US971858A - Apparatus for manufacturing gas. - Google Patents

Apparatus for manufacturing gas. Download PDF

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US971858A
US971858A US29912706A US1906299127A US971858A US 971858 A US971858 A US 971858A US 29912706 A US29912706 A US 29912706A US 1906299127 A US1906299127 A US 1906299127A US 971858 A US971858 A US 971858A
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gas
fuel
pipe
air
generator
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Burdett Loomis
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LOOMIS UTILIZATION Co
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LOOMIS UTILIZATION Co
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    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C10PETROLEUM, GAS OR COKE INDUSTRIES; TECHNICAL GASES CONTAINING CARBON MONOXIDE; FUELS; LUBRICANTS; PEAT
    • C10JPRODUCTION OF PRODUCER GAS, WATER-GAS, SYNTHESIS GAS FROM SOLID CARBONACEOUS MATERIAL, OR MIXTURES CONTAINING THESE GASES; CARBURETTING AIR OR OTHER GASES
    • C10J3/00Production of combustible gases containing carbon monoxide from solid carbonaceous fuels

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  • This invention relates to apparatus for manufacturing producer-gas, or water-gas, or a mixture of such gases, suitable for mo tive power and heating purposes.
  • the object of my invention is to provide a two-chambered generator of simple construction, connected at the top and having convenient means for admitting hot air at the top, also admitting steam at the bottom and passing it up and down, or in opposite directions through the chambers, and for taking off gas from the bottom of either chamber; and particularly adapted for making gas from lignite, peat, garbage, shavings, sawdust, wood and other poor waste material.
  • the apparatus may be operated in various ways for making the particular quality of gas desired.
  • FIG. 1 represents a top plan view.
  • Fig. 2 represents an elevation of the apparatus.
  • Fig. 3 represents a vertical section of the generator, partly in elevation, as viewed from the side opposite to that shown in Fig. 2.
  • Fig. 4; represents a vertical section taken on line 4: 1;, Fig. 1, showing part of one chamber and its discharge neck.
  • Fig. 5 represents a sectional elevation of a modification of the generator and driers.
  • the generator A is preferably constructed of elliptical or oblong shape in cross section as shown in Fig. 1, with the usual iron shell and brick lining as shown in Fig. 3.
  • a transverse partition C which is preferably made with two iron jackets forming between them an air space, each jacket having a brick lining as shown in Fig. 3.
  • This partition extends a little over one-half the height of the furnace, and may extend two-thirds or threefourths of the height of the furnace, forming the two lower fuel chambers 13 and B which are preferably made circular in cross section, as indicated by dotted lines in Fig. 1.
  • these chambers B and B are provided with outwardly extending necks Z) and Z) as shown in Figs. 1 and 4.
  • the brick linings of these necks are curved downward and outward as indicated by c, to facilitate the discharge of ashes and cinders when it is desired to clean the fires.
  • the necks, or horizontal extension chambers 71, b are of sufficient length horizontally to permit the contained fuel to rest at the angle of repose, as indicated by the dotted line i in Fig. 4, without running out of the opening at, when the door is open.
  • These necks are, for convenience, prefeaibly constructed at an angle to the long horizontal axis of the furnace, as shown in Fig. 1, although .my invention is not limited to this particular arrangement. With the construction shown,
  • the apparatus is more compact and will require fewer joints and elbows in the connecting pipes leading to the scrubber.
  • the generator A is, preferably, provided with a central fuel opening :0, having the usual door frame provided with a door or lid (1.
  • the chambers B and B are each provided near their lower ends, with an opening 0], closed by a door a as shown in Fig. 3.
  • the outer ends of the necks Z), Z) are provided with openings :0, door frames and tight fitting doors a and a, as shown in Fig. 1.
  • the lower ends of tle fuel chambers may each be provided with the grate c, as shown in Fig. 3, but for most purposes I propose to operate the generator without a grate, and as shown in Fig. 4.
  • each neck With the top of each neck is connected a gas outlet pipe F, having a downwardly projecting pipe D, which extends down nearly to the bottom or floor of the neck as shown in Fig. 4.
  • the gas pipe F is provided with a valve 7', and connects with the air heater G.
  • the pipe D connects with pipe F by a T- conpling and is provided with a water acket (Z to protect it from injury by heat. ith this jacket connect inlet and outlet water pipes 2' and 7".
  • the gas pipe F and its valve f are the same in construction as pipe F and valve f and connect with the neck 6 and heater G in the same manner.
  • Steam supply pipes S and S having valves 3 and 5 may connect with the pipes D as shown in Fig. 2.
  • a steam supply pipe S having a valve 5-" may connect with the door frame of the top opening cc as shown in Figs. 1 and 3.
  • the downwardly extended pipe D is arranged with its opening near the bottom of the extension or necks Z) and L for compelling the gases to pass down through the whole body of fuel, or for compelling the inflowing steam to pass into the bottom of the body of fuel.
  • the tubular air heater G is constructed with upper and lower tube sheets g, g, connected by tubes g and providing upper and lower gas chambers g, g, as shown in Fig. 2.
  • a gas outlet pipe F leads from the upper gas chamber down to the rotary exhauster K which is provided with a discharge pipe 70.
  • the inlet gas pipes F, F connect with the lower gas chamber 9.
  • the tube chamber may be provided on op positc sides with baffle plates 9', as indicated by dotted lines, to compel the cold air to travel back and forth and thus brought into more intimate contact with the whole heating surface of the tubes.
  • An air outlet pipe E connects with the upper part of the tube chamber, just below the upper tube sheet, and leads to the upper fuel opening a at the top of the generator.
  • This pipe is provided with a controlling valve 6 and with a branch pipe E having a valve 0.
  • a short vertical pipe FF projects from pipe E centrally up through the bottom of the drier H and is therein provided with a conical hood 6, providing an annular exit opening for hot air, as shown in Fig. 3.
  • the drier H for moist fuel material may be made of iron, in cylindrical form, and mounted on, or adjacent to, the top of the generator, as shown in Fig. 3, and have an open top 72 and lower discharge doors it.
  • An inclined chute 71 is placed between one of the doors 71. and the fuel supply opening A fan, or a Root blower, L, Fig. 1, is placed adjacent to the heater G and takes in air through the inlet m and discharges it through the outlet Z which connects with the lower end of the tube chamber in the heater G.
  • the heater G may be of any desired kind and shape.
  • each of the chambers B, B being constructed in a separate shell with an iron casing, and connected at the top by a large flue or pipe C which may have a valve 0.
  • Each chamber is provided with a fuel supply neck or opening a, provided with the usual lid and with each of said necks there will connect a hot air supply pipe E
  • a drier H or H is mounted upon, or adjacent to, the top of each generating chamber and may be constructed as shown in Fig. 3.
  • the chamber H however, may be constructed with opposite inclined shelves j for facilitating the feeding and drying of fine moist material, such as sawdust, some kinds of garbage or other moist material.
  • each shelf j may be provided in the shell an opening and door it for inserting a tool to push downward the material.
  • the upper openings of the driers H and H may be provided with close fitting doors and near the top of each there may be connected a stack pipe J J for carrying off the moist air and vapors. Hot air pipes will connect, as shown, with the base of each drier.
  • fires will be kindled in both the fuel chambers, and at first allowed to burn by pipe i natural draft-the top lid (1. being open for escape of productstill both bodies of fuel are well ignited, then peat, or lignite, or bituminous coal, or any other desired kind of fuel is fed in through the opening a: so as to fill the generator some distance above the partition C.
  • the valves fand j" being open, the exhauster may be started, drawing air through opening a: down into both bodies of fuel, where combustion takes place, forming producer-gas, containing earbon-monoxid, carbon dioxid and hydrogen.
  • Some watervapor will be set free from the upper layer of fuel, especially when peat or other moist fuel is used.
  • the mixed gases and vapor pass down through the incandescent fuel, where the carbon dioxid is converted into carbon monoxid and where *ater-vapor and hydrocarbon vapors are decomposed and converted into fixed gas.
  • This perfected producer-gas is passed off from the base of both chambers through the outlet pipes into the base of heater G where it is cooled and imparts heat to the air circulated around the tubes g, and then passed through a scrubher or is drawn ofi directly by the exhauster K and delivered to :1V holder or directly to a furnace, or a gas engine.
  • the air-blower L is put in motion, forcing air through the tube chamber of heater G, where it is highly heated, and thence through pipe E into the top of the generator, and pipes E E into the bottom of the drier H.
  • the hot air blast passes up through the moist material and drives off from twenty-five to fifty per cent. of the contained water, and leaving, preferably, about twenty per cent. of water in the material. This twenty per cent. of water will, when decomposed in contact with incandescent carbon in the generator, yield the desired per cent. of hydrogen when making producer gas.
  • the air, carrying watervapor, will escape up the stack J. Under some circumstances the top of the drier may be left open. As the material becomes sufficiently dried it is drawn out through one of the doors h and fed directly into the generator.
  • valve f may be closed, while valve f remains open, and a regulated. supply of steam may be admitted through pipe S into the base of chamber B for decomposition in contact with the incandescent fuel therein.
  • the direction of the flow of gas may be reversed by closing valve f and opening valve f, thereby taking gas off from the base of chamber B, and delivering it into the air-heater.
  • the body of fuel in chamber B having been highly heated, steam may then be admitted into the base of the chamber B and decomposed and the resulting gas passed down through the body of incandescent fuel in chamber B where carbonic acid will be converted into carbon monoxid, and vapor will be converted into fixed combustible
  • the body of fuel in chamber B may be separately heated to incandescence and afterward used as the decomposing and fixing chamber by reversing the valves.
  • steam may be admitted through the upper pipe S and passed with hotair and gases down through either one of the fuel chambers for increasing the percentage of hydrogen gas.
  • the Water vapor from the fuel such as peat, lignite, shavings, sawdust, garbage or wood, will be decomposed to form carbon monoxid and hydrogen.
  • the air and steam may be shut off and one of the gas outlet valves, as 7 may be closed, and the door a opened for cleaning out ashes. I may at this time keep the exhauster running for the reason that any air that is admitted through the open door will simply be drawn up through one bed of fuel and the resulting gases drawn down through the other bed of fuel without material detriment to the quality of gas being generated.
  • both of the valves 7 and f may be opened and gas be drawn down through both chambers of the generator and thence off through the tubular heater.
  • the twenty per cent. of water in the fuel material will be decomposed into hydrogen and carbon monoxid, and the latter will be supplemented by carbon monoxid made by oxygen of the air combining with carbon of the fuel.
  • the modified form of generator shown in Fig. 5 may be operated substantially as above described with reference to Figs. 1 to 4-, generating the same kinds of gas.
  • the apparatus is very simple to operate and can be managed by unskilled laborers.
  • An upright gas-generator having a lower horizontal extension or neck provided with a pipe extending through the top down to near the bottom and having a steam-inlet pipe and a gas-outlet pipe connecting with it, substantially as described.
  • An upright gas-generator having a lower horizontal extension or neck, a water jacket pipe extending down to near the bottom, a valved steam supply pipe and a valved gas outlet pipe connecting with said downwardly extending pipe, substantially as described.
  • a gas generator constructed with a partition rising from the base thereof and forming two fuel chambers in the base, each of which is provided with a curved, outwardly sloping lower end and with a horizontal extension chamber, provided with an outer door and with a downwardly extending pipe with which are connected a valved steam inlet and a valved gas outlet, substantially as described.
  • a gas generator constructed with two lower fuel chambers, connecting at the top and being curved downward and outward at their lower ends and having horizontal extension chambers provided with doors at their outer ends, downwardly extending pipes for admitting steam and for taking oil? gas, connecting with said extension chambers, substantially as described.

Description

B. LOOMIS.
APPARATUS FOR MANUFAOTURING GAS.
APPLIOATION I'ILBD I'EB.2, 1906.
Patented Oct. 4, 1910.-
4 SHEETS- 81311131 l.
B. LOOMIS.
APPARATUS FOR MANUFACTURING GAS.
APPLICATION FILED FBB.2, 1906.
Patented 0ct.4,1910.
4 SHEETS-SHEET 2.
LOOMIS. APPARATUS FOR MANUFACTURING GAS.
APPLICATION FILED I'EB.Z, 1906. I 971, 5 Patented 0011.4,1910.
4 BHBETS SHEET 3.
B. LOOMIS.
APPARATUS FOR MANUFACTURING GAS.
- APPLICATION FILED IEB.2, 190a.
Patented Oct. 4, 1910.
4 SHEETS-SHEET 4.
TINTE @AE ran FFT.
BURDETT LOOMIS, 0F HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT, ASSIGNOR '10 LOOIVIIS UTILIZATION COMPANY, A CORPORATION OF NEW JERSEY.
APPARATUS FOR MANUFACTURING GAS.
stress.
Application filed February 2, 1906.
Specification of Letters Patent.
To all whom it may concern:
Be it known that I, Bonnnrr LOOMIS, a citizen of the United States, residing at Hartford, in the county of Hartford and State of Connecticut, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Apparatus for Manufacturing Gas, of which the following is a specification.
This invention relates to apparatus for manufacturing producer-gas, or water-gas, or a mixture of such gases, suitable for mo tive power and heating purposes.
The object of my invention is to provide a two-chambered generator of simple construction, connected at the top and having convenient means for admitting hot air at the top, also admitting steam at the bottom and passing it up and down, or in opposite directions through the chambers, and for taking off gas from the bottom of either chamber; and particularly adapted for making gas from lignite, peat, garbage, shavings, sawdust, wood and other poor waste material.
I have found that in generating gas from peat, lignite, and other material above mentioned, in furnaces of the ordinary construct-ion, such fuel, when ignited will give much trouble by running out of the lower openings when the doors are opened for cleaning out ashes and regulating the tires, and for overcoming this difliculty I provide the lower ends of the connected chambers with extended necks and connect them with downwardly extending pipes which serve for admitting steam and taking off gas.
In practice I find it advantageous to dry out the excess of moisture from peat, garbage, sawdust, and other waste material, so as to remove all but about twenty per cent. of water before admission to the generator, by means of hot air, which is heated by hot gases passed off from the gene 'ator. The twenty per cent. of water remaining in the material will be sufiicient to yield, by decomposition, the desired per cent. of hydrogen in the gaseous product. I also find it advantageous to admit hot air heated as aboveto the top of the generator and draw it down through the fuel material into the zone of incandescent charcoal or coke, near the base, where decomposition and complete gasification are effected. The hot air thus introduced carries down the water and bydrocarbon vapors from the fresh upper layers of material, into the incandescent zone where decomposition is effected, and greatly aids in the economical production of gas at a minimum expense.
The apparatus may be operated in various ways for making the particular quality of gas desired.
The matter constituting my invention will be set forth in the claims.
I will now describe the details of con struction of my apparatus by reference to the accompanying drawings in which Figure 1 represents a top plan view. Fig. 2 represents an elevation of the apparatus. Fig. 3 represents a vertical section of the generator, partly in elevation, as viewed from the side opposite to that shown in Fig. 2. Fig. 4; represents a vertical section taken on line 4: 1;, Fig. 1, showing part of one chamber and its discharge neck. Fig. 5 represents a sectional elevation of a modification of the generator and driers.
The generator A is preferably constructed of elliptical or oblong shape in cross section as shown in Fig. 1, with the usual iron shell and brick lining as shown in Fig. 3. At the base is provided, centrally, a transverse partition C which is preferably made with two iron jackets forming between them an air space, each jacket having a brick lining as shown in Fig. 3. This partition extends a little over one-half the height of the furnace, and may extend two-thirds or threefourths of the height of the furnace, forming the two lower fuel chambers 13 and B which are preferably made circular in cross section, as indicated by dotted lines in Fig. 1. At the lower ends these chambers B and B are provided with outwardly extending necks Z) and Z) as shown in Figs. 1 and 4. The brick linings of these necks are curved downward and outward as indicated by c, to facilitate the discharge of ashes and cinders when it is desired to clean the fires. The necks, or horizontal extension chambers 71, b are of sufficient length horizontally to permit the contained fuel to rest at the angle of repose, as indicated by the dotted line i in Fig. 4, without running out of the opening at, when the door is open. These necks are, for convenience, prefeaibly constructed at an angle to the long horizontal axis of the furnace, as shown in Fig. 1, although .my invention is not limited to this particular arrangement. With the construction shown,
the apparatus is more compact and will require fewer joints and elbows in the connecting pipes leading to the scrubber.
At the top, the generator A is, preferably, provided with a central fuel opening :0, having the usual door frame provided with a door or lid (1. By means of this single opening both of the chambers B and B can be supplied with fuel from the drying chamber or other supply. The chambers B and B are each provided near their lower ends, with an opening 0], closed by a door a as shown in Fig. 3. The outer ends of the necks Z), Z) are provided with openings :0, door frames and tight fitting doors a and a, as shown in Fig. 1. The lower ends of tle fuel chambers may each be provided with the grate c, as shown in Fig. 3, but for most purposes I propose to operate the generator without a grate, and as shown in Fig. 4.
With the top of each neck is connected a gas outlet pipe F, having a downwardly projecting pipe D, which extends down nearly to the bottom or floor of the neck as shown in Fig. 4. The gas pipe F is provided with a valve 7', and connects with the air heater G. The pipe D connects with pipe F by a T- conpling and is provided with a water acket (Z to protect it from injury by heat. ith this jacket connect inlet and outlet water pipes 2' and 7". The gas pipe F and its valve f are the same in construction as pipe F and valve f and connect with the neck 6 and heater G in the same manner.
Steam supply pipes S and S having valves 3 and 5 may connect with the pipes D as shown in Fig. 2. A steam supply pipe S having a valve 5-" may connect with the door frame of the top opening cc as shown in Figs. 1 and 3.
The downwardly extended pipe D is arranged with its opening near the bottom of the extension or necks Z) and L for compelling the gases to pass down through the whole body of fuel, or for compelling the inflowing steam to pass into the bottom of the body of fuel.
As a modification I provide the pipes D extending up through the base of the fuel chambers and provided with hoods d as shown in Fig. 3. These pipes D may serve for admitting air, or air and steam, and for taking off the gas.
' The tubular air heater G is constructed with upper and lower tube sheets g, g, connected by tubes g and providing upper and lower gas chambers g, g, as shown in Fig. 2. A gas outlet pipe F leads from the upper gas chamber down to the rotary exhauster K which is provided with a discharge pipe 70. The inlet gas pipes F, F connect with the lower gas chamber 9. The tube chamber may be provided on op positc sides with baffle plates 9', as indicated by dotted lines, to compel the cold air to travel back and forth and thus brought into more intimate contact with the whole heating surface of the tubes. An air outlet pipe E connects with the upper part of the tube chamber, just below the upper tube sheet, and leads to the upper fuel opening a at the top of the generator. This pipe is provided with a controlling valve 6 and with a branch pipe E having a valve 0. A short vertical pipe FF projects from pipe E centrally up through the bottom of the drier H and is therein provided with a conical hood 6, providing an annular exit opening for hot air, as shown in Fig. 3.
The drier H for moist fuel material, may be made of iron, in cylindrical form, and mounted on, or adjacent to, the top of the generator, as shown in Fig. 3, and have an open top 72 and lower discharge doors it. An inclined chute 71 is placed between one of the doors 71. and the fuel supply opening A fan, or a Root blower, L, Fig. 1, is placed adjacent to the heater G and takes in air through the inlet m and discharges it through the outlet Z which connects with the lower end of the tube chamber in the heater G.
The heater G may be of any desired kind and shape.
In Fig. 5 I have shown the generator of a modified construction, each of the chambers B, B being constructed in a separate shell with an iron casing, and connected at the top by a large flue or pipe C which may have a valve 0. Each chamber is provided with a fuel supply neck or opening a, provided with the usual lid and with each of said necks there will connect a hot air supply pipe E A drier H or H is mounted upon, or adjacent to, the top of each generating chamber and may be constructed as shown in Fig. 3. The chamber H however, may be constructed with opposite inclined shelves j for facilitating the feeding and drying of fine moist material, such as sawdust, some kinds of garbage or other moist material.
Above each shelf j may be provided in the shell an opening and door it for inserting a tool to push downward the material. The upper openings of the driers H and H may be provided with close fitting doors and near the top of each there may be connected a stack pipe J J for carrying off the moist air and vapors. Hot air pipes will connect, as shown, with the base of each drier. With this construction itwill be evident that each of the generating chambers B, B may be operated separately, if desired, for making gas.
In operating the apparatus shown in Figs. 1 to a, fires will be kindled in both the fuel chambers, and at first allowed to burn by pipe i natural draft-the top lid (1. being open for escape of productstill both bodies of fuel are well ignited, then peat, or lignite, or bituminous coal, or any other desired kind of fuel is fed in through the opening a: so as to fill the generator some distance above the partition C. The valves fand j" being open, the exhauster may be started, drawing air through opening a: down into both bodies of fuel, where combustion takes place, forming producer-gas, containing earbon-monoxid, carbon dioxid and hydrogen. Some watervapor will be set free from the upper layer of fuel, especially when peat or other moist fuel is used. The mixed gases and vapor pass down through the incandescent fuel, where the carbon dioxid is converted into carbon monoxid and where *ater-vapor and hydrocarbon vapors are decomposed and converted into fixed gas. This perfected producer-gas is passed off from the base of both chambers through the outlet pipes into the base of heater G where it is cooled and imparts heat to the air circulated around the tubes g, and then passed through a scrubher or is drawn ofi directly by the exhauster K and delivered to :1V holder or directly to a furnace, or a gas engine.
The manufacture of gas having been started and the drier H supplied with moist material, the air-blower L is put in motion, forcing air through the tube chamber of heater G, where it is highly heated, and thence through pipe E into the top of the generator, and pipes E E into the bottom of the drier H. The hot air blast passes up through the moist material and drives off from twenty-five to fifty per cent. of the contained water, and leaving, preferably, about twenty per cent. of water in the material. This twenty per cent. of water will, when decomposed in contact with incandescent carbon in the generator, yield the desired per cent. of hydrogen when making producer gas. The air, carrying watervapor, will escape up the stack J. Under some circumstances the top of the drier may be left open. As the material becomes sufficiently dried it is drawn out through one of the doors h and fed directly into the generator.
At the same time that air is admitted by C into the generator, valve f may be closed, while valve f remains open, and a regulated. supply of steam may be admitted through pipe S into the base of chamber B for decomposition in contact with the incandescent fuel therein.
At any suitable time in the operation of the generator the direction of the flow of gas may be reversed by closing valve f and opening valve f, thereby taking gas off from the base of chamber B, and delivering it into the air-heater.
Should it be desired to periodically heat up one of the bodies of fuel to incandescenccfor use in decomposing steam or vapor and fixing gases, then steam is shut off from the base of both chambers and one of the valves, as f, is closed and valve 7" is opened. Air is now admitted through pipe E at the top, and the exhauster being in operation, will dra air down into the chamber B thereby causing active combustion of the fuel therein. The resulting gas will be drawn off through pipe F the air heater, and delivered by the exhauster into a holder or any desired place of use; it may be passed through a separate body of fuel which has been previously heated to incandescence. The body of fuel in chamber B having been highly heated, steam may then be admitted into the base of the chamber B and decomposed and the resulting gas passed down through the body of incandescent fuel in chamber B where carbonic acid will be converted into carbon monoxid, and vapor will be converted into fixed combustible In a similar manner the body of fuel in chamber B may be separately heated to incandescence and afterward used as the decomposing and fixing chamber by reversing the valves. At any desired time steam may be admitted through the upper pipe S and passed with hotair and gases down through either one of the fuel chambers for increasing the percentage of hydrogen gas. It is to be understood also, that the Water vapor from the fuel, such as peat, lignite, shavings, sawdust, garbage or wood, will be decomposed to form carbon monoxid and hydrogen.
lVhenever desired the air and steam may be shut off and one of the gas outlet valves, as 7 may be closed, and the door a opened for cleaning out ashes. I may at this time keep the exhauster running for the reason that any air that is admitted through the open door will simply be drawn up through one bed of fuel and the resulting gases drawn down through the other bed of fuel without material detriment to the quality of gas being generated.
\Vith the exhauster K in ope ation and the blower L forcing air into the top of the generator, both of the valves 7 and f may be opened and gas be drawn down through both chambers of the generator and thence off through the tubular heater. In this operation the twenty per cent. of water in the fuel material will be decomposed into hydrogen and carbon monoxid, and the latter will be supplemented by carbon monoxid made by oxygen of the air combining with carbon of the fuel.
The modified form of generator shown in Fig. 5 may be operated substantially as above described with reference to Figs. 1 to 4-, generating the same kinds of gas.
By means of this apparatus all carbonic acid and vapor are converted into fixed combustible gas which is perfectly adapted for motive power in gas engines and for various heating purposes.
The apparatus is very simple to operate and can be managed by unskilled laborers.
Having described my invention, what I claim, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is
1. An upright gas-generator having a lower horizontal extension or neck provided with a pipe extending through the top down to near the bottom and having a steam-inlet pipe and a gas-outlet pipe connecting with it, substantially as described.
2. An upright gas-generator having a lower horizontal extension or neck, a water jacket pipe extending down to near the bottom, a valved steam supply pipe and a valved gas outlet pipe connecting with said downwardly extending pipe, substantially as described.
3. A gas generator constructed with a partition rising from the base thereof and forming two fuel chambers in the base, each of which is provided with a curved, outwardly sloping lower end and with a horizontal extension chamber, provided with an outer door and with a downwardly extending pipe with which are connected a valved steam inlet and a valved gas outlet, substantially as described.
4. A gas generator constructed with two lower fuel chambers, connecting at the top and being curved downward and outward at their lower ends and having horizontal extension chambers provided with doors at their outer ends, downwardly extending pipes for admitting steam and for taking oil? gas, connecting with said extension chambers, substantially as described.
5. The combination with two fuel chambers, connecting at the top and having outwardly curved lower ends and horizontal extension chambers provided with doors and gas take-off pipes, of an air heater with which said gas pipes connect, an air blower and pipe connecting with said heater, and a pipe for hot air connecting the heater with the top of the generator, substantially as described.
In testimony whereof I aflix my signature in presence of two witnesses.
BURDETT LOOMIS.
Vitnesses HARRISON B. FREEMAN, J r., G. L. Loouls.
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