WO1995017174A1 - Process for making laxatives containing dioctyl sulfosuccinate - Google Patents

Process for making laxatives containing dioctyl sulfosuccinate Download PDF

Info

Publication number
WO1995017174A1
WO1995017174A1 PCT/US1994/014259 US9414259W WO9517174A1 WO 1995017174 A1 WO1995017174 A1 WO 1995017174A1 US 9414259 W US9414259 W US 9414259W WO 9517174 A1 WO9517174 A1 WO 9517174A1
Authority
WO
WIPO (PCT)
Prior art keywords
process according
preceding
coating material
coating
step
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/US1994/014259
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Paul Dale Leis, Jr.
Stanley Allen Cummins
Paul Joseph Sagel
Original Assignee
The Procter & Gamble Company
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US16979493A priority Critical
Priority to US08/169,794 priority
Application filed by The Procter & Gamble Company filed Critical The Procter & Gamble Company
Publication of WO1995017174A1 publication Critical patent/WO1995017174A1/en

Links

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61KPREPARATIONS FOR MEDICAL, DENTAL, OR TOILET PURPOSES
    • A61K36/00Medicinal preparations of undetermined constitution containing material from algae, lichens, fungi or plants, or derivatives thereof, e.g. traditional herbal medicines
    • A61K36/18Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
    • A61K36/88Liliopsida (monocotyledons)
    • A61K36/899Poaceae or Gramineae (Grass family), e.g. bamboo, corn or sugar cane
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61KPREPARATIONS FOR MEDICAL, DENTAL, OR TOILET PURPOSES
    • A61K31/00Medicinal preparations containing organic active ingredients
    • A61K31/70Carbohydrates; Sugars; Derivatives thereof
    • A61K31/715Polysaccharides, i.e. having more than five saccharide radicals attached to each other by glycosidic linkages; Derivatives thereof, e.g. ethers, esters
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61KPREPARATIONS FOR MEDICAL, DENTAL, OR TOILET PURPOSES
    • A61K36/00Medicinal preparations of undetermined constitution containing material from algae, lichens, fungi or plants, or derivatives thereof, e.g. traditional herbal medicines
    • A61K36/18Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
    • A61K36/185Magnoliopsida (dicotyledons)
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61KPREPARATIONS FOR MEDICAL, DENTAL, OR TOILET PURPOSES
    • A61K36/00Medicinal preparations of undetermined constitution containing material from algae, lichens, fungi or plants, or derivatives thereof, e.g. traditional herbal medicines
    • A61K36/18Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
    • A61K36/185Magnoliopsida (dicotyledons)
    • A61K36/48Fabaceae or Leguminosae (Pea or Legume family); Caesalpiniaceae; Mimosaceae; Papilionaceae
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61KPREPARATIONS FOR MEDICAL, DENTAL, OR TOILET PURPOSES
    • A61K36/00Medicinal preparations of undetermined constitution containing material from algae, lichens, fungi or plants, or derivatives thereof, e.g. traditional herbal medicines
    • A61K36/18Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
    • A61K36/185Magnoliopsida (dicotyledons)
    • A61K36/48Fabaceae or Leguminosae (Pea or Legume family); Caesalpiniaceae; Mimosaceae; Papilionaceae
    • A61K36/481Astragalus (milkvetch)
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61KPREPARATIONS FOR MEDICAL, DENTAL, OR TOILET PURPOSES
    • A61K36/00Medicinal preparations of undetermined constitution containing material from algae, lichens, fungi or plants, or derivatives thereof, e.g. traditional herbal medicines
    • A61K36/18Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
    • A61K36/185Magnoliopsida (dicotyledons)
    • A61K36/48Fabaceae or Leguminosae (Pea or Legume family); Caesalpiniaceae; Mimosaceae; Papilionaceae
    • A61K36/483Gleditsia (locust)
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61KPREPARATIONS FOR MEDICAL, DENTAL, OR TOILET PURPOSES
    • A61K36/00Medicinal preparations of undetermined constitution containing material from algae, lichens, fungi or plants, or derivatives thereof, e.g. traditional herbal medicines
    • A61K36/18Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
    • A61K36/185Magnoliopsida (dicotyledons)
    • A61K36/68Plantaginaceae (Plantain Family)
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61KPREPARATIONS FOR MEDICAL, DENTAL, OR TOILET PURPOSES
    • A61K36/00Medicinal preparations of undetermined constitution containing material from algae, lichens, fungi or plants, or derivatives thereof, e.g. traditional herbal medicines
    • A61K36/18Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
    • A61K36/88Liliopsida (monocotyledons)
    • A61K36/899Poaceae or Gramineae (Grass family), e.g. bamboo, corn or sugar cane
    • A61K36/8998Hordeum (barley)
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61KPREPARATIONS FOR MEDICAL, DENTAL, OR TOILET PURPOSES
    • A61K9/00Medicinal preparations characterised by special physical form
    • A61K9/14Particulate form, e.g. powders, Processes for size reducing of pure drugs or the resulting products, Pure drug nanoparticles
    • A61K9/16Agglomerates; Granulates; Microbeadlets ; Microspheres; Pellets; Solid products obtained by spray drying, spray freeze drying, spray congealing,(multiple) emulsion solvent evaporation or extraction
    • A61K9/1605Excipients; Inactive ingredients
    • A61K9/1617Organic compounds, e.g. phospholipids, fats
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61KPREPARATIONS FOR MEDICAL, DENTAL, OR TOILET PURPOSES
    • A61K9/00Medicinal preparations characterised by special physical form
    • A61K9/48Preparations in capsules, e.g. of gelatin, of chocolate
    • A61K9/50Microcapsules having a gas, liquid or semi-solid filling; Solid microparticles or pellets surrounded by a distinct coating layer, e.g. coated microspheres, coated drug crystals
    • A61K9/5073Microcapsules having a gas, liquid or semi-solid filling; Solid microparticles or pellets surrounded by a distinct coating layer, e.g. coated microspheres, coated drug crystals having two or more different coatings optionally including drug-containing subcoatings

Abstract

A process is described for making an ingestible, neutral tasting laxative composition by coating dioctyl sulfosuccinate with a material selected from the group consisting of C14-18 fats, C16-20 fatty acids, sucrose polyesters, C14-18 fats and waxes, pH sensitive polymers, food gums, and combinations thereof. Preferably, two successive, different coatings are applied to the dioctyl sulfosuccinate by steps including either fluid bed coating, spray congealing, spray quenching, or spray drying.

Description

PROCESS FOR MAIONG LAXATIVES CONTAINING DIOCTYL

SULFOSUCCINATE

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Bulk fibers such as psyllium and methylcellulose are known effective laxatives. Bulk fiber laxatives are often powders which are mixed in water and consumed. Another type of laxative is a stimulant laxative, which is typically available in tablet or capsule form. These include senna, phenolphthalein, casanthranol, and bisacodyl.

Benefits of bulk laxatives relative to stimulant laxatives include: mildness, naturalness, minimal to no diarrhea, and/or a more normal, bulked bowel movement. However, bulk laxatives traditionally work slower than stimulant laxatives. Although stimulant laxatives can be harsh and are sometimes associated with cramping, the constipated person is often quite uncomfortable and does not want to wait the several days it may take for a bulk fiber to provide relief. Stimulant laxatives ordinarily provide overnight relief from constipation. An ideal laxative would be one which provides the benefits of bulk fiber, yet also provides speed to relief. The active ingredient in some commercially available stool softeners is dioctyl sulfosuccinate, which is an anionic medicinal surfactant. Dioctyl sulfosuccinates combined with stimulant laxatives such as phenolphthalein, casanthranol, and senna are permitted active ingredients, according to the Federal Register, vol. 40, No. 56, Part II Over-the-Counter-Drugs, "Proposed Establishment of Monographs for OTC Laxative, Antidiarrheal, Emetic and Antiemetic Products", p.12941. Also included therein is dioctyl sulfosuccinate (docusate sodium) in combination with sodium carboxymethylcellulose. It is believed that there is no commercially available laxative composition with both dioctyl sulfosuccinate and the bulk fibers herein as the active ingredients. It has been found by the present invention that bulk fibers, particularly psyllium, methylcellulose, polycarbophil, calcium polycarbophil, bran, malt soup extract, karaya, guar gum, and mixtures thereof, can be combined with dioctyl sulfosuccinate to provide a laxative with surprisingly increased speed to relief. Benefits of this combination can include gentle relief, making bowel movements easier to pass, relief of constipation, causing predictable results, good signal to go, complete relief and/or a normal, bulked bowel movement. A problem, though, with including dioctyl sulfosuccinate in ingestible laxative compositions, particularly those which are to be masticated, is the bad taste of this anionic surfactant. This bitter taste is a particular problem in laxative drink mixes, chewable tablets and food forms containing dioctyl sulfosuccinate. A process has therefore now been invented by which can been invented by which an ingestible, neutral tasting laxative composition containing dioctyl sulfosuccinate can be made.

This process has the advantage of making a composition which is effective for treating constipation, and which, even though it contains dioctyl sulfosuccinate, is not bad tasting. By this process, the encapsulated dioctyl sulfosuccinate is not tasted in the mouth, yet it is available in the gastrointestinal tract to aid in the relief of constipation.

A further advantage of this process is its use in making a dioctyl sulfosuccinate-containing composition for use as a medicinal drug which minimizes or eliminates the stomach disturbances, such as nausea, which can be side effects of talcing dioctyl sulfosuccinate.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to a process for making an ingestible, neutral tasting laxative composition by coating dioctyl sulfosuccinate with a material selected from the group consisting of Ci4-ιg fats, C16-20 fatty acids, sucrose polyesters, C^-jg fats and waxes, pH sensitive polymers, food gums, and combinations thereof.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION I. Composition of the Present Invention Compositions according to the present invention include certain bulk fibers and dioctyl sulfosuccinate. Bulk forming laxatives work by increasing the water content and bulk volume of the stool, thereby promoting a bowel movement. The bulk fiber is generally not absorbed by the gastrointestinal tract. Dioctyl sulfosuccinate assists in relieving constipation. The combination is believed to work more quickly to relieve constipation than bulk fiber alone. The bulk fiber ingredient of the present compositions ordinaiily is a powder which comprises the physical majority of the composition. The dioctyl sulfosuccinate is ordinarily a soft, waxy material which is present in the composition in much smaller amounts than the bulk fiber. A. Bulk Fiber

The ingestible compositions herein comprise from about 1% to about 99.99%, preferably from about 5% to about 99%, more preferably from about 10% to about 98%, most preferably from about 15% to about 95%, by weight of the composition, of bulk fiber. For the preferred drink mix form, from about 50% to about 70%, by weight of the composition, of bulk fiber, preferably psyllium, is preferred. Preferred bulk fibers herein are selected from the group consisting of psyllium, methylcellulose, calcium polycarbophil, polycarbophil, bran, malt soup extract, karaya, guar gum, and mixtures thereof. More preferred bulk fibers are selected from the group consisting of psyllium, sodium methylcellulose, calcium polycarbophil, polycarbophil, and mixtures thereof. Most preferred is psyllium husk. The bulk fiber herein is preferably not carboxymethylcellulose. Carboxymethylcellulose has a tendency to make smeary stools, which are difficult to wipe clean after a bowel movement.

Preferred psyllium husk for use herein comprises particle sizes distributed such that: less than about 15% is greater than about 80 mesh, at least about 45% is within the range of from about 80 mesh to about 200 mesh, and less than about 40% is smaller than about 200 mesh. This is according to U. S. Patent 5,149,541, Leis, Jr. et al, issued September 22, 1992, incorporated herein by reference. Most preferably, the psyllium husk is milled to a particle size no greater than 4% on 100 mesh and betwen 25% and 50% through 200 mesh. Preferred psyllium husk for use herein is sanitized according to U. S. Patents

4,911,889 and/or 5,229,117, Leland et al, issued March 27, 1990 and July 20, 1993, both incorporated herein by reference. Psyllium husk for use herein is preferably in a composition comprising hydrolyzed starch oligosaccharide, preferably maltodextrin, and is preferably sweetened with cyclamate, aspartame, saccharin or a combination thereof; according to U. S. Patent 4,459,280, CoUiopoulos, issued June 10, 1984, incorporated herein by reference. Psyllium husk for use herein preferably comprises edible acid and is agglomerated according to U. S. Patent 5,219,570, Barbera, issued June 15, 1993, incorporated herein by reference. The psyllium husk preferably comprises citric acid which is uniformly dispersed throughout a maltodextrin coating, further according to Barbera. Preferably, then, the psyllium husk is agglomerated with maltodextrin and further comprises citric acid which is uniformly dispersed throughout the maltodextrin.

Preferably, psyllium husk-containing drink mixes herein comprise the divalent cation salt of strong inorganic acids selected from the group consisting of magnesium sulfate, calcium sulfate, calcium chloride, zinc sulfate, zinc chloride, and mixtures thereof; preferably magnesium sulfate. This is according to U. S. Patents 5,232,698 and/or 5,234,916, Hord, issued August 3 and 10, 1993, both incorporated herein by reference.

B. Dioctyl Sulfosuccinate

The ingestible compositions herein also comprise from about 0.0005% to about 25%, preferably from about 0.005% to about 15%, more preferably form about 0.1% to about 10%, most preferably from about 0.5% to about 5%, by weight of the composition, of dioctyl sulfosuccinate.

Preferably, the dioctyl sulfosuccinate is selected from the group consisting of dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate, dioctyl calcium sulfosuccinate, dioctyl potassium sulfosuccinate, and mbctures thereof. Most preferred is dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate or dioctyl calcium sulfosuccinate. This composition is preferably a single dose composition for relieving constipation.

Dioctyl sulfosuccinate is sulfosuccinic acid bis[2-ethylhexyl]ester. Sodium dioctyl sulfosuccinate is a white waxy solid producing a clear, colorless solution in alcohol.. The chemical formula for sodium dioctyl sulfosuccinate is C2θH37O7SNa.

The mechanism of action of dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate has not been proven. Without meaning to be bound by theory, it is believed that dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate at millimolar concentrations provides taxation by acting as an intestinal secretagogue. It is further believed that the ability of dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate to enhance retention of luminal fluid and therefore fecal hydration may be the reason that it enhances taxation when combined with bulk fiber, particularly psyllium husk. Dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate is not appreciably absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract.

Interestingly, dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate is a medicinal drug which has been found to be commonly associated with gastrointestinal disturbances such as diarrhea in both hospitalized and nonhospitalized patients, according to R Stewart and L. Cluflζ "Gastrointestinal Manifestations of Adverse Drug Reactions", The American Journal of Digestive Diseases. Vol. 19, No. 1, pp. 1-7 (January 1974). The bulk fibers herein may reduce these gastrointestinal disturbances. The combination of a natural stimulant laxative, casanthranol, and dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate has been found to be significantly superior to a preparation containing another natural stimulant laxative, senna, in producing earlier stools with less straining. M. J. Adels, "Relative Efficacy of Three Laxatives in Post- Partum Hospital Use", Delaware Medical Journal, July, 1974. C. Forms

The laxative composition herein is preferably selected from the group consisting of a drink mix, solid dose form, gel capsule form, and a food form. It is most preferably in the form of a drink mix. Food forms include wafers, bars, cookies, cereals, muffins, beverages and baked goods where moisture contents are kept at very low levels. For baked goods, it is preferred to keep the water activity (aw) less than 0.5. Preferred food forms herein are wafers or bars. Solid dose forms include tablets, liquid containing capsules, and hard or soft shelled capsules. Gel capsule forms can include hard or soft gelatins, which can be filled with dry or liquid materials.

The laxative compositions herein are preferably selected from the group consisting of drink mbces, tablets, capsules, liquicaps, wafers, and bars. They are most preferably powdered drink mixes. The most preferred drink mbces herein consist essentially of from about 4 grams to about 10 grams, most preferably from about 4.5 grams to about 6 grams, of bulk fiber, preferably psyllium husk, and from about 100 milligrams to about 500 milligrams, most preferably from about 200 milligrams to about 300 milligrams, of dioctyl sulfosuccinate, preferably calcium or sodium.

Alternatively, the compositions herein can be in two or more parts or phases, as where dioctyl sulfosuccinate is in microcapsules within or combined with the bulk fiber.

Compositions herein can be used for treatment of occasional constipation, eg. a single dose, or for daily fiber therapy, eg. a drink mix which is mixed with at least eight ounces of liquid and ingested one time per day each morning for no more than seven days. Single doses are preferred.

A single dose of a composition herein preferably contains from about 0.5 gram to about 100 grams, preferably from about 1 to about 10 grams, of bulk fiber, preferably psyllium husk. A single dose of a composition herein also preferably contains from about 5 milligrams to about 1000 milligrams, preferably from about 100 milligrams to about 500 milligrams, of dioctyl sulfosuccinate, preferably calcium or sodium. D. Optional Ingredients Compositions of the present invention optionally contain additional ingredients, depending upon the form of the composition and the desired effect and aesthetics. Some compositions, such as solid dose forms, gel capsule forms and food forms, preferably comprise, in addition to the bulk fiber and dioctyl sulfosuccinate, from about 0.1% to about 85%, more preferably from about 30% to about 80%, most preferably from about 50% to about 70%, by weight of the composition, of carrier material. Such carrier material can include flow agents, like fumed silicon dioxide, starches, dextrin, maltodextrins, sweeteners, dispersants, emulsifiers, flavoring, coloring, and contain other fibers, such as oat bran, wheat bran, or rice bran, to add body and flavor.

Psyllium-containing product forms, methods for making, and useful carrier materials are described in, for example, U. S. Patent 4,459,280, CoUiopoulos, issued July 10, 1984, U. S. Patent 4,548,806, CoUiopoulos, issued October 22, 1985, and

U. S. Patent 4,321,263, PoweU et al, issued March 23, 1982, all incorporated herein by reference.

Useful excipients which can be included in pharmaceutical forms herein are described in the American Pharmaceutical Association's Handbook of Pharmaceutical Excipients. incorporated herein by reference.

E. Methods for Treating Constipation

The present invention also relates to methods for treating constipation in humans or lower animals. These methods comprise oraUy administering a safe and effective amount of any of the laxative composition described herein. By "safe and effective amount" is meant an amount of this laxative composition which is high enough to positively modify the condition being treated, but low enough to avoid serious side effects at a reasonable benefit/risk ratio within the scope of sound medical judgement. The safe and effective amount may vary with the age and physical condition of the person being treated, the severity of the condition, the specific ingredients employed, and like factors.

II. Process of the Present Invention

The present invention is a process for making an ingestible, neutral tasting laxative composition by coating dioctyl sulfosuccinate with a material selected from the group consisting of C14-18 fats, C16-20 fatty acids, polyol polyesters, Ci4-ι fats and waxes, pH sensitive polymers, food gums, and combinations thereof.

Derivatives of these materials are also included, though not preferred.

By "neutral tasting" is meant that, when ingested, the bitterness of the dioctyl sulfosuccinate is not detected by the person (or lower animal) who is ingesting it (ie. the taste is not bad). A sugar or other flavor could also be added to the composition to enhance its taste. These compositions are preferably chewable tablets, drink mixes, and food forms.

A. Benefits of Coating

The coating of the present process is advantageous in that the dioctyl sulfosuccinate is prevented from effecting a bad taste in the mouth. The coating can also be chosen so that it remains largely intact through the stomach, thereby avoiding the gastric disturbances which are commonly associated with the use of dioctyl sulfosuccinate as a medicinal drug. The protective coating is chosen so that it is dissolved/melted/digested before reaching the large intestine so that dioctyl sulfosuccinate is available for stool softening action.

For example, a Ci4-ιg fat coating on the dioctyl sulfosuccinate is believed to melt in the gastrointestinal tract, releasing the dioctyl sulfosuccinate to soften the stool. Fat miceUes are then beUeved to be digested by pancreatic Upase in the smaU intestine, and the free fatty acids and monoglycerides thus released are then almost totaUy absorbed through the waU of the smaU intestine. In the case of the fat/wax coating, it is beUeved that when the fat is melted, the wax, which is bound by the fat, is also released. It is likely that the wax is passed through with the stool. In the case of a fatty acid coating, the fatty acids melt in the gastrointestinal tract and the dioctyl sulfosuccinate is then released to act in the intestine. The fatty acids are easUy absorbed by the smaU intestine.

The pH sensitive polymer and gum coatings herein have the advantages of the fat/fatty acid coating. It is beUeved that the pH sensitive polymer coating does not dissolve untU it is in a specific pH environment, preferably the basic environment of the smaU intestine. It is likely that the pH sensitive polymer is passed through with the stool. The food gums also "melt away" in the gastrointestinal tract, releasing the dioctyl sulfosuccinate for action in the intestine. The gums used for coating herein are polysaccharides which are also broken down by naturally occuring enzymes and absorbed through the intestine.

B. Single or Double Coatings

The coating can be a single coating or multiple coatings. A double coating is preferred. In the preferred double coating, a second coating is selected from the group consisting of C^-jg fats, Cj6-20 fatty acids, sucrose polyesters, Ci4-ιg fats and waxes, pH sensitive polymers, food gums, and combinations thereof. Although both coatings are selected from among the same materials, the second coating preferably is different from the first coating; the second coating preferably does not have any appreciable amount of material in common with the first. Each coating can be made up of one or more materials from within the same grouping, eg., a Ci6 triglyceride and a Cjg triglyceride, and/or between groupings, eg., a Cjg triglyceride and a pH sensitive polymer. However, it is preferred that a single material be used for each coating.

C. Types of Coating Materials

Preferred coating materials are those which are melted, dissolved, removed or digested in the gastrointestinal tract and which do not appreciably alter the dioctyl sulfosuccinate. Preferred are those coating materials which substantially melt or are largely dissolved at or about body temperature. The coating material is preferably below the melting point of the dioctyl sulfosuccinate.

Preferred food gums are selected from the group consisting of starches, cellulose derivatives, guar gum, locust bean gum, pectin, algin, carrageenan, xanthan gum, gum arabic, agar, gum ghatti, karaya, tragacanth, and combinations thereof.

Some of these are described in Industrial Gums: Polvsaccharides and their

Derivatives, by R. Whistler and J. BeMiUer, Third Edition, incorporated herein by reference (see Chapters 5-8, 13, 18, and 20). Most preferred are cellulose derivatives. Preferred ceUuIose derivatives are selected from the group consisting of methylceUulose, ethylcellulose, carboxymethylceUulose, hydroxypropyl methylceUulose, hydroxypropyl ethylceUulose, and mbctures thereof.

Preferred C^-jg fats herein are trimyristan, tripalmitin, and tristearin. C\ and Ci g fats are preferred. Fats for use herein are preferably solid in the mouth but melt at body temperature. The preferred melting point is between about 95 °F and about 99°F. Also preferred are palmitic, oleic, palmitic triglyceride (POP) and soybean hardstock.

Waxes for inclusion with fats herein are esters of long chain fatty acids and long chain alcohols. Preferred are beeswax, and vegetable waxes. More preferred waxes are selected from the group consisting of jojoba, polyethylene glycol of molecular weight between about 1,000 and about 20,000, preferably between about

5,000 and about 10,000, stearin waxes, sorbitan ester waxes, and mbctures thereof.

Most preferred is sorbitan tristearin, preferably with soybean hardstock.

Cj6 to C20 f tty acids are palmitic, stearic and arachidic. Cjg and Cjg fatty acids and sorbitan esters are preferred. pH sensitive polymers suitable for use herein are selected from the group consisting of ceUulose acetate phthalate (CAP), polymethacrylic acid polymers, and mixtures thereof. Eudragit® S-100 for flavored drink mbces and Eudragit® E (Rohm

Pharma) for wafers or beverages are most preferred.

Suitable polyol polyesters (ca ed "Olestra") for use herein are described in U.S. Patent 4,005,196, Jandecek et al, issued January 25, 1977, incorporated herein by reference. Sucrose polyester is preferred.

D. Preferred Processes

There are several preferred processes for coating the dioctyl sulfosuccinate.

The most preferred process is (a) melting the coating material under a heat within about 10°F, preferably within about 5°F, of the melting point of the coating material, or substantiaUy dissolving the coating material in a solvent, preferably an organic solvent, most preferably acetone, (b) adding the dioctyl sulfosuccinate to a fluid bed and (c) coating (b) with (a) in the fluid bed. The melted coating material is preferably less than the melting point of the dioctyl sulfosuccinate so that when the dioctyl sulfosuccinate is added, it does not melt. In this way, particles with a core of dioctyl sulfosuccinate surrounded by succeeding layers of coating material are made. This preferred process microencapsulates the dioctyl sulfosuccinate particles, forming larger particles. The fluid bed coating apparatus is preferably a Glatt Powder Coater/Granulator. An even more preferred process is: (a) substantiaUy dissolving the coating material in an organic solvent, (b) adding the dioctyl sulfosuccinate to a fluid bed and (c) coating (b) with the product of (a) in the fluid bed. Most preferably, the dioctyl sulfosuccinate is coated with carboxymethylcellulose and ceUulose acetate phthalate. Either one can be the outer coating. Preferably, two successive, different coatings are applied to the dioctyl sulfosuccinate

A second preferred process is (a) melting the coating material under a heat within about 10 °F, preferably within about 5°F, of the melting point of the coating material, and preferably below the melting point of dioctyl sulfosuccinate, (b) adding the dioctyl sulfosuccinate to the product of step (a), and (c) spray congealing or spray quenching the product of (b); wherein the coating material is selected from the group consisting of Ci4-ι g fats, Cιg-20 fatty acids, C^-j fats and waxes, and mixtures thereof. This is beUeved to be a macroencapsulating process, where particles or flakes of coating material containing smaller particles of dioctyl sulfosuccinate are made. This process involves spray entraining the dioctyl sulfosuccinate in the coating material. It is beUeved that a matrix of coating material and dioctyl sulfosuccinate is thus formed.

In the more preferred spray congealing process, the product of (b) is preferably sprayed into air, preferably dehumidified, which is at a temperature below the melting point of the coating material, so that solidification into smaU particles takes place. In the spray quenching step, the product is preferably sprayed , most preferably via nozzle(s), into a liquid, preferably water,, which is at a temperature below the melting point of the coating material The air or Uquid is most preferably at a temperature more than about 30°F less, preferably more than about 70°F less, than the melting point of the coating material. The Uquid should not be one which would dissolve the particles formed.

A third preferred process is (a) substantiaUy dissolving the coating material in a solvent, preferably an organic solvent, most preferably acetone, (b) adding the dioctyl sulfosuccinate to the product of step (a), and (c) spray drying. Spray drying is preferably into air which has been heated to a temperature at or above the vaporization temperature of the solvent. The solvent should not be one which dissolves the dioctyl sulfosuccinate. This process involves spray entraining the dioctyl sulfosuccinate in the coating material.

For these processes, the product of step (c) is preferably, in step (d), combined with bulk fiber selected from the group consisting of psyllium, methylceUulose, polycarbophil, calcium polycarbophU, bran, malt soup extract, karaya, guar gum, and mbctures thereof. Then, preferably, a drink mix, chewable tablet, or food form is made from the product of step (d), preferably along with other ingredients commonly used in that form. The final composition is preferably within the scope of the composition invention described herein. The coating herein preferably (1) completely covers the entire surfaces of aU dioctyl sulfosuccinate particles, (2) is of sufficient thickness to delay dioctyl sulfosuccinate release during consumption, and (3) w l release in the digestive system to provide the dioctyl sulfosuccinate.

Upon completion of the coating process the particles can be tested for leakage of the dioctyl sulfosuccinate. This leakage preferably should not exceed 20 ppm in 240 mil Uters of water per 240 miUigram dose.

Plasticizers, such as castor oil, triethylcitrate, and acetylated monoglycerides, are optionaUy and preferably included in the coating solution. The product of step (b) preferably comprises, by weight: from about 70% to about 95%, more preferably from about 80% to about 90%, of solvent; from about 5% to about 20%, more preferably from about 10% to about 15%, of the coating material; and from about 1% to about 10%, more preferably from about 2% to about 5%, of plasticizer. It most preferably consists essentially of 83-87% solvent; 10-13% barrier material; and 2-4% plasticizer. The coating materials are preferably coated on the dioctyl sulfosuccinate from the product of step (a) to coating ranges of; by weight, from about 1% to about 50%. The coating materials are more preferably coated on the dioctyl sulfosuccinate from, for example, aqueous solutions, organic solvent solutions or hot melts, to coating ranges of, by weight, preferably from about 5% to about 30%, most preferably from 8% to 20%.

One embodiment of this invention is where the dioctyl sulfosuccinate is coated with pH sensitive ceUuloses or ceUulosic films, waxes, fats, gums, methacrylic acid polymers, acetylated monoglycerides, or combinations thereof, and then included in the composition with the bulk fiber. Possible combinations include dioctyl sulfosuccinate coated with an occlusion hydrophobic fat, wax, or gum, then with a pH sensitive material (eg, ceUulosic or polyacryUc acid polymer). This encapsulated form would preferably be mixed with the bulk fiber in a powdered drink mix, chewable tablet, or a food form.

The foUowing examples iUustrate the compositions and processes of the present inventions. They are presented by way of example only and are not to be construed as limiting the scope of these inventions.

AU parts, percentages, and ratios used herein are by weight unless otherwise specified. AU references cited herein are expressly incorporated by reference.

EXAMPLE I

Drink Mix Composition A composition of the present invention is as foUows. This composition is preferably a drink mix used for the treatment of occasional constipation. The drink mix is mbced with at least 8 oz. of Uquid and ingested so as to provide the foUowing amounts of psyllium and dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate.

Component Amount

PsyUium husk 5.1 grams

Dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate 240 milligrams

The psyUium husk is milled to a small particle size: no more than 4% on 100 mesh and betwen 25% and 50% through 200 mesh, preferably according to U. S.

Patent 5,149,541, Leis, Jr. et al, issued September 22, 1992. These psyUium particles are then agglomerated with maltodextrin and citric acid is sprayed on, preferably according to U. S. Patent 4,459,280, CoUiopoulos, issued June 10, 1984 and U. S.

Patent 5,219,570, Barbera, issued June 15, 1993. Dioctyl calcium sulfosuccinate, dioctyl potassium sulfosuccinate, can be substituted for the dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate, or two or three of these can be combined.

MethylceUulose, polycarbophil, calcium polycarbophil, bran, malt soup extract, karaya, guar gum, or mbctures of these can be substituted for the psyUium. The amounts of psyUium and/or dioctyl sulfosuccinate can be varied within the ranges specified herein.

EXA.MPLE Π

Tablet Composition A composition of the present invention in the form of a tablet is as foUows.

Material Weight %

MethylceUulose 76.3 Dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate 19.7

Disintegration agent 4.0

These tablets are made by a standard wet granulation process. The tablet target weight is 525 milligrams. The tablet hardness target is 23 SCUs.

PsyUium, polycarbophil, calcium polycarbophU, bran, malt soup extract, karaya, guar gum, or mixtures of these can be substituted for the methylceUulose. The amounts of psyUium and/or dioctyl sulfosuccinate can be varied within the ranges specified herein.

Dioctyl calcium sulfosuccinate, dioctyl potassium sulfosuccinate, can be substituted for the dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate, or two or three of these can be combined.

EXAMPLE m F Foooo<d Wafer Composition

\ comp poossiittiioonn ooff tthhee pprreesent invention in the form of a WΪ foUows.

Raw Materials Weight %

Ascorbic acid 0.15

Natural and artificial flavors 1.54

Corn oil 14.80

Cornstarch 1.97

Fructose crystalline 6.82

Lecithin oil 0.99

Molasses granular Ught 0.39

Oat huU fiber 6.42

PsyUium husk 13.32

Sodium bicarbonate 0.20

Sucrose white granulated 17.40

Table oats 8.89

Water purified USP Balance

Wheat flour 19.21

Docusate sodium 0.63

Sorbitan tristearin 0.20

Procedure: In a Hobart bowl add corn oU and lecithin and mix for one minute using speed #1. Note: pre-heat (microwave) lecithin, if necessary. Add psyUium, docusate (which has been coated with the sorbitan tristearin) and mix for one minute using speed #1. Into a separate Hobart bowl, add part of the sucrose, fructose, molasses and half of the water. Mix for 1 minute using Speed #1. Add psyUium/oil/lecithin pre-mix, and oat-fiber. Mix for 1 minute Add rest of water, soda, flavors, ascorbic acid, and starch. Mix for 1 minute w/speed #1. Add flour to the mixer and mix for 1 minute w/speed #1. Record weight of the entire batch and calculate yield. RoU dough into sheets approximately 0.1 inch thick. Cut dough into rectangles of (about 2.5"L X 1.6"W). Place bars on baking trays and bake at 375° for 10-12 minutes.

MethylceUulose, polycarbophil, calcium polycarbophil, bran, malt soup extract, karaya, guar gum, or mbctures of these can be substituted for the psyUium. The amounts of psyUium and/or dioctyl sulfosuccmate can be varied within the ranges specified herein.

Dioctyl calcium sulfosuccinate, dioctyl potassium sulfosuccinate, can be substituted for the dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate, or two or three of these can be combined.

EXATMPLE IV Tablet Composition A composition of the present invention in the form of a tablet is as foUows. Raw Materials % Wt PsyUium 71.0

EthylceUuiose 4.8

Isopropyl alcohol*

MicrocrystalUne ceUulose 16.7

PVP** 1.9 Carnuba wax 2.3

Docusate sodium 3.3

•dried off during drying process ♦♦cross linked polyvinyl pyrollidone Procedure: Soak ethylcellulose in isopropyl alcohol overnight. Granulate psyUium with isopropyl/ethylceUulose mixture in mixer. Dry at 49°C for 3 hours. MiU through 12 mesh screen. Mix in a mixer the foUowing: psyUium, microcrystaUine ceUulose and carnuba wax. Compress the tablet per granulation specifications using a tableting press. Coat the core tablets.

MethylceUulose, polycarbophil, calcium polycarbophil, bran, malt soup extract, karaya, guar gum, or mbctures of these can be substituted for the psyUium. The amounts of psyUium and/or dioctyl sulfosuccinate can be varied within the ranges specified herein. Dioctyl calcium sulfosuccinate, dioctyl potassium sulfosuccmate, can be substituted for the dioctyl sodium sulfosuccmate, or two or three of these can be combined.

EXAMPLE V Fat Co-Melt Process

A process according to the present invention is as foUows. Objective:

Coblend dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate (caUed docusate sodium), soybean hardstock and sorbitan tristearate in a hot melt, then congeal the blend in cold water and coUect the solid particles. Approach:

Raw Materials: Docusate sodium - 99% pure, SIGMA; dioctyl sulfosuccinate

Sorbitan tristearate - Famodan® TS by Grindsted Products Soybean hardstock - Durkee Soy 1-8

The materials are combined in the foUowing ratios:

Weight % Docusate sodium 25.0 Sorbitan tristearate 15.0 Soybean hardstock 60.0

100.0

These materials are completely melted in a microwave oven. Care is taken to not overheat or scorch the fats. Once melted, the materials are thoroughly mixed. The hot melt is then pumped into a running food processer fiUed with ice water. The high agitation breaks the melted droplets into smaU flakes particles, and the ice water quickly congeals the hot meh. Foaming is likely to occur. The contents of the blender are poured into an 80 mesh sieve and rinsed with cold water. The material is rinsed untU no further foaming occurs, which indicates that any docusate remaining on the particles is rinsed away. The resulting particles are fine, irregularly shaped and mostly flakelike in appearance. The particles are air dried.

The experiment can be further refined by varying particle shape, docusate concentration, and types of melted fats. This could reduce surface area thereby reducing the amount of docusate lost during the rinsing step. Surface area may be reduced by changing particle shape and particle size.

EXAMPLE VI Double Coating Process A process according to the present invention is as foUows. Objective:

EUminate the bitter taste of dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate (caUed docusate sodium) by applying a double coating.

Coating Material % Weight Weight (grams')

CarboxymethylceUulose 5 125

Water * 95 2375 * double distffled, 99.99% pure

Method:

Place 2375 miUiUters of the water in a 4 Uter beaker. Using mechanical stirring (vigorous-without incorporating air), slowly add 125 grams of CarboxymethylceUulose (CMC). It is best to add the powder as a thin stream that wiU quickly mbc into the water without clumping. Addition time for the 125 grams is 10 minutes. Continue stirring for an additional 20 minutes until the solution is clear. If necessary, store at 4°C.

1st Coat Run:

Coating Materials % Weight Weight f grams')

Sodium Docusate 29.4 1000

5% CMC Coating Solution 70.6 2400

Method: Clean and assemble a Glatt Fluid bed coater with Wuester coating chamber. Lift into place. Power up the control panel and start the air turbine. Adjust exhaust flap to 26% and set air inlet temp, to 60°C. AUow to run untU inlet air is to set temperature. Stop air and lower assembly. Charge Wuester chamber with 1000 grams of sodium docusate. Chamber partition gap is set at about 1/2 inch. Lift assembly into place and restart air flow. Let run for a few minutes to reach equilibrium and then start pumping the coating solution. Pump at 30 rpm=18 ml/min and an air atomization pressure of 3.2 bar. When run is complete, shut down air and lower assembly. Remove Wuester chamber quickly to avoid contamination of coated product by uncoated powder. Store product in an air tight container at room temperature until next coatmg step.

2nd Coat Run: Coating Materials Weight (grams)

Cellulose acetate phthalate (CAP) 144

Castor OU 36

Acetone GR 1188 Water * 132

* double distiUed, deionized; 99.99% pure Place 1148 grams of acetone in a 4 liter beaker. With mechanical stirring, slowly add 180 grams of CAP. Stir gently until CAP is in solution. Add 45 grams of castor oil with stirring. FinaUy, slowly add the water to the solution. A precipitate wiU form but wiU redissolve into solution. Reweigh the solution and top off with acetone to 1500 grams to make up for acetone evaporation during mixing. Use 1213 grams of coating solution. Method:

Clean and assemble Glatt with Wuester coating chamber. Power up control panel and start turbine and heat inlet air to 50°C. Stop air flow and lower assembly, charge Wuester chamber with 970 grams of CMC coated sodium docusate. Raise assembly and restart air. Allow a few minutes to reach equilibrium. Start pumping coating solution. Pump at 150 rpm=46 ml/min, and an air atomization pressure of 2.84 bar. When run is complete, shut down air and lower assembly. Remove Wooster chamber quickly to avoid contamination of double coated product by single coated product. Store finished product in an air tight container.

EXAMPLE VTI Double Coating Process A process according to the present invention is as foUows.

Objective:

Eliminate the negative flavor of dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate (caUed docusate sodium) via a double coating, here called barrier (first) and protective (second) coatings. Approach:

Raw Materials: ( 1 ) sodium docusate (85%) sodium benzoate ( 15%)

(2) barrier coating (a) Eudragit S-100

(b) Eudragit E

(c) CeUulose acetate phthalate (CAP) ' (d) Other ceUulosic films

(e) Other pH sensitive films

(3) plasticizers (a) Castor oU

(b) Triethyl citrate

(c) Acetylated monoglycerides (Coating Solution: 85% solvent; 12% barrier material; 3% plasticizer)

The sodium docusate is placed in a fluid bed coating apparatus. A solution containing one or more of the barrier coatings named above plus plasticizer is spray coated onto the sodium docusate untU it (1) completely covers the entire surfaces of aU docusate particles, (2) is of sufficient thickness to delay docusate release during consumption, and (3) wiU release in the digestive system to provide the dioctyl sulfosuccinate. The coating ranges are expected to be 10 to 25% by weight of the finished coated docusate product.

Upon completion of the coating process the material is tested for leakage. Docusate leakage should not exceed 20 ppm in 240 miUiUters of water per 240 milligram dose.

In order to protect the barrier coating during consumption and to provide a means for softening the particles so there is no gritty mouth feel, the coated particles are coated again with a protective coating. Raw Materials for Protective Coating: (1) Protective ceUulosics

(A) MethylceUulose

(B) CarboxymethylceUulose

(C) Hydroxypropyl methylceUulose or (2) Protective Waxes/Fats (A) Polyethylene glycol

(B) Sorbitan tristearin/soybean hardstock

(C) Others

These materials can be coated from aqueous solutions or hotmelts to coating ranges of8 to 20%. Other processes of the present invention are obtained when other Ci4-ι fats, C16-20 f tty acids, sucrose polyesters, Ci4-ι g fats and waxes, pH sensitive polymers, food gums, or combinations thereof are substituted for these coating materials.

Having described the various modifications of the present invention, it will appear to those of ordinary skill in the art that various modifications may be made and that such modifications are intended to be within the scope of this invention.

Claims

What is claimed is:
1. A process for making an ingestible, neutral tasting laxative composition by coating dioctyl sulfosuccinate with a material selected from the group consisting of C 14-18 fats, C 15-20 fatty acids, sucrose polyesters, C 14-18 fats and waxes, pH sensitive polymers, food gums, and combinations thereof.
2. The process according to Claim 1 comprising the steps of: (a) melting the coating material under a heat within -12.2°C (10°F) of the melting point of the coating material, or substantially dissolving the coating material in a solvent, (b) adding the dioctyl sulfosuccinate to a fluid bed and (c) coating (b) with the product of (a) in the fluid bed.
3. The process according to any of the preceding claims wherein two successive, different coatings are applied to the dioctyl sulfosuccinate, preferably first carboxymethylcellulose and then cellulose acetate phthalate.
4. The process according to any of the preceding claims comprising the steps of: (a) substantially dissolving the coating material in an organic solvent, (b) adding the dioctyl sulfosuccinate to a fluid bed, and (c) coating (b) with the product of (a) in the fluid bed in the fluid bed.
5. The process according to any of the preceding claims comprising the steps of: (a) melting the coating material under a heat within -12.2°C (10°F) of the melting point of the coating material, (b) adding the dioctyl sulfosuccinate to the product of step (a), and (c) spray congealing or spray quenching the product of (b); wherein the coating material is selected from the group consisting of C14-18 fats, C16-20 fatty acids, C14-18 fats and waxes, and mixtures thereof.
6. The process according to any of the preceding claims wherein the coating material comprises a C 14-18 fat selected from the group consisting of trimyristan, tripalmitin, and tristearin.
7. The process according to any of the preceding claims comprising the steps of: (a) melting the coating material under a heat within -15°C (5°F) of the melting point of the coating material, and below the melting point of dioctyl sulfosuccinate, (b) adding the dioctyl sulfosuccinate to the product of step (a), and (c) spray congealing or spray quenching the product of (b).
8. The process according to any of the preceding claims wherein step (c) is spray congealing, and wherein, in step (c), the product of (b) is sprayed into air which is at a temperature below the melting point of the coating material.
9. The process according to any of the preceding claims wherein step (c) is spray quenching, and wherein, in step (c), the product of (b) is sprayed into a liquid which is at a temperature below the melting point of the coating material.
10. The process according to any of the preceding claims wherein the liquid in step (c) is water which is at a temperature more than -1.1°C (30°F) less than the melting point of the coating material.
11. The process according to any of the preceding claims comprising the steps of: (a) substantially dissolving the coating material in a solvent, (b) adding the dioctyl sulfosuccinate to the product of step (a), and (c) spray drying.
12. The process according to any of the preceding claims wherein the solvent in step (a) is acetone and wherein step (c) spray drying is into air which has been heated to a temperature at or above the vaporization temperature of acetone.
13. The process according to any of the preceding claims wherein the dioctyl sulfosuccinate in the composition is selected from the group consisting of dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate, dioctyl calcium sulfosuccinate, dioctyl potassium sulfosuccinate, and mixtures thereof.
14. The process according to any of the preceding claims wherein the product of step (c) is, in step(d), combined with bulk fiber selected from the group consisting of psyllium husk, methylcellulose, polycarbophil, calcium polycarbophil, bran, malt soup extract, karaya, guar gum, and mixtures thereof.
15. The process according to any of the preceding claims wherein a drink mix, chewable tablet, or food form is made from the product of step (d).
16. The process according to any of the preceding claims wherein the product of step (b) comprises, by weight: from 70% to 95% of the solvent; from 5% to 20% of the coating material; and from 1% to 10% of plasticizer.
17. The process according to any of the preceding claims wherein the coating materials are coated on the dioctyl sulfosuccinate from the product of step (a) to coating ranges of, by weight, from 1% to 50%.
18. The process according to any of the preceding claims wherein the coating material comprises a food gum selected from the group consisting of starches, cellulose derivatives, guar gum, locust bean gum, pectin, algin, carrageenan, xanthan gum, gum arabic, agar, gum ghatti, karaya, tragacanth, and combinations thereof; a cellulose derivative selected from the group consisting of methylcellulose, ethylcellulose, carboxymethylcellulose, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, hydroxypropyl ethylcellulose, and mixtures thereof; or a wax selected from the group consisting of jojoba, polyethylene glycol of molecular weight between 1,000 and 20,000, stearin waxes, sorbitan ester waxes, and mixtures thereof; and/or a pH sensitive polymer selected from the group consisting of cellulose acetate phthalate, polymethacrylic acid polymer, and mixtures thereof.
PCT/US1994/014259 1993-12-20 1994-12-09 Process for making laxatives containing dioctyl sulfosuccinate WO1995017174A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US16979493A true 1993-12-20 1993-12-20
US08/169,794 1993-12-20

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
AU12668/95A AU1266895A (en) 1993-12-20 1994-12-09 Process for making laxatives containing dioctyl sulfosuccinate

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
WO1995017174A1 true WO1995017174A1 (en) 1995-06-29

Family

ID=22617206

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
PCT/US1994/014259 WO1995017174A1 (en) 1993-12-20 1994-12-09 Process for making laxatives containing dioctyl sulfosuccinate

Country Status (2)

Country Link
AU (1) AU1266895A (en)
WO (1) WO1995017174A1 (en)

Cited By (27)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2011095314A2 (en) 2010-02-03 2011-08-11 Grünenthal GmbH Preparation of a powdery pharmaceutical composition by means of an extruder
US8075872B2 (en) 2003-08-06 2011-12-13 Gruenenthal Gmbh Abuse-proofed dosage form
US8939388B1 (en) 2010-09-27 2015-01-27 ZoomEssence, Inc. Methods and apparatus for low heat spray drying
WO2015078891A1 (en) 2013-11-26 2015-06-04 Farmaceutici Formenti S.P.A. Preparation of a powdery pharmaceutical composition by means of cryo-milling
US9161917B2 (en) 2008-05-09 2015-10-20 Grünenthal GmbH Process for the preparation of a solid dosage form, in particular a tablet, for pharmaceutical use and process for the preparation of a precursor for a solid dosage form, in particular a tablet
US9332776B1 (en) 2010-09-27 2016-05-10 ZoomEssence, Inc. Methods and apparatus for low heat spray drying
US9629807B2 (en) 2003-08-06 2017-04-25 Grünenthal GmbH Abuse-proofed dosage form
US9636303B2 (en) 2010-09-02 2017-05-02 Gruenenthal Gmbh Tamper resistant dosage form comprising an anionic polymer
US9655853B2 (en) 2012-02-28 2017-05-23 Grünenthal GmbH Tamper-resistant dosage form comprising pharmacologically active compound and anionic polymer
US9737490B2 (en) 2013-05-29 2017-08-22 Grünenthal GmbH Tamper resistant dosage form with bimodal release profile
US9750701B2 (en) 2008-01-25 2017-09-05 Grünenthal GmbH Pharmaceutical dosage form
US9855263B2 (en) 2015-04-24 2018-01-02 Grünenthal GmbH Tamper-resistant dosage form with immediate release and resistance against solvent extraction
US9861945B1 (en) 2017-08-04 2018-01-09 ZoomEssence, Inc. Ultrahigh efficiency spray drying apparatus and process
US9872835B2 (en) 2014-05-26 2018-01-23 Grünenthal GmbH Multiparticles safeguarded against ethanolic dose-dumping
US9913814B2 (en) 2014-05-12 2018-03-13 Grünenthal GmbH Tamper resistant immediate release capsule formulation comprising tapentadol
US9925146B2 (en) 2009-07-22 2018-03-27 Grünenthal GmbH Oxidation-stabilized tamper-resistant dosage form
US9993787B1 (en) 2017-08-04 2018-06-12 ZoomEssence, Inc. Ultrahigh efficiency spray drying apparatus and process
US10058548B2 (en) 2003-08-06 2018-08-28 Grünenthal GmbH Abuse-proofed dosage form
US10064945B2 (en) 2012-05-11 2018-09-04 Gruenenthal Gmbh Thermoformed, tamper-resistant pharmaceutical dosage form containing zinc
US10080721B2 (en) 2009-07-22 2018-09-25 Gruenenthal Gmbh Hot-melt extruded pharmaceutical dosage form
US10130591B2 (en) 2003-08-06 2018-11-20 Grünenthal GmbH Abuse-proofed dosage form
US10155234B1 (en) 2017-08-04 2018-12-18 ZoomEssence, Inc. Ultrahigh efficiency spray drying apparatus and process
US10154966B2 (en) 2013-05-29 2018-12-18 Grünenthal GmbH Tamper-resistant dosage form containing one or more particles
US10201502B2 (en) 2011-07-29 2019-02-12 Gruenenthal Gmbh Tamper-resistant tablet providing immediate drug release
US10252181B2 (en) 2017-08-04 2019-04-09 ZoomEssence, Inc. Ultrahigh efficiency spray drying apparatus and process
US10300141B2 (en) 2010-09-02 2019-05-28 Grünenthal GmbH Tamper resistant dosage form comprising inorganic salt
US10335373B2 (en) 2012-04-18 2019-07-02 Grunenthal Gmbh Tamper resistant and dose-dumping resistant pharmaceutical dosage form

Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JPS63264534A (en) * 1987-04-22 1988-11-01 Kao Corp Laxative composition
WO1992011001A1 (en) * 1990-12-19 1992-07-09 Solvay (Societe Anonyme) Oral pharmaceutical composition
EP0573978A1 (en) * 1992-06-12 1993-12-15 Kao Corporation Surfactant-containing seamless capsules

Patent Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JPS63264534A (en) * 1987-04-22 1988-11-01 Kao Corp Laxative composition
WO1992011001A1 (en) * 1990-12-19 1992-07-09 Solvay (Societe Anonyme) Oral pharmaceutical composition
EP0573978A1 (en) * 1992-06-12 1993-12-15 Kao Corporation Surfactant-containing seamless capsules

Non-Patent Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
PATENT ABSTRACTS OF JAPAN vol. 013, no. 072 (C - 570) 17 February 1989 (1989-02-17) *

Cited By (29)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US9629807B2 (en) 2003-08-06 2017-04-25 Grünenthal GmbH Abuse-proofed dosage form
US8075872B2 (en) 2003-08-06 2011-12-13 Gruenenthal Gmbh Abuse-proofed dosage form
US10130591B2 (en) 2003-08-06 2018-11-20 Grünenthal GmbH Abuse-proofed dosage form
US10058548B2 (en) 2003-08-06 2018-08-28 Grünenthal GmbH Abuse-proofed dosage form
US9750701B2 (en) 2008-01-25 2017-09-05 Grünenthal GmbH Pharmaceutical dosage form
US9161917B2 (en) 2008-05-09 2015-10-20 Grünenthal GmbH Process for the preparation of a solid dosage form, in particular a tablet, for pharmaceutical use and process for the preparation of a precursor for a solid dosage form, in particular a tablet
US10080721B2 (en) 2009-07-22 2018-09-25 Gruenenthal Gmbh Hot-melt extruded pharmaceutical dosage form
US9925146B2 (en) 2009-07-22 2018-03-27 Grünenthal GmbH Oxidation-stabilized tamper-resistant dosage form
WO2011095314A2 (en) 2010-02-03 2011-08-11 Grünenthal GmbH Preparation of a powdery pharmaceutical composition by means of an extruder
US9579285B2 (en) 2010-02-03 2017-02-28 Gruenenthal Gmbh Preparation of a powdery pharmaceutical composition by means of an extruder
US9636303B2 (en) 2010-09-02 2017-05-02 Gruenenthal Gmbh Tamper resistant dosage form comprising an anionic polymer
US10300141B2 (en) 2010-09-02 2019-05-28 Grünenthal GmbH Tamper resistant dosage form comprising inorganic salt
US9551527B2 (en) 2010-09-27 2017-01-24 ZoomEssence, Inc. Methods and apparatus for low heat spray drying
US8939388B1 (en) 2010-09-27 2015-01-27 ZoomEssence, Inc. Methods and apparatus for low heat spray drying
US9332776B1 (en) 2010-09-27 2016-05-10 ZoomEssence, Inc. Methods and apparatus for low heat spray drying
US10201502B2 (en) 2011-07-29 2019-02-12 Gruenenthal Gmbh Tamper-resistant tablet providing immediate drug release
US9655853B2 (en) 2012-02-28 2017-05-23 Grünenthal GmbH Tamper-resistant dosage form comprising pharmacologically active compound and anionic polymer
US10335373B2 (en) 2012-04-18 2019-07-02 Grunenthal Gmbh Tamper resistant and dose-dumping resistant pharmaceutical dosage form
US10064945B2 (en) 2012-05-11 2018-09-04 Gruenenthal Gmbh Thermoformed, tamper-resistant pharmaceutical dosage form containing zinc
US10154966B2 (en) 2013-05-29 2018-12-18 Grünenthal GmbH Tamper-resistant dosage form containing one or more particles
US9737490B2 (en) 2013-05-29 2017-08-22 Grünenthal GmbH Tamper resistant dosage form with bimodal release profile
WO2015078891A1 (en) 2013-11-26 2015-06-04 Farmaceutici Formenti S.P.A. Preparation of a powdery pharmaceutical composition by means of cryo-milling
US9913814B2 (en) 2014-05-12 2018-03-13 Grünenthal GmbH Tamper resistant immediate release capsule formulation comprising tapentadol
US9872835B2 (en) 2014-05-26 2018-01-23 Grünenthal GmbH Multiparticles safeguarded against ethanolic dose-dumping
US9855263B2 (en) 2015-04-24 2018-01-02 Grünenthal GmbH Tamper-resistant dosage form with immediate release and resistance against solvent extraction
US10155234B1 (en) 2017-08-04 2018-12-18 ZoomEssence, Inc. Ultrahigh efficiency spray drying apparatus and process
US9993787B1 (en) 2017-08-04 2018-06-12 ZoomEssence, Inc. Ultrahigh efficiency spray drying apparatus and process
US10252181B2 (en) 2017-08-04 2019-04-09 ZoomEssence, Inc. Ultrahigh efficiency spray drying apparatus and process
US9861945B1 (en) 2017-08-04 2018-01-09 ZoomEssence, Inc. Ultrahigh efficiency spray drying apparatus and process

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
AU1266895A (en) 1995-07-10

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US4551331A (en) Easily dispersible dietary fiber product and method for producing the same
KR0168715B1 (en) Tastemasked pharmaceutical materials
ES2202302T3 (en) chewable composition which releases a drug.
RU2095054C1 (en) Solid medicinal formula for oral administration
CA2493519C (en) Encapsulation of sensitive components using pre-emulsification
US6277412B1 (en) Pellet-type formulation intended for treating the intestinal tract
KR100426882B1 (en) Nutritional products for reducing the serum cholesterol comprising a dietary fiber encapsulated in zein
US4894234A (en) Novel drug delivery system for antiarrhythmics
DE69824319T2 (en) Didanosine tablets with enteric coating
EP0464040B1 (en) A moderated spun fibrous system and method of manufacture
RU2197227C2 (en) Pharmaceutical composition covered by enterosoluble envelope and method of its preparing
CA2127352C (en) Pharmaceutical preparation in the form of an effervescent and/or disintegrating tablet or an instant granulate, and process for producing it
US20020004499A1 (en) Antibiotic composition
US4716041A (en) Diffusion coated multiple-units dosage form
KR950007205B1 (en) Antacid compositions with prolonged gastric residence time
US4797288A (en) Novel drug delivery system
US5238686A (en) Sustained-release pharmaceutical preparation
FI109657B (en) The method of orally consumable products for the preparation of a composition for
JP3560244B2 (en) Pharmaceutical dosage form and a preparation of the solid in the form of release in two stages over a long period of time
DK170922B1 (en) Cefaclorformulering with long duration of action
JP2820239B2 (en) Controlled release powder and its manufacturing method
US5013557A (en) Taste masking compositions comprising spray dried microcapsules containing sucralfate and methods for preparing same
US4790991A (en) Ingestible aggregate and delivery system prepared therefrom
US4140756A (en) Film-coated matrix core tablet
ES2206680T3 (en) water dispersible compositions containing natural hydrophilic water-insoluble pigments, methods of preparation and use thereof.

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AK Designated states

Kind code of ref document: A1

Designated state(s): AU CA

AL Designated countries for regional patents

Kind code of ref document: A1

Designated state(s): AT BE CH DE DK ES FR GB GR IE IT LU MC NL PT SE

DFPE Request for preliminary examination filed prior to expiration of 19th month from priority date (pct application filed before 20040101)
121 Ep: the epo has been informed by wipo that ep was designated in this application
122 Ep: pct application non-entry in european phase
NENP Non-entry into the national phase in:

Ref country code: CA