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US961192A - Photographic shutter. - Google Patents

Photographic shutter. Download PDF

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Publication number
US961192A
US961192A US51204409A US1909512044A US961192A US 961192 A US961192 A US 961192A US 51204409 A US51204409 A US 51204409A US 1909512044 A US1909512044 A US 1909512044A US 961192 A US961192 A US 961192A
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United States
Prior art keywords
shutter
lever
spring
ring
motor
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
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US51204409A
Inventor
Andrew Wollensak
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WOLLENSAK OPTICAL Co
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Wollensak Optical Co
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Priority to US51204409A priority Critical patent/US961192A/en
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G03PHOTOGRAPHY; CINEMATOGRAPHY; ELECTROGRAPHY; HOLOGRAPHY
    • G03BAPPARATUS OR ARRANGEMENTS FOR TAKING PHOTOGRAPHS OR FOR PROJECTING OR VIEWING THEM; APPARATUS OR ARRANGEMENTS EMPLOYING ANALOGOUS TECHNIQUES USING WAVES OTHER THAN OPTICAL WAVES; ACCESSORIES THEREFOR
    • G03B9/00Exposure-making shutters; Diaphragms
    • G03B9/08Shutters

Description

A. WOLLENSAK. i PHOTOGRAPHIU SHUTTER.

.APPLIGATION FILED AUG, 9, 1909.

Patented June 14, 1910.

9 SHEETSSHEET 1.

WITNESSES: INVENTOR: m I m 15m %@7M WJW A. WOLLENSAK.

PHOTOGRAPHIG SHUTTER.

3 APPLICATION FILED AUG.9,1909. 961,192, Patented June 14,1910.

9 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

' Wrmssszs: .v luvsu'rom I I 1 I A. WOLLENSAK.

PHOTOGRAPHIG SHUTTER.

APPLICATION FILED AUG.9, 1909. I 9 1, 1 92, Patented June 14,1910.

9 sums-sum a.

FIG

l 98 69 Q 70 Ir d WITNESSES: QIKNVEIZI/TOR: {MM/a; w fiww a M A. WOLLENSAK. PHOTOGRAPHIIG SHUTTER. APPLICATION FILED AUG.9, 1909.

961,1 92 Patented June 14, 191.0.

9SHEETSSHEET 4.

FIG.|3.

NO "I WITNESSES: r; INVENTOR:

A. WOLLENSAK.

PHOTOGEAPHIU SHUTTER. a APPLICATION FILED AUG. 9, 190 961,192, Patented June 14,1910.

9 SHEETSSHEET 5.

l &1 1;

-' ags' WITNESSES: INVENTOR:

A. W OLLENSAK. PHOTOGRAPHIO SHUTTER.

APPLICATION FILED AUG. 9, 1909. 961,192, Patented June 14, 1910.

9 SHEETSSHBET 6- WITNESSES: INVENTOR: Z04? gnaw);

' A. WOLLE-N SAK.

. PHOTOGRAPHIU'SHUTTER.

APPLICATION FILED AUG. 9, 1909.

Patented June 14, 1910.

9 SHEETS-SHEET 7.

8 82 136a 40 Iv [WITNESS s: luvzwm Ma (206,, M T v w A; I ,QLLZIW V a? A. WOLLENSAK.

I'HOTOGHAPHIO SHUTTER. APPLICATION FILED AUG. 9, 1909.

961,1 92, Patented June 14,1910.

WITNESSES: INVENTOR: amid ZM ,QW

A. WOLLENSAK;

PHOTOGRAPHS SHUTTER. AP UJIGAT ION FILED AUG.9, 1909.

961,192. Patented June 14,1910.

9 SHEETS-SHEET 9.

i in :I 9/ a M i 151' 0. A 40 v 5 l4 7 86 WITNESSES: INVENTOR:

I A @s UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

ANDREW WOLLFINSAK, OF ROCHESTER, NEW YORK, ASSIGNOR '10 WOLLENBAK OPTICAL COMPANY, OF ROCHESTER, NEW YORK, A. CORPORATION OF NEW YORK.

PHOTOGBAPHIC SHUTTER.

Specification or Letters Intent. Patented J ine 14, 1910.

Application fled August 9, 1909. Serial No. 512,044.

To all whom it may concern.-

Be it known that I, ANDREW WOLLENBAK, a citizen of the United States, and resident of Rochester, in the county of Monroe and State of New York, have invented'certain new and useful Improvements in Photographic 'Shutters, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to photographic shutters, and consists in the apparatus hereinafter described and claimed.

The object of the invention is to produce an eflicient and satisfactory between-the-lens shutter, capable of high speeds and operating without jar. The shutter may he supplied with means for producing certain high speeds adapted to photograph ragildly moving objects. At the some time t e shutter is compact and of good appearance.

In the drawings :-Figure 1 is a. front elevation of the shutter complete, on a smaller scale than the succeeding figures; Fig. 2 shows the shutter casing with all parts removed therefrom except the shutter blades and their supporting plate; Fig. 3 shows the same parts, and, m addition, the bladenctuator and a pivot-support; Fig. 4 is a front elevation of the shutter with the scale plate removed, showin the cam-ring; Fig. 5 is a front elevation o the shutter showing the cover plate, the cam-ring being removed; Fig. 6 is a rear view of the device for looking certain parts of the casing together; Fi 7 is apartial bottom plan of the same loc lsing device with a part of the shutter casing; 8 is a view similar to Fig. 3, with certain parts added; Fig. 9 is the same as Fig. 8, but with the motor-lever, the retarder mechanism, the setting-lever, and the time and bulb dctcnts in place; Figs. 10, 11 and 12 Show the parts of the motoriever; Fig. 13 shows the same parts as Fig. 9, with the addition of the secondary motor spring; Fig. 14 is the same as Fig. 13, with the addition of the cletent controller lever and the retarder controller; Fig. 15 shows the bulb release-level. Fig. 16 shows the main tri lever; Fig. 17 shows the retardcr lever; Fig. 18 shows the retardcr trip; Fig. 19 shows the blade-actuating parts during the setting movement; Fi 20 shows the same parts after the setting operation is completed; Fig. 21 shows the same parts while the shutter is open during release; Fig. 22 shows the same parts when the shuttor-blades have completed their movement; Fig. 23 shows the position of the detents when the shutter is open during a time exposure, the release-button being depressed; Fig. 24 shows the same parts after the releaseutton is freed; Fig. 25 shows the same parts with the release-button"againL-.;

depressed, the shutterblades having closed; Figs. 26 and 27 show the bulb detents; Fig. 28 shows the time detent; Fig. 29 is a view similar to Fig. 4:, showing the shutter set for a bulb exposure; Fig. 30 shows the position of the detents when the cam-ring is set as in Fig. 29; Fig. 31 shows the position of the detents when the cam-ring is set for a slow-speed instantaneous exposure; Fig. 32 shows the blade-actuating parts and the detents while the shutter is open during an instantaneous exposure; Fig. 33 shows the same parts after the shutter has closed; Fig. 34 is a view similar to Figs. 4: and 29, showing the shutter set for instantaneous exposures of the slowest speed; Fig. 35 is a. partial view showing the setting-button depressed, and the main trip lever about to engage the retarder trip; Fig. 36 shows the same parts after the main trip lever has fully engaged the retarder trip; Fig. 37 shows the same parts, and also the detents, while the shutter is open during an instantaneous exposure; Fig. 38 shows the position of the retarder mechanism when the shutter is open during 'a fast instantaneous exposure; Fig. 39 shows the position of the camring when the shutter is set for instantaneous exposures of the highest speed; Fig. 40 shows the high-speed lever and sprin in the inoperative position; Fig. 41 shows t e same parts in operative position; Fig. 42 is a cen tral, vertical section through the complete shutter; and Fig. 43 is an enlarged central vertical section through the lower part of the shutter.

The casin 1, within which the shutterblades and t e o eratin parts therefor are inclosed, is circu er in orm (Fig. 2). On the rear of the casing is a screw-threaded extension 2 (Fig. 42) adapted to enter the lens-hoard. of a camera and so to support the shutter in the proper position. This extension is also internally threaded at 3 to receive the rear combination of the lens.

A plate 4, fitting the inner .riphery of the casing 1, is fastened to tie latter by means of screws 5 (Fig. 2), and carries projecting studs 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11 on its front side. baid studs serve as pivotal supports for certain olperating parts. Between the plate 4 and t e extension 2 is a de ressron (Fig. 42) in which is contained the iris diaphrugm 12. The leaves of said diaphragm are pivoted on the rear side of the plate 4, and are moved by a ring 13 that has an operatin arm 14 projecting through a slot 1 in the ower edge of the casing l.

The front of the casin is closed by a cover plate 15, Fig. 5, that is astened in place by screws 16. An internally-threaded apelture 17 in said plate is adapted to receive the front combination of the lens. On the front side of the cover plate 15 are circular shoulders l8 and 19, the latter being smaller in diameter and projecting farther forward than the cover plate (Figs. 5 and 42.)

A. flat ring 20, Fig. 4, (hereinafter designated the cam-ring) lies against the face of the plate 15, and has an annular bearing on the shoulder 18. Said ring has a knurled outer edge, so that it may be easily turned in either direction. The inner edge, which bears upon the shoulder 18, is irregular in form, having on one side an aperture 21 terminating in a wedge or cam-face 22, and on the other side a cam 23 that extends outwardly from the shoulder 18 to a notch 24., in an eccentric curve. By rotating the camring 20, the irregular inner edge acts on oer tain parts that project through the cover plate 15 in ways to be described in detail hereinafter.

Against the front face of the canrring is the scale plate, which consists of a ring 25, Fig. 1, fitting around the shoulder 19 and of larger diameter than the annular shoulder 18. Said ring carries a series of figures near its upper edge, indicating the ditferent exposures for which the shutter may be adusted, and near its lower edge other figures to indicate the diaphragm opening and cooperating with the arm 14. B rotating the cam-ring 20 as aforesaid, unti an indicator 26 thereon is opposite the desired figure on the scale plate 25, the shutter parts may be brought to the proper positions to accomplish the desired exposure. The scale plate 25 is so attached to the cover plate 15 that it may be removed only by some one familiar with its construction. The internal mechanism of the shutter, therefore, cannot. be reached and tampered with by a novice, as the scale plate and cam-ring must be removed before the screws 16 that hold the cover plate 15 in place become visible.

On the rear side of the scale late are projeetm r studs 27 (Figs. 5 6 and J) having enlarged made that are a opted to enter a corresponding number of keyhole slots 28 in the cover plate 15. Said slots are large at one end and small at the other, so that if the heads of the studs 27 are pushed through the large portions of the slots, and the scale plate 25 1s turned slightly in a clockwise direction, the heads pass under the contracted portions 29 of the slots 28 and can not be taken outexcept by turnin the scale plate in a contrary direction. t may be seen from Figs. 4 and 5 that the shanks of the studs 27 closely fit the smaller parts 29 of the keyhole slots 28.

Near one of the slots 28 is a pivot 30, projecting inwardly from the plate 15, and carrying a latch 31, (a rear view of which is shown in Fig. 6). The lower end 32 of the latch projects into the slot 1, Figs. 7 and 12, at the bottom of the casing 1, and may be operated by a suitable tool such as an awl inserted therein, and may be swung either upward or downward about the ivot 30. When swun upward (see full ines, Fig. 6, and dotted lines, Fig. 5), a tongue 33 on the latch is brought close up to the adjacent stud 27, and hes in line with the stud and the pivot 30, thus forming an abutment which the stud cannot push aside when an attempt is made to turn the scale plate 25. The scale plate is thus securely locked to the cover plate 15. holding the cam-rim 20 in place, and may e turned and remove only after the latch 31 is swung downward (see dotted lines, Fig. 6). As the latch is practically invisible, the shutter is unlikely to be opened by an incompetent person.

The shutter proper comprises a series of pivoted blades, ual in size, and adapted to be moved simu taneousl about their respective pivots by means 0 a connector that is attached to all of them. The blades 34, in the present instance, are of a modified crescent form, (Fig. 2) and are spaced at equal distances from each other on studs 35 that are set in the main supporting plate 4. The central 2. erture in the said plate is completely close by the blades when the latter occupy the position shown in Fig. 2, as each blade then overlaps the adjacent one. The lowermost blade is double, 2'. a, one blade is placed close to the plate 4, and an other is placed on the same ivot, in front of the remainin blades, F1 42, so that the central over up of the b adcs is thoroughly covered on oth sides, as a safeguard against light leakage.

For one operation of the shutter the blades are simultaneously turned on the pivots 35 from the position shown in Fig. 2, through approximately 45 degrees, in a counter-clockwise direction. When the blades have reached this position, the exposure-aperture is fully open. To close the shutter, the blades are moved in the same direction until they stand at right angles to the position shown in Fig. 2, the opposite ends over-lapping, Fig. 22. To accomplish the next exposure, the blades are moved in the reverse direction (clockwise), and after exposure again occupy the position shown in Fi 2. lhis reversal of movement is ob taine by automatic means.

The blade actuator, which swings the blades 34 about the pivots 35, comprises a blade-ring 36 (Fig. 3) that is connected, through suitable mechanism, with the motor spring. Said ring is concentric with the exposure-aperture, and its inner periphery bears on the edge of a guide plate 37 that is fastened to the front faces of the pivots 35 by screws 38. Portions of said guide plate are cut away to reduce the friction of the ring 36 thereon. The latter is held in its proper plane on one side by washers on some of the screws 38, and on the opposite side by an arc-shaped plate, Fig. 3, t rough which the remaining screws 38 pass. The plate 39 serves as a support for pivots 40, 41, 42, 43 and 44, on which certain movable parts are hang, it being impossible to fasten the pivots in suitable positions in the main sup rtin plate 4 because of the shutter bled am? the blade actuator.

The blade ring 36 carries on its rear face a series of studs 45, which enter slots 46 in the blades 34 (Fig. 2). It is obvious that if said ring is rotated in the proper direc tion, the blades will be swung simultaneously about the pivots 35. The extent of movement of the ring 36 is governed by alug 47, Fig. 3, on the guide plate 37 that projects into a recess 48 in the inner periphery of the ring. Another lug 49, on the outer periphery of the blade ring 36, cooperates with a spring-pressed latch 50 that is hung on the pivot 6. When the ring 36 is at the right-hand limit of its rotation, the latch 50 prevents itfrom rotating toward the leftunder action of the motor spring, by engaging the lower edge of the lug 49 (Fig. 3), and when said ring is at the left-hand limit of its rotation, on onposite movement is prevented by the latch engaging the upper edge of said lug. The length of the lug 49 is just equal to the distance through which any given point on the blade ring may move, as controlled by the stops forming the ends of the recess 48.

The shuttenactuating lever 51 by which the blade ring 36 is rotated from riht to left, or vice versa (Fig. 8), is in e ect a double bell-crank, serving to change the vertical movement of the motor or main lever (hereinafter more fully described) to the requisite movement,- for actuating the '8, and the late shutter rin 86. The lever 51 is hung on a pivot 52 t at projects from the guide plate 37, and its upper end carries a pin 53 that enters a notch 54: in the rin 36. Pins 55 and 56 are set in the lower en of said lever, on the left and right side of the ivot 52, respectively and equidistant there rom. It is obvious irom the foregoing that if upward pressure is aypplied to the pin 56 when the parts occup t e positions shown in Fig. 50 1s disengaged from the lug t9, the lever 51 will be swung about the pivot 52 until the pin 53 has carried the ring 36 toward the left to the limit of its movement, thereby causingi a com lete o ening and closing of the bla es 34. imilar y, another exposure is obtained b upward pres sure on the pin 55, which ti ts the lever 51 toward the right and opens and closes the shutter by moving the parts back to their former positions.

The motor lever before mentioned is supported on the pivot 8, and its construction may be clearly understood by reference to Figs. 9 to 12. The lever proper 57 (Fi 10) is a curved arm that is normally he d up against the top of the shutter casing by the action of the motor spring 58 that is coiled around the said pivot. The right-hand end of the lever has a backwardly-extending lug 59 and a projection 60, for purposes to be described. Below the projection 60 is a forwardly-extending lug 61.

The setting lever 62, hung on the pivot 10, is pressed upwardly by a spring 63 against the setting-button 63 that extends through the casing 1 with its axis conveniently in a radius of the latter. The lug 61 on the motor lever 57 normally rests against the free end of the setting lever 62, and when the latter is depressed by pushing the button 63, the motor lever is swung downward on its pivot 8 and the motor spring 58 is put under tension (Figs. 19 and 20).

The motor lever 57 carries a catch that automatically engages the lowermost of the pins 55 and 56 when the lever is depressed. This catch constitutes automatic reversing means for applying the action of the motor spring to the shutteractuating lever in either of two opposite directions. In the present instance the catch consists of a crescent-shaped piece 64 (Fig. 11) that is pivoted at its upper center on a stud 64 on the lever 57. The lower ends of the catch terminate in books 65 and 66, and between said hooks and the stud 64 are studs 68, on which are coiled springs 69 andTO. The upper ends of these springs engage lugs on the edge of the piece 64, and their free ends project into the spaces above the books 65 and 66.

When the motor lever 57 is depressed by the setting lever 62, the catch 64 moves downward with it. If the shutter-actuating lever 51 stands as shown in Fig. 8, the in 55 is uppermost, and is struck by the rec end of the spring 69 as the catch 64 approaches it. This causes the catch to tilt about its pivot 64 and the hook 66 slips down along the right side of the pin 56 (Fig. 19) and when ast it, said hook is carried underneath sai pin (Figs. 19 and 20) by the action of the spring 69, which, by its pressure against the pin 55, tends to turn the catch 64 in a clockwise direction. This constitutes the operation of setting the shuther. When the latch 50 is moved away from the lug 49, by means of suitable release mechanism controlled through the release button 71, the motor spring 58, being in tension, instantly raises the lever 57, and therefore the catch 64. The book 66 on the latter exerts an upward pull on the pin 56, and the actuating lever 51 is thereby swun to the left (Figs. 21 and 22) moving the bla e ring 36 to its limit as before described, causing a complete opening and closing of the shutter blades 34. The parts are then ready to be reset for another exposure, and by pressing the button 63 the motor leverfii is again moved downward. This time the pin 56 is uppermost, and is therefore struck by the spring. 70, which causes the catch 64 to tilt toward the left. The hook 65 then passes along the pin 55 and snaps under it, being held there by the action of the spring 70. A depression of the button 71 then releases the latch 50, and the motor spring 58 raises the lever 57 and the catch 64, which throws the lever 51 toward the ri ht, causing the ring 36 to move in that irection and so again to open and close the shutter blades. It is thus seen that at each operation of the shutter the blades and parts connected therewith move in directions opposite to those followed in the preceding operation. Therefore, after one exposure, it is unnecessary to return the blades to their former position to make another exposure, obviating the use of an aperture-cover or blind to prevent exposure in resetting.

On the same stud 64 that carries the catch 64, is a piece '72 (Fig. 12) that acts as a stop for the pins 55 and 56, and is operative only during slow-speed instantaneous exposures. Its function will be described in detailhereinafter. The said stop has two depending arms 73 and 74. having notches 75 and 76, respectively, in their lower ends.

The release mechanism is controlled, as before stated. by the button 71. which acts directly on the spring-pressed release lever 77 (Fig. 8) that Is hung on the pivot- 7. On the pivot 6, in front of the latch 50, is a lever 78 (Fig. 15), hereinafter designated as-the bulb release-lever. The lower end of this lever rests upon the lunger of the pump 79 66 that rejects throng the casing and is operated by bulb-pressure. The lever 77,when depressed by the button 71, may also move the lever 78, by strikin a. pin 80 on the rear side of the latter. fimen the lever 78 is tilted about its pivot, its left edge strikes a forwardlyrojectin lug 81 on the latch 50, and re eases sai latch from the In 4.9 on the blade-actuating ring 36. The s utter blades are then free to move under the impulse of the motor spring'58. Suitable detents are provided to hold the shutter open for time and bulb exposures. The construction and operation thereof will now be described.

The time detent is a lever 82 (Fig. 28) that is pivoted on the stud 40. The left end of said lever is normally forced downward by the action of a spring 83 (Fig. 8). A notch 84 in its lower edge is slightly wider than :1 lug 36 (Fig. 3) that projects forwardly from the outer edge of the ring 36. When the shutter is closed, the said lug occupics a position to the right or left of the notch 84.

In front of the detent 82 are the bulbdetents 85 and 86 (Figs. 26 and 27) that are also pivoted on the stud 4:0. Suitable springs coiled on the pin 41 and reactin against the pin 42 (Figs. 9 and 13) tend to force theleft ends of these detents downward. These ends overlie the bulb release lever 78, restin against a lag 87 at the up per end of the atter, and may swing downward when said-lever is tilted (Fig. 23), and are raised by the lug 87 when the lever is raised b its spring 78. The spring 83 continua ly premes the leftend of the time detent 82 toward a stud 88 that plrojects rearwardly from the lower end of t e bulb release-lever 78.

The operation of these parts in making a time exposure is as follows: When the button 71 is depressed, the lever 77 tilts the lever 78 as described. The stud 88 raises the left end of the time detent 82, and the lug 8? permits the detents 85 and 86 to drop under the action of their springs. The time detent can move only until its lower edge strikes the lug 36" (if the ring 36 occu pics the position shown), but the stud 88 moves to the which position it attains before the latch 50 is freed by the lever 78. When this latter action occurs, the shutter opens, under the impulse of the previously-set motor spring, the ring 36 being rotated in a counter-clocks wise direction. The detent 85 has a shoul der 89 (Fig. 26) that now lies in the path the lug 36, in such a position that when say lug strikes it, and etc 5, the shutter is to] open. The detent 86 as a similar shouldl 90, facing in the opposite direction, and sat position shown in Fig. 23,

shoulder prevents a reboundin of thezring 36 by dropping down behind t e lgg 36 as soon as the latter has passed it. hen the button 71 is released, the lever 78 tends to resume its normal position, and therefore to raise the ends of the detents and 86, and to permit. the end of the time detent 82 to move downward. Before the lug 36" can slip off the end of the shoulder 89, it is caught in the notch 84 of the detent 82 (Fig. 24) and the shutter is thus held open, and remains open until the button 71 is again depressed. The notch 84 is sli htly wider than the space between the shou ders 89 and 90. Therefore, when the detent 85 has reached its normal position, the lug 36 escapes from the shoulder 89 and rests against the right-hand edge of the notch 84 ig. 24 When the button 71 is again de resse the lever 78 is tilted as be ore, an the time detent 82 is raised, permit ting the lug 36 to escape from the notch 84:. As the edge of said lug is beyond the shoulder 89, the detent 85 rests upon it, and cannot drop, although the detent 86 is free to do so. Nothing then obstructs the movement of the lug 36, and the shutter is therefore closed by its operating mechanism (Fig. 25). When theshutter is operated in the opposite direction, the detent 86 drops first and the shoulder 90 thereon sto s the lug 36*. On the first release of the utton 71, said lug is caught as before in the notch 84:, and is released therefrom on-the second depression of said button, having passed beyond the shoulder 90 after the first release. To make bulb exposures, the time detent 82 is rendered inoperative, and the lug 36" is then caught by the shoulder 89 or 90, as the case may be, and is freed therefrom as soon as the button 71 is released. The means for holding the said time detent con sists of a detent controller-lever 91 (Fi 14, 30, 31 and 37), which has a forwar yturned end 92 that projects through the cover plate 15 (Figs. 4 and 5) into the slot- 21 in the cam-ring 20 (see Fig. 29). When the latter is turned so that the pointer 26 stands at B on the scale, the point of the wedge or cam-face 22 moves under the end 92 and slightly raises it (Fig. 29). The opposite end 93 of the lever 91 then resses downward against the upper side 0 a lug 94 on the time detent 8'2, and holds the latter above the lug 36. The lever 91 is ex osures. w Therefore, when the button 71 66 is epressed,the lug 36" strikes the shoulder 89, and is retained only as long as said button is held down. On releasing the latter, the detent 85 rises with the lever 78 and the shutter is closed b the motor mechanism. Exposures in whic the shutter o ens and closes on a single ressure of the re ease button 71 are eflfected by moving the cam rin 20 until the pointer 26 is at I. The end 92 of the lever 91 is thus raised u on the inner periphery of said cam-ring lg. 34:), and the end 93 depresses the In 94 until it strikes the right-hand ends of oththe detents 85 and 86. These detents and the detent 82 are thus prevented from drop ing into the path of the lug 36 when the ever 78 is tilted (see Fig. 37). When the button 71 is depressed, the lug 36 is free to have its full travel, and the shutter opens and closes. Means are provided for regulating the length of time that the shutter remains open in the automatically-timed or instantaneous exposures. Said means comprise retarding mechanism that may be placed in the path of the motor lever for any desired portion of its stroke, together with a suitable tripping device to release said lever suddenly at the end of the period of retardation. The parts whereby this action is accomplished are illustrated in Figs. 13, 14, 16, 17 and 18.

On the pivot 11 is a plate 96 (Fig. 13) that bears a stud 97. Said late is pressed toward the ri ht side of the casing 1 by pring 98. 5n the stud 97 is hung a lever 99 (Fig. 17) that has a lug 100 at its upper left end. Its lower end is pivotally connected to a link 101 that is attached to a plunger 102. The latter is slidable in a dashpot 103 that projects through the casing 1 and which pre erably corresponds in size and appearance with the bulb-pump 79. A lever 104 (Fi 18) is also ivoted to the link 101, an its upper on is normally pressed against the ug 100 by the action of a spring 105 that is coiled around the ivot 97 (Fig. 13) and bears against the ower end of the plate 96. This lever 104 may be called the retarder trip. In front of the lever 104 and conecting the stud 97 on the plate 96 and the stationary pivot 11, is the speed-controller arm 106, having at its upper end a stud 107 that pro ects through the cover plate 15 and into the path pressed away from the lug 94 by a spring i 95. Said spring is coiled around the pivot- E screw 40 that enters the pivot 40 and retains all the detect-s thereon.

By referring to Fig. 30, which shows the position of the detents and the detent conof the cam-edge 23 on the ring 20. The 12 action of the spring 98 serves to press said stud 10? close against said cam-face. When the cam-ring 20 is turned in a clockwise direction, the face 23 forces the stud 107, and

troller lever 91 when set for bulb exposures, it will be clear that the bulb detents 85 and 86 are free to operate as in time therefore the arm 106 and the plate 96, toward the left. The stud 97 is thus swung downward, movin the levers 99 and 104 nearer to the dashpot 103, (Fig. 38).

A lever 108 (Fig. 16), which may be designated the main tripdever, 1S hung on the pivot 9, and through the action of a spring 109 that is coiled about the same pivot, its lower end is pressed toward the center of the shutter, but movement in this direction is limited by one of the blade-pivot screws 38 (Figs. 13 and 14). On the upper end of said lever, to the left of the pivotal center, is a shoulder 110, and between said shoulder and the pivot 9 is a stud 111 that has a fiat lower s1de. The shoulder 110 is in such a location that it is caught by the lug 59 on the motor lever 57 when the latter moves downward, and the lower end of the lever 108 is thus swung toward the right. The stud 111 is in such a location that it is struck by the projection 60 on the motor lever 57 when the latter moves upward, and the lever 108 is thereby swung toward the left. On the lower end of said lever 108 is a stud 112 that is adapted to strike the upper end of the retarder-t-rip 104 when the latter is in its normal position, but which swings clear of said trip when the parts are set as shown in Fig. 38.

With the pointer 26 set at I on the scale, the detents 82, 85 and 86 are prevented from interfering with the movement of the shuttar-actuating ring 36, as before described. When the setting-button 63 is depressed, the motor lever is moved downward, and the catch 64 engages one of the pins 55 or 56. At the same time the lower end of the main trip lever 108 is swung over against the retarder-trip 104, and the latter is moved toward the right (Fig. 35) until the stud 112 slips over its upper end, which occurs before the motor lever reaches its downward limit of movement. As soon as the stud 112 has passed over the top of the trip 104:, the spring 105 again presses the latter against the lug 100 on the retarderlever 99, and as soon as the motor lever is completely set, the action of the spring 109 carries the main trip lever 108 toward the left until the stud 112 rests against the ri ht up 1' edge of the retarder trip 104 lg. 36; hen the parts are in this position, there is a slight space between the stud 111 and the ro ection 60 on the motor lever. If the re ease button 71 is then depressed, the rin 36 is freed from the latch 50, the motor .ever 57 flies upward under the impulse of the motor spring 58, and the shutter is fully open when the pro'ection 60 strikes the lower side of the stu 111. In order to move farther, the motor lever must swing the main trip lever 108, which, rcstin against the trip 104, causes the latter an the lever 99 (both being in effect one lever) to swing inwardly, pus ing the plun er 102 into the dashpot 103. As the das pot is closed at its outer end, the air within it can off the upper end of the retarder trip 104 (Fig. 37). Therefore, no appreciable movement of the shutter blades occurs during the time that the retarder mechanism is in operation. When the retarder parts are in this position (Fig. 37) the projection 60 has moved to the left edge of the flat lower side of the stud 111, and slips off the latter at the same instant that the stud 112 slips oil the trip 104. The motor lever 57 then being free 'to move through the remainder of its stroke, the shutter is instantly closed. The spring 109 then returns the main trip lever 108 to its normal position.

During the movements just described, the stop 72 hereinbefore mentioned, becomes operative. Its purpose is to prevent a re bound of the shutter-blades and actuating ring when the projection 00 strikes the stud 111. In the time and bulb exposures this rebound is prevented by the detents 85 and 86. If the stop 72 were removed, the actuat-in lever 51, when moved by the hook 66, woul fly eat the center and over to the left side, on er the im ulse of the motor spring, because the hoo 65 would not be in position to catch the pin 55. With said stop in place, the pin 55 strikes the inner or right hand ed e of the arm 73 at its extreme end as the ever 51 moves from right to left, and tends to turn the stop around the stud 64 in a clockwise direction. Movement in this direction is prevented, however, by the arm 74, because the notch 76 in its end comes down on the pin 56, which is moving toward it. Thus movement of the stop in one direction is prevented by the pin 55, and in the other direction by the pin 56, the action and reaction through said stop occurring instantaneously. As a resuit, the movement of the blades 34, the ring 36, and the actuating lever 51 is arreste just as said blades are fully opened, and at that point the projection 60 strikes the stud 111 and the retarding mechanism becomes operative. The shuttenoperating parts then occupy the positions shown in mg. 21, the pin 55 having just passed oil the end of the arm 73. On a reverse movement of the actusting lever 51, the pin 56 strikes the left side of the arm 74, and the notch comes down upon the pin 55, resulting in thesame efiect as before.

The length of time the shutter remams open is determined by the position of the reta-rder trip 104, whlch is governed by the cam-face 23, actin through the stud 107, the arm 106, the p ate 96 and the stud 97. The further the cam-ring is turnedtoward the left, the lower the end of the retarder trip 104 is carried, and consequently, the shorter becomes the distance the plunger 102 must move before the stud 112 slipsoif said trip. An exposure of practically any desired length may thus be obtained. When the retarder trip 104. has been lowered so far that the stud 112 passes without striking it (Fig. 38), the shutter opens and closes at the highest 5 eed with which the spring 58 is capable 0 driving the actuating parts. To provide for still igher speeds, an auxiliary spring is used, that is normall inoperative, but which is wound up an exerts its pressure on the motor lever when the cam-ring is turned far enough to engage its controlling parts. Said spring is illustrated in Figs. 40 and 41. On the pivot 44; is an arm 113, from which. a stud 114. projects into the slot 21 in the cam-plate 20. The auxiliary spring 115 (which is referably stronger than the spring 58) is coi ed around the pivot 44, back of the arm 113. One end of said spring is caught against a lug 116 on said arm, and its other end rests against a stud 117 on the motor lever 57, be low the pivotal pointof the latter. Normally, the sprin 115 is under very slight tension, just so cient to hold the arm 113 against the post 43 (Fig. 40). When the cam-ring 20 is moved far enough, the wedge or cam-face 22 thereon wedges under the stud 11. {Fi 39), and swings said arm toward the le (Fig. 41) partially winding up the spring 115. The upper end of the latter then presses with considerable force upon the stud 117, so that its power is added to that of the main motor spring 58 when the shutter is operated, and a very rapid exposure is obtained. Owing to the form of the shutter-blades, and their simultaneous operation, the whole plate is covered at the instant of exposure, which is a distinct advantage in extremely rapid work, as it obviates the distortion that is common in the use of the curtain ty e of shutter.

It will be noted om the drawings that the pump 79, the retarder dashpot 103, the setting-button 63" and the release button 71, are disposed at equal intervals around the circumference of the shutter-casing. This 5 construction gives the shutter an exceed ingly trim and symmetrical a pearance (Fig. 1), the diaphragm-lever 14 using the only other visible moving part.

\Vhat I claim is 1- 1. In a photographic shutter, a casing; shut er mechanism inclosed therein; a fixed plate within said casing having keyhole I slots therein; a scale plate forming the front of said casing and swing posts provided with enlar ed heads adapted to on age in said keyhole slots; and a locking ever in said casing for holding one of said posts in the narrow portion of its keyhole slot.

2. In a photographic shutter liavin an exposure opening, a blade movable in either of two directions to open and close said opening; a motor spring acting in one direction only; and mechanism interposed between the motor spring and the blade for operating the blade by the spring in either 0 two opposite directions to open and close the shutter by movement in each direction.

3. In a photographic shutter having an exposure 0 ening, shutter blades pivoted around sai opening; a ring connected to said blades for openin and closing the blades by motion in eit er of two opposite directions; a motor spring acting in one direction only; and mechanism interposed between the ring and the motor spring for operating said ring by the spring in either 0 two opposite directions to open and close the shutter by movement in each direction.

1. In a photographic shutter, a casing; shutter mechanism inclosed therein; a fixed plate within said casing having keyhole slots therein; a scale plate forming the front of said casing and having posts provided with enlarged heads adapted to engage in said keyhole slots; a locking lever in said casing for holding one of said posts in the narrow portion of its keyhole slot; and a rotary controlling plate held between said two plates and provided with cams for engaging and controlling parts of the shutter mechanism.

5. In a photographic shutter, a shutter .blade; 3. motor spring acting in one direction only; and automatic reversing mechanism interposed between the motor spring and the shutter blade for operating the blade in opposite directions by successive spring impulses.

6. In a photographic shutter having an exposure 0 ening, shutter blades arranged around sai opening; a rim connected to said blades for operating tem; a motor spring acting in one direction only; and automatic reversing mechanism interposed between the ring and the motor spring for operating said ring in opposite directions by successive spring impulses.

7. In a photographic shutter having an exposure opening, shutter blades arranged around said opening and adapted to open and close said exposure opening by a simultaneous continued movement of the blades in one direction; a ring connected to said blades for operating them; a motor spring acting in one direction only; and automa-i 1c reversing mechanism interposed between the motor spring and the ring for operating the ring in op site directions by successive spring impu sea.

8. In a photographic shutter having an exposure 0 ning, shutter blades arranged around sai opening; a motor spring acting in one direction only; a motor lever actuated thereby; a ring connected with the shutter blades for operat-in the same; a pivoted shutter lever connects to said ring for operating the same; and automatic reversm means for connecting said motor lever wit said shutter lever for tilting it in opposite directions by successive impulses of said spring. I

9. In a photographic shutter having an exposure opening, a shutter blade arranged around said opemn a motor spring acting in one direction any; a motor lever actuated by said spring; a shutter ring connected to said shutter blades; a pivoted shutter lever connected to said ring; and means for connecting the motor lever with the shutter lever selectively on opposite sides of its ivot for throwing the shutter in opposite irections by said spring.

10. In a photographic shutter having an exposure opening, a series of shutter blades pivoted around said opening; a ring connected to said blades for operating them; a motor spring acting in one direction only; a pivoted shutter lever for oscillating saidring in opposite directions; a motor lever operated by said motor spring; means for connecting said shutter lever and said motor lever for oscillating the ring in one direction by one complete 0 station of the motor spring; and means or connecting the shutter lever and the motor lever for oscillating the ring in the opposite direction by another complete operation of the motor spring.

11. In a photographic shutter having an exposure opening, a series of shutter blades pivoted around said opening; a motor spring acting in one direction only; an oscillating ring connected to the shutter blades for operating them; and means interposed between the motor spring and the shutter ring for oscillating the shutter ring in opposite directions by successive actions of said motor spring.

12. In a photographic shutter having an exposure opening, a series of shutter blades pivoted around said opening; a motor s ring acting in one direction only; an oscil sting ring connected to the shutter blades for operating them; means for placing said motor spring under tension; latch mechanism for releasing the same; and means interposed between the motor spring and the ring for operating the latter in opposite directions upon successive settings of the motor spring.

13, In a photographic shutter having an exposure opening, a shutter blade for said opening; a motor spring; means between the spring and the shutter blade for operating the latter; and a second motor spring adapted to Lian be set to supplement the action of the first motor spring to produce higher speeds of the shutter blade.

14. In a photographic shutter, a casing; shutter mechanisn'i inclosed therein; a fixed plate within the casing; an outer plate coverin the fixed plate, the two plates being provided with interlockin devices for re taining the outer plate an said devices being disengageable by relative movement of the plates; and a locking device concealed within the casing but accessible from withoutand operating to prevent relative disengaging movement of the plates.

15. In a photographic shutter, a casing comprising two members; screws securing the members together; shutter mechanism inclosed within the casing; 21. late covering the heads of the screws; an means concealed Within the casing for locking the plate in position.

16. In a photographic shutter, a shutter blade; a motor s ri'n connections between the spring and t e b ade for actuating the blade; a second motor spring arranged to supplement the action of the first mentioned motor spring; and means for adjusting the second spring to, vary its force and regulate the speed of the shutter blade.

17. In a photographic shutter having an exposure 0 coin a shutter blade movable in either 0 two directions to open and close said opening; a motor spring acting in one direction only; mechanism connecting the shutter blade and the motor spring for actuating the shutter blade in either direction; and means for arresting said mechanism when the shutter blade is in open position.

18. In a photographic shutter, shutter mechanism including a pivotally-mounted member operative in either direction to produce an exposure, said member being provided with two abutments on opposite sides of its pivotal center; a. motor spring; and means for connectin the motor spring alternatively with saiE abnt-ments to actuate said member in either direction.

19. In a photographic shutter, shutter mechanism including apivotally-mounted member operative in either direction to produce an exposure; mot-or spring acting in one direction only; mechanism for connecting the spring with said member to operate it in either direction; and means for arrest iug both said mechanism and said member when the shutter is open.

20. In a photographic shutter, shutter mechanism including a pivotally-monnted member operative in either direction to pr duce an exposure, said member being provided with two abutments on opposite s1des of its pivotal center; a motor s ring; and means for connecting the spring a ternatively with the abutments to actuate said member in eithet diirectiom e id me cemprit v beak-shaped member arranged to engage means. whenlthe'ehutterueqpeifi"angle tentangenged, to engage one 0% the abut- I.

each of said abutments.

21. In a photographic shutter, shutter- 5 mechanism includlng a pivotally-mounted member operatiye in either directmn topmduoe an egzpesiire, said member being provided with twdebutments on opgosite sldes of its pivotal center; "a motor sprmg"n 1ea'ns 10 for oonneeting the spring alternative 3; with the abutments to actuate said member in ther-aireeiphffa eeeererr e nfi i.

ments to arnest the movement of the pivot 1.5-'j':'.' ally-m0unted member when the shutter is open. ANDREW WOLLENSAK.

Witnesses: I

L.-TnoN,- C. Gmorm.

US51204409A 1909-08-09 1909-08-09 Photographic shutter. Expired - Lifetime US961192A (en)

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Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2424439A (en) * 1945-05-17 1947-07-22 Fairchild Camera Instr Co Focal-plane shutter
DE958983C (en) * 1951-04-03 1957-02-28 E H Helmut Junghans Dr Ing central locking
US2891456A (en) * 1951-03-30 1959-06-23 Junghans Helmut Centering shutter for photographic cameras
US2925024A (en) * 1952-12-11 1960-02-16 Junghans Helmut Centering shutter for photographic cameras
US2980004A (en) * 1957-08-27 1961-04-18 Hycon Mfg Company Camera shutter mechanism
DE976929C (en) * 1951-03-31 1964-08-20 Helmut Dr-Ing E H Junghans Central locking system for photographic lenses with double blades which open in the same, after each exposure reversing rotation
US3242839A (en) * 1963-03-04 1966-03-29 Compur Werk Gmbh & Company Photographic objective shutter

Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2424439A (en) * 1945-05-17 1947-07-22 Fairchild Camera Instr Co Focal-plane shutter
US2891456A (en) * 1951-03-30 1959-06-23 Junghans Helmut Centering shutter for photographic cameras
DE976929C (en) * 1951-03-31 1964-08-20 Helmut Dr-Ing E H Junghans Central locking system for photographic lenses with double blades which open in the same, after each exposure reversing rotation
DE958983C (en) * 1951-04-03 1957-02-28 E H Helmut Junghans Dr Ing central locking
US2925024A (en) * 1952-12-11 1960-02-16 Junghans Helmut Centering shutter for photographic cameras
US2980004A (en) * 1957-08-27 1961-04-18 Hycon Mfg Company Camera shutter mechanism
US3242839A (en) * 1963-03-04 1966-03-29 Compur Werk Gmbh & Company Photographic objective shutter

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