WO1980002512A1 - Computerized gaming system - Google Patents

Computerized gaming system Download PDF

Info

Publication number
WO1980002512A1
WO1980002512A1 PCT/US1980/000404 US8000404W WO8002512A1 WO 1980002512 A1 WO1980002512 A1 WO 1980002512A1 US 8000404 W US8000404 W US 8000404W WO 8002512 A1 WO8002512 A1 WO 8002512A1
Authority
WO
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
game machine
indicia
prize
gaming system
player
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/US1980/000404
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
S Krause
M Goldman
Original Assignee
Tele Vend Inc
System Operations Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports or amusements, e.g. casino games, online gambling or betting
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports or amusements, e.g. casino games, online gambling or betting
    • G07F17/326Game play aspects of gaming systems
    • G07F17/3262Player actions which determine the course of the game, e.g. selecting a prize to be won, outcome to be achieved, game to be played

Abstract

A computerized gaming system including a plurality of remotely located multiple or single win game machine terminals (10) and a remotely located central processing station (32). Each of the game machine terminals is computerized and enables a player to attempt to win a prize by matching player selected indicia (24) with random indicia (22) generated by the central processing station. The game machine terminal pays off prizes in accordance with a predetermined prize schedule (28) and the number of matches between the player selected indicia and the randomly generated indicia. Even if no matches are made between the player selected indicia and the randomly generated indicia, a consolation prize will be awarded if any indicia repeats in the randomly generated indicia a predetermined number of times. If the prize to be awarded is less than a predetermined value, the game machine terminal immediately pays out the prize to the player. If the prize to be awarded is greater than a predetermined value, visual and audible alarms (66) associated with the game machine terminal go off, indicating that the player has won a grand prize. In this instance, a validation ticket indicating the identification code of the game machine terminal producing the winning prize, the time and date on which the game was played, a validation code and the prize amount won is issued to a casino employee at the central processing station. The casino employee then hand carries the validation ticket to the game machine terminal and presents the ticket to the player after the employee has determined that the game machine terminal has not been tampered with. The player is then free to cash in the ticket at cashier's station in the casino.

Description

COMPUTERIZED GAMING SYSTEM BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is directed towards a novel method and apparatus for playing a game of chance, more particularly for playing a modified slot machine type game. In the past, slot machines were primarily electro-mechanical devices which operate independently of .each other. While there are several variations on the standard slot machine, they generally include three symbol wheels containing a plurality of picture symbols (such as cherries and oranges) which are rotated responsive to the actuation of a switch arm coupled to the slot machine. The symbol wheels stop at "random" locations to display three picture symbols. If at least two of the symbols match, the slot machine pays out a predetermined prize which varies as a function of the amount of money wagered and the odds of matching the symbols displayed.

While the standard slot machine has proven to be very popular, it has several drawbacks. Due to its electro-mechanical nature, its frequency of repair record is relatiyely high. Additionally, since each machine is independent of the remaining machines, the casino does not have continuous access to information regarding the total amount wagered and total amount

OMPI paid out by the various machines at the casino. Finally, while the standard slot machine format has maintained the public interest for many years, casinos are continually looking for improved variations on this format to increase the interest of the casino patrons.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

In order to overcome the foregoing drawbacks, the present invention is directed towards a computerized gaming system including a plurality of remote game machine terminals (each in the form of a modified slot machinel and a central computer. Each of the game machine terminals is computerized and contains a minimum number of mechanical parts. Additionally, each of the remote game machine terminals continuously communicates with the central computer in a manner which enables the central computer to keep a continually updated record of the total amount of money wagered and the total amount of money paid out by each of the game machine terminals. Finally, the present invention provides an improved slot machine format by permitting the player to select random indicia to be matched, providing the player with a sense of participation.

In the preferred embodiment of the invention, each game machine terminal takes the form of a modified slot machine including six electronic numerical displays and a keyboard which enables the player to select any one of the digits 0-9. Indicia other than numbers such as card symbols, Bells, fruits, etc. could also be used. The object of the game is to match the player selected number with a randomly-generated number which is displayed on the numerical displays responsive to actuation of a switch arm of the game machine terminal. The game machine terminal pays off prizes in accordance

OMPI /,, IPO with a predetermined prize schedule and the number of matches between the player selected number of indicia and the randomly-generated number of indicia. Even if no matches are made between the player selected number an -the. randomly-generated number,,a consolation prize will be awarded if any digit (e.g., 7) repeats in the randomly-generated number a predetermined number of times (e.g., 4 times). If the prize to be awarded is less than a predetermined value, the game machine terminal immediately pays out the prize to the player. If the prize to be awarded is greater than the pre¬ determined value, visual and audible alarms associated with the game machine terminal go off, indicating that the player has won a grand prize. In this instance, a validation ticket indicating the identification code of the game machine terminal producing the winning prize, the time and date on which the game was played, a validation code and the prize amount won is issued to a casino employee by the central computer. This will normally be done in an office area of the casino. The casino employee then hand carries the validation ticket to the game machine terminal and presents the ticket to the player after the employee has determined that the game machine terminal has not been tampered with. The player is then free to cash in the ticket at a cashier's station in the casino.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

For the purpose of illustrating the invention, there are shown in the drawings several embodiments which are presently preferred; it being understood, however, that this invention is not limited to the precise arrangements and instrumentalities shown.

OMPI IPO Figure 1 is a perspective view of the housing of a game machine terminal which forms part of the computerized gaming system of the present invention.

Figure 2 is a block diagram of the computer- ized gaming system of the present invention.

Figure 3 is a block diagram of the structure of the game machine terminal.

Figure 4 is a block diagram of the structure of the central computer which forms part of the computer- ized gaming system of the present invention.

Figures 5a and 5b are a flow diagram of a program controlling the operation of each game machine terminal of the present invention.

Figure 6 is a flow diagram of the program controlling the central computer of the present inven¬ tion.

Figure 7 is a schematic diagram of a second embodiment of a game machine terminal which may be utilized in connection with the present invention. DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

Referring now to the drawings wherein like numerals indicate like elements, there is shown in Figure 1 a game machine terminal constructed in ac¬ cordance with the principles of the present invention and designated generally as 10. Game machine terminal 10 preferably takes the form of a modified slot machine including a housing 12, a switch actuating arm 14, a display panel 16, a coin receiving slot 18 and a coin dispensing slot 20. Display panel 16 includes a digital display 22 and a keyboard 24. The object of game machine terminal 10 is to permit a player-to wager a desired amount and attempt to win a prize by matching a player selected number with a psuedo-random number generated in response to the actuation of arm 14.

OMPI A player initiates the game by depressing one of the push buttons of keyboard 24, so as to select the desired number (e.'g. , 7), and depositing a coin or token in coin receiving slot 18. The player then pulls switch actuating arm 14 to initiate the generation of the psuedo-rando number on display 22. Upon actuation of switch arm 14, the individual digits of digital display 22 begin to incrementally advance at variable speeds and, after a predetermined time period, stop sequentially to display a psuedo-random number (473777 in the example shown).. Game machine terminal 1Q then determines the number of matches between the selected number (7) and the psuedo-random number (473777^ and computes a prize amount determined by the number of matches and the amount wagered. If the prize amount is below a predetermined value, for example $25Q,0Q, game machine terminal 10 immediately pays out the prize by depositing coins or tokens in coin receiving tray 26. If the prize amount is greater than the predetermined value, lights behind enunciator display 28 begin flashing and an audible signal (such as a bell or a siren) is generated to indicate a grand prize winner. As will be explained in greater detail below, a validation ticket is then hand carried by an employee of the operator of gaming system 30 (normally a casino) to the winning machine and presented to the player after the employee determines that the machine had not been tampered with. The player may then cash the validation ticket in with the casino cashier.

As indicated by the prize structure set forth on enumerator display 28 of Figure 1, game machine terminal 10 is capable of playing two games. The first game compares the number selected by the player with

OMPI. the. random number displayed on digital display 22 and determines the amount won as a function of the number of matches and the amount wagered. In the example illustrated in Figure 1, game machine terminal 10 would pay out $25.00. if a $1.00 token was deposited in coin receiving slot 18. The machine terminal 10 can be set to accept coins of various denominations of, for example, 5jzi, 10j£, 25jZ., 5Q<^ or $1.Q0 by interchanging the coin acceptor within the machine. In a second game played by game machine terminal 10, a comparison is made between the individual digits displayed in digital display 22 and a consolation prize is awarded if any number occurs at least, for example, four times in the pseudo-random number. In the example shown, if any number other than number 7 had been selected, the player would be entitled to a payoff of $2.00 for a $1.00 wager based upon the consolation prize payoff schedule illustrated on display 28.

While Figure 1 discloses a single game machine terminal 10, the present invention contemplates a computerized gaming system 3Q (see Figure 2} including a plurality of remote game machine terminals lQa, lQb, 10c, lOd ... lOn which communicate with a central computer 32 via a system bus 34 or other communication network. Central computer 32 generates the psuedo-random numbers displayed by each game machine terminal 1Q and maintains a complete record of each game played in¬ cluding the total amount wagered, the coin denomina¬ tion of each machine, and the total amount paid out by each machine terminal 10., Additionally, central com¬ puter 32 generates a validation ticket whenever a prize amount above the predetermined value is won by a player of any of the game machine terminals 10. The valida¬ tion ticket is issued to an employee of the casino and

OMPI indicates both the terminal identification code of the winning game machine terminal 10 and the amount of the prize a validation code together with any other desired information. The validation ticket is hand carried by the casino employee to the appropriate game machine terminal and handed to the player of- that machine after the casino employee determines that the machine had not been tampered with.

The manner in which computerized gaming system 30 carries out the foregoing functions will now be described with reference to Figures 3-6. Figure 3 is a block diagram of a single game machine terminal 10, Each of the game machine terminals IQa-lQn are identical in structure. Ac¬ cordingly, the structure and operation of only a single such terminal will be described.

The heart of game machine terminal 10- is a central processing unit (CPU). 36 which controls the operation of game machine terminal 10 in accordance with a program stored in ROM memory 38, CPU 36 may be any commercially available microprocessor, by way of example, an INTEL 808Q„ ROM memory 38 may be any suitable read-only memory. The program stored in memory 38 causes CPU 36 to step game machine terminal 10 through each of the steps set forth in the flow diagram of Figures 5a and 5.b, and described in detail below. In addition to storing the program, memory 38 stores a multi-digit terminal identification code which is unique to and identifies both the particular game machine terminal 10 with which memory 38 is associated and the denomination of coil that coil acceptor 56 is set for. By way of example, terminal lQa, a $1,0.0. machine, may be identified by the terminal number 1000000 while game terminal 10b, a 5<z_ machine, could be identified by the terminal number 5Q0 Q01,

OMPl" /,, IPO -«. In addition to ROM memory 38, each terminal 10 includes a random access memory (RAM) 40. Random access memory 40 may be any commercially available RAM and serves to temporarily store information received from central computer 32. As will be shown below, each game terminal 10 communicates with the central computer 32 by an appropriate communications link such as system bus 34. When transmitting information between the various game machine terminals 10 and central computer 32, it is preferable to encode the information trans¬ mitted on the communication system to prevent tampering with the system. To this end, game machine terminal 10 includes a data encryption unit 42 which encodes the data transmitted from the game machine terminal 10 to central computer 32 and decodes the data received by game machine terminal 10 from central computer 32. While any data encryption unit may be utilized, there are several commercially .available microprocessor peripheral units (e.g. INTEL Part No. 8294) designed to encode and decode 64 bit blocks of data using the algorithm specified in the Federal Information Pro¬ cessing Data Encryption Standard. Such a data en¬ cryption unit operates on 64 bit text words using a 56 bit user specified key to produce 64 bit cipher words. The algorithm specified by the Federal Information Processing Data Encryption Standard is permanently contained in the data encryption unit while the user specified key is stored in memory 38. As such, the 56 bit key may be changed at any time by the operator of the computerized gaming system 30.

The operation of display panel 16 is controlled by keyboard section 44 which includes digital display 22, keyboard 24, a lever key 50 and a keyboard and display interface 52. Digital display 22 (Figure 1) includes a plurality s±x in the example shown) of individual displays which are preferably seven segment LED or LCD displays. As will be shown below, these displays are stepped through their various outputs (i.e., 0, 1, 2 ... 9) at a high rate of speed responsive to the actuation of switch actuating arm 14. As a result, the individual displays give the appearance that they are "rotating" in a manner similar to the pictorial display wheels of a standard slot machine. While each individual display of digital display 22 is preferably a numerical display, displays which utilize any type of indicia (e.g., alphabetical or pictorial) may also be used. Additionally, standard electro¬ mechanical displays may be substituted for the electronic displays illustrated. Still referring to Figure 1, keyboard 24 includes a plurality of push button switches which are preferably back lighted interlock switches. The switch last depressed represents the number selected by the player and is back lit to the exclusion of the remaining switches. While each switch of keyboard 24 is shown as representing a different digit, they can also represent letters or pictorial displays in accordance with the type of display used in digital display 22. While push button switches are illustrated, any other appropriate selector switch may be used.

Lever key 5Q is preferably a single pole, double throw snap switch which is connected to switch actuating arm 14 and closes whenever switch actuating arm 14 is pulled. When key lever 50 is actuated, it generates a game initiator signal which causes the information on keyboard 24 (i.e., the number selected) to be applied to keyboard and display interface 52 which generates a digital code representative of this information and places it on data bus 54. Interface 52 also causes the "rotation" of the individual digits of digital display responsive signals generated by CPU 36. See below.

The coin receiving and dispensing operations of game machine terminal 10 are controlled by coin receiving and dispensing section 46. A coin acceptor 56 is located behind coin receiving slot 18 (Figure 1) and receives a specific denomination of coins (e.g., $1,001 deposited by the player. Coin acceptor 56 verifies the receipt of a proper denomination coin or token and causes the count in coin count meter 60 to increase by one each time a non-bogus coin or token is deposited in slot 18. The count in coin count meter 60 thereby represents the amount wagered by the player. The information in coin count meter 60 is applied to data bus 54 in the form of a coded signal by peripheral interfact 64.

Coin dispenser 58 is located behind coin dispensing slot 20 and dispenses coins or tokens of the same denomination that coin acceptor 56 has been de- signed to accept into coin receiving tray 26 responsive to instructions received from CPU 36 via data bus 54. This information is generated in the form of digital signals on bus 54 and applied to coin dispenser 58 by peripheral interface 64. Coin count meter 62 counts the number of coins generated by coin dispenser 58 and thereby insures. that the appropriate number of coins are dispensed.

Visual and audible enunciator 66 is located behind the translucent face of enunciator display 28 and includes audible and visual signal generators which provide an indication that a grand prize (i.e., one greater than the predetermined amount) has been won. Enunciator 66 is enabled by CPU 36 (via interface 64) whenever a grand prize has been won,

OMPI . IPO - ll " -

Coin acceptor 56 and coin dispenser 58 are commercially available devices and may be obtained from various manufacturers of vending machines such as Rowe, Inc., Coin Acceptors, Inc., and Bally Manufacturing Company. Coin counter meters 60 and 62 are preferably - electro-mechanical meters which may be obtained from Durant Company or Hecon, Inc. Peripheral interface 64 is similarly a commercially available device which may be obtained from INTEL under their designation Part No. M8255A.

As noted above, game machine terminal 10 operates in cooperation with central computer 32. Information is transmitted between game machine terminal 10 and central computer 32 via a data bus or other appropriate transmission system such as a modem. To this end, terminal 10 includes a communication inter¬ face 68 which receives the encoded data (from data encryption unit 421 which is located on data bus 54 and converts this information into a form which may be efficiently transmitted on the transmission system connecting terminal 10- with central computer 32. One suitable communication interface is available from INTEL under the designation Part No, M8251. If the information transmitted between terminal 10 and co - puter 32 is transmitted via a modem, the output of communication interface 68 is applied to a standard RS232C connector which applies the information to the phone line. If the information is transmitted via a standard system bus (see Figure 2\, the output of interface 68 is applied directly to the data bus. The structure of central computer 32 is illustrated in Figure 4. As shown therein, central computer 32 includes a communication interference 70 and a

OMPI WwIiPrOu data encryption unit 74 which are identical in structure and function to interface 68 and encryption unit 42, respectively. Central computer 32 also includes a CPU 76 which is preferably more sophisticated than CPU 36 and is capable of responding to a high order language program (e.g., BASIC or FORTRAN), stored in floppy disc memory 78. As will be described in greater detail below with reference to Figure 6, CPU 76 generates a psuedo-random number responsive to receipt of the information generated by the game machine terminal 10. and compares the psuedo-random number to the number selected by the player. CPU 76 then determines the player's winnings in accordance with the prize structure illustrated on enunciator display 28 and generates a two digit win code (other win codes may be used)_ indica¬ tive of the prize amount. The psuedo-random number, terminal identification code, number selected and win code are stored, along with the time and date indicated by calendar clock 80, in memory 78. In this manner, floppy disc memory 78 maintains a continuous history of the operation of gaming system 30 including the total amount wagered and the amount paid out.

In addition to storing the information in memory 78, CPU 76 returns information concerning the psuedo-random number generated, the terminal identifica¬ tion code, the player selected number and the win code to the game machine terminal 10. after encryption by data encryption unit 74. This information is used by game machine 1Q to provide a visual indication of the psuedo-random number generated and to pay the prize amount in a manner described below. In the event that the prize amount is greater than a predetemined number of coins, CPU 76 causes line printer 82 to print out a validation ticket containing information regarding the

OMPI IPO identification code of the terminal 10 being played, the time and date at which the game was played, the amount wagered, a validation code and the amount won. This ticket is issued to a casino employee for verifica- tion at the terminal 10 in the manner described above. This ticket may also include a code identifying the particular gaming system 3Q. While central computer 32 preferably issues a validation ticket, the present invention encompasses the use of any type of informa- tion record medium which will inform the casino employee of the foregoing information.

In the preferred embodiment, central computer 32 also includes an on-line keyboard/display terminal 84 which permits the operator of gaming system 10. to withdraw any desired information from memory 78 in¬ cluding the total amount paid out during that time period. Each of the elements of central computer 32 are standard computer elements and may be purchased from several large computer firms. The operation of gaming system 30 will now be described with reference to the flow diagrams of Figures 5 and 6. As noted above, the player initiates the game by depressing one of the push button switches of keyboard 24, depositing a coin or token in slot 18 (thereby incrementing the count in meter 60) and pulling switch actuating arm 14. See blocks 86 and 88 of Figure 5A. When switch actuating arm 14 is pulled, lever key 50 is closed causing a game initiation or interrupt signal to be generated and applied to data bus 54 via interface 52, CPU 36 senses this signal and, in accordance with the program stored in memory 38, requests data from keyboard 24 identifying the number selected by the player. This information is transmitted via keyboard and display interface 52 and is stored in a register of CPU 36. See block 90. Thereafter, CPU 36 applies a digital signal indicating that the game has been initiated to . data bus 54. This information is stored in memory 40. Immediately thereafter, CPU 36 applies information concerning the player selected number (as determined by keyboard 24), the identification code of terminal 1Q (stored in memory 38) and the user selected key (also stored in memory 101 to data encryption unit 42, Data encryption unit 42 codes this information in accordance with the specified key and places the coded information on data bus 54. Thereafter, CPU 36 causes the encoded information to be transmitted to central computer 32 via communication interface 68. See block 9-2. The transmitted signal will be referred to herein as a request signal. The central computer accepts and acts on each request in the queing order in which the request was received.

After transmitting the encoded request signal to computer 32, CPU 36 instructs interface 52 to begin incrementing each of the individual displays of digital display 22. As indicated in blocks 94-1Q4, a sub¬ routine in the program stored in memory 38 causes CPU 36 to generate signals which cause each of the indivi¬ dual displays of digital display 22 to increment at different speeds. By way of example, the number displayed by the first display 22a will be incremented (i.e., from 0 to 1, from 1 to 2, etc.) every 75 milli¬ seconds while the second display 22b will be incremented once every 1Q.Q milliseconds. By varying the rate at which each of the individual displays of digital display 22 increment between 75 and 175 milliseconds, each of the displays will give the appearance of "rotating". CPU 36 continues to generate signals which cause the individual displays of digital display 22 to increment at their respective rate until the psuedo-random number is returned from central computer 32.

OMPI After initiating the "rotation" of each of the displays of digital display 22, CPU 36 waits 100 milliseconds to determine if it has received return data from computer 32. See block 106. At the end of this time interval, CPU 36 determines whether or not data, in the form of a response signal, has been re¬ ceived from central computer 32. If the response signal has been received, the game is completed in the standard manner described below. If a response signal has not been received at the end of the 100 millisecond delay period, CPU 36 causes coin dispenser 58 to return the coin or token wagered, disables display 22 and posts an out-of-order light which may be located on the enunciator display 28. See blocks 110, 112, and 114. In this condition, game machine terminal 10 is out of operation and must be repaired by a casino employee before again being placed in use.

Referring now to Figures 4 and 6, the operation of central computer 32 will now be described. The request signal containing the terminal identification code and player selected number transmitted by terminal 10 are received by communication interface 70 and placed on data bus 72. The encoded information is now decoded by data encryption unit 74 and applied to CPU 76. Upon receipt of this information, CPU 76, under program control of memory 78, generates the psuedo- random number. See block 118. By way of example, the psuedo-random number may be generated utilizing an intrinsic function command (such as RND in the language BASICS and using a random feed from a freerrunning incrementing storage register (RND (N)) so as to gen¬ erate a multi-digit random number. This number is then rounded off to the required number of digits (6 in the embodiment illustrated in Figure 1) and is stored in one of the registers of CPU 76. CPU 76 compares the

^JRE

OMPI pseudo-random number with the player selected number and generates a win code indicative of the prize won. See block 120. One suitable two digit win code is illustrated in the following table:

TABLE I

No match 00 No payout, end game

1 match 01 payout 1 coin

2 match 02 payout 2 coins

3 match 03 payout 10 coins

4 4 mmaattcchh 0 044 payout 25 coins

5 match 10 activate enunciator

6 match 20 activate enunciator any four of a kind 05 payout 2 coins any- five of a kind 06 payout 50 coins aannyy ssiixx ooff aa kkiinndd 3 300 activate enunciator

The win code, along with a psuedo-random number, is stored in one of the buffers of CPU 76. At this point, CPU 76 determines whether the amount won is over the predetermined value e . g . , 250 coins). See block 122. If the amount won is less than 250 coins, the psuedo-random number generated, the terminal identification code, the player selected number and the win code are encoded by data encryption unit 74 and transmitted back to terminal 10. See blocks 124, 126. If the amount won was over 250 coins, CPU 76 causes line printer 82 to print out a voucher including all of the information described above. See block 128. Thereafter, the psuedo-random number generated, the terminal identification code, the player selected number and the win code are encoded by data encryption unit 74 and retransmitted to terminal 10 in the form of an encoded response signal. See blocks 124 and 126.

OMP WIP Finally, information concerning play and win data is stored in floppy disc memory 78. See block 129.

Returning now to Figures 3 and 5, the manner in which game machine terminal 10 responds to the response signal transmitted by central computer 32 will now be described. The response signal transmitted by central computer 32 is applied to data bus 54 of termi¬ nal 10 via communication interface 68. All game machine terminals ClOl monitor system bus 34 for response signals during a "response signal" mode and accept only that data train that corresponds to its own address (identification numberl and acknowledges acceptance to central computer 32 through a "handshake" signal. The encoded information is decoded by data encryption unit 42 and placed in RAM memory 40.. CPU 36 checks the received response signal to determine if it contains the identification code of the terminal 10 with which CPU 36 is associated. If not, the response signal information is erased from memory 40 and CPU 36 awaits receipt of a new response signal. If the response signal contains the identification code associated with CPU 36, CPU 36 responds thereto as follows. Upon receipt of the proper response signal, CPU 36 dampens- the rate of incrementation of each of the displays of digital display 22 to give the appearance that the displays are rotating at an exponentially decreasing speed. After approximately 300 milliseconds, CPU 36 causes the first display 22a to stop incrementing at the number corresponding to the first digit of the psuedo-random number generated in memory 40. See block

300 milliseconds later, CPU 36 causes the second display 22b to stop incrementing at the number corres¬ ponding to the second digit of the psuedo-random number Ce 'g», -7) • See block 132. This information is repeated for the third, fourth, fifth and sixth displays (blocks 134-140) so that each of the six digits of the psuedo- random number is displayed on digital display 22.

IPO CPU 36 then compares the psuedo-random number stored in memory 40 with the player selected number to determine which digit positions present a match between the preselected number and the psuedo-random number. See block 142. CPU 36 then causes those displays which match with the preselected number (e.g., displays 22b, 22d, 22e and 22f in the example shownl to indicate a match between these numbers and the preselected numbers. See block 144. After initiating the flashing of the appropriate displays, CPU 36 withdraws the win code from memory 40 and determines whether or not the win code indicates that the player has won a prize. If the win code indicates that no prize has been won (e.g., a code of 001, the game is ended and game machine terminal 10 is ready to accept a new wager. See decision blocks 146. If the win code indicates that the player has won, CPU 36 then determines if the amount won is over the pre¬ determined value (e.g., 250). See decision block 148. If the amount won is less than the predetermined value, CPU 36 places a digital signal on data bus 54 which causes coin dispenser 58 to dispense coins until coin count meter 62 indicates that the appropriate number of coins have been dispensed. See block 150. At this point, the game is completed and terminal 10 is again ready to accept a new wager.

If the prize amount is greater than the predetermined value, CPU 36 enables visual and audible enunciator 66 thereby indicating a grand prize. See block 152. At this point, the program in memory 38 halts and the machine is effectively disabled until it receives a clear code from computer 32. See block 154. The clear code will not be generated by the computer until the casino employee determines that the machine has not been tampered with and enters the clear code on

" URE

OMPI

Λ. IPO keyboard-display terminal 84 (see Figure 4) . See block 156. When machine terminal 10 receives the clear code from computer 32, CPU 36 rests terminal 10 and the terminal is again ready to receive another wager. See block 158.

In the foregoing embodiment, only a single prize structure was utilized in connection with each game machine terminal 10. In accordance with the second embodiment to the present invention, the prize structure of the game may be changed randomly or according to the time.of day. As shown schematically in Figure 7, enunciator display 28 may be divided into two halves 22a and 22b illustrating the respective prize structures A and B. During those portions of the day in which prize structure A is used, the portion 22a of enunciator display 22 will be back lit. Similarly, during those portions of the day in which prize structure B is used, portion 22b is back lit. The change in prize structure may be controlled by an internal clock in game machine terminal io. or by signals received from central computer 32 which has its own timing clock 80. In either case, central computer 32 keeps track of which machines are under the control of which prize structure. The advantage of changing the prize structure in the foregoing manner is to encourage greater play during off peak hours or to add interest at random time during the day.

In another modification of applicant's invention, central computer 32 may be programmed to generate a random bonus win at machine terminal 10 irrespective of the psuedo- random number generated and the player selected number. By way of example, the bonus win may be generated randomly or the central computer 32 may be programmed to count the number of games played by gaming system 30 and generate a bonus win responsive to each thousandth game played. Such a "random" bonus adds excitement to the game played by

OMPI Λ. WIPO « each machine terminal 10. Finally, while game machine terminal 10 has been described in connection with an embodiment that can receive only one coin or token, one skilled in the art could easily modify the program illustrated in Figures 5 and 6 to enable each machine terminal 1Q to accept a variable wager determined by the number of coins deposited in slot 18 and pay out a prize in accordance with the amount wagered. The central computer would know the denomination of the coin and the number of coins inserted by a code number within the identification address of each machine terminal, for example, 1100001 would identify terminal #1 which is set for one coin Operation at a denomination of $1.00. Should the customer insert $5.0Q for a single play, the address would change to 1500001. A quarter machine with 3 coins inserted would change the first two numbers of the address to 5300002. The first digit of the identification number denotes the denomination of the coin while the second digit shows the amount of coins that have been inserted by the customer, for a single play.

In order to determine the down time of each remote terminal 10, central computer 32 periodically runs a monitor subroutine program during which an attempt is made to communicate with each machine termi¬ nal 10. Whenever one of the remote terminals 10 posts an out-of-order light (see block 144 of Figure 5A) , it also stores an out-of-order bit in a predetermined location in RAM memory 40. If a handshake mode cannot be established or if the handshake is established but interrogation determines that an error bit is stored in RAM 40, central computer 32 causes this information to be stored in a file of disc memory 78 in order that a continuous record of the down time of each remote terminal 10 may be maintained. At the same time,

OMPI IPO central computer 32 causes a print-out of the machine terminal which is down along with the time and date of the interrogation. Service personnel can then repair the out-of-order terminal. The present invention may be embodied in other specific forms without departing from the spirit or essential attributes thereof and, accordingly, reference should be made to the appended claims, rather than to the foregoing specification, as indicating the scope of the invention.

Claims

WHAT IS CLAIMED IS:
1. A computerized gaming system, comprising:
(A) a plurality of remote game machine terminals each of said remote game machine terminals having a unique game machine terminal identification code associated therewith;
(B) a central processing station remotely located from said game machine terminals, said central processing station communicating with said remote game machine terminals via an information transmission channel; (C) each of said remote game machine terminals including first means for transmitting a request signal to said central processing station responsive to the generation of a player activated game initiation signal, said request signal being indicative of both a player selected indicia and the identification code unique to the remote game machine terminal transmitting said request signal;
GDI said central processing station including second means for: 11 generating a random sequence of indicia whenever said central processing station receives a request signal generated by one of said remote game machine terminals;
C21 generating a win code indicative of a prize amount determined by the number of matches between the player selected indicia identified by said received request signal and said random sequence of indicia in accordance with a predetermined prize structure;
C.31 issuing a validation ticket at said central processing station if said prize amount indicated by said win code is greater than a predetermined value, said validation ticket identifying the identification code associated with said remote game machine terminal which transmitted said received request signal; and
O PI (4) transmitting a response signal to said remote game machine terminals, said response signal indicating said random sequence of indicia, said win code and the identification code associated with said remote game machine terminal which transmitted said received request signal; and
(E) said first means also determining if said transmitted response signal contains the identification code unique to the respective game machine terminal and, if said identification code is present, for: (1)_ displaying said random sequence of indicia indicated by said received response signal;
(21 examining said win code indicated by said received response signal to determine if said prize amount is greater than said predetermined value; and (3) immediately paying out said prize amount if said winnings are below said predetermined value and providing a human perceptible indication that a grand prize has been won if said prize amount is greater than said predetermined value,
2. The computerized gaming system of claim 1, wherein said first means includes means for encoding said transmitted request signal in accordance with an operator specified key and for decoding said received response signal in accordance with said operator specified key.
3. The computerized gaming system of claim 2, wherein, said second means includes means for decoding said received request signals in accordance with said operator specified key and for encoding said transmitted response signals in accordance with said operator specified key.
OMPI 4. The computerized gaming system of claim 3, wherein said first and second means each include means for permitting the operator of said computerized gaming system to change said operator specified key.
5. The computerized gaming system of claim 1, wherein said first means includes:
(Al a digital display for displaying said random sequence of indicia; and (B)_ a keyboard for enabling said player to select said player selected indicia.
6. The computerized gaming system of claim 5, wherein said digital display includes a plurality of electronic displays.
7. The computerized gaming system of claim 6, wherein said first means further includes means for annunciating those indicia of said random indicia which match said player selected indicia.
8. The computerized gaming system of claims 6 or 7, wherein said keyboard includes a plurality of push buttons and wherein said first means includes means for back lighting the said push buttons selected by said player.
9. The computerized gaming system of claim 1, wherein said first means further includes means for annunciating those indicia of said random sequence of indicia which match said player selected indicia.
10. The computerized gaming system of claim 1, wherein said validation ticket also includes information regarding the date and time at which said game was played.
OMPI IPO 11. The computerized gaming system of claims 1 or 10, wherein said validation ticket further includes information identifying said computerized gaming system.
12. The computerized-gaming system of claim 1, wherein said prize amount is determined by the number of matches between individual elements of said random sequence of indicia as well as the number of matches between said player selected indicia and said sequence of indicia.
13. The computerized gaming system of claim 1, wherein said second means also includes means for randomly generating a win code indicative of a random prize amount irrespective of the number of matches between said player selected indicia and said random sequence of indicia,
14. The computerized gaming system of claim 1, wherein said prize amount is determined in accordance with a first predetermined prize structure during certain hours of the day and in accordance with a second pre- determined prize structure during other hours of the day.
15. The computerized gaming system of claim 1, including means for enabling the operator of said com¬ puterized gaming system to change said predetermined prize structure.
16. A method for playing a game of chance utilizing a computerized gaming system comprising a plurality of remote game machine terminals, each of said remote game machine terminals having a unique game machine terminal identification code associated therewith,
O PI
&*, IPO
' and a central processing station remotely located from said machine terminals and communicating with said remote game machine terminals via an information transmission channel, said method comprising the steps of: (Al transmitting a request signal from one of said remote game machine terminals to said central processing station responsive to the generation of a player activated game initiation signal, said request signal being indicative of a player selected indicia and the identification code of said one of said game machine terminals;
(Bl at said central processing station; (1) generating a random sequence of indicia responsive to receipt of said request signal; (2) generating a win code indicative of a prize amount determined by the number of matches between said player selected indicia identified by said received request signal and said random sequence of indicia in accordance with a predetermined prize structure; (31 issuing a validation ticket if said prize amount indicated by said win code is greater than a predetermined value, said validation ticket identifying the identification code associated with said one of said remote game machine terminals and the prize amount indicated by said win code; and
(41 transmitting a response signal to said one of said game machine terminals, said response signal indicating said random sequence of indicia, said win code and said identification code associated with said one of said remote game machine terminals; and
(Cl determining, at said one of said remote game machine terminals, if said transmitted reponse signal contains said identification code associated with said one of said game machine terminals and, if said identification code is present:
O P (1) displaying, at said one of said re¬ mote game machine terminals, said random sequence of indicia indicated by said received response signal;
(2) examining, at said one of said remote game machine terminals, said win code indicated by said received response signal to determine if said prize amount is greater than said predetermined value; and
(3) immediately paying out, at said one of said remote game machine terminals, said prize amount if said prize amount is below said predetermined value and providing a human perceptible indication that a grand prize has been won if said prize amount is greater than said predetermined value.
17. The method of claim 16, further including the step of encoding said transmitted request signal in accordance with an operator specified key and decoding said received response signal in accordance with said operator specified key.
18. The method of claim 17, further including the steps of decoding said received request signals in accordance with said operator specified key and for encoding said transmitted response signals in accordance with said operator specified key.
19.. The method of claim 18, further including the step of changing said operator specified key.
2Q. The method of claim 26, further including the step of annunciating those indicia of said random sequence of indicia which are displayed at said one of said remote game machine terminals and which match said player selected indicia.
OMPI /._ WIPO 21. The method of claim 16, wherein said prize amount is determined by the number of matches between individual elements of said random sequence of indicia as well as the number of matches between said player selected indicia and said sequence of indicia.
22. The method of claim 16, further including the step of randomly generating, at said central process¬ ing station, a win code indicative of a random prize amount irrespective of the number of matches between said player selected indicia and said random sequence of indicia.
23. The method of claim 16, wherein said prize amount is determined in accordance with the first predetermined prize structure during certain hours of the day and in accordance with the second predetermined prize structure during other hours of the day.
24. The computerized gaming system of claim 1, wherein said first means includes:
(al a digital display for displaying said random sequence of indicia; and (b) a dial for enabling said piayer to select said player-selected indicia.
25. The computerized gaming system of claim 1, wherein said prize amount is normally determined in accordance with a first predetermined prize structure and is determined in accordance with a second predetermined prize structure during random hours of the day.
OM WIP 26. The method of claim 16, wherein said prize amount is normally determined in accordance with a first predetermined prize structure and is determined in accordance with a second predetermined prize structure during random hours of the day.
OMPI
PCT/US1980/000404 1979-05-14 1980-04-10 Computerized gaming system WO1980002512A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US3846779 true 1979-05-14 1979-05-14
US38467 1979-05-14

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
WO1980002512A1 true true WO1980002512A1 (en) 1980-11-27

Family

ID=21900136

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
PCT/US1980/000404 WO1980002512A1 (en) 1979-05-14 1980-04-10 Computerized gaming system

Country Status (2)

Country Link
EP (1) EP0028652A1 (en)
WO (1) WO1980002512A1 (en)

Cited By (46)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB2119989A (en) * 1982-05-08 1983-11-23 John Barry Noble Amusement machines
GB2124418A (en) * 1982-05-24 1984-02-15 Coin Controls Monitoring system for gaming machines
GB2144567A (en) * 1983-08-02 1985-03-06 Maygay Machine Limited Gaming machines
GB2144644A (en) * 1983-08-08 1985-03-13 Robert Paul Barrie Video gaming machine
GB2151054A (en) * 1983-10-20 1985-07-10 Mecca Leisure Ltd Systems for playing games
WO1985003158A1 (en) * 1983-12-31 1985-07-18 Armstrong Charles V Amusement and gaming apparatus
US4636951A (en) * 1983-05-02 1987-01-13 Ainsworth Nominees Pty. Ltd. Poker machine communication system
EP0214290A1 (en) * 1985-03-08 1987-03-18 Sigma Enterprises, Incorporated Slot machine
EP0233298A1 (en) * 1985-12-11 1987-08-26 Elton Fabrications Limited Improvements relating to amusement arcade machines for use in amusement and/or gaming or the like
GB2187320A (en) * 1986-02-10 1987-09-03 Joseph Carlisi Gaming apparatus
US4695053A (en) * 1986-03-07 1987-09-22 Bally Manufacturing Corporation Gaming device having player selectable winning combinations
US4756531A (en) * 1986-02-10 1988-07-12 Dire Felix M Apparatus and process for multiple wins in one game
GB2208737A (en) * 1987-08-17 1989-04-12 Ainsworth Nominees Pty Ltd Gaming machines
EP0497562A2 (en) * 1991-01-28 1992-08-05 Kabushiki Kaisha Universal Game machine
EP0555565A1 (en) * 1992-02-14 1993-08-18 Bally Wulff Automaten GmbH Cheat-proof winnings pay-out device for gambling machines
US5249800A (en) * 1990-02-20 1993-10-05 Bally Gaming International, Inc. Progressive gaming control and communication system
US5397125A (en) * 1993-12-15 1995-03-14 Anchor Coin, Inc. Gaming device with payouts of multiple forms
EP0829833A1 (en) * 1995-04-03 1998-03-18 Igor Garievich Kondratyuk Gambling and lottery method and gambling automaton for implementing the same
EP0829834A2 (en) * 1996-09-10 1998-03-18 International Game Technology Central random number generation for gaming system
WO1999039312A3 (en) * 1998-01-30 1999-09-23 Ilan Bauminger Game system
EP0855685A3 (en) * 1997-01-27 1999-12-15 Nec Corporation An electronic lottery system and its operating method and computer-readable recording medium in which the electronic lottery program code is stored
WO2001024128A1 (en) * 1999-09-30 2001-04-05 Joe Zock An interactive computer-based gaming system
EP1185343A2 (en) * 1997-07-03 2002-03-13 Walker Digital, LLC Method and apparatus for securing on-line virtual punchboard transactions
WO2002073554A1 (en) * 2001-03-13 2002-09-19 Hoarton, Lloyd, Douglas, Charles A gambling apparatus
US6535726B1 (en) 2000-01-12 2003-03-18 Gilbarco Inc. Cellular telephone-based transaction processing
GB2415279A (en) * 2004-06-15 2005-12-21 Project Leisure Ltd Gaming apparatus
US7644861B2 (en) 2006-04-18 2010-01-12 Bgc Partners, Inc. Systems and methods for providing access to wireless gaming devices
US7811172B2 (en) 2005-10-21 2010-10-12 Cfph, Llc System and method for wireless lottery
US8070604B2 (en) 2005-08-09 2011-12-06 Cfph, Llc System and method for providing wireless gaming as a service application
US8092303B2 (en) 2004-02-25 2012-01-10 Cfph, Llc System and method for convenience gaming
US8162756B2 (en) 2004-02-25 2012-04-24 Cfph, Llc Time and location based gaming
US8292741B2 (en) 2006-10-26 2012-10-23 Cfph, Llc Apparatus, processes and articles for facilitating mobile gaming
US8319601B2 (en) 2007-03-14 2012-11-27 Cfph, Llc Game account access device
US8397985B2 (en) 2006-05-05 2013-03-19 Cfph, Llc Systems and methods for providing access to wireless gaming devices
US8504617B2 (en) 2004-02-25 2013-08-06 Cfph, Llc System and method for wireless gaming with location determination
US8506400B2 (en) 2005-07-08 2013-08-13 Cfph, Llc System and method for wireless gaming system with alerts
US8510567B2 (en) 2006-11-14 2013-08-13 Cfph, Llc Conditional biometric access in a gaming environment
US8581721B2 (en) 2007-03-08 2013-11-12 Cfph, Llc Game access device with privileges
US8613658B2 (en) 2005-07-08 2013-12-24 Cfph, Llc System and method for wireless gaming system with user profiles
US8645709B2 (en) 2006-11-14 2014-02-04 Cfph, Llc Biometric access data encryption
US8876591B2 (en) 2004-08-19 2014-11-04 Igt Gaming system having multiple gaming machines which provide bonus awards
US8899477B2 (en) 2006-05-05 2014-12-02 Cfph, Llc Device detection
US9183693B2 (en) 2007-03-08 2015-11-10 Cfph, Llc Game access device
US9306952B2 (en) 2006-10-26 2016-04-05 Cfph, Llc System and method for wireless gaming with location determination
US9411944B2 (en) 2006-11-15 2016-08-09 Cfph, Llc Biometric access sensitivity
US9600968B2 (en) 2004-08-19 2017-03-21 Igt Gaming system having multiple gaming machines which provide bonus awards

Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3770269A (en) * 1968-06-17 1973-11-06 C Elder Random unit generator amusement device
US3786234A (en) * 1971-11-16 1974-01-15 Intercontinental Services Inc Game control and data handling system
US3796433A (en) * 1971-06-14 1974-03-12 Hydro Search Inc Electronic gaming device simulating the game of blackjack
US4072930A (en) * 1974-09-13 1978-02-07 Bally Manufacturing Corporation Monitoring system for use with amusement game devices
US4095795A (en) * 1974-06-24 1978-06-20 Saxton James C Amusement apparatus and method
US4099722A (en) * 1975-07-30 1978-07-11 Centronics Data Computer Corp. Electronic slot machine
US4157829A (en) * 1975-01-28 1979-06-12 System Operations, Inc. Instant lottery game employing vending machines which are centrally controlled by computers

Patent Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3770269A (en) * 1968-06-17 1973-11-06 C Elder Random unit generator amusement device
US3796433A (en) * 1971-06-14 1974-03-12 Hydro Search Inc Electronic gaming device simulating the game of blackjack
US3786234A (en) * 1971-11-16 1974-01-15 Intercontinental Services Inc Game control and data handling system
US4095795A (en) * 1974-06-24 1978-06-20 Saxton James C Amusement apparatus and method
US4072930A (en) * 1974-09-13 1978-02-07 Bally Manufacturing Corporation Monitoring system for use with amusement game devices
US4157829A (en) * 1975-01-28 1979-06-12 System Operations, Inc. Instant lottery game employing vending machines which are centrally controlled by computers
US4099722A (en) * 1975-07-30 1978-07-11 Centronics Data Computer Corp. Electronic slot machine

Cited By (73)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB2119989A (en) * 1982-05-08 1983-11-23 John Barry Noble Amusement machines
GB2124418A (en) * 1982-05-24 1984-02-15 Coin Controls Monitoring system for gaming machines
US4636951A (en) * 1983-05-02 1987-01-13 Ainsworth Nominees Pty. Ltd. Poker machine communication system
USRE37414E1 (en) 1983-05-02 2001-10-16 Aristocrat Technologies Australia Pty Ltd Poker machine communication system
GB2144567A (en) * 1983-08-02 1985-03-06 Maygay Machine Limited Gaming machines
GB2144644A (en) * 1983-08-08 1985-03-13 Robert Paul Barrie Video gaming machine
GB2151054A (en) * 1983-10-20 1985-07-10 Mecca Leisure Ltd Systems for playing games
WO1985003158A1 (en) * 1983-12-31 1985-07-18 Armstrong Charles V Amusement and gaming apparatus
EP0214290A4 (en) * 1985-03-08 1988-12-15 Sigma Entpr Inc Slot machine.
EP0214290A1 (en) * 1985-03-08 1987-03-18 Sigma Enterprises, Incorporated Slot machine
EP0233298A1 (en) * 1985-12-11 1987-08-26 Elton Fabrications Limited Improvements relating to amusement arcade machines for use in amusement and/or gaming or the like
GB2187320B (en) * 1986-02-10 1990-02-14 Joseph Carlisi Gaming apparatus
US4756531A (en) * 1986-02-10 1988-07-12 Dire Felix M Apparatus and process for multiple wins in one game
GB2187320A (en) * 1986-02-10 1987-09-03 Joseph Carlisi Gaming apparatus
US4695053A (en) * 1986-03-07 1987-09-22 Bally Manufacturing Corporation Gaming device having player selectable winning combinations
GB2193828B (en) * 1986-03-07 1989-11-08 Bally Mfg Corp Gaming device having player selectable winning combinations
GB2208737B (en) * 1987-08-17 1991-08-14 Ainsworth Nominees Pty Ltd Improvements in poker machines
GB2208737A (en) * 1987-08-17 1989-04-12 Ainsworth Nominees Pty Ltd Gaming machines
US5249800A (en) * 1990-02-20 1993-10-05 Bally Gaming International, Inc. Progressive gaming control and communication system
EP0497562A3 (en) * 1991-01-28 1993-04-21 Kabushiki Kaisha Universal Game machine
EP0497562A2 (en) * 1991-01-28 1992-08-05 Kabushiki Kaisha Universal Game machine
EP0555565A1 (en) * 1992-02-14 1993-08-18 Bally Wulff Automaten GmbH Cheat-proof winnings pay-out device for gambling machines
US5397125A (en) * 1993-12-15 1995-03-14 Anchor Coin, Inc. Gaming device with payouts of multiple forms
EP0829833A1 (en) * 1995-04-03 1998-03-18 Igor Garievich Kondratyuk Gambling and lottery method and gambling automaton for implementing the same
EP0829833A4 (en) * 1995-04-03 2000-03-29 Igor Garievich Kondratyuk Gambling and lottery method and gambling automaton for implementing the same
EP0829834A2 (en) * 1996-09-10 1998-03-18 International Game Technology Central random number generation for gaming system
EP0829834A3 (en) * 1996-09-10 1999-12-01 International Game Technology Central random number generation for gaming system
EP0855685A3 (en) * 1997-01-27 1999-12-15 Nec Corporation An electronic lottery system and its operating method and computer-readable recording medium in which the electronic lottery program code is stored
US6595855B2 (en) 1997-01-27 2003-07-22 Nec Corporation Electronic lottery system and its operating method and computer-readable recording medium in which the electronic lottery program code is stored
US6790139B2 (en) 1997-07-03 2004-09-14 Walker Digital, Llc Method and apparatus for securing a computer-based game of chance
EP1185343A2 (en) * 1997-07-03 2002-03-13 Walker Digital, LLC Method and apparatus for securing on-line virtual punchboard transactions
EP1185343A4 (en) * 1997-07-03 2002-10-16 Walker Digital Llc Method and apparatus for securing on-line virtual punchboard transactions
WO1999039312A3 (en) * 1998-01-30 1999-09-23 Ilan Bauminger Game system
GB2339049B (en) * 1998-01-30 2002-03-27 Nds Ltd Game system
GB2339049A (en) * 1998-01-30 2000-01-12 Nds Ltd Game system
WO2001024128A1 (en) * 1999-09-30 2001-04-05 Joe Zock An interactive computer-based gaming system
US6535726B1 (en) 2000-01-12 2003-03-18 Gilbarco Inc. Cellular telephone-based transaction processing
US7039389B2 (en) 2000-01-12 2006-05-02 Gilbarco Inc. Cellular telephone-based transaction processing
WO2002073554A1 (en) * 2001-03-13 2002-09-19 Hoarton, Lloyd, Douglas, Charles A gambling apparatus
GB2374190B (en) * 2001-03-13 2004-09-29 Donald William Bursill A gambling apparatus
US8696443B2 (en) 2004-02-25 2014-04-15 Cfph, Llc System and method for convenience gaming
US8504617B2 (en) 2004-02-25 2013-08-06 Cfph, Llc System and method for wireless gaming with location determination
US9430901B2 (en) 2004-02-25 2016-08-30 Interactive Games Llc System and method for wireless gaming with location determination
US8162756B2 (en) 2004-02-25 2012-04-24 Cfph, Llc Time and location based gaming
US8092303B2 (en) 2004-02-25 2012-01-10 Cfph, Llc System and method for convenience gaming
US8616967B2 (en) 2004-02-25 2013-12-31 Cfph, Llc System and method for convenience gaming
GB2415279A (en) * 2004-06-15 2005-12-21 Project Leisure Ltd Gaming apparatus
US9224266B2 (en) 2004-08-19 2015-12-29 Igt Gaming system having multiple gaming machines which provide bonus awards
US8876591B2 (en) 2004-08-19 2014-11-04 Igt Gaming system having multiple gaming machines which provide bonus awards
US9600968B2 (en) 2004-08-19 2017-03-21 Igt Gaming system having multiple gaming machines which provide bonus awards
US9005015B2 (en) 2004-08-19 2015-04-14 Igt Gaming system having multiple gaming machines which provide bonus awards
US9852580B2 (en) 2004-08-19 2017-12-26 Igt Gaming system having multiple gaming machines which provide bonus awards
US8708805B2 (en) 2005-07-08 2014-04-29 Cfph, Llc Gaming system with identity verification
US8506400B2 (en) 2005-07-08 2013-08-13 Cfph, Llc System and method for wireless gaming system with alerts
US8613658B2 (en) 2005-07-08 2013-12-24 Cfph, Llc System and method for wireless gaming system with user profiles
US8070604B2 (en) 2005-08-09 2011-12-06 Cfph, Llc System and method for providing wireless gaming as a service application
US7811172B2 (en) 2005-10-21 2010-10-12 Cfph, Llc System and method for wireless lottery
US7644861B2 (en) 2006-04-18 2010-01-12 Bgc Partners, Inc. Systems and methods for providing access to wireless gaming devices
US8403214B2 (en) 2006-04-18 2013-03-26 Bgc Partners, Inc. Systems and methods for providing access to wireless gaming devices
US8695876B2 (en) 2006-05-05 2014-04-15 Cfph, Llc Systems and methods for providing access to wireless gaming devices
US8740065B2 (en) 2006-05-05 2014-06-03 Cfph, Llc Systems and methods for providing access to wireless gaming devices
US8397985B2 (en) 2006-05-05 2013-03-19 Cfph, Llc Systems and methods for providing access to wireless gaming devices
US8899477B2 (en) 2006-05-05 2014-12-02 Cfph, Llc Device detection
US8939359B2 (en) 2006-05-05 2015-01-27 Cfph, Llc Game access device with time varying signal
US9306952B2 (en) 2006-10-26 2016-04-05 Cfph, Llc System and method for wireless gaming with location determination
US8292741B2 (en) 2006-10-26 2012-10-23 Cfph, Llc Apparatus, processes and articles for facilitating mobile gaming
US9280648B2 (en) 2006-11-14 2016-03-08 Cfph, Llc Conditional biometric access in a gaming environment
US8510567B2 (en) 2006-11-14 2013-08-13 Cfph, Llc Conditional biometric access in a gaming environment
US8645709B2 (en) 2006-11-14 2014-02-04 Cfph, Llc Biometric access data encryption
US9411944B2 (en) 2006-11-15 2016-08-09 Cfph, Llc Biometric access sensitivity
US9183693B2 (en) 2007-03-08 2015-11-10 Cfph, Llc Game access device
US8581721B2 (en) 2007-03-08 2013-11-12 Cfph, Llc Game access device with privileges
US8319601B2 (en) 2007-03-14 2012-11-27 Cfph, Llc Game account access device

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
EP0028652A1 (en) 1981-05-20 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US5324035A (en) Video gaming system with fixed pool of winning plays and global pool access
US5855515A (en) Progressive gaming system
US5265874A (en) Cashless gaming apparatus and method
US6280328B1 (en) Cashless computerized video game system and method
US8142272B2 (en) Method and apparatus for facilitating entry into bonus rounds
US6746330B2 (en) Method and device for implementing a coinless gaming environment
US7156738B2 (en) Casino gambling machine with bonus round award redemption
US5695402A (en) Game of chance
US7275991B2 (en) Slot machine with ticket-in/ticket-out capability
US5038022A (en) Apparatus and method for providing credit for operating a gaming machine
US6685563B1 (en) Programmable bonus gaming device having coin-in threhold criteria adapted for interconnection with conventional gaming device
US5941771A (en) Electronic gaming machine and method
US6117013A (en) Playing device system
US6315665B1 (en) Arcade game
US6506116B1 (en) Game machine
US6379248B1 (en) Method and apparatus for controlling a gaming device having a plurality of balances
US7134959B2 (en) Methods and apparatus for providing a lottery game
US5833540A (en) Cardless distributed video gaming system
US5186463A (en) Method of playing a lottery game
US6746328B2 (en) Multiplier per selected indicia
US6270410B1 (en) Remote controlled slot machines
US6336863B1 (en) Gaming device with bonus mechanism
US6113098A (en) Gaming device with supplemental ticket dispenser
US7204756B2 (en) Lottery system with method for paying multiple progressive jackpots
US20040242319A1 (en) Gaming device method and apparatus employing alternate payout features

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AK Designated states

Designated state(s): BR DE GB JP MC NL

AL Designated countries for regional patents

Designated state(s): FR