US968166A - Internal-combustion engine. - Google Patents

Internal-combustion engine. Download PDF

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US968166A
US968166A US1904201447A US968166A US 968166 A US968166 A US 968166A US 1904201447 A US1904201447 A US 1904201447A US 968166 A US968166 A US 968166A
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cylinder
piston
port
exhaust
fixed
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Charles Y Knight
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Lyman Bernard Kilbourne
Charles Y Knight
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02BINTERNAL-COMBUSTION PISTON ENGINES; COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL
    • F02B1/00Engines characterised by fuel-air mixture compression
    • F02B1/02Engines characterised by fuel-air mixture compression with positive ignition
    • F02B1/04Engines characterised by fuel-air mixture compression with positive ignition with fuel-air mixture admission into cylinder

Description

0. Y. KNIGHT.

INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE. APPLICATION FILED APR. 4, 1904' 968,1 66. Patented Aug.23, 1910.

5 SHEETS-SHBET 1.

0. Y. KNIGHT.

INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE.

APPLIOATION FILED APR.4,1904.

968,165, Patented Aug. 23, 1910 5 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

0. Y. KNIGHT. INTERNAL COMBUSTION B NGINE.

APPLIOATION FILED APR. 4.1904.

Patented Aug. 23, 1910.

6 SHEETS-SHEET 3.

C. Y. KNIGIIT.

INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE.

APPLICATION FILED APR.4.19Q4.

968, 1 66. Patented Aug. 23. 1910 5 SHEETS8HEET 4.

[mummmmmmnmlmumk c. Y. KNIGHT. INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE.

APPLICATION FILED APR 4. 1904. 968,, 1 66; Patented Aug. 23, 1910.

6 SHEETSSHBBT 5.

; .a,citizen of the United States;

i in HOF: o ,v V ]BENARQ,KILBOIIRNE, OFfCHICAGO, ILLINOIS.

To all who-1n it concern: 7 -,B e it known that I, CnauLns Y. KNIGHT, residing at Qak--Parlc ,,in the-county of Cook and State ,;t1on,;llngines, of which the f llll,. Cl G: Il',-:lnd exact specification.

lily gmvention, relates to internal combusioertains other objects which will appear are attained, an example of which of lllinoisj, have invented certain new and n seful; Improyements 1n Internal-Combusfollowing is 21 tion engines and it-has for its primary ob- .ect :to,prov1de ailmproved form of such engme in which the moving parts for coniti'olling the fluid contents space during the -the piston shall 1 be positively acting and-the of the explosion high pressure strokes of use of puppet val-res orthe like for such pgntpo e avoided. I 1l.l l these ends in view, the invention consists lllficcl'ttllil features of novelty in ;the-const1:nct ion, coinbii'l'ation and arrangeanentwf-.:parts by which the said-object and hereinafter invention .will' now be described with referf .ence .to: theaccompanying drawings, the

intention. being more particularly pointed .outjnithe claims. 1 v

esailil the: said drawings-Figure 1 is a vertical sectionalw'iew of an engine or motor embodying this invent-ion. Fig. 2 is a. simila'r section taken on a plane at right angles to that of Fig.1. Fig. 3 is a side elevation thereof partly broken away and partly' sec t-iox1edQ-Fig. 4 is a plan view: Fig. 5 is a 'plansection on the line 5-5, Fig. 1 Fi ti is -a 'section'taken through the base longitudinally of thecrank suit. and Fig. 7 is ancnlargcddetail plan section taken ap proximately on the line.7-7, Fig. 1.

In carrying out my invention, I employ teleseoped or concentric cylinders or cylindrical. elements, the outeryone of which is fixed-,while the inner one moves or recipro-' 'catesf with relation thereto. Concentric with the: explosion to the piston, the explosion space andpiston being surrounded by the said movable element. and with relation to which the piston rcciproeates ooaxially and is, connected therewith for imparting moyement thereto relatively to the fixed cyhn AK geek, .anLxuoxs, sn'ssrezuon or as to draw in,

means, with crank 5 frnnronn on. .4

oNE-EALF TO LYMAN f 'mrnnuAn-ooiunus' rxon nitcrnn.

V Specification of Letters-Patent. Application filed a n}, 904. Serial No. 201,44t.

Patented Aug. 23,1910;

' der and to the said third cyliiidrical eleinenti The fixed cylinder has ports which at times communicate with the explosion space, and at other t mes are cut oil therefrom by portcontrolling provisions, or means-external to the explosion space. and reciprocating cylindcr but moving in concert with the latter in cooperative relation to the inner face of the v fixed cylinder. I will describe in detail the example of my invention shown in the drawin s embodying these principles.

' he inner reciprocating elementis shown at 1, and it is in the form of an o en-ended barrel, and 14 is the fixed cylin ical element, while 2 is the third cylindrical eleinent which, in this example, is fixed against movement with the piston 3 by being rigidly secured to the fixed cylinder or cylindrical element 14 and projects into the'latter andis spaced from the walls thereof and also projects into the cylindrical element 1 in a position opposed to the piston 3, the element 2 in the example shown being inthe form of a head or extension on the fixed cylinder head and all of these parts being co-axial with the piston, in cylindrical element l situated in the anniilar space between the opposed faces of so with the reciprocatthe fixed cylinder and the head 2 and moves with relation to but in concert'with the piston for cotiperating with the head 2 to control the fluid contents of the explosion space during the compression and explosion strokes which are the high pressure strokes of the piston and while the element 1 moves con temporaneously with the piston moves a shorter distance and undergoes a less number of strokes than the piston. The piston and the reciprocating element 1 are timed in their movements in accordance with the four-stroke cycle of an explosion motor so compress and explode the charge between and against the head 2 and the piston and then exhaust the spent gases from the explosion space; The piston 3 is connected by a pitman. 4, or other suitable of a crank shaft (5.

The air or other ingredients of the explosive charge may be admitted to the explosion or firing space within the element- 1 and between the head 2 and piston 3 through the wall of the outer cylinder H above described areso concri trolling also the ports of the fixed cylinder during the inspiration and exhaust strokes.

- A zone of the cylinder 1 or a portion of its wall area at or near the explosion end or end adjacent-tbs igniting means is apertured or provided with ports preferably on op'posite sides, one an intake port 11 and the other an exhaust port 12, and at a point belowor farther outward than the port 12 it is provided with a second exhaust port 13 ordinarily known as a terminal exhaust port,

which in this example of the invention is a the main exhaust port and which during the inspiration, compression and firing strokes is cut ofi by the piston 3 while they exhaust port 12 and intake port 11 are closed at the roper periods by-the wall of cylinder d the lower or inner end of the head 2 over which the cylinder 1 reciprocates in sliding contact for lapping its apertured zone or port areawith t e head 2. 'On cylinder 14'is formed anoutlet connection 15 for the exhaust port 12 and an intake connection 16 for the intake port 11, the con' nection 16 being arran ed considerably below the exhaust connectmn 15, and the inner end of the head 2 bein provided with an exhaust passage 18 su stantially opposite the exhaust ort or connection 15, so that .when the cylinder 1 descends to connect the intake 11 with the intake connection or port 16, the exhaust port 12 although being also below or uncovered b the head 2 at that time, is nevertheless c os'ed' at its outer end by cylinder 14. It is also seen that around" the cylinder 1 wherethe twoports' 11, 12

are situated, is disposed an annular element 19 through which said ports are formed and in which, on both sides of said ports, are situated suitable piston rings 20 which fit closely against the cylinder 14, thereby constituting port-controlling provisions or means external to or concentric with the explosion s ace and cylinder 1, coiiperating directly witthe inner face of fixed cylinder l t-and ui'oving in concert with cylinder 1 and the piston for cutting off communication with the explosion space throu h the exhaust port of the fixed cylinder dur rig the inspiration stroke, and through the intake port-durin the exhaust stroke (and by the expression external to as employed herein with reference to the port-controlling 50' provisions last referred to and the cylinder 1, I wish to be understood as meaning portcontrolling means disposed without and not within the cavity of said cylinder.) hen thelinspiration outward stroke is finished,

orabout finished, thecylinder 1 rises a suflicient distance to cover the inlet port 11, or to take itout of register with the fixed port 16, but does not risefar enough to bring the exhaust port '12 into register with exhaust passage 18 and exhaust port or outlet 15 until the charge thu's sucked into cylinder 1 has been compressed by the succeeding inward stroke of the piston and has been exploded, and the second inward stroke of the four-stroke cycle, that is, the exhaust stroke, is commenced.

Near the conclusion of the working or firing stroke, the )iston uncovers terminal exhaust port 13, allowing the major portion of the exhaust to escape, and subsequently the cylinder 1 moves to place the other exhaust port 12 into communication with fixed exhaust port 15 and passage 18 so that the return movement of the piston will force the remainin smoke and products of combustion out-through passage 18 and ports, 12, 15. If desired, this upward movement of the cylinder 1 may also be utilized for the whenth'e intake port 11 reaches said by-pass the air compressed in chamber 21 will pass around the upper partf'of the element 19 and enter the explosion chamber throu h a port or assage 23 formed in the hen 21 and pre erably turned downwardly at its .inner end so that the air current will descend .into the cylinder 1 on one side until it strikes the piston 3, which will cause it to ascend on the other side toward the outlet passage 18, thereby'crowding the remaining smoke through the exhaust port 15 and cleari out or example, one side of chameven the small percentage of the pro ucts of combustion that might have lingered in the explosion space above the limit of the travel of the piston 3. Chamber 21 is su'pplied with air when rylinder l descen again through a small inlet port 24 which is opened and closed bythc element 19.

The piston 3 being at or about the limit of its return or exhaust stroke, and starting, -.or about to start, downwardly on its inspira- -tion stroke, the cylinder 1 is again moved downwardly to bring the intake port 11 iiito register with the port or connection 16 and to close the ports or passages-15., 18, and the port 11 remains in register with the inlet cou'nectionbr port 16 until the inspiration.

stroke is comp eted, whereupon cylinder 1 again rises to close inlet port ll as before elements 1, 2, in which the movable intake jquently the ports of the exp port ll and exhaust port- 12 are formed at.

the explosion end thereof, during the compression and-explosiol'i strokes, thatis to? say, substantially throughout one revolution of the crank shaft notwithstanding the fact that the element 1 moves contemporaneously with thepiston-during such ieriod. (onselosion space are tightly closed duringv these two high pressurestrokes and possibility of leakage is reduced tothe nnnimnm. To this end the lower end of the head 2.in its cylindrical where it tovelsthe ports 11, 1 is proirit ed with a'l'iacking 2:) which may be continuous or sectional, as desired. The 'pressure being always outward it. is innnaterial 'hicl iway it is made. At suitable intervals 'al'iovefthe ports or passages 18, 23. the'head Q15 protddet with one or more packingrings 26 which prevent )ressure from escaping over"'the ,npper' end of cylinder 1 around which "the cylinder It s contracted, as shown at- 14; for the purpose of obtaining the desired compression in the air, chamber 2l' bytbe u )ward inovenient of the element 19; This element 19, however, as before mentioned, performs important functions in the'controlof the fixed intake and exhaust ports-15, 16 at times. when the expl'osion spacej within cylinder 1 is open, by reason of the ports 11, 12 thereof being outof lap with or uncovered by the port-controlling portion of the head 2, whiclroccurs when either of these two ports is below the head, and also when port 12 rises to the place where the head is cut away to form the passage 18, and. at which time port 11 in. register with port 'h'en ports 11, 12 are below the head, the element 15) intereepts communication between the exhaust port 15 and the explosion space via the ex- I haust port 12 of cvlinder 1. and when ports ll, 12 are in register withports 23, 18 1e spectively. said element It! prevents the fire from the explosion space reaching the intake port 16' via port 23 and also prevents the tire and burned gases from. passing around cylinder 1 in chamber 21 and enterin; the intake port 16, the piston rings :10 being a valuable auxiliary to the attainment of these desirable results, as well as making the element or annular piston l!) sutiic icntly tight to prt'nluce'the re uired air pressure n1 chamber 21.

The cylinder 1, if desired may be exposed throughout as much of its surface as possible; without leiivinglhe ports 11512 uncoveredjwhen at theliuiit of its downward stroketan'dtlie snrface. of cylinder 1 may be! ,1 "provided with-radiating ribs or has 24-, "adapted, lfdesn'ed, to pass upwardly into the outer cylinder H as cylinder 1 rises, and to become exposed to. the atmosphere when cylinder 1 descends, and by thus iibrating in the open air. cause the heatto radiate from'cylinder l more rapidly.

In order that-the main exhaust taking, place through the exhaust port 13 may be conducted away, an exhaust connection 28 may be employe .l.- This connection is provided with a valve eatQSl arranged close with the cooling of said cylinder, said connection and valve seat are formed on or secured to a r1ng'31 which surrounds cylinder 1 and is supported by standard 6, 7. 8, the

latter being-formed with shouh ers 32 upon whichthe ring 31 is held by nuts 33. These standards also pass through and are secured to ears It) on head 2, and thus serve as supports for cylinder 14. The base flange 9 is preferably formed with a guide collar 34 which receives and steadies the lower end of cylinder 1 and forms in effect a continuation of cylinder 14 and makes an appropriate connection between cylinder 1 and crank case 35, in which latter the crank shaft 5 is journaled in any suitable way. 7 The outer cylinder 14 of the engine thus described.corresponds to what is the usual fixed cylinder in an ordinary explosion engine, but for the sake of exposing the sides of the inner cylinder 1 to the cooling action of the tltlllOSPllQl'Q; the outer cylinder H is cut, away near its lower end and supported by the standards (3. 7, 8 instead of being continuous with its base portion 34.

The head 2, if desired. may be formed with a water space 36 which may be providcd with inlet and outlet connections 37. 3S, and the inner end of the head may-be made concave. as shown in Fig: l and 2. and through the upper end oi this concavity may be introduced a suitable igniter, here shown as a spark plug 39, whereby the explosive charge is ignited between the head and the piston. The head is formed with a recess 40 for receiving-this plug, and therecess is completely surrounded by the binder space 36 for keeping the plug cool.

A suitable mechanism for o 'ieratively connecting-the movable cylindrical element 1 with the piston 3 and imparting to said cyrod 41 preferably passes intothe crank case, i a and carries an eccentric strap 44 in which is gournaled an eccentric 45 secured to one en of a pitman 46 whose other end is' con- 15 nectedby a. wrist-pin 4:7 with a gear wheel 48 journaled on shaft 49 in the crank case and deriving motion from a pinion 50.0n the crank shaft 6, said gear and pinion being in the proportion oftwoto one since theengine -29 1s afour'cycle type. The connection between'the eccentric 45 and the pitman- 46 may be accomplished in any suitable wa Asqshownin' Fig. 7 it is effected by providing the pitman with two branches 51 secured Q ,to' the eccentricatone point by a transverse .bolt 52 and at another point'by a pivot pin 53-sothatthe of thepitman 46 will gljsolfrockitlk eccentr c inthe strap @Land wilhcausethe r0d 4=1 toris'e and fall since 9, the pivot-'53 is eccentricto the eccentric, and in fact is tlie-shift'of said eccentric,.but the ads of;this pivot or shaft 53 are rigidly secured in two slides 54, 55 and these are mounted upon two guide-ways 56, 57 respem ther at one 3i .tively, which i are connected to end bya cross-connection 58, an these guideways 56, 57 are provided with trunnions 59,

' 60, respectively, journaled in suitable standards 61*, 62* rising from the bottom of the ii! crank case 35, so that-asthemain gear wheel 48 revolves, the eccentric will be rocked on its pivot 53 and also pulled back and forth bodily along the guide-ways.56,57, while these ids-ways are also oscillated in a ver- 5, ti'cal, i-rection by two cranks 61, 62, on a, cran shaft 63 journaled in suitable bearing 64 iii the bottom of crank cash 35 and .con-

nected 'by pinion 65 to the gear wheel 48, pinion 65 being-of the same diameter as pin- ..ion 50. The cranks 61,62 are connected by links. 66, :67, respectively, with the guideways56f57 so as to oscillatesaid guide-ways with. un form pressure,

. -In Fi "1 of the drawingthepin'ions -50, 65 and .=t e gear wheel LB-have been marked with numbers oorres ondingwithsthe four quarters of a comp ete revolution of the crank shaft, the pmions which make one revolution .to one revolution of the crank shaftbeing numbered I to IV, and the gear wheel 48'which makes a half revolution to each complete revolution 0 the crank shaft is numbered throughout the first half I to IV and'throughont the second half with the same numbers, but each having-the exponent a?, so that the plain numbers on the gear represent the inspiration and compression strokes, and the numbers with the exponents, the firing and the exhaust strokes. I will now describe'the operation, having reference to these numbers.

Assumin the parts to be in the osition shown in i s. 1 and 2, which i1 ustrate thenrin the firing or working stroke, when the crank reaches the limit of the firing stroke the gear 48 will have turned me eighth of a turn, and the lower inion 65 a quarter turn all in the direction 0 the arrows placed thereon respectively, and the lower main exhaust 13 will be uncovered, letting 8Q out the bulk of the exhaust while the cylinder 1 will be moved upwardly only a trifling distance by the combined upward movements of the rod 46and the guide-ways 56,

57, thus allowing both upper ports 11 and 18 35 to remain closed, but during t enext quarter turn of the crank the guide-ways 56, 57 are, tilted upwardly to 'theopposite extreme of the position shown in Fig. 1, as is also the rod .46 which in addition tobeing tilted. is also pulled sharply to the left by passing through the next eighth of its travel, thus,

causing the slides which carry the eccentric 45 to ride up the steep incline of the guideways and thereby 0 en the upper enhapst or auxiliary port '12, t at is, bring it into register with ports 15, 18, short y after the piston starts its 'return or exhaust stroke; a a

c this upward movement of the cylinder 1 is occurring, air is being compressed in gen chamber 21, .as before described, and when. in-take passage 11 reaches by-pass122,,this compressed air rushes downwardly. int'q'fthe cylinder 1 through the passage 23 and cbolsand clears out the remaining prodn'ctso f 10a combustion. The wrist-pin 47 in moving from the point III to the point I-V pulls-the eccentric 45 farther outward along theguideway 56, 57 but the cylinder 1 is not thereby raised any appreciable extent because the '110 uide-way and in fact the were. also moves downwardwhile the eccentric is slightly raised; orrocked on its pivot 53 and these movements neutralize each other to theextent of holding the auxiliary exhaust pas- 116 sage practically stationary until the piston again starts down and the cranks 5- and 61 and the wrist-pin pass points IV in their revolution. The wrist 4:7 in traveling through the first half of its 'most ra id 'de- 120 scent from-IV to I and crank 61 o'ugh the latter half of its most rapid descent or from pointIV to point I, while the eccentric' 45 is at the outer end of its travel on the guide'56, 57, naturally causes the cylinder 1 to be pulled downwardly very rapidly anda great distance in a short space of time, closing the auxiliary exhaust passages 15, 18

and bringing the intake port 11 opposite the in t ke connection or port 16 -w ere it i e--- rhuw wm r mains until points II on the pinions and-II on the gear are or are about to be reached when the piston will be at or about. the limit of its inspiration stroke, but as the piston finishes its stroke and starts back the in-takc 16 is closed by the ascending movement of the cylinder 1 taking, place ra )idly as a result ofthe crank'Gl p assing point II, lifting piston compresses the charge while the wrist the guide-ways 56, 57 while the eccentric is near the outer end thereof and is itself rocked upwardly on its downward movement of rod 46 from -)'oint I to II. The in-take now being-closed, the. travels from. point II to point IV a and the crank (it from point II to point IV, and consequently during the compression stroke, the cylinder 1 remains substantially at rest with the in-take closed because wrist- 47 in passing from point II to .point 1" pushes thecccentric 4fi;to;the center of the guide-way. that is, to a point opposite the trunnions' 59 where the upward oscillation of the guideway, due to the crank 61 moving from point II to ;'.point I II,.ca'n have no effect. The working or firing stroke begins ,approximately at point- IV on the crank pinion 50 and pinion (i5 and at 1V" on't'he gear 48, and

ceases at poiutSIL As the crank til moves from point IV 'to point I I, it first lowers the guldeqva'y 51-3. 57, and then raises it, but this motion has little or no effect on the cylinder 1, because-the wrist- 47 during thisperiod pushes the-eccentric farther toward trunnion ii9,"which ist-he center of oscill'ation of guide'fgfi and consequently the in-takc 11 and auxiliary exhaustremain closed until the point I] is reached, the bulk of the exhaust having taken place as the piston passes the lower exhaust port- 13. Then the piston again starts up, 'or shortly' thereafter, the

cylindenl is giyen asharp upward movement by the co'nll'iined upward movement of the guide 56, 57, and the wrist 47 in passing from point II topoint II and the movement of the eccentric 45 toward'the left,,up thesteep incline of the guide-way, as before described, thgis connecting the exhaust port- 12 with thga rhxiliarv exhaust passage 15, 18. l*ro1nthep'oint III on the cycle is repeated as before explained.

By the desc,rihed means, it will be seen that. whildthficrahk 5 is making substantially one complete revolution during the compression and explosion strokes of the piston, the movable ports 11' and 12 of cylindcr 1 are held in lapped relation with the packing 25, and during the next revolution, while the piston is making its exhaust and explosion strokes, that is, is moving inwardly to expel the exhaust through passage 18 and port 12,-and moving outwardly to (l aw in anothercharge through got 11, the fixed inlet and exhaust ports 15 and 16 are guarded bv the ort'controlliiw means or w u I b substantially opposite one another and the cylinder 1 travels from a position where" port 11 is in register withport 16 to a 'posi tion where port 12 is in register with pas-" sage 18. The pinions 50, 65 being substairtially equal in diameter andthe cranks 5 and 80, (31' being of greatly diflerent lengthsfwith" f the difference 'in favor of the crank 5, it follows that while these cranks makewthef same number of revolutions during each y-:

cle, the crank (31 travels a much less distance; and consequently at a much slower'rate of speed than the'crank 5, and therefore, while the piston 3 is making a stroke twicejthe length of crank 5, the cylinder 1 does'n0t:.

twice the throw of the crank 61, whiclr'i substantially equal to the distance between the two horizontal planes in which, the pas sa e 18 and port 16 are situated respectively;

Vhat I claini is: I i

1. In an internal combustion engine, the] combination of a working reciprocating'piston, a crank shaft connected thereto, a'fixed cylinder coaxial with the piston and having intake and exhaust ports, two concentric 'eyl lindrical elements-one, of which surrounds the other and one of which is movable axially with relation to the other, said elements being coaxial-with said fixed cylinder and surrounded thereby, the movable one 'of's aid elements encompassing the piston and ahf' space in which the piston reciproc'ates and having means for the admission of a"charge offluid to said space a-ndthe exhausflbf gases therefrom, the said movable one of 9', said elements having sliding cotiperative re lation with the other for preventing the escape of fluid from said compression and tiring strokes of the'piston, means for firing the char e in said 'sp port-controlling means concentric with saidmovable element and'with the inner face of the fixed cylinder-and peripherally cooper u ating therewith for controlling 'said intake and exhaustports therein, and means 0 eratively connecting the movable oneof said elements and said port-controlling means with the piston for -'reciprocating-them rela tively to the piston and to the fixed cylinder and to the other oneof said elements. L

In an internal combustion engine'thecombination ofa working reciprocating PIS-c ton, a crank shaft connected thereto, a fixed cylinder coa-xial with the piston and having space during the-"i move at any time a greater distance-thanf 'ildf -intake and exhaust ports, two concentric cy-' 739:

' lindric'al elements one of which siirrounds' the other and one of which is fixed against movement and the other of which is movable axially with relation to the first, said elements being coaxial with said fixed cylin der and surrounded thereby, the movable one of said elements encompassing the piston and a space in which the piston reciprocates and having means for the admission of acharge of fluid to saidspace and the exhaust of gases therefrom, the said movable one of said elements haviiig sliding cooperative relation withthe other for preventing the escape of fluid fromsaid space during the compression and firing strokes of the piston, means for firin a charge in said space between and' against: the piston and the fixed one of said elements, means conncctin the movable ,one of said elements with the piston for moving itjover the said fixed element to close the said space against the escape of fluid therefrom-klnriug thesaid compression and tiring strokes of the piston, and then impart-in 'furth'er movement to it relatively to sai "fixedelement" for opening said space -dur1ng the next {two strokes of the piston, andrcciprocat-ing poct;

controlling meansloc'ate able elementand-coiperating with the inner face of the fixed cvlmder and being also opcrat-ively connected with the piston for cutprising means operativ the piston with said prisin ting oil communication between :sa'id space andexhaust port during thesecond one of thetwo lastsaid strokesof the-piston; a v

- '3. An internal combustion engine havin in combination a fixed cylinder provide with a port and a fixed head, means arranged within'said cvlinder for controlling.

the saidport embodying a second cylinder telescoped therewith and movable with re.- lat-ion thereto and'having bearingagainst said head, a piston arranged in said-second cylinder, and means operatively connecting second cylinder for moving the latter with relation to the first cylinder and thereby controlling said port.

'4. An internal combustion engine comiu'combination a cylinder having an inlet port and an exhaust port, ahead over which said cylinder slides, adapted to cover and uncoversaid ports, apiston in, said cylinder and means 'operatively connected with said piston for moving said cylinder with relation to said head.

An internal combustion ermine comin' combination a cylinder airing inlet and exhaust ports, a head fixed withr lation to said cylinder and over which the cylinder slides, said head having inlet and exhaust ports ada ted to register respectively with said in ct and exhaust orts in the cylinder, a iston in said cylin er,' a"nd e l connected with said 'piston for moving said cylinder with relation to said head.

1 around said movscenes 6.- An internal combustion engine, comprising'in' combination a movable cylinder having inlet and exhaust )orts, ahead fixed with relation to said cylin er and over which the latter slides, an outer cylinder inclosing a part of said movable cylinder andflhaving inlet and exhaust ports respectively, adapted to register with the first said inlet and exhaust ports, a piston in said movable cylinder, and means operatively connected .75 with said piston for moving said movable cylinder with relation to said head and outer cylinder for covering and uncovering said inlet and exhaust ports.

I 7. An internal combustion engine comauprising in combination a cylinder provided with a port, a member telescoped with said cylinder for covering and uncovering said port, a piston in said cylinder, a crank conncctcd with said piston, an eccentric con- 'ncctcd withsaid cylinder for moving it relnlively to said member, audmeans operativ ely connected with said crank for impart-v ing to said eccentricarocking or rotating movement on its own axis and a bodily "curvilinear movement. D 8.An.. internal combustion engine comprising in combination a cylinder havin a port and means for opening and closing said port, one of said parts being movable with relation to the other, an eccentric connected with the movableoneof said parts, a piston \.insai(l cylinder, acrank connected with said piston, apivoted guide-way on which said eccentric slides, means operatively connected with said crank for oscillating said pivoted guidc-wav, and meansopcratively connected with saitfcrank' for sliding said eccentricon said guide-way and for imparting to said eccentric a partial rotation on its own axis, k; '9. An internal combustion engine comprisiiig in combination a cylinder having a port, a member for openin and closing said port, one of said parts being movable with relation to the other, an eccentric connected 1 0 with the movable one (if said parts, a piston in said cylinder, a crank connected to saidpiston, two pinions,-one"of which is connected to said crank, and a gear wheel lar er than said inions connecting them to-c gctlier, a pivotet guide-way on which said eccentric slides, a crank OpB-ltlilYflly co'nnected to the other one of said; pinioiis and I to said guide-fay,- and a crank -connected with said gear and to said eccentric.

10. In a four cycle internal combustion engine the combination of a fixed cylinder having fixed intake and exhaust ports, a re- ."ciprocating .piston coaxialwith said cylinder, a crank shaft connected to the-piston, 125 means for respectively controllingsaid intake and exhaust ports during two strokes of the cycle and preventim fluid egress from the explosionspac'e of the engine during 'the other two strokes, embodying a recipro- 3 fixed ports thereof into and out of commu nication with the explosion space as thereciprocatin'g' cylinder moves, a crank shaft, :1 workin piston connected thereto and encompass with the reciprocating cylinder for moving itto place the exploslonspace into communication-with the intake port of the fixed cylinder durin the "inspiration outward" stroke of the PlSlZOflfll'ld with said exhaust combination of a fixed port during the third succeedingpiston stroke, messed .cylinder having-a fixed member oppospd to the piston and encom-' passed by the reciprocating cylinder, and means for exploding a charge between and against said member and iston.

17. In aninternal com ustion engine the combination of a fixed cylinder having intake and exhaust rte, a reci rocating cylinder surrounded y said fixed cylinder and surrounding the explosion space of the engins and having ports in its'sides adapted to move into and out of're 'ster respectively with the r'ts in the fixed cylinder for a quitting uid to and exhausting fiuid from the explosion space, port-controlling means fixed against movement and engaging said reciprocating cylinder for preventing fluid I escape through the ports thereof, a working piston reciprocating coaxially with relation to said. reciprocating icylinder" and -surrounded thereby, means 0' ratively' necting the reciprocating c inder with the piston for reciprocatin t e reciprocating cylinder with the sai orts thereof in lapped relation with sai means during two successive piston strokes and out of lap relation therewith durin the two sucoeediiii strokes of the piston, and

means for firing'a charge in the explosion space during the second one of the first two i said piston strokes.

18. In an internal combustion engine the cylinder having intake and exhaust; 'orts, a reci rocatingcylinder surrounded by said fixe cylinder'a-nd surrounding the explosion space of the'engine and lhavin means 'for fluid admission" to and exhaust oni "the explosion-space including an exhaust port movable therewith, port-controlling means internal to said reciprocating cylinder and engaging there with for" controlling said exhaust port thereof, a working piston reciprocating coaxially with relation to said reciprocating cylinder and surrounded thereby, means operatively connecting the reciprocating cyl-' inder with the piston for reciprocatin the reciprocating cy inder with the said ex a-ust port thereof in lapped relation with said port-controlling means'dnring two successive piston strokes-and-out o lapped rela-' tion therewith during the two succeeding by said reciprocat ng cylinder and reciprocating with relation thereto, .means, operatively connecting the piston conport-controlling comes strokes of the piston, means for controlling thendmission of fluid to the explosion space from said intake port of the fixed cylinder, and means for firing a charge in the exglo sion space during the second one of the rst two said iston'str'okes.

;19. A our-cycle internal combustion engine having in combination a fixed cylinder provided with a closed end fixed with rela tion thereto, said cylinder having a port,

means for controlling said port embodying a movable cylindrical element, a piston arran (1 concentrically with said movable cylin rical element and opposed to the closed endof said fixed cylinder, means for firing a charge in the spa between said fixed end of the cylinder and said piston, and means for moving the said port controlling means to out 01f; communication between thesaid space and the said port durin oneoof the inward piston strokes and to p ace the said port-in communication with said space during the next inward piston stroke of the same c cle. i

20. an internal, combustion engine, "the combination of a fixed cylinder having in take and exhaust'ports, a reciprocating cylinder surrounded by said fixed cylinder and surrounding the explosion space of the engine and having means for fluid admission ,to and exhaust from the explosion space ineluding an exhaust port movable therewith into and out of communication with the exhaust port of the fixed cylinder, port-control-ling means internal to said reciprocating cylinder and engaging therewith for controlling fluid esca e through the exhaust port thereof, a wor ing piston reciprocating boaxially with relation to said reciprocating cylinder, means connecting the reciprocating cylinder withthe piston for reciprocating tie reciprocating cylinder with said exhaust port thereof in lapped relation to said portcontrolling means during two successive piston strokes and out of lapped relation therewith during the two succeeding strokes of the piston, port-controlling means external to the explosion space and internal to said fixed cylinder and engaging the inner face thereof and movable contemporaneously with the said reciprocating cylinder for intercepting communication between the explosion spaceand s'aidintake and exhaust .ports 'of the fixed cylinder alternately dur mg the .sccond twosaid piston strokes, and means for firing a charge in the explosion space during one of the first two said piston strokes. I f I r 21. In an internal combustion engine, the

'combi atjionofa. fixed cylinder having intake and exhaust ports, a reciprocating cylinder surrounded by said fixed cylinder and surrounding the "explosion space ofthc en- 'gine and having means for fluid admission to and exhaust from the explosion space, a

: iixed liead containing-a wa ter space,- telef s'ooped inlsaid reciprocating cylinderand ena reciprocating coaxially with relation to said bodies v gaging therewith for controlling. fluid escape rom the explosion space, a working piston reciprocating cylinder and surrounded thereby, means operatively connecting the reciprocating cylinder with the piston forreciprocating the reciprocating cylinder with thci 0 said means for fluid admission to and ex lation to said head during two successive :haust from the explosion space in lapped repiston strokes, and out of lapped relation "therewith .during the two succeeding strokes 3E-' of the piston, and means for firing a charge o 'ing'apertured for induction of the charge n'd dischargeof the"exhaust and the aperin the explosion space during the second one otthc first two said piston, strokes.

"1,22. In an internal combustion engine the c'o nbjnation of a fixed cylinder having iii- ,2 0"tak'e and exhaust ports, a crank shaft, ,a re- -."cip o'cating piston connected therewith, a re cipiocating cylinder surrounded by the fixed j. i 9 ,25"

rider, and surrounding the explosion ace'ofithe' engine and containing andguiding"'tl ie piston and in which the piston recipro'cates relatively thereto, a cylindrical member telescoped with said reciprocating cylinder and fixed against movement therewith and with the piston, means for explodngfa charge in said'reciprocating cylinder betweenan'd against said member and pisthe wall of said reciprocating cylinder tured 'area thereof being adapted to move as and away-from said member, means fnnecting'the' piston with said reciprocat ing"cyliudei" for reciprocating the recipro- "ta' 'tingf'cyliiiderwith the said aperturcd area thereof in lapppd relation to said member fduring two successivepiston strokes, and meats external to saidreciprocating cylin- 'der' and reciprocable contemporaneously with the movement thercof for controlling fluid admission to the explosion space when the :id'apertureil area is outof lapped relation with the said member during one stroke of the piston, and controlling communication 'bcti'veen thcffixcd exhaust portandpxplosion space during another stroke of. the piston.

232 112 an internal combustion engine the combination of a fixed cylinder surrounding the explosion space of the engine-and having latter element is fixed against movement. l

one of said elements having its wall apertured throughout a portion of its area for fluid admission to and exhaust from the explosion space and both of said elements belug concentric with said fixed cylinder, a 7

packing interposed between the contiguous faces of said elements and secured to one of them for covering the said apcrtui'ed area of the other one during one inward stroke of the piston and the succeeding outward stroke, said packin being substantially equal in width to the travel of said i'eciproeating element during the two said strokes of the piston, means connecting the piston p with the said reciprocating element for moving it until said apertured area and packingare in overlapped relation substantially thiwighout the revolution of-the crank shaft inciuding said two piston strokes and out of,

such relation substantially throughout the immediately preceding revolution of the crank shaft, the'said means for controlling communication between the explosion space and fixed ports also including reciprooating port-controlling means surrounding said reciprocatm element and connected with the piston and having sliding cooperative rela-- tion with the inner face of said fixed cylinder for alternately cutting the said intake and exhaustports oif'froni communication with the explosion space durin the second said revolution of the crank sha I 24. In an internal" combustion engine the combination or" a. piston, a crank shaftconnccted thereto, a fixed cylinder having fixed intake and exhaust ports, ahead fixed in said cylinder against movement with the piston, reciprocating port-controlling means embodying a cylindrical element surround ing the piston and telcscoped with said head and surrounded by said fixed cylinder and encompassing the explosion space of the en ginc, said reciprocating port controlling means having ports cotiperating exteriorly with the fixed cylinder to open and close communication between the explosion s iiace and said fixed ports alternately during one revolution of the crank shaft, said cylindrical elements cotiperating interiorly with the said head to close egress ,frour-theexplosion space during the nextrevolution of the crank shaft, and means for firing a charge in the explosion space during the latter said revolution.

25. In an internal combustion engine, the

combination of a piston, a crank shaft connected thereto, two cylindrical telescoped elements, one of which surrounds the explosion space of the engine and is operatively connected with the piston and reciprocates contemporaneously therewith with relation to the other element, and which latter element'is fixed against movement with the piston, one of said elements having means tor-fluid admission to and exhaust 1 from the explosion space, a packing interposed between the contiguous facesofis'aid elements for covering said means and being equal in Width to the travel of said reciproeating ele nent' during the compression and explosion stroke of the plston', means for supplying and exhausting the charge and .spent gases respectively coiiperating with cylin'der forn ing the side walls of the explosion, space ofthe engine and having means for fluid induction toand exhaust from the explsion space and being sur- -rounded by said fixed cylinder and adapted to place the fixed port-s thereof into and out of communicationwith the explosion space as the: reciprocating cylinder moves, a

crank ,shaft, a working piston connected thereto and embraced by said reciprocating, cylinderand reciprocating directly therein 25.

with relation thereto, 'means operatively connectin the piston with the reciprocating cylinder or r iprocating the latter to place the explosion pace into communication with the, int ake port! of the fixed cylinder during 'BXPlOSIOII space c the-inspiration outward stroke-of the piston and with said fixed exhaust;port during the third. suceeeding piston" stroke, .said fixed cylinderhaving a xed headopposed to' the piston and filling'the end'of the reciprocate -mgcylinder and adapted tolap the said means to prevent egress from the'ex- Immediately succeed inspiration. stroke, and means for ex lodln'g the'charge between and against .sai headand pistonl',

27.;In an internal combustion engine, thecombinationof a fixed cylinder haying fixed intake and exhaushports, means 'for con trolling fluid ingress to and'egressfrom the nr bodying a cylindrical head fixed againstmovement with relation to the said fixed c linder, and roj'ect-in" thereinto and space .fromfthe wal s thereo and a reciprocating cylinder surrounded by the explosion space of the engine an having n'leans for fluid induction .toan'd exhaust from the explosion space, said reciprocatin cylinder being telescoped over 'said ihea sea,

whereby the exploslonspace is o *ned and closed as the reciprocating cylinggrmoves, port-controlling means a'roi'ulgi said reciprocating cylinder engaging and coiiperating with-the innerface of the fixed cylinder for emit-rolling said fixed ports therein, a working' piston reciprocating in said reciprocating cylinder with relation thereto, a-crank shaft connected to said piston, means operatively connected with the piston for moving the reciprocating cylinder and said portcont-rolling means with relation 'to the said head ano fixed cylinder in concert with the movement of the piston for opening communication between the explosion space and the said fixed intake port during an outward piston stroke, then lapping said means for fluid induction and exhaust of the reciprocating cylinder over the said head to close the explosion space during the two sifcceed ing piston strokes, and finally opening comlnunication between the xplosion space and said fixed exhaust port during the piston stroke immediately followin said-two sue- .ceeding strokes, andmeans tor exploding a ;charge between" said head and piston.

28., In an internal combustion engine, the combination of a fixed cylinder having intake and'pxhaust ports, a cylindrical head prrojecting into said cylinder and spaced an the walls thereof and forming an annularspace therewith, two concentric cylindrical elements telescoped in said cylinder. over said head,- around the explosion space ofirthe engine, reciprocably fitted in said an 1 d 0 th St k nlu'lar space, the inner one of said elements p oslon space urmg e two ston' r0 esy Witnesses 'Enan crs A. Horxms, ALI's'rAD'r.

CHARLES r. KNIGHL f

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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3731662A (en) * 1971-02-18 1973-05-08 Dueck Building Supplies Ltd Internal combustion two-stroke power unit

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3731662A (en) * 1971-02-18 1973-05-08 Dueck Building Supplies Ltd Internal combustion two-stroke power unit

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