USPP9846P - Dahlia plant named Lizzy - Google Patents

Dahlia plant named Lizzy Download PDF

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Publication number
USPP9846P
USPP9846P US08/260,451 US26045194V US9846P US PP9846 P USPP9846 P US PP9846P US 26045194 V US26045194 V US 26045194V US 9846 P US9846 P US 9846P
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United States
Prior art keywords
lizzy
cultivar
color
plant
dahlia
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Expired - Lifetime
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US08/260,451
Inventor
Henry C. J. Lommerse
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Ball Horticultural Co
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Ball Horticultural Co
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Priority to US08/260,451 priority Critical patent/USPP9846P/en
Assigned to BALL HORTICULTURAL COMPANY reassignment BALL HORTICULTURAL COMPANY ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: LOMMERSE, HENRY C.J.
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A01AGRICULTURE; FORESTRY; ANIMAL HUSBANDRY; HUNTING; TRAPPING; FISHING
    • A01HNEW PLANTS OR NON-TRANSGENIC PROCESSES FOR OBTAINING THEM; PLANT REPRODUCTION BY TISSUE CULTURE TECHNIQUES
    • A01H6/00Angiosperms, i.e. flowering plants, characterised by their botanic taxonomy
    • A01H6/14Asteraceae or Compositae, e.g. safflower, sunflower, artichoke or lettuce
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A01AGRICULTURE; FORESTRY; ANIMAL HUSBANDRY; HUNTING; TRAPPING; FISHING
    • A01HNEW PLANTS OR NON-TRANSGENIC PROCESSES FOR OBTAINING THEM; PLANT REPRODUCTION BY TISSUE CULTURE TECHNIQUES
    • A01H5/00Angiosperms, i.e. flowering plants, characterised by their plant parts; Angiosperms characterised otherwise than by their botanic taxonomy
    • A01H5/02Flowers
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T83/00Cutting
    • Y10T83/727With means to guide moving work
    • Y10T83/728In pivotal or arcuate movement
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T83/00Cutting
    • Y10T83/929Tool or tool with support
    • Y10T83/9372Rotatable type
    • Y10T83/9377Mounting of tool about rod-type shaft
    • Y10T83/9379At end of shaft
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T83/00Cutting
    • Y10T83/929Tool or tool with support
    • Y10T83/9457Joint or connection
    • Y10T83/9464For rotary tool
    • Y10T83/9469Adjustable

Definitions

  • the present invention relates to a new and distinct cultivar of Dahlia plant, botanically known as Dahlia cav., and hereinafter referred to by the cultivar name Lizzy.
  • Lizzy is a sport or mutation of the commercial Dahlia cultivar Connie, U.S. Plant Pat. No. 6,768.
  • the plant of this disclosure was a spontaneous color mutation of unknown causation. I discovered the sport on Mar. 2, 1990 in a controlled environment facility in Enkhuizen, The Netherlands.
  • the ray floret color is purple red.
  • the inflorescences are fuller and more dense compared to the cultivars. This increase in fullness is a result of an increased number of rows of ray florets and an increased number of ray florets per inflorescence.
  • the inflorescence diameter is larger than other cultivars.
  • Plants are compact in growth habit and are suited for potted plant culture.
  • the cultivar Lizzy is most similar to its parent cultivar, the commercial Dahlia cultivar Connie, in its inflorescence form and plant habit.
  • the cultivar Lizzy differs from the cultivar Connie in its purple red ray florets compared to bright orange-red ray floret color of Connie; fuller inflorescences as a result of more rows of ray florets per inflorescence; larger inflorescence diameter; and simple leaf arrangement compared to the compound or trifoliate arrangement of leaves on the cultivar Connie.
  • the accompanying colored photograph illustrates the overall appearance and inflorescence color of the new cultivar, showing the colors as true as it is reasonably possible to obtain in colored reproductions of this type.
  • the photograph is a top view of a single flowering pot of Lizzy.
  • the new cultivar has not been observed under all possible environmental conditions.
  • the phenotype may vary significantly with variations in environment such as temperature, light intensity and daylength.
  • the following is a detailed description of my new cultivar based on plants produced under normal commercial practice in Enkhuizen, the Netherlands, in a glass-covered greenhouse with average day temperatures of 18° C. and average night temperatures of 16° C.
  • Leaf arrangement Simple. 2.
  • Leaf shape Ovate to rounded with acuminate tip. 3.
  • Leaf margin Serrated. 4.
  • Leaf size a. Length without pedicel: 7 cm. b. Width: 4 cm. c. Pedicel length: 3 cm. 5.
  • Fully expanded leaf color a.
  • Top side 137B.
  • Leaf vein color 138A.
  • Stamens a. Anther color: 1B. b. Pollen color: 13C. 2.
  • Pistils a. Stigma shape: Narrow, lancet-shaped. b. Stigma color: 2B. c. Style color: 2C.
  • Ovary number single.
  • Ovary size 1 mm.
  • Ovary color 144A.
  • Fertility about the same as the parent plant.

Abstract

A new and distinct cultivar of Dahlia plant named Lizzy characterized by its purple red ray floret color; full and dense inflorescences; large inflorescence diameter; inflorescences held above the foliage; compact growth habit; and simple leaf arrangement.

Description

The present invention relates to a new and distinct cultivar of Dahlia plant, botanically known as Dahlia cav., and hereinafter referred to by the cultivar name Lizzy.
Lizzy is a sport or mutation of the commercial Dahlia cultivar Connie, U.S. Plant Pat. No. 6,768. The plant of this disclosure was a spontaneous color mutation of unknown causation. I discovered the sport on Mar. 2, 1990 in a controlled environment facility in Enkhuizen, The Netherlands.
Asexual reproduction of the new cultivar by terminal cuttings from side shoots taken by me at Enkhuizen, The Netherlands, has shown that the unique features of this new Dahlia are stabilized and are reproduced true to type in successive generations of asexual reproduction.
The following characteristics have been repeatedly observed and are determined to be the basic characteristics of Lizzy. These characteristics in combination distinguish the new Dahlia from both its parent variety and other cultivated Dahlias of this type as a new and distinct cultivar:
1. The ray floret color is purple red.
2. The inflorescences are fuller and more dense compared to the cultivars. This increase in fullness is a result of an increased number of rows of ray florets and an increased number of ray florets per inflorescence.
3. The inflorescence diameter is larger than other cultivars.
4. Inflorescences are held above the foliage.
5. Plants are compact in growth habit and are suited for potted plant culture.
6. Leaves are simple and not compound.
The cultivar Lizzy is most similar to its parent cultivar, the commercial Dahlia cultivar Connie, in its inflorescence form and plant habit. The cultivar Lizzy differs from the cultivar Connie in its purple red ray florets compared to bright orange-red ray floret color of Connie; fuller inflorescences as a result of more rows of ray florets per inflorescence; larger inflorescence diameter; and simple leaf arrangement compared to the compound or trifoliate arrangement of leaves on the cultivar Connie.
The accompanying colored photograph illustrates the overall appearance and inflorescence color of the new cultivar, showing the colors as true as it is reasonably possible to obtain in colored reproductions of this type. The photograph is a top view of a single flowering pot of Lizzy.
The new cultivar has not been observed under all possible environmental conditions. The phenotype may vary significantly with variations in environment such as temperature, light intensity and daylength. The following is a detailed description of my new cultivar based on plants produced under normal commercial practice in Enkhuizen, the Netherlands, in a glass-covered greenhouse with average day temperatures of 18° C. and average night temperatures of 16° C.
Color references are made to The Royal Horticultural Society Colour Chart except where general terms of ordinary dictionary signficance are used.
Classification:
A. Botanical.--Dahlia cav. cv Lizzy.
B. Common.--Dahlia.
C. Commerical use.--Potted plant. This plant is well adapted for use as a patio plant, as well as a bedding plant, which has been shown to be adapted to be readily asexually reproduced from either cuttings or from the tubers produced by the plant.
Parentage:
Sport of commercial Dahlia cultivar Connie, U.S. Plant Pat. No. 6,768.
Propagation:
A. Type.--Terminal cuttings from side shoots or by tuberous divisions.
B. Time to initiate roots.--7 to 10 days at soil temperatures of 18° to 20° C.
C. Rooting habit.--Central root with numerous secondary roots.
Tuber description:
A. Early or initial root system on rotted cuttings.--Compact primary root having several compact secondary roots originating from the pericycle.
B. Mature root system.--Typical of the species, with maturity crown intiates are formed at the proximal end from which subsequent year's growth may develop in the form of aerial shoots.
Plant description:
A. General appearance.--Generally round in appearance.
B. Plant size.--Approximately 19 to 20 cm in height from top of soil level.
C. Growth habit.--Compact and upright.
D. Foliage description.--1. Leaf arrangement: Simple. 2. Leaf shape: Ovate to rounded with acuminate tip. 3. Leaf margin: Serrated. 4. Leaf size: a. Length without pedicel: 7 cm. b. Width: 4 cm. c. Pedicel length: 3 cm. 5. Leaf texture: a. Young leaves: Some luster. b. Fully expanded leaves: dull. 6. Young leaf color: a. Top side: 138A. b. Under side: 138B. 7. Fully expanded leaf color: a. Top side: 137B. b. Under side: 137C. 8. Leaf vein color: 138A.
Flowering description:
A. Inflorescence.--Fully double, decorative peony flowering habit with 5 rows of ray florets.
B. Natural flowering season.--July to October in the northern hemisphere.
C. Inflorescence orientation.--Inflorescences are held at a 120° angle to the peduncle and approximately 3.5 cm above the foliage.
D. Quantity of infloresccences.--In general, 5 to 8 fully developed inflorescences per plant are present at one time.
E. Ray florets.--1. Shape: Slightly cupped, rounded at tip, narrow. 2. Color: Purple red. a. When opening, top side: 59A. b. When opening, under side: 59B. c. Fully open, top side: 60A. d. Fully open, under side: 60B. e. Fading to: 59C. 3. Number or ray florets: An average of 75 per inflorescence. 4. Size of inflorescence: a. Diameter: 10 cm. b. Height: 3.5 cm.
F. Reproductive organs.--1. Stamens: a. Anther color: 1B. b. Pollen color: 13C. 2. Pistils: a. Stigma shape: Narrow, lancet-shaped. b. Stigma color: 2B. c. Style color: 2C. d. Ovary number: single. e. Ovary size: 1 mm. f. Ovary color: 144A. g. Fertility: about the same as the parent plant.
Disease resistance: No suspectibility or resistance to fungal, bacterial or viral pathogens has been noted.

Claims (1)

I claim:
1. A new and distinct cultivar of Dahlia plant named Lizzy, as illustrated and described.
US08/260,451 1994-06-14 1994-06-14 Dahlia plant named Lizzy Expired - Lifetime USPP9846P (en)

Priority Applications (1)

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USPP9846P true USPP9846P (en) 1997-04-01

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Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
USPP11566P (en) * 1999-01-19 2000-10-10 Ruigrok; Frank N. G. Dahlia plant named `Ruicaro`
USPP11602P (en) * 1999-01-19 2000-10-24 Ruigrok; Frank N. G. Dahlia plant named `Maryland`

Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
USPP6768P (en) * 1987-12-10 1989-05-02 Royal Sluis B.V. Dahlia plant named Connie

Patent Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
USPP6768P (en) * 1987-12-10 1989-05-02 Royal Sluis B.V. Dahlia plant named Connie

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
USPP11566P (en) * 1999-01-19 2000-10-10 Ruigrok; Frank N. G. Dahlia plant named `Ruicaro`
USPP11602P (en) * 1999-01-19 2000-10-24 Ruigrok; Frank N. G. Dahlia plant named `Maryland`

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Owner name: BALL HORTICULTURAL COMPANY, ILLINOIS

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:LOMMERSE, HENRY C.J.;REEL/FRAME:008187/0985

Effective date: 19960906