WO1981002925A1 - Firearm stabilizing device - Google Patents

Firearm stabilizing device Download PDF

Info

Publication number
WO1981002925A1
WO1981002925A1 PCT/US1981/000362 US8100362W WO8102925A1 WO 1981002925 A1 WO1981002925 A1 WO 1981002925A1 US 8100362 W US8100362 W US 8100362W WO 8102925 A1 WO8102925 A1 WO 8102925A1
Authority
WO
WIPO (PCT)
Prior art keywords
means
firearm
framework
user
arm
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/US1981/000362
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
P Theodore
Original Assignee
P Theodore
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US13623480A priority Critical
Priority to US136234 priority
Application filed by P Theodore filed Critical P Theodore
Priority claimed from AU71519/81A external-priority patent/AU7151981A/en
Publication of WO1981002925A1 publication Critical patent/WO1981002925A1/en

Links

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41CSMALLARMS, e.g. PISTOLS, RIFLES; ACCESSORIES THEREFOR
    • F41C33/00Means for wearing or carrying smallarms
    • F41C33/001Shooting harnesses; Stabilising devices, e.g. straps on the body
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41CSMALLARMS, e.g. PISTOLS, RIFLES; ACCESSORIES THEREFOR
    • F41C23/00Butts; Butt plates; Stocks

Abstract

A rifle (10) which has a novel stabilizing structure (20) comprising a hand grip (22) and a framework (23, 24, 26) extending rearwardly from the hand grip (22). This framework encloses an open space (36) which receives the arm of the user so that forces are exerted upon the stabilizing structure (23, 24, 26) by the superior, posterior and inferior surfaces of the shoulder or upper arm. In addition, there is an auxiliary bar (28) spaced a short distance rearwardly from the hand grip (22). This auxiliary bar (28) engages the base of the thumb of the firing hand in such a way as to produce additional stabilizing forces upon the rifle (10), resulting in resistance to translational movements and rotational movements about any set of three mutually perpendicular axis. In addition, the design of the framework (23, 24, 26) compels the user to hold the rifle in the preferred elbow-up attitude, and to aim it across the chest.

Description

Description

Firearm Stabilizing Device

Technical Field

This invention relates generally to firearms, and particularly concerns a stabilizing structure for use in automatic and semi-automatic firearms.

Background Art

A conventional shoulder arm has a barrel which points in a forward, or firing, direction, and a stock which extends rearwardly therefrom. The rear of the stock terminates in a butt which normally rests against the front, or anterior, surface of the shoulder of the user. The point of contact of the butt against the shoulder provides a fulcrum about which the entire firearm can rotate when the recoil force (the rearward reaction of the firearm to the forward ejection of the bullet) drives the firearm rearwardly against that shoulder. The axis of such rotation is one which extends laterally (from side to side), and the direction of such rotation is such as to elevate the barrel.

This sudden elevation of the barrel can be a problem in the use of any shoulder arm or hand gun, but it has particularly severe consequences in the use of automatic and semi-automatic firearms. A semi-automatic firearm is one which fires one bullet for each, trigger actuation, without requiring any action on the part of the user to reload the firing chamber. An automatic firearm is one which keeps on firing as long as the trigger is actuated. With either type of firearm, repeated firing at a relatively high repetition rate is possible. When a firearm is used in this way, the sudden upward climb of the barrel caused by recoil after each shot makes it difficult for the user to keep the firearm leveled at the target; i.e. , to recover from each recoil impulse in time for the next shot.

The recoil problem cannot be effectively counteracted by muscular effort to resist the rearward motion, unless such effort is initiated before firing. This is primarily because the human nervous system cannot react rapidly enough to the recoil impulse. But a forward thrust exerted in advance of firing would cause the firearm to move forwardly, taking the butt of the firearm away from the user's shoulder, and thus depriving it of a stable platform in the critical moment prior to firing.

Firearms are also subject to a number of other movements, both translational movements and rotations about various other axes, such as the sagittal (longitudinal) and polar (vertical) axes, which are perpendicular to the lateral axis mentioned above. At least some of these other movements are induced by recoil, and thus they too present the user of an automatic or semi-automatic .firearm with the problem of post-recoil recovery during a sequence of rapidly repeated shots. These other movements can also occur during aiming and firing (i.e. , before recoil occurs) as a result of various bodily motions, such as flinching, unsteadiness, trigger-jerking, breathing, etc., which can be difficult to control. Such movements often delay target acquisition and cause muzzle jump during aiming. As a result, the user fires less accurately.

U.S. Patent No. 3,209,481 of Gilbert discloses a rifle with a pistol-style hand grip. In addition, the rear of the rifle stock is provided with a curved implement which hooks behind the rifle user's upper arm. The stock does not rest against the user's shoulder. There is, however, nothing to prevent the rifle from undergoing recoil-induced rotation (in a barrel-elevating direction) about the fulcrum provided by the user's trigger hand. In addition, the Gilbert rifle is not effectively stabilized against the various other directions of linear motion or rotation about the various other axes, which can result either from recoil forces or from bodily motion during aiming and firing.

In this type of firearm, it is disadvantageous for the point of arm engagement (e.g. , the curved

•implement) to be substantially below the- level of the hand grip. This forces the user to hold the arm of his trigger hand in an elbow-down attitude, which is a weaker, and therefore less stable, firing position. This elbow-down position, moreover, inherently causes the trigger hand to push diagonally upwardly, rather than straightforwardly, on the hand grip. That upward angle introduces an upward component of force on the firearm, which undesirably enhances any tendency of the barrel to kick upwardly in response to the recoil.

Disclosure of Invention

The present invention provides an improved form of firearm stabilizing structure which lacks a shoulder-contacting butt, and which provides a hand grip so that forward thrust can be effectively exerted, and which includes means extending behind the upper arm so that the forward thrust can be exerted prior to firing. In addition, the stabilizing structure of

OMPI

2-- V/lPO the present invention is designed so that the user keeps his elbow high. It also is designed to contact the hand and arm or shoulder of the user in a unique combination of locations calculated to lock the firearm in a stable network of forces and torques which not only resist forward and rearward movement, but also resist other translational movements, barrel- elevating rotation about a lateral axis, and rotation about the other axes as well, whether induced by recoil or by bodily movement.

The objective of increased repetitive accuracy and the objective of limiting undesirable bodily movement are both aided by the elimination or reduction of four possible motions, which are: 1. Linear motion generated backward along the barrel as horizontal recoil; 2. Upward rotation around the stock butt plate (lateral axis), the so-called "vertical component of recoil"; 3. Horizontal rotation around the hand grip position (polar axis); and 4. Rotation about the rifle barrel (sagittal axis). Thus, the invention, through its own structure in combination with muscular action and body skeletal structures, stabilizes the firearm against linear recoil and rotation about any of three mutually perpendicular axes, as follows:

1. The horizontal recoil force is dampened or eliminated by isometrically (statically) contracting the muscular groups (shoulder horizontal, flexors and elbow extensors) which would normally act in opposition to this force, prior to the act of firing. This eliminates the time delay inherent in conscious or reflexive contraction of these muscular groups in response to the sensing of the recoil force.

OMPI 2. The so-called "vertical component of recoil", which is actually the torque caused by the now greatly reduced horizontal recoil force (see above) acting about the rifle stock butt plate, is reduced or eliminated by removal of the stock itself. This eliminates the fulcrum or axis for such rotation. In addition-, correct use o-f this invention requires that the arm be held in a semi-abducted (elevated) position, which reduces the tendency for muscular activity to push the gun upward during response to recoil.

3. Rotation about a polar (top to bottom) axis is reduced or eliminated by a static generation of torque about this axis. The required static torque is generated by the phalanges of the hand

(fingers) acting on the hand grip. The fulcrum or' axis about which this torque is generated passes through an auxiliary bar, directly behind the hand grip, which is held stable by the first metacarpal of the thumb, and the limitation of the generated rotation occurs when a rear frame member comes in contact with the muscular mass of the posterior arm or shoulder.

4. Rotation about a sagittal (front to rear) axis is reduced or eliminated by a static generation of torque about this axis. The required static torque is generated by the force of the third, fourth, and fifth phalanges of the hand on the hand grip, and the first metacarpal of the thumb on the auxiliary bar. The limitation of rotation about this axis occurs when top and bottom frame members come in contact with the arm or shoulder muscle mass (deltoid) and the inferior side of the upper arm, respectively.

These and other features of the invention will be more readily understood from the detailed description which is set forth below, when taken in conjunction with the following drawings.

REA - /'-J-/-

/ PI Brief Description of Drawings

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a firearm in accordance with this invention.

Figs. 2 and 3 show a user holding the firearm of Fig. 1 in a one-handed firing position.

Fig. 4 shows a user of the same firearm holding it in a conventional two-handed firing position.

Fig. 5 is a schematic force diagram corresponding to a side elevational view of the firearm.

Fig. 6 is a schematic force diagram corresponding to a top plan view of the firearm.

Fig. 7 is a schematic force diagram corresponding to a rear elevational view of the firearm.

Best Mode for Carrying Out the Invention

Figs. 1 through 4 illustrate a rifle 10 constructed in accordance with the principles of this invention, although the invention is also applicable to other types of shoulder arms and even to hand guns. This rifle includes a conventional barrel 12 which points in a forward firing direction indicated by arrow 13. At the rear of the barrel is 'a firing mechanism 14, and below that is a trigger mechanism 16 and an ammunition clip 18. These components are all conventional. In place of the conventional rifle stock, however, a rifle stabilizing structure 20 extends rearwardly from the firing mechanism 14. This structure comprises a forwardly located vertical bar 22 which depends from the firing mechanism 14 and an open framework including a rear¬ wardly located curved vertical bar 23 connected to top and bottom horizontal bars 24 and 26, respectively.

OMPI ' In addition, there is an auxiliary vertical bar 28 which is connected between the horizontal bars 24 and 26 at a location between the forward and rearward vertical bars 22 and 23. The auxiliary bar 28 is slidable along the length of bars 24 and 26, so that its position may be adjusted horizontally. Once satisfactorily adjusted, it can be locked in position by tightening a pair of set screws 30 and 32.

Although the preferred framework disclosed is substantially rectangular in form, and includes one or more members which together fully close off the framework in each of four directions (i.e. , bar 23 to the rear, bar 24 at the top, bar 26 at the bottom and auxiliary bar 28 at the front), it will be appreciated that alternate framework configurations are also possible. For example, there may be a greater or lesser number of bars, or the framework may not be rectangular or even quadrilateral in form, or it may not be fully closed off in all four of the- directions named above. It will also be appreciated that the choice of straight or curved bar configurations is not essential to the practice of the invention, that rear bar 23 may or may not be integral with horizontal bars 24 and 26, and that the vertical bars 22 and/or 28 may be diagonal, if desired, instead of vertical. Other variations of the basic framework configuration are also possible.

The forward vertical bar 22 provides a hand grip which is conveniently encircled by the trigger hand of the rifle user. In this position, the trigger finger engages the trigger mechanism 16 for firing the weapon as seen in Figs. 2-4. Immediately behind the hand grip bar 22, between that bar and the auxiliary bar 28, is an empty space 34 which serves as a thumb- receiving opening. The auxiliary bar 28 is normally

- imETζr

OMPI τ?o adjusted to be as close as possible to the hand grip bar 22, and still allow the metacarpal, i.e. , the thick .portion or base, of the thumb to fit fairly tightly between the bars 22 and 28, or at least to intrude partially into the space 34, so that forces are exerted on both the bars 22 and 28. These forces will be described in greater detail below.

Adjusting the auxiliary bar 28 forwardly in this manner leaves a larger space 36 between the vertical bars 23 and 28. This space 36, which is also bounded by the horizontal bars 24 and 26, serves as an arm-receiving opening. When using the rifle of this invention, the user inserts his firing arm, i.e. , the arm which is attached to the trigger hand, _ entirely through the space 36 in the open framework.

The resulting position of the trigger hand and arm is illustrated in Fig. 2. For convenience, it will be assumed that the user of the rifle uses his right hand to pull the trigger, and therefore inserts his right arm through the framework opening 36. However, it will be appreciated that everything that is said herein is equally applicable to left-handed marksmen, if the terms right and left are simply interchanged. The user's right hand encircles the hand grip bar 22, while the trigger finger of the right hand engages the trigger mechanism 16. This position permits either the thick muscle surrounding the metacarpal bone of the right thumb or the webbing between the thumb and forefinger to push forwardly (arrow 38) .against the hand grip bar 22.. With a conventional rifle stock, such a forward force exerted upon the rifle would make the stock separate from the right shoulder of the user. But, with the open framework stabilizing structure 20 of this rifle,

O 2 curved bar 23 is behind the rear, or posterior, surface 40 of the upper portion of the user's right arm or shoulder. Therefore, as the right hand pushes the rifle forwardly, bar 23 comes into contact with that posterior surface 40 and prevents the rifle from being displaced any further in the forward direction. Thus, the shoulder horizontal flexor and elbow extensor muscles are isometrically or statically tensed in opposition to each other. The result is that, during aiming, the rifle remains in equilibrium, so far as the forward/rearward direction is concerned, because of a static balance between the forward force 38 exerted on hand grip bar 22 by the right hand and a rearward force 41 exerted on the rear bar 23 by the posterior surface 40 of the right shoulder or upper right arm. - •

When the rifle is fired, the recoil force is exerted in a rearward direction, as indicated by arrow 42 (Fig. 2). Because the right hand is already exerting a continuous forward force 38 on the rifle and the associated neurons of the voluntary muscular system are already firing, the recoil force 42 is immediately counteracted to some extent by the right hand. -If the right hand had not already been pushing forwardly against the rifle, the human nervous system could not react rapidly enough to exert such a recoil- opposing force in the brief time that it takes for the barrel 12 to jump upwardly.

The open framework portion 23, 24, 26 which receives the upper right arm of the user is at approxi¬ mately the same height as the hand grip bar 22. Thus, the upper right arm is at approximately the same height as the right hand while the rifle 10 is being aimed and fired. This, in turn, causes the right elbow to be raised so that it points more

ΓUREXD*

OMPI ZTV outwardly from the body (the semi-abducted position), instead of forcing or permitting that elbow to drop to the side of the body, pointing downwardly. The elbow-up attitude, depicted in Fig. 2, permits the right hand to push more strongly against the hand grip bar 22, and thus creates a more stable firing position.

It also prevents the right hand from pushing 'diagonally upwardly against the hand grip, which it would have to do if the elbow were pointed down.

Such an upward push aids, rather than opposes, barrel climb.

The forward pressure of the right hand against the hand grip bar 22 may not absorb all of the recoil force. If there is some rearward displace¬ ment of the rifle 10 due to recoil, such rearward displacement does not cause the rifle to strike against the front, or anterior, surface 43 of the right shoulder, which, in turn, would permit the right shoulder to be used as a fulcrum about which the barrel 12 can pivot upwardly (arrow 45) in response to recoil. Since the rear portion of the framework is the bar 23, and this is located behind the right arm or shoulder, the rifle cannot be driven against the forwardly facing surface 43 by rearward recoil movement. Thus, the shoulder cannot provide a fulcrum for barrel-elevating rotation.

The only body surface which can absorb the rearward recoil force is the right hand. Therefore, any barrel-elevating rotation which can be induced by the recoil force would have to cause the. rifle to rotate about that hand as its fulcrum, i.e. , rotation of the weapon in a counterclockwise direction, as viewed in Figs. 1 and 2, about an axis 44 (see Fig. 1). This axis, which extends from left to right, relative to the rifle user, may be referred to as the lateral axis of rifle rotation. As seen in Fig. 2, however, such counterclockwise rotation of the rifle about axis 44 involves downward motion of the stabilizing structure 20 at the rear of the rifle; and such downward motion is resisted by the engagement of upper bar 24 against the upper, or superior, surface 46 (the deltoid muscle) of the upper portion of the user's right arm or shoulder. This is particularly true since the upper right arm of the user is not held in a steeply sloping position, but rather is held with the right elbow high. Therefore, the upper right arm is in a favorable position to exert an upward force 47 (Fig. 2) on the bar 24, resisting counterclockwise rifle rotation about the lateral axis 44. This helps to keep the barrel 12 from being suddenly elevated by the recoil force.

In addition to the "vertical component of recoil", there are other directions of translational and rotational movement which may be induced either by recoil or by undesired body motions. These other movements also present a problem "of recovery during rapidly repeated fire, as well as a problem of user accuracy during aiming and firing; and these other movements also are stabilized by the stabilizing structure 20 of this invention. For example, rotation of the rifle can occur about a longitudinal or sagittal axis 50, as well as about a vertical or polar axis 52 (Fig. 1). With respect to rotation of the rifle about a vertical or polar axis 52, the unique stabilizing structure 20 permits the user to lock the rifle into a balanced pair of torques which tend to resist rotary movement about that axis. Specifically, the fingers of the user's right hand, other than the

OMPI trigger finger, curl around the left side of the hand grip bar 22, and pull laterally to the right so as to exert a horizontal force on the hand grip bar 22, which is directed horizontally away from the torso of the user. This force is represented by arrows 54; see Figs. 2-4 and 6-7.

In addjltion, the metacarpal portion of the user's right thumb inserted into opening 34, which presses laterally to the left against the auxiliary bar 28, is indicated by arrows 56 (Figs. 2-4 and 6). This force is directed laterally or horizontally inward toward the torso of the user. In order for the auxiliary bar 28 to function in this manner, it should squeeze against the base or metacarpal portion of the user's right thumb. If it does not, the set screws 30 and 32 should be loosened and the bar 28 adjusted to provide a fairly .small space 34 between the bar 28 and the hand grip bar 22. After the set screws are tightened, the rifle is then adjusted for the particular user, and no further adjustments need be made unless, and until, another person uses the weapon.

A further horizontal force (arrow 58, Figs. 2, 6 and 7) is exerted by the posterior surface 40 of the user's right arm or shoulder upon the rear vertical bar 23. The two horizontal forces 54 and 58, which are directed to the right, or outwardly from the torso of the user, are balanced statically by the force 56. The latter force, which is exerted by the right thumb, is directed horizontally to the left or inwardly toward the torso of the user. This causes the rifle to be in equilibrium so far as horizontal movement in the left- right direction is concerned, and also produces a net torque of zero so far as rotation about the polar axis 52 is concerned. With respect to rotation about the longitudinal or sagittal axis 50, a similar situation exists. The force 58 tends to turn the rifle 10 in one direction about the longitudinal or sagittal axis 50. It is opposed by another force, represented by arrow 60 in Figs. 1, 2 and 7, exerted in the opposite horizontal direction, i.e. , inward toward the torso of the user, by the lower or inferior surface 62 of the user's upper right arm (see Fig. 2). The inward horizontal force 56 exerted on auxiliary bar 28 by the metacarpal portion of the user's right thumb also tends to oppose force 58, while the outwardly directed horizontal force 54 exerted by the fingers of the right hand upon the hand grip bar 22 tends to oppose the forces 56 and 60. The result is that the open framework of the stabilizing structure 20 tends to rotate in a direction for the upper bar 24 to press against the superior surface 46, and the lower horizontal bar 26 to press against the inferior surface 62. This tends to lock the rifle 10 against any rotation about the longitudinal or sagittal axis 50.

The rifle 10, when held in the firing position illustrated, is thus locked in a network of balanced forces and torques, which tend to resist translational movement in any direction, as well as rotation about the three mutually perpendicular axes.

In addition, the presence of the auxiliary bar 28 actually forces the user to keep his right elbow up. The geometry of the arrangement illustrated in the drawings is such that, if the user tries to lower his right elbow, he finds it anatomically impossible to lower it very far before bringing the base of the right thumb into blocking engagement with the auxiliary bar 28, after which the right elbow can descend no further. Thus, the user is compelled to aim and fire the rifle in the preferred elbow-up attitude.

- U £ ^

OMPI ^ Furthermore, the stabilizing structure 20 of this invention forces the user of the rifle 10 to aim it in a sideward direction across his chest, as opposed to pointing it straight ahead. The reason for this is that', if the rifleman attempts to swing the rifle toward the front of his body, the auxiliary bar 28 exerts a pressure on the base of his right thumb, which forces his trigger hand into an unnatural and uncomfortable position. The sideward aiming stance, which is thus compelled by this invention, has significant advantages. By placing both arms and the rifle 10 across his chest to assume this sideward stance, the user puts added pressure on his rib cage, thus somewhat restricting his breathing.- It is desirable to restrict one's breathing during aiming and firing, so as to minimize movement of the firearm induced by the rising and falling of the rib cage as air is taken into and expelled from the lungs. In addition, in those instances where the present invention is used in an assault rifle or other military weapon, it will be realized that a rifleman who stands sideways presents a smaller target for the enemy's return fire.

Finally, it is believed that the translational and rotational motions, which are described above, are so interrelated to each other, by virtue of the body mechanics involved, that the stabilization of one or more of these motions somehow helps synergis- tically to stabilize one or more of the others as well; for example, by tensing one or more muscles, each of which is related to movements in. more than one direction.

So effective is this unique stabilizing structure 20 that it has proven possible for the rifle 10 to be fired effectively when held with only one hand, as illustrated in Figs. 2 and 3. Thus, the rifle can be treated somewhat like a pistol, i.e., held and fired by the right hand, with the stabilizing structure 20 engaging the various surfaces of the right thumb and upper right arm or shoulder as described above. However, the rifle 10 can also be fired in the conventional two-handed position, as illustrated in Fig. 4.

There may be other variations of the invention which fall within the scope of the novel principle taught herein. For this reason, the disclosed embodiments are to be taken as merely exemplary, and such variations are intended to be covered by the following claims.

- θREA

OMPI fy IPO Λ ,

Claims

Claims
1. A firearm comprising a barrel pointing in a forward firing direction and a stabilizing structure having a plurality of means positioned to contact selected locations on the body of a user of said firearm in a manner for said body-contacting means to receive forces tending to resist rotation of said firearm about each one of three mutually perpendicular axes when said firearm is held in firing position by said user.
2. A firearm as in claim 1, wherein at least some of said body-contacting means are positioned to contact selected locations on the body of said user in such"manner that said body-contacting means receive a balanced pair of opposing forces exerted in a direction parallel .to said firing direction.
3. A firearm as in claim 2, wherein said body-contacting means include: a framework having an opening adapted to receive said upper arm; means on said framework adapted to engage a posterior surface of said upper arm or the adjacent shoulder in a manner for said framework to receive a rearward force; and means located forward of said framework and adapted to be contacted by the thumb of said hand in a manner to receive a forward force to counterbalance said rearward force.
4. A firearm as in claim 3, wherein said framework also includes means positioned, to contact a superior surface of said upper arm or said shoulder whereby to resist barrel-lifting rotation of said firearm about a laterally extending axis located forwardly of the point of contact with said superior surface. 5. A firearm as in claim 4, wherein said framework opening is at substantially the same height as said forward means whereby said user tends to keep said arm in an elbow-up attitude when said thumb
5 contacts said forward means.
6. A firearm as in claim 5, wherein said stabilizing structure includes auxiliary means contacting said hand, when said thumb contacts said forward means, whereby said user is forced to keep iθ said arm in said elbow-up attitude.
7. A firearm as in claim 6, wherein said auxiliary means is spaced rearwardly of said forward ^ means a sufficiently short distance to contact the base of said thumb, when said thumb contacts said
15 forward means, in a manner for said auxiliary means to receive a lateral force directed inwardly toward the torso of said user.
8. A firearm as in claim 7, wherein said framework also includes means contacting an inferior
20 surface of said upper arm in a manner to receive a lateral force directed inwardly toward the torso of said user.
9. A firearm comprising a barrel pointing in a forward firing direction and a stabilizing
25 structure including a framework having an opening adapted to receive an arm of a user of said firearm, means located forwardly of said framework and adapted to be contacted by the thumb of said arm, and auxiliary means located rearwardly of said forward means and
30 sufficiently close to said forward means -to contact the base of said thumb.
10. A firearm as in claim 9, wherein said framework opening is unobstructed rearwardly of said auxiliary means whereby to avoid contact with the
35 anterior surface of said user's shoulder.
OMPI , IPO
11. A firearm as in claim 9, further comprising means for adjusting the distance between said hand grip and said auxiliary means.
12. A firearm as in claim 9, wherein said framework includes means adapted to contact a posterior surface of the upper portion of said arm or the adjacent shoulder, and said forward means and said means adapted to contact said posterior surface are at approximately the same horizontal level whereby said user tends to keep said arm in an elbow-up attitude.
13. A firearm as in claim 12, wherein said auxiliary means is positioned to contact said thumb in a manner to force said arm into an elbow-up attitude.
14. A firearm as in claim 9, wherein said framework includes means positioned" to contact a superior surface of the upper portion of said arm or the adjacent shoulder when said arm is received within said framework opening.
15. A firearm as in claim 14, wherein said framework also includes means positioned to contact an inferior surface of said upper arm when said arm is received within said framework opening.
16. A firearm comprising a barrel pointing in a forward firing direction, forward means adapted to be contacted by the thumb of a user's hand, and auxiliary means located rearwardly of said forward means and positioned close enough thereto to contact said thumb in a manner for said auxiliary means to receive a lateral force directed toward the torso of said user.
17. A firearm as in claim 16, further comprising means adapted to contact a posterior surface of said user's body in a manner to receive a lateral force directed away from said torso.
OMPI / WIP
18. A firearm as in claim 17, further comprising means adapted to contact an inferior surface of said user's upper arm.
19. A firearm as in claim 18, further comprising means adapted to contact a superior surface of said user's body.
20. A firearm comprising: a forwardly pointing barrel; a stabilizing structure including forward means adapted to be contacted by the thumb of a user of said firearm; auxiliary means positioned to contact said thumb in a manner to receive a force directed in a first lateral direction; and means positioned to contact a posterior surface of said user's body in- a manner to receive a force directed in an opposite lateral direction.
21. A firearm as in claim 20, wherein said stabilizing structure also includes means positioned to contact a posterior surface of said user's body in a manner to receive a rearward force.
22. A firearm as in claim 21, wherein said stabilizing structure also includes means positioned to contact an inferior surface of said user's upper arm in a manner to receive a second force directed in said first lateral direction.
23. A firearm comprising: a barrel pointing in a forward firing direction; a stabilizing structure including first means adapted to be contacted by the thumb of a user of said firearm in a manner to receive a force directed in a first sagittal direction; second means positioned to contact said thumb in a manner to receive a force directed in a first lateral direction; third means positioned to contact a superior surface of said user's body in a manner to receive a force directed in an upward direction; fourth means positioned to contact a posterior surface of said body in a manner to receive a force directed in an opposite sagittal direction and in an opposite lateral direction; and fifth means positioned to contact an inferior surface of said user's upper arm in a manner to receive a second force directed in said first lateral direction.
24. A firearm as in claim 23, wherein said first means includes a hand grip and said stabilizing structure includes a framework located rearwardly of said hand grip and having an opening therein to receive said upper arm, said second means includes a front portion of said framework located closely behind said'hand grip, said third means includes an upper portion of said framework, said fourth means includes a rear portion of said framework and said fifth means includes a lower portion of said framework.
25. A firearm comprising: a forwardly pointing barrel; a stabilizing structure including forward means adapted to contact the thumb of a user of said firearm; and a framework located rearwardly of said forward means and having an opening therein to receive an arm of said user, said framework including an auxiliary means positioned to contact said thumb and an upper portion positioned to contact a. superior surface of said user's body.
26. A firearm as in claim 25, wherein said framework also includes a rear portion positioned to contact a posterior surface of said user's body.
OMP
A
27. A firearm as in claim 26, wherein said framework also includes a lower portion positioned to contact an inferior surface of said user's upper arm.
28. A firearm comprising: a forwardly pointing barrel; a stabilizing structure including a hand grip; and a framework located behind said hand grip and having an opening adapted to receive an arm of a user of said firearm.
29. A firearm as in claim 28, wherein said framework is so arranged that when said arm is inserted through said framework opening, and the hand of said arm grasps said hand grip, said framework contacts a posterior surface of said user's body and does not contact any anterior surface of said user's body.
30. A firearm comprising: a forwardly pointing barrel; a stabilizing structure including forward means; and a framework located behind said forward
means, said framework having an opening adapted to receive an arm of a user of said firearm, and said framework being so arranged that, when said arm is inserted in said framework opening and the hand of said arm contacts said forward means, a front portion of said framework contacts the base of the thumb of said hand.
31. A firearm as in claim 30, wherein said framework is so arranged that an upper portion thereof contacts a superior surface of said user.'s body.
32. A firearm comprising: a forwardly pointing barrel; a stabilizing structure including forward means; and '
^UR£^
OMPI
< ° a framework located rearwardly of said forward means, said, framework having an opening therein and including an upper bar positioned to extend above a superior surface of the body of a user of said firearm, a rear bar positioned to extend behind a posterior surface of said body, a lower bar positioned to extend below an inferior surface of said user's upper arm, and an auxiliary bar positioned to engage the base of the thumb of the hand of said arm when said arm extends through said framework opening and said hand contacts said forward means.
33. A firearm comprising: a barrel pointing in a forward firing direction; and a stabilizing structure including
A) means at the forward portion thereof providing
1) a hand grip, and
2) a rearwardly bounded thumb-receiving opening behind said hand grip, and
B) means at a rear portion thereof providing a rearwardly bounded arm-receiving opening.
34. A firearm as in claim 33, wherein both of said means are at approximately the same horizontal level.
35. A firearm as in claim 33, wherein said stabilizing structure also includes means providing an upward boundary for said arm-receiving opening.
36. A firearm as in claim 33,. wherein said stabilizing structure also includes means providing a lower boundary for said arm-receiving opening.
37. A firearm comprising: a barrel pointing in a forward firing direction; and a stabilizing structure including
A) means at the forward portion thereof providing
1) a hand grip, and 2) a rearwardly-bounded thumb-receiving opening behind said hand grip, and
B) means at the rear portion thereof providing a rearwardly, upwardly and downwardly bounded arm-receiving opening.
38. A firearm as in claim 37, wherein both of said means are at approximately the same horizontal level.
PCT/US1981/000362 1980-04-01 1981-03-23 Firearm stabilizing device WO1981002925A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US13623480A true 1980-04-01 1980-04-01
US136234 1980-04-01

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
AU71519/81A AU7151981A (en) 1980-04-01 1981-03-23 Firearm stabilizing device

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
WO1981002925A1 true WO1981002925A1 (en) 1981-10-15

Family

ID=22471952

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
PCT/US1981/000362 WO1981002925A1 (en) 1980-04-01 1981-03-23 Firearm stabilizing device

Country Status (4)

Country Link
EP (1) EP0049275A1 (en)
BE (1) BE888234A (en)
IT (1) IT1137114B (en)
WO (1) WO1981002925A1 (en)

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2000029803A1 (en) 1998-11-13 2000-05-25 Vasile Cinciu Firearm without recoil
US6250009B1 (en) * 1999-06-29 2001-06-26 Michael I. Leontuk Gun brace
WO2011102894A2 (en) 2010-02-16 2011-08-25 Trackingpoint, Inc. Advanced firearm or air gun scope
US9470467B2 (en) * 2014-08-25 2016-10-18 Gerald K. Englert Shooting aid
WO2016172773A1 (en) * 2015-04-29 2016-11-03 Rodrigues Dos Santos Adeilton Retractable gunstock for portable firearms

Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US45361A (en) * 1864-12-06 Improvement in magazine or self-loading fire-arms
US1191460A (en) * 1915-03-29 1916-07-18 Albert B Pratt Firearm.
US1340127A (en) * 1918-10-31 1920-05-11 Herman L Welch Pistol
US1497794A (en) * 1923-10-12 1924-06-17 Edward W Saunders Steadying device for pistols
US2436175A (en) * 1942-05-23 1948-02-17 Ernest C Neal Automatic firearm
US3184877A (en) * 1964-05-28 1965-05-25 William G Andrews Pistol stabilizer
US3209481A (en) * 1964-03-23 1965-10-05 William V T Gilbert Gunstock with an arcuate arm engaging end portion
US3324588A (en) * 1965-09-27 1967-06-13 William V T Gilbert Gunstock
US3648396A (en) * 1970-05-21 1972-03-14 Roger A Smith Stabilizing attachment for hand guns
US3665632A (en) * 1969-11-25 1972-05-30 Wade L Ford Firearm shoulder support and strap attachment

Patent Citations (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US45361A (en) * 1864-12-06 Improvement in magazine or self-loading fire-arms
US1191460A (en) * 1915-03-29 1916-07-18 Albert B Pratt Firearm.
US1340127A (en) * 1918-10-31 1920-05-11 Herman L Welch Pistol
US1497794A (en) * 1923-10-12 1924-06-17 Edward W Saunders Steadying device for pistols
US2436175A (en) * 1942-05-23 1948-02-17 Ernest C Neal Automatic firearm
US3209481A (en) * 1964-03-23 1965-10-05 William V T Gilbert Gunstock with an arcuate arm engaging end portion
US3184877A (en) * 1964-05-28 1965-05-25 William G Andrews Pistol stabilizer
US3324588A (en) * 1965-09-27 1967-06-13 William V T Gilbert Gunstock
US3442042A (en) * 1965-09-27 1969-05-06 William Van Tyle Gilbert Rotatable and slidable gunstock
US3665632A (en) * 1969-11-25 1972-05-30 Wade L Ford Firearm shoulder support and strap attachment
US3648396A (en) * 1970-05-21 1972-03-14 Roger A Smith Stabilizing attachment for hand guns

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2000029803A1 (en) 1998-11-13 2000-05-25 Vasile Cinciu Firearm without recoil
US6250009B1 (en) * 1999-06-29 2001-06-26 Michael I. Leontuk Gun brace
WO2011102894A2 (en) 2010-02-16 2011-08-25 Trackingpoint, Inc. Advanced firearm or air gun scope
US9470467B2 (en) * 2014-08-25 2016-10-18 Gerald K. Englert Shooting aid
WO2016172773A1 (en) * 2015-04-29 2016-11-03 Rodrigues Dos Santos Adeilton Retractable gunstock for portable firearms

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
IT8120843D0 (en) 1981-03-31
BE888234A (en) 1981-10-01
IT1137114B (en) 1986-09-03
BE888234A1 (en)
EP0049275A1 (en) 1982-04-14

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US9494378B2 (en) Ambidextrously operated bolt catch assembly
US8671923B2 (en) Stock and trigger assembly for crossbow
US8910407B2 (en) Handgun arm handle
US8622050B2 (en) Line crossbow conversion kit and hybrid compound bow
US10551137B2 (en) Semi-automatic pistol
US8281699B2 (en) Firearm with enhanced recoil and control characteristics
ES2230630T3 (en) Arc composed with a counterweight.
ES2237623T3 (en) Reverse shock absorber device.
US7520206B2 (en) Ballistic shield and methods of use
US4593675A (en) Cross bows
US6615527B1 (en) Trigger mechanism
US6736124B2 (en) Quick release trigger device
US4878305A (en) Hand-carried weapon
US8667722B2 (en) Firearm with enhanced recoil and control characteristics
US4426989A (en) Bow string release
US6678986B2 (en) Handgun aiming device and method
US6564787B1 (en) Laser aimed slingshot
US3495770A (en) Weapon sling
US4967642A (en) Machine gun
US9310161B2 (en) Adjustable grip extender for a firearm
US3927808A (en) Device for firearm
US6802148B1 (en) Target grip apparatus for a firearm
US5438784A (en) Magazine safety
US6732464B2 (en) Discharging device
US4691614A (en) Nonsymmetrical compensator for handgun

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AK Designated states

Designated state(s): AU BR DK JP NO SU

AL Designated countries for regional patents

Designated state(s): AT CH DE FR GB SE