WO1992019440A1 - Improved balloon catheter of low molecular weight pet - Google Patents

Improved balloon catheter of low molecular weight pet Download PDF

Info

Publication number
WO1992019440A1
WO1992019440A1 PCT/US1992/003549 US9203549W WO9219440A1 WO 1992019440 A1 WO1992019440 A1 WO 1992019440A1 US 9203549 W US9203549 W US 9203549W WO 9219440 A1 WO9219440 A1 WO 9219440A1
Authority
WO
WIPO (PCT)
Prior art keywords
tubing
process
balloon
accordance
length
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/US1992/003549
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Nitin Matani
Zbigniew Cierkosz
Original Assignee
Danforth Biomedical, Inc.
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US69428891A priority Critical
Priority to US694,288 priority
Application filed by Danforth Biomedical, Inc. filed Critical Danforth Biomedical, Inc.
Publication of WO1992019440A1 publication Critical patent/WO1992019440A1/en

Links

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M25/00Catheters; Hollow probes
    • A61M25/10Balloon catheters
    • A61M25/1027Making of balloon catheters
    • A61M25/1029Production methods of the balloon members, e.g. blow-moulding, extruding, deposition or by wrapping a plurality of layers of balloon material around a mandril
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE IN GENERAL
    • B29CSHAPING OR JOINING OF PLASTICS; SHAPING OF MATERIAL IN A PLASTIC STATE, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; AFTER-TREATMENT OF THE SHAPED PRODUCTS, e.g. REPAIRING
    • B29C49/00Blow-moulding, i.e. blowing a preform or parison to a desired shape within a mould; Apparatus therefor
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE IN GENERAL
    • B29KINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBCLASSES B29B, B29C OR B29D, RELATING TO MOULDING MATERIALS OR TO MATERIALS FOR MOULDS, REINFORCEMENTS, FILLERS OR PREFORMED PARTS, e.g. INSERTS
    • B29K2067/00Use of polyesters or derivatives thereof, as moulding material
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE IN GENERAL
    • B29KINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBCLASSES B29B, B29C OR B29D, RELATING TO MOULDING MATERIALS OR TO MATERIALS FOR MOULDS, REINFORCEMENTS, FILLERS OR PREFORMED PARTS, e.g. INSERTS
    • B29K2105/00Condition, form or state of moulded material or of the material to be shaped
    • B29K2105/0094Condition, form or state of moulded material or of the material to be shaped having particular viscosity
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE IN GENERAL
    • B29LINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBCLASS B29C, RELATING TO PARTICULAR ARTICLES
    • B29L2031/00Other particular articles
    • B29L2031/753Medical equipment; Accessories therefor
    • B29L2031/7542Catheters

Abstract

Balloon catheters are formed from low molecular weight polyethylene terephthalate with an intrinsic viscosity of 0.9 dL/g or less by placing tubing of such material in a mold cavity whose diameter exceeds that of the tubing by the desired degree of expansion, and pressurizing the tubing while heating the mold to a temperature exceeding both the first and second order transition temperatures of the PET from which the tubing was made, so that the tubing expands to fill the mold cavity. The resulting balloon is characterized by an unusually high toughness combined with superior flexibility and softness of feel.

Description

IMPROVED BALLOON CATHETER OF LOW MOLECULAR WEIGHT PET

This invention is in the field of polymeric materials and their use in medical devices, and relates particularly to the manufacture of balloon catheters.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Balloon catheters are widely used in medical procedures and are well recognized for their ability to correct various types of internal problems without invasive surgery. The operation and use of a balloon catheter involves insertion of the catheter into the body vessel where treatment is to be performed, followed by expansion of the balloon section by pressurized fluid. Qualities which the balloon must have for the catheter to function effectively are that it be readily expandable despite being made of inelastic material, and readily collapsible as well to permit removal from the body vessel when the procedure is completed. This is particularly true for balloon catheters designed for relieving arterial stenosis and for other procedures inside blood vessels. The balloon must be sufficiently flexible to fully and rapidly expand when_pressurized, and yet sufficiently tough to withstand the high pressure without rupture.

The handling of a balloon catheter is a very delicate matter, since careless handling can create tears which can remain unnoticed until the catheter is pressurized. Openings in the balloon wall can result in high pressure fluid entering the artery or other vessel in which the catheter has been inserted. This can cause internal injuries to the patient as well as a loss of pressure inside the catheter. Similarly, rough surfaces caused by mishandling can cause injury to the internal vessel wall. The balloon must therefore be flexible to respond rapidly to inflations and deflations and yet sufficiently tough and durable to withstand

SUBSTITUTE SHEET these changes and the stress of a high pressure differential without damage to the balloon wall.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It has now been discovered that a balloon catheter with an unusual combination of durability and toughness on the one hand and flexibility and softness to the touch on the other is achieved from a low molecular weight polyethylene terephthalate (PET) , in a process which involves expanding a length of tubing of the PET by pressurizing the tubing interior at a temperature which is above both the first and second order transition temperatures of the PET.

While it was heretofore believed that high molecular weight PET and the high tensile strength which is inherent in such a material was necessary to form a sufficiently tough balloon catheter, the present invention establishes that low molecular weight PET can be used effectively, and is in fact superior since it offers significant benefits as well which are not achievable with the high molecular weight material. While its tensile strength may be lower, the balloon formed from the low molecular weight PET has greater toughness, which is the integral of tensile strength vs . elongation, rendering the balloon less susceptible to the formation of tears or weak spots. The resulting product is easier to handle, safer to use and more durable.

A related discovery is that, unlike -higher molecular weight materials, the low molecular weight PET does not need to be biaxially oriented in the balloon formation process to achieve a sufficiently durable balloon. Expansion to form the balloon can be thus confined to the radial direction (or

"hoop" expansion) , rather than a combination of the axial and radial directions, with no loss in beneficial properties.

Other features and advantages of the invention will become evident from the description which follows.

SUBSTITUTE SHEET DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION AND PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Due to the inexactness and spread of the molecular weight for any given sample of PET, the intrinsic viscosity of PET is conventionally used as a measure of its molecular weight. Intrinsic viscosity η^ is derived from the actual viscosity of a solution of the polymer by calculating the relative viscosity ηr, which is the ratio of the viscosities of the solution and the solvent, subtracting 1 from ηr to achieve the specific viscosity ι?sp, dividing τjsp by the concentration of the solution to achieve the reduced viscosity red' anc eχtrapolating -7re{j to zero concentration. The determination is generally made at 25°C or a temperature in the vicinity thereof, and the units of intrinsic viscosity are deciliters per gram (dL/g) .

The PET used in accordance with the present invention may therefore be characterized by an intrinsic viscosity of about 0.9 dL/g or less. This corresponds approximately to a number average molecular weight of about 43,000. In most cases, best results will be obtained with PET having intrinsic viscosity in the range of about 0.6 dL/g to about 0.9 dL/g (corresponding approximately to a number average molecular weight range of 24,500 to 43,000), and preferably about 0.65 dL/g to about 0.8 dL/g (number average molecular weight of 27,500 to 36,500). One example which has been used effectively is PET with an intrinsic viscosity of about 0.72 dL/g, corresponding approximately to a number average molecular weight of 31,600. All intrinsic viscosity values herein refer to 25°C. In the practice of the present invention, the PET is first supplied as a length of hollow tubing, formed by any conventional manner. Extruded tubing is a prime example. The crystalline state of the PET in the tubing is not critical and may vary, although it must be consistent throughout any single extrusion run and from lot to lot. Amorphous PET is acceptable and is also preferred.

The tubing diameter and wall thickness will vary with the dimensions desired for the finished balloon, and are

SUBSTITUTESHEET otherwise not critical. A typical range for wall thickness i about 0.005 inch (0.013cm) to about 0.050 inch (0.127cm), wit preferred thicknesses falling within the range of about 0.008 inch (0.020cm) to about 0.020 inch (0.051cm). A typical rang 5 for tubing outer diameter is about 0.01 inch (0.025cm) to about 0.10 irich (0.25cm), with preferred diameters falling within the range of about 0.02 inch (0.051cm) to about 0.05 inch (0.13cm) .

The balloon is formed by expansion of a segment of 10 the tubing in the radial direction to a preestablished or preselected expanded diameter. This is achieved by placing the tubing in a mold cavity which has the desired shape and dimensions of the final balloon, pressurizing the interior of the tubing and heating the mold to cause the tubing in the

15 cavity to soften and expand to fill the cavity. During this expansion, the radially directed pressure causes the tubing wall to be stretched in the direction along the tubing circumference, perpendicular to the tube axis. This is referred to as the "hoop" expansion, and is distinguished from

20 axial expansion or the longitudinal stretching of the tubing. With amorphous tubing as the starting material and only hoop expansion being performed, the finished balloon will lack biaxial orientation of the crystal structure, at least to any appreciable degree that might have a bearing on the properties

25 of the finished balloon.

The degree of expansion can be varied and is not critical. In most cases, expansion will be performed to result in an increase in the outer diameter of the tubing to a degree ranging from about 2.0 times to about 10.0 times the

30 unexpanded diameter, preferably from about 3.0 times to about 6.0 times.

The length of the segment of tubing which is expanded to form the balloon is not critical and does not affect either the process or the product which is formed. In 5 most cases, the balloon will be from about 1 inch (2.54cm) to about 3 inches (7.6cm) in length.

The pressure exerted inside the tubing during the expansion is not critical, and subject only to the limitations of the mold. In most applications, the pressure will generally lie within a range such as about lOOpsi (gauge) to about 200psi, although a range of about 120psi to about 160psi is preferred. The temperature to which the tubing is heated to cause it to expand in accordance with this invention is a temperature which is about 20°C or more above the first order transition temperature of the PET.

Like the intrinsic viscosity, the first and second order transition temperatures are further means of characterizing the PET used in the practice of this invention and distinguishing it from PET's which differ in average molecular weight, molecular weight distribution or both. The second order transition temperature is the lower of the two, and both are lower than the melt temperature. In preferred embodiments of this invention, the first order transition temperature is less than about 90°C, and in more preferred embodiments, it is from about 70°C to about 80°C. Likewise, in preferred embodiments, the second order transition temperature is from about 40°C to about 65°C, and in more preferred embodiments, from about 50°C to about 60°C.

Preferred processing temperatures are those which exceed the first order transition temperature by from about 20°C to about 80°C. Particularly preferred temperatures are those exceeding the first order transition temperature by from about 30°C to about 50°C. Tubing made from PET with a first order transition temperature of about 73-77°C and a second order transition temperature of about 55°C has been used with success with a processing temperature of about 115-121°C. The mold in which the tubing is expanded when forming the balloon will be in the form of a hollow tube of sufficient diameter to permit insertion of the PET tubing. The mold cavity will be an expanded portion of the hollow tube whose diameter will equal the diameter to which the PET tubing is to be expanded along the portion forming the balloon, and whose length will correspond to the desired length of the balloon. Preferably only this expanded portion will be heated during the pressurization and expansion of the PET tubing. At either end of this expanded portion will be a narrow bore segment which will hold the PET tubing in the center of the expanded portion so that the tubing will expand uniformly in all radial directions. The narrow bore segment on one side may be of somewhat larger diameter to permit the balloon once formed (although flattened out due to the removal of internal air pressure) to be removed from the mold.

The mold may be constructed of any material which is inert to the PET, and can withstand the pressure exerted upon the PET tubing from inside. The mold cavity must also have sufficient surface smoothness to produce a balloon having a texture which is smooth and soft to the touch, to minimize the possibility of the formation of weak spots in the balloon wall and to form a balloon which can be inserted into the artery or other body vessel with a minimum of resistance. A transparent mold offers the advantage of permitting the operator to monitor the insertion of the tubing and the expansion process. Glass is a useful material in this regard, although a wide array of other materials and types of materials may be used as well.

The mold may be heated in any of a variety of ways, subject only to the need to avoid excessive heating at any particular point along the tubing, and to assure full heating of all portions of the tubing in the mold cavity. The entire mold may be placed inside a heating unit or immersed in a heated heat transfer medium to heat all portions of the mold cavity simultaneously. Alternatively, particularly in the case of a transparent mold such as glass, the mold may be slowly drawn through or past a heating element, such as for example through a resistance heater, whereby heat application is begun at one end of the mold cavity and slowly progresses to the opposite end, with the balloon expansion proceeding simultaneously. The expansion, which will start at one end and progress to the other, is readily monitored in this manner. For tubing of the dimensions cited above, a typical drawing rate is approximately 2.0-2.5cm/min. In each of these methods, the pressure is maintained inside the tubing while the heat is applied so that the tubing expands as it reaches the elevated temperature of the heating unit.

Once the expansion is complete, the internal pressure is lowered to ambient pressure and the balloon is cooled. This stabilizes the crystal structure of the PET, and in particular the hoop orientation of the molecules. Cooling is readily performed in the mold cavity. Since the mold itself is being cooled at the same time, the cooling rate is controlled by the mold and is slower than it would be if the entire balloon were placed in direct contact with a cooling medium.

A balloon prepared in accordance with the procedure described above may be mounted on a suitable shaft to complete the catheter construction, the shaft being of conventional configuration and construction and the mounting being performed according to conventional techniques already in use in catheter manufacture. All other features of the procedure for constructing the catheter and of the catheter itself are conventional and substantially unaffected by the practice of this invention.

The foregoing is offered primarily for purposes of illustration. It will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art that modifications and variations in terms of both materials and methods can be introduced without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

SUBSTITUTE SHEET

Claims

WHAT IS CLAIMED IS;
1. A process for forming a polyethylene terephthalate catheter balloon, said process comprising: (a) placing in a mold cavity a length of tubing formed from polyethylene terephthalate having an intrinsic viscosity of about 0.9 or less;
(b) pressurizing the interior of said tubing at a temperature which is higher than the first order transition temperature of said polyethylene terephthalate by at least about 20°C, to radially expand said length of tubing to fill said mold cavity;
(c) cooling said tubing so expanded while still pressurized, to stabilize said tubing in an expanded state.
2. A process in accordance with claim 1 in which step (b) is conducted at a temperature which is higher than the first order transition temperature of said polyethylene terephthalate by from about 30°C to about 50°C.
3. A process in accordance with claim 1 in which said length of tubing is formed from polyethylene terephthalate having a first order transition temperature of from about 70°C to about 80°C.
4. A process in accordance with claim 1 in which said length of tubing is formed from polyethylene terephthalate having a second order transition temperature of from about 50°C to about 60°C.
5. A process in accordance with claim 1 in which said length of tubing is formed from polyethylene terephthalate having an intrinsic viscosity of from about 0.65 to about 0.8.
SUBSTITUTESHEET
6. A process in accordance with claim 1 in which step (b) comprises pressurizing the interior of said tubing to a pressure of from about lOOpsi to about 200psi.
7. A process in accordance with claim l in which step (a) comprises placing said length of tubing in a cavity of a glass mold.
8. A process in accordance with claim 1 in which the cross sections of said mold cavity and said length of tubing are such that an expansion ratio of about 3.0 to about 6.0 is achieved in step (b) .
9. A process in accordance with claim 1 in which axial expansion of said tubing is substantially avoided.
SUBSTITUTESHEET
PCT/US1992/003549 1991-05-01 1992-04-29 Improved balloon catheter of low molecular weight pet WO1992019440A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US69428891A true 1991-05-01 1991-05-01
US694,288 1991-05-01

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Cited By (22)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5348538A (en) * 1992-09-29 1994-09-20 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Shrinking balloon catheter having nonlinear or hybrid compliance curve
US5447497A (en) * 1992-08-06 1995-09-05 Scimed Life Systems, Inc Balloon catheter having nonlinear compliance curve and method of using
US5554120A (en) * 1994-07-25 1996-09-10 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Polymer blends for use in making medical devices including catheters and balloons for dilatation catheters
US5714110A (en) * 1993-09-20 1998-02-03 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Process improvements for preparing catheter balloons
US5807520A (en) * 1995-11-08 1998-09-15 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Method of balloon formation by cold drawing/necking
US5849846A (en) * 1994-07-25 1998-12-15 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Balloons for medical catheters
US5951941A (en) * 1994-03-02 1999-09-14 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Block copolymer elastomer catheter balloons
US6123712A (en) * 1996-08-23 2000-09-26 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Balloon catheter with stent securement means
US6270504B1 (en) 1996-08-23 2001-08-07 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Stent delivery system
US6358227B1 (en) 1997-09-10 2002-03-19 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Dilatation catheter balloon made from pen based homopolymer or random copolymer
US6391032B2 (en) 1996-08-23 2002-05-21 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Stent delivery system having stent securement means
US6406457B1 (en) 1994-03-02 2002-06-18 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Block copolymer elastomer catheter balloons
US6607544B1 (en) 1994-01-26 2003-08-19 Kyphon Inc. Expandable preformed structures for deployment in interior body regions
US6610069B2 (en) 1996-08-23 2003-08-26 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Catheter support for stent delivery
US6719773B1 (en) 1998-06-01 2004-04-13 Kyphon Inc. Expandable structures for deployment in interior body regions
US6726714B2 (en) 2001-08-09 2004-04-27 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Stent delivery system
US6730377B2 (en) 2002-01-23 2004-05-04 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Balloons made from liquid crystal polymer blends
US6977103B2 (en) 1999-10-25 2005-12-20 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Dimensionally stable balloons
WO2006086161A1 (en) * 2005-02-08 2006-08-17 Medtronic Vascular, Inc. Hybrid mold for a catheter balloon and method of manufacturing such a balloon
US7101597B2 (en) 1997-09-10 2006-09-05 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Medical devices made from polymer blends containing low melting temperature liquid crystal polymers
US7163522B1 (en) 1994-03-02 2007-01-16 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Block copolymer elastomer catheter balloons
US7261720B2 (en) 2002-01-11 2007-08-28 Kyphon Inc. Inflatable device for use in surgical protocol relating to fixation of bone

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US4443399A (en) * 1981-05-07 1984-04-17 Idemitsu Petrochemical Co., Ltd. Method of producing biaxially oriented sheet or film and apparatus therefor
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US4820349A (en) * 1987-08-21 1989-04-11 C. R. Bard, Inc. Dilatation catheter with collapsible outer diameter
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US4950239A (en) * 1988-08-09 1990-08-21 Worldwide Medical Plastics Inc. Angioplasty balloons and balloon catheters
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US4145466A (en) * 1977-09-02 1979-03-20 Rohm And Haas Company Melt strength improvement of PET
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US4550007A (en) * 1981-11-10 1985-10-29 Mitsubishi Plastics Industries Limited Process for production of a plastic bottle
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Cited By (40)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5447497A (en) * 1992-08-06 1995-09-05 Scimed Life Systems, Inc Balloon catheter having nonlinear compliance curve and method of using
US5348538A (en) * 1992-09-29 1994-09-20 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Shrinking balloon catheter having nonlinear or hybrid compliance curve
US5403340A (en) * 1992-09-29 1995-04-04 Scimed Lifesystems Inc. Shrinking balloon catheter having nonlinear compliance curve
US5500181A (en) * 1992-09-29 1996-03-19 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Shrinking balloon catheter having nonlinear compliance curve
US6328710B1 (en) 1993-09-20 2001-12-11 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Process improvements for preparing catheter balloons
US5714110A (en) * 1993-09-20 1998-02-03 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Process improvements for preparing catheter balloons
US6979341B2 (en) 1994-01-26 2005-12-27 Kyphon Inc. Expandable preformed structures for deployment in interior body regions
US6607544B1 (en) 1994-01-26 2003-08-19 Kyphon Inc. Expandable preformed structures for deployment in interior body regions
US7700033B2 (en) 1994-03-02 2010-04-20 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Block copolymer elastomer catheter balloons
US5951941A (en) * 1994-03-02 1999-09-14 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Block copolymer elastomer catheter balloons
US6406457B1 (en) 1994-03-02 2002-06-18 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Block copolymer elastomer catheter balloons
US7163522B1 (en) 1994-03-02 2007-01-16 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Block copolymer elastomer catheter balloons
US7618696B2 (en) 1994-03-02 2009-11-17 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Block copolymer elastomer catheter balloons
US5554120A (en) * 1994-07-25 1996-09-10 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Polymer blends for use in making medical devices including catheters and balloons for dilatation catheters
US5565523A (en) * 1994-07-25 1996-10-15 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Polymer blends for use in making medical devices including catheters and balloons for dilatation catheters
US5747591A (en) * 1994-07-25 1998-05-05 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Polymer blends for use in making medical devices including catheters and balloons for dilation catheters
US6013728A (en) * 1994-07-25 2000-01-11 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Polymer blends for use in making medical devices including catheters and balloons for dilatation catheters
US5849846A (en) * 1994-07-25 1998-12-15 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Balloons for medical catheters
US5807520A (en) * 1995-11-08 1998-09-15 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Method of balloon formation by cold drawing/necking
US6881216B2 (en) 1996-08-23 2005-04-19 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Balloon catheter with stent securement means
US6517548B2 (en) 1996-08-23 2003-02-11 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Stent delivery system
US6419685B2 (en) 1996-08-23 2002-07-16 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Balloon catheter with stent securement means
US6610069B2 (en) 1996-08-23 2003-08-26 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Catheter support for stent delivery
US6391032B2 (en) 1996-08-23 2002-05-21 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Stent delivery system having stent securement means
US6270504B1 (en) 1996-08-23 2001-08-07 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Stent delivery system
US6123712A (en) * 1996-08-23 2000-09-26 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Balloon catheter with stent securement means
US6802849B2 (en) 1996-08-23 2004-10-12 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Stent delivery system
US8152819B2 (en) 1996-08-23 2012-04-10 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Catheter support for stent delivery
US6866649B2 (en) 1997-09-10 2005-03-15 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Dilation catheter balloon made from pen based homopolymer or random copolymer
US6358227B1 (en) 1997-09-10 2002-03-19 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Dilatation catheter balloon made from pen based homopolymer or random copolymer
US7101597B2 (en) 1997-09-10 2006-09-05 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Medical devices made from polymer blends containing low melting temperature liquid crystal polymers
US6585688B2 (en) 1997-09-10 2003-07-01 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Dilatation catheter balloon made from PEN based homopolymer or random copolymer
US6719773B1 (en) 1998-06-01 2004-04-13 Kyphon Inc. Expandable structures for deployment in interior body regions
US7722624B2 (en) 1998-06-01 2010-05-25 Kyphon SÀRL Expandable structures for deployment in interior body regions
US7875035B2 (en) 1998-06-01 2011-01-25 Kyphon Sarl Expandable structures for deployment in interior body regions
US6977103B2 (en) 1999-10-25 2005-12-20 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Dimensionally stable balloons
US6726714B2 (en) 2001-08-09 2004-04-27 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Stent delivery system
US7261720B2 (en) 2002-01-11 2007-08-28 Kyphon Inc. Inflatable device for use in surgical protocol relating to fixation of bone
US6730377B2 (en) 2002-01-23 2004-05-04 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Balloons made from liquid crystal polymer blends
WO2006086161A1 (en) * 2005-02-08 2006-08-17 Medtronic Vascular, Inc. Hybrid mold for a catheter balloon and method of manufacturing such a balloon

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