus of claim 17, wherein the profile is connected to receive revised communication forwarding options in the form of generic data messages from a generic data interface.
20. The communication apparatus of claim 14, wherein the single address is a telephone number.
21. The communication apparatus of claim 14, wherein die communications include at least one of telephone, pager, facsimile, voice mail, and electronic text communications.
22. The communication apparatus of claim 14, wherein d e communication router further includes a media format translation device configured to translate a received communication into a different communication medium for transmission.
23. The communication apparatus of claim 14, wherein the profile further stores cross- media notification information and die personal communications internetworking further includes a cross-media notification device responsive to die received communication received on one of d e plurality of wireless and wireline communications networks, and to die profile, and being configured to transmit in a first preselected medium a notification signal indicating receipt of die received communication.
24. The communication apparatus of claim 23, wherein die cross-media notification information includes a second preselected medium and, when die first preselected medium is not avadable, die cross-media notification device transmits in die second predetermined medium die notification signal indicating receipt of die received communication.
25. The communication apparatus of claim 14, wherein the profile further includes received communication screening information and the communication router is further responsive to the screening information.
26. The communication apparatus of claim 25, wherein die received communication screening information includes information to screen communications based on at least one of a received communication's media type, time of day received, day of week received, origin, and sender.
27. The communication apparatus of claim 14, further including a server connected to the profile.
28. The communication apparatus of claim 27, wherein the server includes a call processor.
29. The communication apparatus of claim 28, wherein the call processor comprises a plurality of interconnected computers.
30. The communication apparatus of claim 28, wherein the call processor includes an interface with at least one of the profile, a wireless data network, an alphanumeric paging network, a telephone network switch, and a voice peripheral.
31. The communication apparatus of claim 30, wherein the voice peripheral includes a text-to-speech converter.
32. The communication apparatus of claim 28, wherein the call processor further includes a service profde cache which contains a subset of information stored in die profile, which subset of information is currendy frequentiy needed.
33. The communication network of claim 27, wherein die server further includes a data messaging peripheral.
34. The communication device of claim 33, wherein die data messaging peripheral includes an interface with at least one electronic messaging network.
35. The apparatus of claim 14, wherein die internetworking is budt on an Advanced Intelligent Network architecture.
36. The apparatus of claim 14, wherein the internetworking is a network adjunct.
37. The communication device of claim 14, wherein the communication router further comprises an audio messaging interface specification analog protocol connected to a public telephone network.
38. The communication device of claim 14, wherein the communication router further comprises an audio- messaging interface specification digital protocol connected to at least one of a modem, a private line, and an integrated signalling digital network basic rate interface.
39. The communication device of claim 14, wherein the communication router further comprises at least one of an analog line connected to a public switched telephone network, a private line, and an integrated signalling digital network.
40. The method of claim 7, wherein the step of updating is done via a wireless network and further includes: a. transmitting a data request from a terminal over a wireless network to the profile; b. transmitting the requested data from the profile over the wireless network to the terminal; c. updating the routing commands at the terminal; d. transmitting the updated routing commands over the wireless network to the profile; and e. storing die updated routing commands in the profile.
41. The method of claim 40, further including after the step of transmitting the updated routing commands: a. generating an update acknowledgement signal; and b. transmitting die update acknowledgement signal over the wireless network to the terminal.
42. The method of claim 9, wherein d e step of sending a message further includes notifying die subscriber of a received telephone call.
43. The metiiod of claim 42, further including after die step of notifying, die step of selecting any one of: a. forwarding die telephone call to a selected telephone number; b. selecting a text message to be transmitted over the wireless data network and converting die text message into synthesized speech and played to the incoming telephone cali' and c. forwarding die call and selecting a text message.
44. The mediod of claim 42, further including die step of remotely updating die subscriber profde via eitiier one of a wireless and a wireline telephone network.
45. The method of claim 44, wherein the step of updating includes using DTMF signals to update the subscriber profile and storing the updated profile.
46. The method of claim 44, further including after the step of updating: a. generating an update acknowledgement signal; and b. transmitting the update acknowledgement signal over the telephone network.
47. The method of claim 5, further including delivering a single message according to a distribution list stored in the subscriber profile, the distribution list instructing the message to be delivered to a plurality of addresses via one of an electronic mail and a facsimile format.
48. The method of claim 5, wherein the step of receiving a voice mail message addressed to the subscriber further includes the steps of: a. receiving from an originating voice mail system voice mail information including identification information; b. extracting the identification information from the message to determine the origin of the voice mail message; c. the step of consulting further comprising determining if the identification of the originator indicates that die originator is also die subscriber; d. if the originator is die subscriber, die step of routing further comprises the steps of: i. not forwarding die voice mad message to the communication network; and ii. extracting header information from the identification information and transmitting a notification to d e subscriber containing die header information; e. if the originator is not the subscriber, die step of routing further includes the steps of. i. if die message exceeds a predetermined length, rejecting the message; and ii. if die message is less man or equal to the predetermined length, the communication router accepting the message; and f. the step of routing die received message further includes routing the voice mail message according to routing instructions in the profde.
49. The mediod of claim 48, wherein before d e step of routing, the step of translating die voice mail message from analog format into a digital format.
50. The method of claim 48, wherein before the step of routing, the step of translating the voice mad message from a digital format into an analog format. The personal communication internetworking o claim 1 , wherein the internetwor ing ork adjunct.
PCT/US1996/003064 1996-03-06 1996-03-06 Personal communications internetworking WO1997033421A1 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

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