US973363A - Separator and classifier. - Google Patents

Separator and classifier. Download PDF

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US973363A
US973363A US47077409A US1909470774A US973363A US 973363 A US973363 A US 973363A US 47077409 A US47077409 A US 47077409A US 1909470774 A US1909470774 A US 1909470774A US 973363 A US973363 A US 973363A
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drum
blades
tray
compartment
compartments
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US47077409A
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Edmund Major
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Edmund Major
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B03SEPARATION OF SOLID MATERIALS USING LIQUIDS OR USING PNEUMATIC TABLES OR JIGS; MAGNETIC OR ELECTROSTATIC SEPARATION OF SOLID MATERIALS FROM SOLID MATERIALS OR FLUIDS; SEPARATION BY HIGH-VOLTAGE ELECTRIC FIELDS
    • B03BSEPARATING SOLID MATERIALS USING LIQUIDS OR USING PNEUMATIC TABLES OR JIGS
    • B03B5/00Washing granular, powdered or lumpy materials; Wet separating
    • B03B5/48Washing granular, powdered or lumpy materials; Wet separating by mechanical classifiers
    • B03B5/56Drum classifiers

Description

B. MA-JOR.- SEPARATOR AND GLASSIFIER. APPLICATION FILED JAN. 5; 1909.
Patented Oct. 18,1910.
3 SHEETS-SHEET}.
A J I i 3. MAJOR. SEPARATOB. AND GLASSIFIER.
I APPLICATION FILED JAN. 5, 1909.
Patented 001;. 18, 1910;
3- SHEETS-SHEET 2.
E. MAJOR SEPARATOR AND GLASSIFIBR.
APPLICATION FILED JAN. 5, 1909.
Patented Oct. 18, 1910.
3 SHEETS-SHEET 3.
EDMUND MAJOR, OF MAITLAIND, SOUTH DAKOTA.
SEPARA'IOR AND CLASSIFIER.
Specification of Letters Patent. Patented Oct. 18, 1919.
Application filed. January 5, 1909. Serial No. 470,774.
To all whom it may concern:
Be it known that I, EDMUND MAJOR, a citizen of the United States, residing at Maitland, in the county of Lawrence and State of South Dakota, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Separators and Classifiers, of which the following is a specification.
My invention relates to separating machines used in concentrating and cyaniding mills for separating slime from sand, and for classifying and separating the sands.
In cyanid mills where the ore is ground in a solution of cyanid or where it is pulverized in water and a solution afterward added, it is necessary to separate the slimes from the sands before the slimes can be properly treated, and before the sands themselves can be also treated for the extraction of the values. Slime so called, is a mass of fine ore particles suspended in a solution, these particles being fine enough to pass a 200- mesh sieve. This product, the slime, is either filter-pressed or it is discharged into tanks and agitated with a cyanid solution, after which it is allowed to settle and the solution decanted. The sands consist of particles of ore in more or less minute granular form. This product is treated separately from the slimes; it is discharged into vats and leached with cyanid solution. That the solution. may percolate freely through the sands it is necessary that all but a small per cent. of the slimes be separated therefrom. In some cases the sands are reground to a slime. In either case, however, a separation is necessary. In concentrating mills, where the best work is done, it is also necessary thatthe sands themselves be classified.
It is to secure this separation of the slimes from the sands and the classification of the sands when necessary that is the object of my invention, my machine being adapted to not only separate the slimes from the sand, but to classify the sands into two or more grades and to discharge the separated sands at a higher level than that at which the material enters the machine.
My invention consists in the arrangementof parts and details of construction set-forth in the accompanying specification and more particularly specified in the appended claims.
In the drawings, Figure 1 is a side View of my separating and classifying drum; Fig. 2
is a vertical longitudinal section thereof; Fig. 3 is a front end view partly broken away; Fig. 4: is a transverse section on the line 44L of Fig. 2; and Fig. 5 is a longitudinal vertical section 011 an enlarged scale, of a drum adapted to separate slime from the sand and to classify the sand into two bodies. 1
Referring now to Figs. 1 to 4, 2 designates a drum of any suitable construction having a smooth inner face and provided upon its exterior with tracks 3, and with a middle rib 4. The tracks 3 are supported in roller bearings 5, mounted upon any suitable base 6, and the rib 4: is provided with sprocket teeth 7 adapted to be engaged by a sprocket chain 8, shown in dotted lines in Fig. 3, and actuated by any suitable power. By this means the drum will be rotated on its bearings. The opposite ends of the drum are partially closed by the annular walls 9 and 10, the wall 9 being higher than the wall 10, as will be seen in Fig. 2. These Walls are held in position by annular heads 11, or in any other desired or suitable manner. A middle inwardly-projecting partition wall 12, is also provided, which is lower in height than either the wall 9 or 10. A flaring mouth 18 is attached to the inner circumference of the wall 10, acting as a discharge mouth for the slime. The inner face of the drum is ribbed or provided with longitudinally extending inclined flanges or blades 14. and 15, located on either side of the central partition 12 As will be seen from Figs. 3 and 1, the flanges or blades 14 are higher and may be nearer together than the flanges or blades 15, for a purpose later stated. 16 is a feed chute, which extends into the drum through the mouth 13 and passes over into the rearmost compartment of the drum back of the partition 12, thus emptying into that portion of the drum having the ribs 14. This trough or chute 16 is connected to a source of pulp supply and it is by this means that the pulped ore enters the separator. A discharge chute 17 extends through the interior of the drum and out at the end opposite to the entrance of the trough 16. This trough 17 is supported in any desired manner at its ends and is for the discharge of the sands. Upstanding braces 18 attached to the trough 17 support a tray 19, which is arranged centrally in the upper portion of the drum, this tray having end walls 20, which are somewhat inside of the heads 11, so that any material carried up by the blades 01 flanges 14 and 15 is bound to fall into the tray 19 and not pass the ends of the tray and into the troughs 16 or 17. Outlet pipes, 21, extend downward from the bottom of the tray (which is hopper-shape in cross section) and discharge into the trough 17. A water or cyanid solution supply pipe 23 extends into the drum just above the tray, and is provided with the upwardly projecting discharge nozzles 24. These nozzles are adapted to discharge a plurality of jets of water or cyanid solution against the upper face of the drum and the blades thereon. A pipe 25 also passes into the drum and is connected to a source of water or solution supply and is provided with a series of upwardly and laterally projecting nozzles, 26, also adapted to discharge water or solution against the inside face of the drum and against the blades thereon. It will be seen that these nozzles are directed toward that portion of the drum which is rising toward the tray or passing immediately over the upper portion of the tray, thus, all sand or material carried up by the blades or flanges 15 and 14 is washed by the sprays of water or solution, and said material will be thereby detached from engagement with the in ner faces of the flanges or blades and washed into the tray 19.
The construction shown in Figs. 1 to 4, as arranged is adapted to separate the sands from the slime, to discharge the sands into the tray 19, from which they are washed down into the trough 17 and so discharged, and to discharge the slime into the slime box 27, into which the lip or mouth 13 extends. The manner of this separation is as follows: Pulp enters by the trough 16 and is directed into the rearmostcompartment of the separating drum. In this compartment the blades or flanges 14 are higher and set more closely together than in the adjacent compartment. As a consequence, the material is considerably agitated in this compartment. The lighter sands float to the top of the waten contained in the rearmost compartment and then gradually flow over the par tition 12 into the front portion of the separator. In this portion the blades 15 are preferably farther apart and of less height than the blades 14 and as a consequence the material, which consists of fine sand and slime, is comparatively little agitated. The slime rises to the top and is carried over the mouth 13 into the slime box 27, while the sand is gradually carried upward by the blades 15, being washed by jets from the nozzles 24 and 26, and is deposited in the tray 19, thence to be discharged into the trough 17. The coarse sand left in the rearmost compartment is also carried up by the blades 14 and deposited in the tray 19, along with the fine sand, and as a consequence the apparatus as arranged is not fitted for the classification of the sands but only the separation of the slime from the sands. In Fig. 5, however, I show a construction which is in almost all respects precisely like that shown in Fig. 2, but which is adapted to classify the sands. In this construction the tray 19 is divided at its middle by a partition 31. Two oppositely inclined discharge troughs 28 and 29 are used, separated from each other by the partition 80, which is in alinement with the partition 81. It will be seen now that the fine sand carried up by the blades 15, will be deposited in one portion of the tray 19 on one side of the partition 31 and from thence will pass into the trough 28 and be carried off in one direction, while the coarse and heavy sands will be carried upward by the blades 14, deposited in the other portion of the tray and will be washed down into the trough 29 and be thereby carried away.
IVhenever used to classify sands into two or more grades, it is necessary that the tray be divided into as many compartments as there are to be grades of sand; that there shall be as many troughs as there are compartments and that the drum itself shall be divided by the partitions 12 to the same number as the partitions 31, and that the blades between each of these partitions shall vary in size or height.
It is to be understood that the nozzles 26 are for the purpose of lightly washing the material carried up by the blades, and that the material is washed from the inner face of the drum and the blades by the sprays from the nozzles 24.
My invention is simple, of relatively cheap construction, is certain in its operation and will positively separate the slimes and sand and classify the latter as described.
The slime and solution overflow is on the opposite end from where the material is deposited upon its entrance into the machine and the operation of the machine is continuous, the classified material being continuously fed into the drum, continuously separated from the slime, raised and deposited into the tray.
Another advantage incident to my machine-is that it deposits the sand at a higher point than where the pulp enters the machine. In this it has a great advantage over other machines used for classifying, as it does away with the necessity of an elevator or sand pump, the drum itself elevating the material and depositing it where it may be easily carried away to any desired receptacle.
Vhile I have shown what I believe to be a practical form of my invention, and preferable for my purpose, I do not wish to be limited to this, as the construction can oba viously be modified in. many Ways without departing from my invention, and the details thereof be accordingly varied.
I have designed my mechanism for use as a classifier and separator of ore pulp, but I do not wish to be limited to this use, as the machine might be applied in the same manner to the separation of other materials.
While I have shown one of the compart ments of the drum provided with blades set closer together than in the other, and said blades higher than the blades in the adj acen-t compartment, I do not wish to be limited to this, it being suflicient if the first compartment has blades which will more thoroughly stir and agitate the materials therein, while the materials in the second compartment are less agitated. This may be secured by placing the blades in one compartment nearer together and higher than in the other compartment, as is shown, or, preferably, by merely making the blades of one compartment higher than the blades of the other. Hence, I do not wish to be limited in this particular, or to the relative amount of blade area in each compartment, whether this blade area be secured by making the blades of one com- 7 partment greater or less than the blades of the other, increasing the number of blades in one compartment over the other, or both.
Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is:
1. In an ore separator, the combination of a rotary drum, longitudinally-extending blades thereon forming material-carrying pockets shaped to deposit the material adj acent the top of the drum, a horizontal tray closed at its ends and mounted in the drum. to receive the material deposited by the blades, a liquid-discharging device directing jets against the blades when the point of deposit is reached, said tray being arranged to catch the said liquid together with the material from the blades, and a sloping discharge trough extending longitudinally of the tray under the same and connected at spaced points therewith for conducting away the material.
2. In an ore separator, a rotatable drum divided by annular partitions into a plurality of compartments, the inner surface of the drum in each compartment being provided with inwardly projecting blades, one of the compartments having a greater area of blade surface than the other, means for continuously discharging pulped material into one of said compartments, a tray supported in the upper portion of the drum, separate sets of washing nozzles located in the interior of the drum and adapted to wash the sides thereof at points above and below the tray, and means for continuously carrying off the materials deposited in the tray upon the rotation of the drum.
3. In an ore separator and classifier a rotatable drum, an annular partition dividing the drum into two communicating compartmcnts, the inner surface of the drum in each compartment being provided with inwardly projecting angular blades, one of said compartments having a greater extent of blade surface than the other, means for discharging pulped material into one of said compartments and for discharging liquid matter from the other of said compartments, a tray supported within the upper portion of the drum, said tray having a transverse partition in alinement with the annular partition dividing the drum, means for discharging the contents ofthe tray, and means for spraying the sides of the drum.
4. In an ore separator and classifier, a retatable drum, an annular partition dividing the said drum into two compartments and having an opening throughwhich the compartme-nts communicate, the inner surface of the drum in each of these compartments being provided with inwardly projecting angular blades, said blades being larger in one compartment than in the other, a trough extending into the drum and into that compartment thereof provided with the larger blades, means for continuously discharging liquid matter from the other of said compartments, a tray supported within the drum at the upper portion thereof, a discharge trough with which said tray is connected, and means for spraying the sides of the drum.
5. In an ore separator and classifier, a rotatable drum provided with annular end walls of'unequal heights, the lowest of said end walls being provided with an outwardly flaring month, an annular partition dividing the drum into two communicating compartments, one of the compartments discharging into the other, the inner surface of the drum in both compartments being provided with inwardly projecting angular blades, the blades in that compartment adj acent to the mouth being lower than the blades in the other compartment, means for discharging pulped material into the compartment having the highest blades, a tray mounted in the upper portion of the drum, a trough into which said tray discharges, and means for spraying the interior face of the drum.
6. In an ore separator and classifier, a rotatable drum having annular end walls, one greater in height than the other, said lowest end wall being provided with an outwardly flaring mouth adapted to empty into a slime boX or other receptacle, the interior of the drum being divided into a plurality of communicating compartments by annular partitions lower than either of the end walls, one compartment discharging into the other, the inner face of the drum in each of said compartments being provided with inwardly projecting angular blades, the blades of that compartment adjacent to the flaring mouth being less in height than the blades of the next adjacent compartment, a trough discharging into that compartment farthest from the said mouth, a fixed tray mounted in the upper portion of the drum divided into compartments corresponding to the compartments of the drum, means for continuously carrying 01f material deposited in said tray, and spraying nozzles supported in the interior of the drum and directed against the face thereof.
7. In an ore separator and classifier, a rotatable drum having end walls of unequal height, the lowest of said end walls being provided with an outwardly flaring mouth adapted to discharge into the slime box or other receptacle, a middle annular partition in said drum lower in height than the end walls and dividing the drum into two compartments, blades in each compartment projecting inward from the inner face of the drum, the blades of that compartment adj acent to the mouth being lower in height than the blades in the other compartment, a trough discharging into the compartment farthest away from said mouth, a tray fixedly mounted within the upper portion of the drum and divided by a middle partition corresponding to the annular partition in the drum, troughs opposed in inclination, supported beneath the tray, one compartment of the tray having discharge pipes leading to one of said troughs, the other hav ing discharge pipes leading to the other of said troughs, a liquid supply pipe entering the drum below the tray and provided with a series of upwardly and laterally projecting nozzles, and a liquid supply pipe entering the drum above the tray and provided with a series of projecting nozzles.
8. I11 a separator and classifier, a drum having end walls of unequal height, the lowest of said end walls being formed with a discharge mouth, the interior of the drum being divided into a series of compartments, each of said compartments being divided from the other by an annular partition of less height than the end walls of the drum, the inner surface of the drum in each compartment being provided with outstanding blades, the blades of one compartment differing from the blades in the adjacent compartment as to height, and a trough arranged in the upper portion of the drum likewise divided into compartments to correspond with the compartment of the drum, each tray compartment having a separate discharge means.
9. In a separator of the class described,
a rotatable liquid-containing casing having an overflow opening at one end and divided into communicating compartments formed with dams between them whereby one compartment overflows into another, means for discharging material into the compartment most remote from' the overflow opening, spaced lnternal longitudlnal blades in each compartment rotatable with the casing for taking up the heaviest particles of the material therein while the lighter particles are carried with the overflow into the adjacent compartment, the blades in the compartment into which is discharged the material 7 to be separated being arranged nearer together than the blades in the other compartment or compartments, and separate means for each compartment arranged to conduct the separated material out of the casing.
10. A rotary drum having a slime opening at one end, agitating blades mounted in the drum, a sand-discharging trough mounted in the drum and extending out of the opening, a tray carried by the trough and arranged to receive the material discharged by the blades, means through which the material passes from the tray to the trough, and a material supply conduit leading into the casing and discharging into the drum adjacent one end thereof.
11. In a separator, the combination of a rotary drum, a plurality of sets of material carrying blades therein, a plurality of sanddischarging conduits mounted in the casing and leading out of the same, a tray carried by the conduits and located above the same,
and means for discharging the separated sands from the tray to the several discharge conduits.
12. In an ore separator, the combination of a rotary drum having an outlet and divided into a plurality of communicating compartments through which liquid flows from one end of the drum to the other, material-discharging means arranged to deliver in the end opposite from the outlet of the drum, a plurality of discharge conduits arranged to receive the material separated in the different compartments, a tray located above the conduits and divided into a plurality of compartments corresponding in number with the drum compartments, and a plurality of connecting discharge pipes between the tray compartments and the discharge conduits.
In testimony whereof I afliX my signature in presence of two witnesses.
EDMUND MAJOR.
lVitnesses:
A. E. RICHARDS, IV. A. ROWE.
US47077409A 1909-01-05 1909-01-05 Separator and classifier. Expired - Lifetime US973363A (en)

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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2983378A (en) * 1958-12-12 1961-05-09 Worthington Corp Aggregate separating unit
US3042208A (en) * 1961-01-31 1962-07-03 John B Holmes Combined washer, separator and grader for loose materials
US3246755A (en) * 1962-05-07 1966-04-19 John B Holmes Apparatus for washing, grading and dewatering loose material
US20060266676A1 (en) * 2005-05-26 2006-11-30 Bossen Paul W Rotary Aggregate Washing and Classification System

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2983378A (en) * 1958-12-12 1961-05-09 Worthington Corp Aggregate separating unit
US3042208A (en) * 1961-01-31 1962-07-03 John B Holmes Combined washer, separator and grader for loose materials
US3246755A (en) * 1962-05-07 1966-04-19 John B Holmes Apparatus for washing, grading and dewatering loose material
US20060266676A1 (en) * 2005-05-26 2006-11-30 Bossen Paul W Rotary Aggregate Washing and Classification System
US8381916B2 (en) 2005-05-26 2013-02-26 Paul W. Bossen Rotary aggregate washing and classification system

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