USPP21179P3 - Walnut rootstock ‘VX211’ - Google Patents

Walnut rootstock ‘VX211’ Download PDF

Info

Publication number
USPP21179P3
USPP21179P3 US11821844 US82184407V USPP21179P3 US PP21179 P3 USPP21179 P3 US PP21179P3 US 11821844 US11821844 US 11821844 US 82184407 V US82184407 V US 82184407V US PP21179 P3 USPP21179 P3 US PP21179P3
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
vx211
rootstock
walnut
paradox
citricola
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Active, expires
Application number
US11821844
Other versions
US20080320618P1 (en )
Inventor
Gale McGranahan
Charles Leslie
Wesley Hackett
Gregory Browne
James McKenna
Thomas Buzo
Stephanie Kaku
Michael McKenry
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
University of California
US Department of Agriculture
Original Assignee
University of California
US Department of Agriculture
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A01AGRICULTURE; FORESTRY; ANIMAL HUSBANDRY; HUNTING; TRAPPING; FISHING
    • A01HNEW PLANTS OR PROCESSES FOR OBTAINING THEM; PLANT REPRODUCTION BY TISSUE CULTURE TECHNIQUES
    • A01H6/00Angiosperms, i.e. flowering plants, characterised by their botanic taxonomy
    • A01H6/54Leguminosae or Fabaceae, e.g. soybean, alfalfa or peanut
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A01AGRICULTURE; FORESTRY; ANIMAL HUSBANDRY; HUNTING; TRAPPING; FISHING
    • A01HNEW PLANTS OR PROCESSES FOR OBTAINING THEM; PLANT REPRODUCTION BY TISSUE CULTURE TECHNIQUES
    • A01H5/00Angiosperms, i.e. flowering plants, characterised by their plant parts; Angiosperms characterised otherwise than by their botanic taxonomy
    • A01H5/08Fruits

Abstract

A new and distinct variety of walnut rootstock denominated ‘VX211’ is described. This new variety, ‘VX211’, can be propagated through standard tissue culture micropropagation or rooted cuttings. ‘VX211’ has vigor and survivability in the nursery and in the orchard. It has reduced susceptibility to damage from nematodes (Pratylenchus vulnus) compared to other ‘Paradox’ rootstock. ‘VX211’ also has reduced susceptibility to damage from Phytophthora citricola in greenhouse screens and in the field compared to other ‘Paradox’ rootstock.

Description

Latin name: Botanical/commercial classification: (Juglans hindsii×Juglans regia)/new ‘Paradox’ walnut rootstock.

Varietal denomination: The varietal denomination of the claimed walnut rootstock is ‘VX211’.

BACKGROUND OF INVENTION

The present invention relates to a new and distinct clonal rootstock of ‘Paradox’ (not patented) walnut tree (Juglans hindsii×Juglans regia) that has been denominated varietally as ‘VX211’, and more particularly to such a walnut rootstock that is vigorous, that has reduced susceptibility to nematodes (Pratylenchus vulnus) and Phytophthora (Phytophthora citricola), and that further is easily clonally propagated by standard tissue culture micropropagation.

It has long been recognized as desirable to provide vigorous walnut rootstocks that have increased resistance to soil pests and diseases, specifically nematodes (Pratylenchus vulnus) and Phytophthora (Phytophthora citricola). The rootstock of the present variety, ‘VX211’, is similar to other ‘Paradox’ walnut rootstocks (Juglans hindsii×Juglans regia), except that it has increased resistance or tolerance to Pratylenchus vulnus and Phytophthora citricola and can be easily micropropagated to produce a vigorous clonal ‘Paradox’ rootstock.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

It was found that the walnut rootstock ‘VX211’ of the present invention exhibits the following combination of characteristics:

    • a) can be propagated through standard tissue culture micropropagation or rooted cuttings;
    • b) has vigor and survivability in the nursery and in the orchard;
    • c) has reduced susceptibility to damage from nematodes (Pratylenchus vulnus) compared to other ‘Paradox’ rootstock; an
    • d) has reduced susceptibility to damage from Phytophthora citricola in greenhouse screens and in the field compared to other ‘Paradox’ rootstock.
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE TABLES

Table 1 shows comparative nursery performance of ‘VX211’ and other walnut rootstock clones.

Table 2 shows growth rating and diameters for ‘VX211’ and other rootstock clones.

Table 3 shows field performance of clonal ‘Paradox’ walnut hybrids, Northern California black walnut and Chinese wingnut rootstocks in non-infested soil and soil infested with Phytophthora.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 shows performance of ‘VX211’ compared to ‘AX1’ under pressure from nematodes at varying densities.

FIG. 2 shows a visual rating of tree growth and condition of clonal and seedling test trees at a Jenny Lind, Calif. field site.

FIG. 3 shows cumulative percent mortality of clonal and seedling test trees at a Jenny Lind, Calif. field site.

FIG. 4 shows tree mortality of clonal and seedling test trees at a Linden, Calif. field site.

FIG. 5 shows relative resistance to Phytophthora citricola among clonal and seedling test trees in greenhouse experiment.

FIG. 6 shows ‘VX211’ at 10 years of age.

FIG. 7 shows bark of ten-year old ‘VX211’.

FIG. 8 shows several three-year old trees of ‘VX211’.

FIG. 9 shows bark at base of three-year old ‘VX211’.

FIG. 10 shows bark and lenticels farther up the stem of ‘VX211’.

FIG. 11 shows 6-month old greenhouse grown ‘VX211’.

FIG. 12 shows grafted ‘VX211’.

FIG. 13 shows spring foliage of ‘VX211’.

FIG. 14 shows deep red of new foliage of ‘VX211’.

FIG. 15 shows upper side of mature leaf of ‘VX211’.

FIG. 16 shows lower side of mature leaf of ‘VX211’.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The new rootstock of the present invention was selected as part of the “Paradox Diversity Study” (PDS) which was initiated in 1996 to study the genetic diversity of commercial ‘Paradox’ sources. The study included approximately 300–500 seeds each (depending on the predicted percent ‘Paradox’), from 37 black walnut sources of ‘Paradox’ provided by California walnut nurseries, and seven controlled crosses made in Davis, Calif. and open-pollinated controls from different Juglans species. Seeds were germinated and grown at 3 different nurseries for one year and then seedlings were distributed to cooperating researchers for tests of response to nematodes, Phytophthora (seed supplied), crown gall (Agrobacterium tumefaciens) and the field environment (field trials). The study was repeated in 1997.

The rootstock of the present invention was evaluated for response to nematodes in 1998 along with 9 siblings and the remaining rootstock families. One-year old seedlings were planted on 1.2 or 1.8 meter spacing with 3.35 meter centers. The field test site was infested with a single population of root lesion nematode (P. vulnus) originally placed on site in 1976. At planting time seedlings were inoculated with additional P. vulnus. Each fall 20 grams of root tissue were collected from each tree. These roots were placed in a mist chamber for 5 days for nematode extraction and nematodes/gram root was calculated.

In July 1998 it was evident that one seedling (‘VX211’) was more vigorous than the others, but in the fall the nematodes were abundant on the roots of ‘VX211’. In July 1999 roots were collected and again nematodes were found to be abundant, but the seedling ‘VX211’ continued to be more vigorous than the other seedlings in spite of the nematodes. Due to its apparent superiority it was transplanted to a “mother block” at an agriculture center in Parlier, Calif. In winter 2000–2001 propagating wood was collected. ‘VX211’ was propagated by hardwood cuttings. Additionally, ‘VX211’ was asexually reproduced by standard tissue culture micropropagation in Davis, Calif. In 2002 a “stock block” was established in Davis, Calif. with 6 trees of ‘VX211’ as well as other promising selections.

Propagation of ‘VX211’ both by standard hardwood cuttings and by standard tissue culture micropropagation was successful. From November 2002 to October 2003, 212 ‘VX211’ plants were micropropagated, rooted in gelled medium and acclimatized in the greenhouse; 153 (72%) survived. When rooted ex vitro, 126/184 (68%) survived. Hardwood cuttings rooted between 73% (11/15) to 87% (13/15). By November 2003 there were 187 available for field trials and 60 available for Phytophthora screening.

In March 2004, 48 plants of the ‘VX211’ clone and a standard ‘Paradox’ (‘AX1’) were evaluated for additional nematode screening and comparison. These were planted in 1/100th acre macroplots. The macroplots had concrete sides 1.5 meter deep into the soil with open bottoms and were nematode-free. ‘VX211’ and ‘AX1’ were planted side by side in 48 separate macroplots infested with 0, 1, 20, or 500 P. vulnus nematodes per 250 cc of soil. Tree diameters and number of nematodes on the roots were determined 2004–2006 (FIG. 1). Nematodes built up quickly but ‘VX211’ was 30% taller in the first year and the diameter of ‘VX211’ was significantly greater than ‘AX1’ in all three years (FIG. 1). The vigor of ‘VX211’ under pressure from nematodes suggests that ‘VX211’ has a means to avoid or escape severe damage from nematodes.

In spring 2004, 106 plants of ‘VX211’ produced through standard tissue culture micropropagation were planted in a nursery along with over 1800 plants of 17 different clones. At the end of the growing season ‘VX211’ was the most vigorous of all clones (Table 1) demonstrating that propagation is true-to-type through successive generations. Eighty-two percent were graftable and the mean diameter was 31 mm at 5 cm from the soil surface.

Graftable trees were distributed for grafted field trials in 5 different orchards in replant situations in 2005. Grafting posed no problem and ‘VX211’ is considered compatible with English walnut scions. It is a typical ‘Paradox’ in that respect. In addition, 30 each of 11 different genoptypes including ‘VX211’ were planted in May 2005 in Davis, Calif. for artificial inoculation with Phytophthora citricola. A randomized block split plot design was used. For each rootstock clone, there were six four-tree plots to be infested and six single-tree plots to serve as non-infested controls. Northern California black (Juglans hindsii) and wingnut (Pterocarya stenoptera) were included as susceptible and resistant controls, respectively. In January 2006, 100 ml of a V8 juice-oat mixture infested with Phytophthora citricola was mixed into the upper 5 cm of soil around the trunk of each tree. A sterile mixture was applied to the uninoculated controls.

Early results from several of the grafted field trials are shown (FIGS. 2–4; Table 2). In all cases ‘VX211’ was one of the superior clones. The block artificially inoculated with Phytophthora was assessed for growth in trunk circumference and development of crown rot as indicated by trunk cankers extending up from the soil surface in November 2006. Sixty-two percent of the susceptible controls were rotted or dead. The uninoculated controls of ‘VX211’ were the most vigorous trees in the block apart from the wingnut controls. No cankers were found on ‘VX211’ or many of the other clones, however the Phytophthora inoculation did appear to depress growth somewhat in ‘VX211’ (Table 3).

Simultaneously with field trials, greenhouse trials were carried out to assess the relative susceptibility of ‘VX211’ and other selected clones to Phytophthora citricola. Standard Phytophthora screening methods were used. Clonal selections including ‘VX211’ were micropropagated, rooted, acclimatized and chilled, and at 2–6 months were transplanted to pots of artificially inoculated soil. Four isolates of P. citricola from different districts of California were used to infest the soil. The isolates were grown in separate jars of V8 juice-oat-vermiculite substrate for one month, mixed in equal proportions and mixed in the soil (40 ml inoculated substrate per liter of soil). Starting two weeks after transplanting, all plants received 48-hour periods of soil flooding every two weeks. Three months after transplanting, soil was washed from the plants and the incidence and severity of crown rot were determined. One selected clone, ‘VX211’ consistently showed moderate resistance. The results from 2006 trials are shown in FIG. 5.

BOTANICAL DESCRIPTION OF THE PLANT

This description is based on the original selection of ‘VX211’, ungrafted, at ten years of age, a 3-year old ungrafted tree in Phytophthora field screen, and a greenhouse-grown plant at 6 months of age. Figures are also shown of a grafted ‘VX211’ tree. Data for the botanical description were collected in spring 2007.

The Munsell Color Charts for Plant Tissues (1977. GretagMacbeth, New Windsor N.Y.) is used in the identification of color. Also, common color terms are to be accorded their ordinary dictionary significance,

  • Botanical classification: Juglans hindsii×Juglans regia.
  • Female parent: Juglans hindsii.
  • Male parent: Juglans regia.

‘VX211’ differs from its female parent by having fewer leaflets/leaf, broader leaflets and hybrid vigor. ‘VX211’ differs from its male parent by having more leaflets/leaf and hybrid vigor. ‘VX211’ does not differ substantially from other similar hybrids except in its superior performance under adverse soil conditions as described in the “Background of the Invention”.

  • Plant: The growth habit of the tree is illustrated in FIG. 6. This 10 year old tree is approximately 7.3 meters in height with a canopy diameter of approximately 5 meters. The trunk circumference at 1.2 meters above ground level is about 0.61 meters. The bark and year-old branches are light brown (2.5Y 7/2) (FIG. 7). New shoots are green (5GY 7/6). Lenticels (approximately 12 per 2.5 square cm) are slightly lighter than the bark (2.5Y 8/2). The 3 year old trees are 4.3–4.9 meters tall (FIG. 8). The bark is brownish-green (2.5GY 5/8) with scattered (22/2.5 square cm.) buff-colored lenticels (7.5YR 8/2) (FIGS. 9, 10). The six month old greenhouse grown tree is about 35 cm. tall and the main stem is about 1 cm. in diameter (FIG. 11) and green (5GY/10). Lenticels about 0.5 mm long are more dense at the base of the plant and are a buff color (2.5Y 8/4). Graft take is in the normal range for seedling ‘Paradox’ walnuts (FIG. 12).
  • Foliage: The slightly pubescent new spring foliage has a reddish hue to it (10R 4/8), darkest towards the tip (FIGS. 13 and 14) turning green (5GY 5/6) as the leaves get older. The leaves are smooth and the margins are entire (not serrate). The leaves are pinnately compound with 13–15 leaflets. The mature leaves of the 6 month old plant have 9–11 leaflets and are 30 cm long and 23 cm wide. The number of leaflets may vary depending on the age and size of the plant. The upper leaf surface is bright green and the same color as the stem (5GY 5/10) (FIG. 14). The lower surface is slightly duller (5GY 6/6) (FIG. 16). The leaflets are about 5 cm wide and 14 cm long with a petiole 4–8 cm long.
  • Inflorescence: No catkins or female flowers appeared in the first 10 years. The tree is probably male sterile as is typical with Juglans hindsii×Juglans regia hybrids. No nuts were observed.
  • Disease resistance and susceptibility: This rootstock is typical of other Juglans hindsii×Juglans regia hybrids except that it possesses higher vigor and ability to survive heavy nematode loads. It is also less susceptible to Phytophthora citricola than other similar hybrids.
  • Usage: The new rootstock of the present invention provides walnut growers with a new clonally propagated ‘Paradox’ rootstock. It can be easily micropropagated.

TABLE 1
Clones grown in Stanislaus County, California in 2004
Graft- Graft-
Planted able able Diameter (mm)
Clone N N % Mean SD Range CV
Nematodes
VX211 106 87 82 31 4.9 21-44 12.6
Phytophthora
AZ2 230 151 66 26 5 13-38 19.2
AZ3 49 24 49 25 6.7 11-37 26.8
NZ1 172 111 64 26 4.4 10-39 16.9
JX2 246 191 78 29 4.1 13-39 14.1
RX1 104 78 75 18 1.6 14-22 8.8
AX1 163 86 53 27 4.3 14-40 15.9
GZ1 108 83 77 26 5.4 13-40 20.8
Px1 247 154 62 26 4.6 12-40 17.7
AZ1 52 38 73 30 4.4 22-43 14.7
UX1 27 23 85 25 4 15-30 16
GZ2 47 38 81 26 4.5 15-33 17.3
Blackline
WIP3 158 66 42 26 5 12-35 19.2
WIP2 10 6 60 25 2.3 23-99 9.2
Control
UX022 71 59 83 23 3.7 14-29 16.1
English
Vina 14 10 71 18 3.7 13-24 20.5
Sunland 64 20 31 26 3.8 18-31 14.6
Totals 1868 1225 66 25

TABLE 2
Walnut Rootstock Orchard Trials-Yuba County.
Established May 2005. Randomized complete block design with 4
clonal and 1 seedling ‘Paradox’ rootstock.
Twelve single tree replicates.
All rootstocks generally grew well except AZ2. Midday stem water
potential measurements suggest that replants and adjacent orchard trees
were generally in a similar range to the replants. AZ2 did not grow
well despite having midday stem water potentials in a similar range to
adjacent trees and the other replants. There was 100% survival of all
replant sources.
June December November % Change
2005 June 2005 2005 2006 (June 2005
Growth Diameter Diameter Diameter to November
Treatment Rating* (mm) (mm) (mm) 2006)
VX211 3.0 29.0 31.2 42.5 a +46.6
AZ2 2.0 26.9 28.5 26.2 c −2.6
NZ1 2.9 23.5 25.8 35.6 b +51.4
JX2 2.2 23.7 26.4 35.2 b +48.5
CONTROL 1.4 20.5 22.4 30.0 bc +46.3
*rootstocks were headed near or below 2005 diameter measurement point. 2006 measurement is on new shoot growing above previous cut.
*Growth rating descriptions:
0 No growth
1 Just breaking
2 Moderate growth
3 Vigorous growth

TABLE 3
Field performance of clonal ‘Paradox’ walnut hybrids, Northern California
black walnut and Chinese wingnut rootstocks in non-infested soil and soil
infested with Phytophthora.
Clone Maternal background
(or of hybrid (or Soil treatment Incidence of
species) species of standard) (January 2006) crown rot (%)
AX1 californica Control 0 c
P. citricola 4 c
AZ2 (major x hindsii)x nigra Control 0 c
P. citricola 0 c
NZ1 (major x hindsii)x nigra Control 0 c
P. citricola 0 c
GZ1 hindsii Control 0 c
P. citricola 4 c
JX2 hindsii Control 0 c
P. citricola 0 c
PX1 hindsii Control 0 c
P. citricola 8 bc
VX211 hindsii Control 0 c
P. citricola 0 c
RX1 microcarpa Control 0 c
P. citricola 0 c
WIP3 hindsii x regia Control 0 c
P. citricola 8 bc
(NCB) (J. hindsii) Control 16 b
P. citricola 62 a
(Wing- (Pt. stenopiera) Control 0 c
nut) P. citricola 0 c
Clone Percent of Incidence of Increase in
(or trunk circ. tree mortality trunk circ.
species) Necrotic (%) (mm)
AX1 0 c 0 c 163 c
1 c 0 c 146 cde
AZ2 0 c 0 c 116 fg
0 c 0 c 117 fg
NZ1 0 c 0 c 116 fg
0 c 0 c 130 def
GZ1 0 c 0 c 157 cd
1 c 0 c 150 cd
JX2 0 c 0 c 166 bc
0 c 0 c 135 def
PX1 0 c 0 c 169 bc
1 c 0 c 157 cd
VX211 0 c 0 c 191 b
0 c 0 c 147 cde
RX1 0 c 0 c 112 fg
0 c 0 c 116 fg
WIP3 0 c 0 c 100 g
2 c 0 c 121 efg
(NCB) 17 b 17 b 65 h
59 a 59 a 57 h
(Wingnut) 0 b 0 c 226 a
0 b 0 c 193 b
1All trees were planted May 2005. The assessments of crown rot and mortality were made 21 Nov. 2006. Means within a column and without letters in common are significantly different (Waller k ratio).

Claims (1)

1. A new and distinct variety of walnut rootstock plant designated ‘VX211’ as shown and described herein.
US11821844 2007-06-25 2007-06-25 Walnut rootstock ‘VX211’ Active 2028-01-25 USPP21179P3 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11821844 USPP21179P3 (en) 2007-06-25 2007-06-25 Walnut rootstock ‘VX211’

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11821844 USPP21179P3 (en) 2007-06-25 2007-06-25 Walnut rootstock ‘VX211’

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20080320618P1 true US20080320618P1 (en) 2008-12-25
USPP21179P3 true USPP21179P3 (en) 2010-08-03

Family

ID=40137937

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11821844 Active 2028-01-25 USPP21179P3 (en) 2007-06-25 2007-06-25 Walnut rootstock ‘VX211’

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) USPP21179P3 (en)

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
USD691167S1 (en) 2011-10-26 2013-10-08 Mcafee, Inc. Computer having graphical user interface
USD692451S1 (en) 2011-10-26 2013-10-29 Mcafee, Inc. Computer having graphical user interface
USD693845S1 (en) 2011-10-26 2013-11-19 Mcafee, Inc. Computer having graphical user interface
USD722613S1 (en) 2011-10-27 2015-02-17 Mcafee Inc. Computer display screen with graphical user interface

Non-Patent Citations (25)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
Browne, G. (2001). "Strategies for Management of Phytophthora on Walnut: Evaluating Potential of Elite Paradox Clones and Wingnut Families," Walnut Research Reports 2000, pp. 429-436.
Browne, G. (2002). "Strategies for Management of Phytophthora on Walnut: Evaluating Potential of Elite Paradox Clones and Wingnut Families," Walnut Research Reports 2001, pp. 101-109.
Browne, G. et al. (2005). "Determining Phytophthora Resistance in Elite Paradox Clones and Specific Etiology of a Paradox Crown and Root Rot," Walnut Research Reports 2004, pp. 379-387.
Browne, G. et al. (2006). "Biology and Management of Phytophthora Crown and Root Rot of Walnut," Walnut Research Reports 2005, pp. 335-344.
Browne, G. T. et al. (1999-2000). Project Plan/Research Grant Proposal for Year 4 of 5 of "Strategies for Control of Phytophthora Root and Crown Rots of Walnut," University of California Division of Agricultural Sciences, 6 pages.
Browne, G. T. et al. (2004-2005). Project Plan/Research Grant Proposal for Year 1 of 2 of "Determining Phytophthora Resistance in Elite Paradox Clones and Specific Etiology of a Paradox Crown and Root Rot," University of California Division of Agricultural Sciences, 5 pages.
Browne, G.T. et al. (1998). "Strategies for Control of Phytophthora Root and Crown Rots of Walnut," Walnut Research Reports 1997, pp. 381-391.
Browne, G.T. et al. (1998). "Strategies for Control of Phytophthora Root and Crown Rots of Walnut," Walnut Research Reports 1997, pp. 381-391.
Browne, G.T. et al. (1999). "Strategies For Control of Phytophthora Root and Crown Rots of Walnut," Walnut Research Reports 1998, pp. 361-371.
Browne, G.T. et al. (2004). "Evaluation of Resistance to Phytophthora citricola Among Diverse Clones of Paradox Hybrid Rootstocks," Proceedings of the Vth International Walnut Symposium, Sorrento, Italy, pp. 395-405.
Grant, J. et al. (2007). "Orchard Performance of Selected Clonal Paradox Rootstocks," Walnut Research Reports 2006, pp. 79-81.
Hackett, W.P. et al. (2003). "Propagation and Retesting of Walnut Rootstock Genotypes Putatively Resistant to Pests and Diseases," Walnut Research Reports 2002, pp. 99-107.
Hackett, W.P. et al. (2004). "Propagation and Retesting of Walnut Rootstock Genotypes Putatively Resistant to Pests and Diseases," Walnut Research Reports 2003,pp. 85-95.
Hackett, W.P. et al. (2005). "Propagation and Retesting of Walnut Rootstock Genotypes Putatively Resistant to Pests and Diseases," Walnut Research Reports 2004, pp. 89-95.
McGranahan, G. et al. (1996). "The Paradox Diversity Study," Walnut Research Reports 1996, pp. 43-48.
McGranahan, G. et al. (1998). "The Paradox Diversity Study," Walnut Research Reports 1997, pp. 55-63.
McGranahan, G. et al. (2006). "Clonal Propagation of Walnut Rootstock Genotypes for Genetic Improvement," Walnut Research Reports 2005, pp. 85-93.
McGranahan, G. et al. (2007). "Clonal Propagation of Walnut Rootstock Genotypes for Genetic Improvement 2006," Walnut Research Reports 2006, pp. 71-78.
McGranahan, Gale. Nurseries Licensed to Sell New Clonal Walnut Rootstocks. Walnut Improvement Program, UC Davis. May 1, 2008. Available at: http://cesutter.ucdavis.edu/files/51594.pdf. *
McKenna, J. et al. (1999). "The Paradox Genetic Diversity Study," Walnut Research Reports 1998, pp. 40-65.
McKenry, M. (2004). "Field Evaluations/Inputs for Grower Replant Settings and New Lines of Nematode Resistance," Walnut Research Reports 2003, pp. 431-439.
McKenry, M. (2005). "Field Evaluations/Inputs for Grower Replant Settings and New Lines of Nematode Resistance," Walnut Research Reports 2004, pp. 407-415.
McKenry, M. (2006). "Field Evaluations/Inputs for Grower Replant Settings and New Lines of Nematode Resistance," Walnut Research Reports 2005, pp. 365-371.
McKenry, M. (2007). "Filed Evaluations/Inputs for Grower Replant Settings and New Lines of Nematode Resistance," Walnut Research Reports 2006, pp. 279-283.
McKenry, M. et al. (2001). "A Three-Year Search for Nematode Resistance in Walnut-Final Report," Walnut Research Reports 2000, pp. 509-512.

Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
USD691167S1 (en) 2011-10-26 2013-10-08 Mcafee, Inc. Computer having graphical user interface
USD691168S1 (en) 2011-10-26 2013-10-08 Mcafee, Inc. Computer having graphical user interface
USD692452S1 (en) 2011-10-26 2013-10-29 Mcafee, Inc. Computer having graphical user interface
USD692454S1 (en) 2011-10-26 2013-10-29 Mcafee, Inc. Computer having graphical user interface
USD692453S1 (en) 2011-10-26 2013-10-29 Mcafee, Inc. Computer having graphical user interface
USD692451S1 (en) 2011-10-26 2013-10-29 Mcafee, Inc. Computer having graphical user interface
USD692911S1 (en) 2011-10-26 2013-11-05 Mcafee, Inc. Computer having graphical user interface
USD692912S1 (en) 2011-10-26 2013-11-05 Mcafee, Inc. Computer having graphical user interface
USD693845S1 (en) 2011-10-26 2013-11-19 Mcafee, Inc. Computer having graphical user interface
USD722613S1 (en) 2011-10-27 2015-02-17 Mcafee Inc. Computer display screen with graphical user interface

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
US20080320618P1 (en) 2008-12-25 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
MAIZE Hybridization of maize, Tripsacum, and Euchlaena
Hutton Siratro—a tropical pasture legume bred from Phaseolus atropurpureus
US6414226B1 (en) Inbred tomato line FDR 16-2045
Nichols Breeding cassava for virus resistance
US6747191B2 (en) Inbred tetraploid watermelon line 90-4194
Luby et al. Blueberries and cranberries (Vaccinium)
Iezzoni et al. Cherries (Prunus)
Lammerts The breeding of ornamental edible peaches for mild climates. I. Inheritance of tree and flower characters
Germain Genetic improvement of the Persian walnut (Juglans regia L.)
Gill et al. Agricultural botany
Kelly Remaking bean plant architecture for efficient production
McNaughton et al. The comparative biology of closely related species living in the same area
McDonough Sexual reproduction, seeds, and seedlings in Aspen: Ecology and Management in the Western United States
US7087819B2 (en) Non-pungent ornamental peppers
Ramming et al. A stenospermocarpic, seedless Vitis vinifera× Vitis rotundifolia hybrid developed by embryo rescue
Irgens-Moller Forest-tree genetics research: Quercus L.
Masaya et al. Adaptation to photoperiod and temperature
Byrne et al. Peach
Morrison et al. Morphology, growth, and rhizome development of Vaccinium angustifolium Ait. seedlings, rooted softwood cuttings, and micropropagated plantlets
Heybroek The Dutch elm breeding program
Dickson Breeding Beans, Phaseolus vulgaris L., for Improved Germination Under Unfavorable Low Temperature Conditions 1
Mehlenbacher Genetic improvement of the hazelnut
US20030121075A1 (en) Method of producing seedless watermelon
Ross et al. INTERSPECIFIC GENETIC RELATIONSHIPS IN LACTUCA'
US7115800B2 (en) Seedless watermelon having small fruit

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: AGRICULTURE, THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, AS REPR

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:BROWNE, GREG T.;REEL/FRAME:020013/0803

Effective date: 20071022

AS Assignment

Owner name: THE REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, CALIF

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:MCGRANAHAN, GALE;LESLIE, CHARLES;HACKETT, WESLEY;AND OTHERS;SIGNING DATES FROM 20071008 TO 20071101;REEL/FRAME:020122/0704