US9361350B2 - Data transfer between first and second databases - Google Patents

Data transfer between first and second databases Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US9361350B2
US9361350B2 US12/732,267 US73226710A US9361350B2 US 9361350 B2 US9361350 B2 US 9361350B2 US 73226710 A US73226710 A US 73226710A US 9361350 B2 US9361350 B2 US 9361350B2
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
record
machine
data
database
records
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Active, expires
Application number
US12/732,267
Other versions
US20110238620A1 (en
Inventor
Navin Kumar Ramineni
Pawan Nachnani
Rajan Madhavan
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
salesforce com Inc
Original Assignee
salesforce com Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by salesforce com Inc filed Critical salesforce com Inc
Priority to US12/732,267 priority Critical patent/US9361350B2/en
Assigned to JIGSAW DATA CORPORATION reassignment JIGSAW DATA CORPORATION ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: MADHAVAN, RAJAN, NACHNANI, PAWAN, RAMINENI, NAVIN KUMAR
Assigned to SALESFORCE.COM, INC. reassignment SALESFORCE.COM, INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: JIGSAW DATA CORPORATION
Publication of US20110238620A1 publication Critical patent/US20110238620A1/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US9361350B2 publication Critical patent/US9361350B2/en
Application status is Active legal-status Critical
Adjusted expiration legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • G06F17/30578
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F16/00Information retrieval; Database structures therefor; File system structures therefor
    • G06F16/20Information retrieval; Database structures therefor; File system structures therefor of structured data, e.g. relational data
    • G06F16/27Replication, distribution or synchronisation of data between databases or within a distributed database system; Distributed database system architectures therefor
    • G06F16/273Asynchronous replication or reconciliation

Abstract

To facilitate data transfer between two databases, a transfer machine accesses both databases and finds matching records. The transfer machine determines and stores a match status of a record in one database. The match status indicates whether the record corresponds to at least one of the records in the other database, and if so, which record or records in the other database correspond to the record. If the match status indicates that the record matches a record in the other database, the transfer machine determines which record is current and updates the other record. If the match status indicates that a record has no match in the other database, the transfer machine adds a copy of the record to the other database.

Description

TECHNICAL FIELD

The subject matter disclosed herein generally relates to the processing of data. Specifically, the present disclosure addresses systems and methods involving data transfer between a first database and a second database.

BACKGROUND

A database stores a body of data in one or more records. An example of a database is a contact information database that stores records corresponding to entities (e.g., business organizations or individual persons) able to receive communications, where the records contain information usable to address communications to the entities. Another example of a database is a customer relationship management (CRM) system that stores records corresponding to entities, where the records contain information usable to manage business relationships with the entities. Management of a business relationship with an entity may involve addressing a communication to that entity.

A record may store data in one or more data fields that organize the data within the record. Within a record, a data field may contain stored data (e.g., a phone number, an e-mail address, a mailing address, or other contact information), or the data field may be empty (e.g., storing no data, or storing null data). For example, a database may be a text file in a computer file system that is stored on a disk drive. Within the text file, a record may be one line of text terminated by a new-line character, and individual data fields may be separated by comma characters. Between comma characters, data within a data field may be a sequence of characters (e.g., a word, a phrase, or a number). Two adjacent comma characters may indicate an empty data field. As another example, a database may be a table (e.g., a spreadsheet) where each row of the table is a record and each column of the table is a data field.

Different databases may store identical or similar data in one or more data fields that are similar in purpose, if not necessarily similar in name or format. For example, one database may contain a record having a data field labeled as “Work Phone,” while another database may contain a record having a data field labeled as “Business Phone.” The two records in the two databases may correspond to a single individual person, and both data fields may contain the same data, namely, a business-related phone number for the person. As another example, a record in one database may contain a data field for a “Work Area Code” and a separate data field for a “Work Phone Number,” while another record in another database may contain a single data field for a “Business Phone Number” that includes an area code.

Furthermore, the two data fields may contain different data. As an example, one data field in one database may contain a current phone number, and the other data field in the other database may contain an out-of-date phone number. As another example, one data field in one database may contain a current phone number, while the other data field in the other database may contain no phone number at all.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Some embodiments are illustrated by way of example and not limitation in the figures of the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a network diagram illustrating a system that includes a transfer machine, a local database, and a remote database, according to some example embodiments;

FIG. 2 is a block diagram of the local database and the remote database, according to some example embodiments;

FIG. 3 is a block diagram of a local record of the local database and a corresponding remote record of the remote database, according to some example embodiments;

FIG. 4 is a block diagram of the transfer machine, according to some example embodiments;

FIG. 5 is a layout diagram illustrating a search interface configured to receive a search query for the local database and provide search results from the local database, according to some example embodiments;

FIG. 6 is a layout diagram illustrating a presentation interface configured to present summaries of the local and remote databases;

FIG. 7-8 are flowcharts illustrating a method of data transfer between the local database and the remote database; and

FIG. 9 is a block diagram illustrating components of a machine, according to some example embodiments, able to read instructions from a machine-readable medium and perform any one or more of the methodologies discussed herein.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Example methods and systems are directed to data transfer between a first database and a second database. Examples merely typify possible variations. Unless explicitly stated otherwise, components and functions are optional and may be combined or subdivided, and operations may vary in sequence or be combined or subdivided. In the following description, for purposes of explanation, numerous specific details are set forth to provide a thorough understanding of example embodiments. It will be evident to one skilled in the art, however, that the present subject matter may be practiced without these specific details.

To facilitate data transfer between a first database and a second database, a transfer machine accesses both databases and finds matching records. The first database may be a local database hosted by a local machine, and the second database may be a remote database hosted by remote machine. For example, the transfer machine may be operated by a provider of a contact information service that uses the local machine to maintain the local database, and the remote machine may be operated by a CRM service provider to maintain the remote database. As operated by the contact information service, the local database may contain records that store contact information for one or more entities. The remote database, as operated by the CRM service provider, may contain records that store information usable to manage business relationships with the one or more entities.

The transfer machine may use fuzzy matching techniques to identify the matching records. Access to the remote database requires authorization from a user of the remote database. The transfer machine obtains authorization from the user and accesses the remote database using the user's credentials (e.g., a username and a password). The matching records are a local record in the local database and a remote record in the remote database. The transfer machine determines and stores a match status of the remote record. The match status indicates whether the remote record corresponds to at least one of the records in the local database, and if so, which local record or records in the local database correspond to the remote record.

If the match status indicates that the remote record does match a record of the local database, the transfer machine determines whether the local record is current. If the local record is current and the remote record is not current (e.g., the remote record is out-of-date), the transfer machine updates the remote record using the local record. This update may be performed automatically (e.g., periodically, based on a preference setting of the user) or in response to a request from the user.

If the match status indicates that the remote record does not match a record of the local database, the transfer machine adds a copy of the remote record to the local database. Adding the copy of the remote record to the local database may be performed automatically (e.g., nightly, weekly, or monthly, based on a preference setting of the user) or in response to a request from the user. Checking for duplicate records may be performed by the transfer machine to avoid adding a duplicate record to the local database.

Moreover, the user may search for one or more records in the local database and request that a copy of a resulting local record be added to the remote database. In this situation, the transfer machine receives the user's search query and adds the copy of the local record to the remote database. The transfer machine may add the copy automatically or in response to a request from the user. Checking for duplicate records may be performed by the transfer machine to avoid adding a duplicate record to the remote database.

Furthermore, the transfer machine may present the user with summaries of the local and remote databases. In this situation, the transfer machine generates a summary of the local database (e.g., based on at least some of the local records) and a summary of the remote database (e.g., based on at least some of the remote records). The transfer machine provides the summaries to a client machine of the user for presentation to the user.

FIG. 1 is a network diagram illustrating a system 100 that includes a transfer machine 180, a first database in the example form of a local database 110, and a second database in the example form of a remote database 130, according to some example embodiments. The system 100 also includes a local machine 120 that maintains the local database 110 (e.g., provides access, updates records, and adds records), a remote machine 140 that maintains the remote database 130, and a client machine 190 of a user. The transfer machine 180, the local machine 120, the remote machine 140, and the client machine 190 are all connected via a network 150.

Any one or more of the machines (e.g., the transfer machine 180) in the system 100 may be implemented as a general-purpose computer that has been configured (e.g., programmed by software) to be a special-purpose computer to perform one or more of the methodologies described herein. An example of such a machine is discussed below with respect to FIG. 9. Furthermore, any two or more of the machines illustrated in FIG. 1 may be combined into a single machine, and the functions described herein for a single machine may be subdivided among multiple machines.

The network 150 may be any network that enables communication between machines (e.g., the local machine 120 and the remote machine 140). Accordingly, the network 150 may be a wired network, a wireless network, or any suitable combination thereof. The network 150 may include one or more portions that constitute a private network, a public network (e.g., the Internet), or any suitable combination thereof.

FIG. 2 is a block diagram of the local database 110 and the remote database 130, according to some example embodiments. The local database 110 includes local records 210, 212, and 214. The remote database 130 includes remote records 250, 252, and 254.

A user-authorized communication path 290 connects the local database 110 and the remote database 130, thus allowing data transfer between the local database 110 and the remote database 130. The user-authorized communication path 290 is a communication path that has been authorized by a user, explicitly or implicitly, presently or previously, to allow communication between the local database 110 and the remote database 130. The user-authorized communication path 290 is implemented using one or more components of the system 100 (e.g., the local machine 120, the remote machine 140, and the network 150) and represents an authorization by the user of the client machine 190 to access the remote database 130 (e.g., using the user's credentials). For example, the user may provide the transfer machine 180 with a username and a password that, in combination, enable the transfer machine 180 to log in to the remote machine 140 as the user and access the remote database 130. As another example, the user may provide the authorization by agreeing to allow communication between the local database 110 and the remote database 130 (e.g., by confirming that the user has read the terms of service for the remote database 130, where the terms of service contain a suitable agreement provision). If the user has access to only some portion of the remote database 130 (e.g., access to only 500 records out of a total of 5 million records in the remote database 130), the transfer machine 180 has access to the same portion of the remote database 130.

The remote database 130 also stores a match status 259 of a particular remote record, namely, remote record 250. The remote database 130 may store the match status 259 as part of the remote record 250, as metadata of the remote record 250, or as a separate record of the remote database 130 (e.g., cross-referenced to the remote record 250). The local database 110 may store a match status 219 as well. For example, the locally stored match status 219 may be a copy of the match status 259 corresponding to the remote record 250. As another example, the match status 219 stored in the local database 110 may be metadata of the remote record 250 or a separate record of the local database 110 (e.g., cross-referenced to the remote record 250).

FIG. 3 is a block diagram of a local record 210 of the local database 110 and a corresponding remote record 250 of the remote database 130, according to some example embodiments. The local record 210 includes local data fields 310 and 320 that respectively store local data 312 and 322. Local data 312 may be of a particular data type (e.g., a personal email address, a business email address, a work phone number, a middle name, a company name, or a job title), and local data 322 may be of another data type. The remote record 250 includes remote data fields 350 and 360 that respectively store remote data 352 and 362. Remote data 352 may be of a particular data type, which may be of the same data type as local data 312. Similarly, remote data 362 may be of another data type.

The match status 259 of the remote record 250 may indicate that the remote record 250 corresponds to (e.g., matches) a record of the local database 110. In particular, the match status 259 may indicate that the remote record 250 corresponds to the local record 210. As discussed below, the correspondence between the remote record 250 and the local record 210 may be an identical match or a fuzzy match (e.g., based on a similarity score that transgresses a similarly threshold). A correspondence relationship 390 is shown in FIG. 3 to signify that the match status 259 indicates that the remote record 250 has been determined (e.g., by the transfer machine 180) to correspond to the local record 210.

FIG. 4 is a block diagram of the transfer machine 180, according to some example embodiments. The transfer machine 180 includes an access module 410, a match module 420, a storage module 430, a transfer module 440, a reception module 450, a search module 460, and a presentation module 470, all configured to communicate with each other (e.g., via a bus, a shared memory, or a switch). Any of these modules may be augmented using hardware, as described below with respect to FIG. 9. Moreover, any two or more of these modules may be combined into a single module, and the functions described herein for a single module may be subdivided among multiple modules.

The access module 410 accesses the local database 110 and the remote database 130, as well as authorization data (e.g., stored at the transfer machine 180 or at the client machine 190) of a user of the client machine 190. The access module 410 may access all or part of the local database 110 and all or part of the remote database 130. For example, the access module 410 may access the remote database 130 to the extent that records of the remote database 130 are accessible by the user of the client machine 190. To access the local database 110, the access module 410 communicates with the local machine 120 via the network 150. Similarly, to access the remote database 130, the access module 410 communicates with the remote machine 140 via the network 150.

The authorization data represents an authorization by the user to transfer data between the local database 110 and the remote database 130. The authorization data includes an authorization indicator (e.g., a permission flag or bit) that indicates the user has authorized the transfer of data. The remote machine 140 may allow the user to have access to the entirety of the remote database 130. Similarly, the local machine 120 may allow the user to have access to the entirety of the local database 110. However, the methodologies discussed herein also apply to situations where the user has limited or partial access to the remote database 130, the local database 110, or both.

Additionally, the authorization data includes authentication data (e.g., login credentials) that authenticates (e.g., verifies or validates) the user to the remote machine 140 for access to all or part of the remote database 130. The authentication data includes a username of the user and a password of the user, and the access module 410 uses the authorization data to access the remote database 130. Similarly, the authorization data may include further authentication data that authenticates the user to the local machine 120 for access to all or part of the local database 110.

The match module 420 determines the match status 259 of a remote record 250 in the remote database 130. As noted above, the match status 259 indicates whether the remote record 250 corresponds to at least one of the records (e.g., local record 210) in the local database 110, and if so, which local record or records correspond to the remote record 250. As noted above, the correspondence may be an identical match or a fuzzy match. An identical match occurs where the local data field 310 of a local record 210 contains local data 312 that is identical to remote data 352 of a remote record 250. The match module 420 may calculate a similarity score based on the local data 312 and the remote data 352, and accordingly determine that a fuzzy match exists where the similarity score transgresses (e.g., exceeds) a similarly threshold (e.g., a predefined value for the similarity score).

Moreover, the match module 420 determines whether a record (e.g., the local record 210 or the remote record 250) is current (e.g., updated with the most recent information available) or not current (e.g., out-of-date). For example, the match module 420 may determine that the local record 210 is current and that the remote record 250 is not current, based on a comparison of timestamps indicating when the local record 210 and the remote record 250 were last updated (e.g., by the user, or by an information service).

Furthermore, the match module 420 determines whether duplicate records exist in the remote database 130. For example, the match module 420 may determine that multiple remote records 250 and 252 in the remote database 130 correspond to the same local record 210 in the local database 110. Based on this, the match module 420 may determine that the multiple remote records 250 and 252 are duplicates of each other. Like all modules discussed herein, the match module 420 may be implemented using hardware (e.g., a processor of a machine), with or without software that configures the hardware.

The storage module 430 stores the match status 259 in the remote database 130 and stores another match status 219 (e.g., a copy of the match status 259 of the remote record 250) in the local database 110. The storage module 430 may store the authorization data at the transfer machine 180 (e.g., using a machine-readable storage medium of the transfer machine 180).

The reception module 450 receives one or more requests from the client machine 190. A request may be generated by the user of the client machine 190. For example, the client machine 190 may transmit a request to update a remote record 250 of the remote database 130 using a local record 210 of the local database 110 (e.g., using local data 312). As another example, the client machine 190 may transmit a request to copy a remote record 252 of the remote database 130 to the local database 110 (e.g., as a new record of the local database 110). As a further example, the client machine 190 may transmit a request to copy a local record 212 of the local database 110 to the remote database 130 (e.g., as a new record of the remote database 130). Any one or more of these requests may be received by the reception module 450. Furthermore, the reception module 450 may receive the authorization data (e.g., from the client machine 190).

The transfer module 440 initiates data transfer between the local database 110 and the remote database 130. In particular, the transfer module 440 may cause the remote machine 140 to modify the remote database 130, may cause the local machine 120 to modify the local database 110, or any suitable combination thereof. The behavior of the transfer module 440 may be based on the match status 259 of the remote record 250. For example, based on the match status 259, the transfer module 440 may cause the remote machine 140 to write a copy of local data 312 into a remote data field 350 of the remote record 250 (e.g., as an update of remote data 352).

As another example, based on the match status 259, the transfer module 440 may cause the local machine 120 to add a copy of a remote record 252 to the local database 110 (e.g., as a new record of the local database 110). Similarly, based on the match status 259, the transfer module 440 may cause the remote machine 140 to add a copy of a local record 212 to the remote database 130 (e.g., as a new record of the remote database 130).

The search module 460 receives a search query from the client machine 190. The search query may be generated by the user of the client machine 190, and the search query may include one or more search terms. For example, the user may generate a search for records in the local database 110 that match the search terms. The search module 460 performs a search based on the search query (e.g., based on the search terms) and provides search results to the client machine 190 in response to the search query. The search results may include a list of references to records in the local database 110, and the search module 460 may present the user (e.g., via the client machine 190) with an interface to request that one or more of the referenced records of the local database 110 be copied to the remote database 130.

The presentation module 470 generates one or more summaries of one or more databases. For example, the presentation module 470 may generate a first summary of the local database 110 and generate a second summary of the remote database 130. A summary presents aggregated information that summarizes at least part of a database. As an example, the user of the client machine 190 may have access to only a portion of the local database 110 (e.g., 50 local records out of 50,000 total local records), and the first summary may be generated based on that portion (e.g., the subset). Similarly, the user may have access to only a portion of the remote database 130 (e.g., 100 remote records out of 10,000 total remote records), and the second summary may be generated based on that portion (e.g., the 100 remote records). Moreover, a summary may be generated by the presentation module 470 based on a number of records, including, for example, a number of remote records that have a particular match status (e.g., matched or unmatched), a number of records determined to be current, a number of records determined to be not current (e.g., out-of-date), or a number of records updated during a period of time (e.g., a week, a month, or year). A summary may include a chart or graph, for example, a pie chart or a bar graph. The presentation module 470 provides the first and second summaries to the client machine 190 for presentation to the user.

FIG. 5 is a layout diagram illustrating a search interface 500 configured to receive a search query for the local database 110 and provide search results from the local database 110, according to some example embodiments. The search interface 500 includes search criteria fields 510-518, a search initiator button 519, search results 520, a search storage button 530, a results export button 540, and an automatic export button 550. The search module 460 causes the client machine 190 to display the search interface 500 to the user. For example, the search module 460 may transmit a web page that includes the search interface 500 to the client machine 190.

The search criteria fields 510-518 accept user-generated submissions of search terms (e.g., keywords), and the search initiator button 519 causes the client machine 190 to transmit the search terms to the search module 460 of the transfer machine 180. The search module 460 generates the search results 520 and provides the search results 520 to the client machine 190 in the search interface 500 (e.g., in the webpage that includes the search interface 500). As shown, the search results 520 include names of persons (e.g., contacts in a contact information database), and each name may be a reference (e.g., a hyperlink) to a record (e.g., record 210) of the local database 110. Selection boxes are shown adjacent to the names. The selection boxes constitute an interface to accept user-generated selections from the search results 520.

The search storage button 530 is operable by the user to save at least some of the information shown in the search interface 500. For example, if the user clicks on the search storage button 530, the transfer machine 180 may save the contents of the search criteria fields 510-518, the search results 520, and the status of the selection boxes (e.g., checked or unchecked) to a machine-readable storage medium at the transfer machine 180.

The results export button 540 is operable by the user to submit a request that the selected search results be copied to the remote database 130. For example, if the user clicks on the results export button 540, the transfer module 440 may cause the remote machine 140 to add a copy of a local record 212 to the remote database 130 (e.g., as a new record of the remote database 130). The automatic export button 550 is operable by the user to submit a persistent version of the request. As an example, if the user clicks on the automatic export button 550, the storage module 430 may store a user preference for automatic (e.g., unattended by the user) export of records in the local database 110 that match the search criteria fields 510-518. The user preference may be stored at the transfer machine 180. Based on the stored user preference, the transfer machine 180 may identify a new local record (e.g., local record 214) in the local database 110, determine that the new local record matches the search criteria fields 510-518, and cause the remote machine 140 to add a copy of the new local record to the remote database 130.

FIG. 6 is a layout diagram illustrating a presentation interface 600 configured to present summaries 610, 620, 640, and 650 of the local and remote databases 110 and 130. The presentation interface 600 includes a first summary 610 in the example form of a pie chart depicting the local database 110, a second summary 620 in the example form of a pie chart depicting the remote database 130, a legend 630, a third summary in the example form of a bar graph based on the local database 110, and a fourth summary in the example form of a bar graph based on the remote database 130.

The first summary 610 depicts proportions of the local database 110 that include current local records, out-of-date local records, inactive local records, and unmatched local records. Similarly, the second summary 620 depicts proportions of the remote database 130 that include current remote records, out-of-data remote records, active remote records, and unmatched remote records. As shown in the legend 630, current records are records determined (e.g., by the match module 440) to be updated with the most recent information available (e.g., to the transfer machine 180). In contrast, out-of-date records are records determined (e.g., by the match module 440) to be not updated with the most recent information available. The unmatched records are records in one database (e.g., the local database 110) that have a match status (e.g., match status 259) indicating no correspondence relationship with any records in another database (e.g., the remote database 130). Inactive records are records determined (e.g., by the match module 440) to contain inaccurate information (e.g., remote data 362), and hence, in some example embodiments may be considered a subset of the out-of-date records. For example, the inactive records may be archived records in a contact information database that are also unmatched to any records in a CRM system.

FIG. 7-8 are flowcharts illustrating a method 700 of data transfer between the local database 110 and the remote database 130. The method 700 includes operations 702-784 and may be performed by modules of the transfer machine 180.

At operation 702, the reception module 450 of the transfer machine 180 receives the authorization data from the client machine 190 (e.g., as submitted by the user). As noted above, the authorization data represents an authorization by the user to transfer data between the local database 110 and the remote database 130.

The access module 410 of the transfer machine 180 performs operations 710-714. At operation 710, the access module 410 accesses the local database 110. In accessing the local database 110, the access module 410 may read one or more local records (e.g., local record 210). At operation 712, the access module 410 accesses the authorization data (e.g., stored at the transfer machine 180). At operation 714, the access module 410 accesses the remote database 130. In accessing the remote database 130, the access module 410 may read one or more remote records (e.g., remote record 250).

At operation 716, the match module 420 of the transfer machine 180 determines the match status 259 of a remote record 250 in the remote database 130. As noted above, the match status 259 is indicative of whether the remote record 250 corresponds to at least one of the records (e.g., local record 210) in the local database 110.

At operation 718, the match module 420 determines whether duplicate records exist in the remote database 130. As noted above, the match module 420 may determine that two or more remote records (e.g., remote records 250 and 252) of the remote database 130 are duplicates of each other, where the two or more remote records each have a match status (e.g., match status 259) indicating a correspondence relationship with the same local record (e.g., local record 210) in the local database 110.

At operation 720, the storage module 430 of the transfer machine 180 stores the match status 259 in the remote database 130 and stores another match status 219 (e.g., a copy of the match status 259 of the remote record 250) in the local database 110.

At operation 730, the method 700 flows to branch A if the match status 259 of the remote record 250 indicates that no local record in the local database 110 corresponds to the remote record 250. If the match status 259 indicates that the remote record 250 corresponds to a local record (e.g., local record 210), the method 700 flows to branch B. This flow control may be performed by a processor of the transfer machine 180, based on the determination of the match status 259 performed in operation 716.

Branches A and B of the method 700 are shown in FIG. 8. In branch A, the remote record 250 does not correspond to any local record in the local database 110. In some example embodiments, the user may submit a search query to search for local records (e.g., local record 210) in the local database 110. In operation 740, the search module 460 of the transfer machine 180 receives a search query from the client machine 190. As noted above, the search query may include one or more search terms (e.g., search criteria fields 510-518).

In operation 742, the search module 460 performs a search based on the search query (e.g., based on the search criteria fields 510-518) and provides search results 520 to the client machine 190 in response to the search query. As noted above, the search results 520 may include a list of references to local records in the local database 110. Moreover, the search module 460 may present the user (e.g., via the client machine 190) with an interface to request that one or more of the referenced records of the local database 110 be copied to the remote database 130.

In operation 750, the reception module 450 of the transfer machine 180 receives a request (e.g., from the user) to copy a local record 212 of the local database 110 to the remote database 130 (e.g., as a new record of the remote database 130). In operation 752, the transfer module 440 of the transfer machine 180 causes the remote machine 140 to add a copy of the local record 212 to the remote database 130.

In various example embodiments, operations 740-752 may be performed regardless whether the match status 259 of the remote record 250 indicates that no local record of the local database 110 corresponds to the remote record 250. In other words, although operations 740-752 are shown in FIG. 8 as part of branch A of the method 700, the operations 740-752 may be executed at any point in the method 700. Moreover, the operations 740-752 may be executed as a standalone method independent of the method 700.

Alternatively, in branch A of the method 700, the user may submit a request to copy the remote record 250 of the remote database 130 to the local database 110 (e.g., as a new record of the local database 110). For example, the local machine 120 may communicate to the user (e.g., via the client machine 190) that the user is to receive a reward in exchange for submission of a new record to the local database 110. In operation 760, the reception module 450 receives the request to copy the remote record 250 to the local database 110, and in operation 762, the transfer module 440 causes the local machine 120 to add a copy of the remote record 250 to the local database 110. Operation 762 may be executed automatically on a periodic basis (e.g., repeated daily, nightly, weekly, monthly, quarterly, or yearly), based on a preference setting of the user.

In branch B of the method 700, the match status 259 indicates that the remote record 250 corresponds to a local record 210 in the local database 110. In operation 770, the match module 420 determines that the local record 210 is current and that the remote record 250 is not current (e.g., based on timestamps of the records 210 and 250). In operation 772, the match module 420 provides a notification to the user via the client machine 190 to communicate that the local record 210 is current, that the remote record 250 is not current, or both.

The user may respond to this notification by submitting a request to the reception module 450 via the client machine 190. In operation 774, the reception module 450 receives a request (e.g., from the user) to update the remote record 250 of the remote database 130 using local data 312 of the local record 210. In operation 776, the transfer module 440 causes the remote machine 140 write a copy of the local data 312 into a remote data field 350 of the remote record 250 (e.g., as an update of remote data 352 stored in the remote data field 350). Operation 776 may be executed automatically on a periodic basis (e.g., repeated daily, nightly, weekly, monthly, quarterly, or yearly), based on a preference setting of the user.

Furthermore, according to the method 700, the presentation module 470 of the transfer machine 180 performs operations 780-784. In operation 780, the presentation module 470 generates a local summary (e.g., first summary 610) of the local database 110, and in operation 782, the presentation module 470 generates a remote summary (e.g., second summary 620) of the remote database 130.

In operation 784, the presentation module 470 provides one or more summaries (e.g., first and second summaries 610 and 620) to the client machine 190 for presentation to the user.

According to various example embodiments, the methodologies discussed herein may enable the transfer machine 180, with authorization from the user, to identify corresponding (e.g., identically matching or nearly matching) records in two different databases maintained by two different machines, even if the different databases are maintained by different entities (e.g., different data service providers). With corresponding records identified, the transfer machine 180 is able to update (e.g., synchronize) one record with information from its corresponding record in the other database, as well as add records from one database to another database. In identifying the corresponding records, transfer machine 180 may relieve the user of considerable expenditures of time and effort used to visually scan database records and mentally compare data stored therein to determine which records are current. Moreover, the transfer machine 180 may relieve the user of spending further time and effort performing manual data entry activities to copy information from one database to another.

FIG. 9 illustrates components of a machine 900, according to some example embodiments, that is able to read instructions from a machine-readable medium (e.g., machine-readable storage medium) and perform any one or more of the methodologies discussed herein. Specifically, FIG. 9 shows a diagrammatic representation of the machine 900 in the example form of a computer system and within which instructions 924 (e.g., software) for causing the machine 900 to perform any one or more of the methodologies discussed herein may be executed. In alternative embodiments, the machine 900 operates as a standalone device or may be connected (e.g., networked) to other machines. In a networked deployment, the machine 900 may operate in the capacity of a server machine or a client machine in a server-client network environment, or as a peer machine in a peer-to-peer (or distributed) network environment. The machine 900 may be a server computer, a client computer, a personal computer (PC), a tablet computer, a laptop computer, a netbook, a set-top box (STB), a personal digital assistant (PDA), a cellular telephone, a smartphone, a web appliance, a network router, a network switch, a network bridge, or any machine capable of executing the instructions 924 (sequentially or otherwise) that specify actions to be taken by that machine. Further, while only a single machine is illustrated, the term “machine” shall also be taken to include a collection of machines that individually or jointly execute the instructions 924 to perform any one or more of the methodologies discussed herein.

The machine 900 includes a processor 902 (e.g., a central processing unit (CPU), a graphics processing unit (GPU), a digital signal processor (DSP), an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC), a radio-frequency integrated circuit (RFIC), or any suitable combination thereof), a main memory 904, and a static memory 906, which are configured to communicate with each other via a bus 908. The machine 900 may further include a graphics display 910 (e.g., a plasma display panel (PDP), a liquid crystal display (LCD), a projector, or a cathode ray tube (CRT)). The machine 900 may also include an alphanumeric input device 912 (e.g., a keyboard), a cursor control device 914 (e.g., a mouse, a touchpad, a trackball, a joystick, a motion sensor, or other pointing instrument), a storage unit 916, a signal generation device 918 (e.g., a speaker), and a network interface device 920.

The storage unit 916 includes a machine-readable medium 922 on which is stored the instructions 924 (e.g., software) embodying any one or more of the methodologies or functions described herein. The instructions 924 may also reside, completely or at least partially, within the main memory 904, within the processor 902 (e.g., within the processor's cache memory), or both, during execution thereof by machine 900. Accordingly, the main memory 904 and the processor 902 may be considered as machine-readable media. The instructions 924 may be transmitted or received over a network 926 (e.g., network 150) via the network interface device 920.

As used herein, the term “memory” refers to a machine-readable medium able to store data temporarily or permanently and may be taken to include, but not be limited to, random-access memory (RAM), read-only memory (ROM), buffer memory, flash memory, and cache memory. While the machine-readable medium 922 is shown in an example embodiment to be a single medium, the term “machine-readable medium” should be taken to include a single medium or multiple media (e.g., a centralized or distributed database, or associated caches and servers) able to store instructions (e.g., instructions 924). The term “machine-readable medium” shall also be taken to include any medium that is capable of storing instructions (e.g., software) for execution by the machine, such that the instructions, when executed by one or more processors of the machine (e.g., processor 902), cause the machine to perform any one or more of the methodologies described herein. The term “machine-readable medium” shall accordingly be taken to include, but not be limited to, a data repository in the form of a solid-state memory, an optical medium, a magnetic medium, or any suitable combination thereof.

Throughout this specification, plural instances may implement components, operations, or structures described as a single instance. Although individual operations of one or more methods are illustrated and described as separate operations, one or more of the individual operations may be performed concurrently, and nothing requires that the operations be performed in the order illustrated. Structures and functionality presented as separate components in example configurations may be implemented as a combined structure or component. Similarly, structures and functionality presented as a single component may be implemented as separate components. These and other variations, modifications, additions, and improvements fall within the scope of the subject matter herein.

Certain embodiments are described herein as including logic or a number of components, modules, or mechanisms. Modules may constitute either software modules (e.g., code embodied on a machine-readable medium or in a transmission signal) or hardware modules. A “hardware module” is a tangible unit capable of performing certain operations and may be configured or arranged in a certain physical manner. In various example embodiments, one or more computer systems (e.g., a standalone computer system, a client computer system, or a server computer system) or one or more hardware modules of a computer system (e.g., a processor or a group of processors) may be configured by software (e.g., an application or application portion) as a hardware module that operates to perform certain operations as described herein.

In some embodiments, a hardware module may be implemented mechanically, electronically, or any suitable combination thereof. For example, a hardware module may include dedicated circuitry or logic that is permanently configured to perform certain operations. For example, a hardware module may be a special-purpose processor, such as a field programmable gate array (FPGA) or an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC). A hardware module may also include programmable logic or circuitry that is temporarily configured by software to perform certain operations. For example, a hardware module may include software encompassed within a general-purpose processor or other programmable processor. It will be appreciated that the decision to implement a hardware module mechanically, in dedicated and permanently configured circuitry, or in temporarily configured circuitry (e.g., configured by software) may be driven by cost and time considerations.

Accordingly, the term “hardware module” should be understood to encompass a tangible entity, be that an entity that is physically constructed, permanently configured (e.g., hardwired), or temporarily configured (e.g., programmed) to operate in a certain manner or to perform certain operations described herein. As used herein, “hardware-implemented module” refers to a hardware module. Considering embodiments in which hardware modules are temporarily configured (e.g., programmed), each of the hardware modules need not be configured or instantiated at any one instance in time. For example, where the hardware modules comprise a general-purpose processor configured using software, the general-purpose processor may be configured as respective different hardware modules at different times. Software may accordingly configure a processor, for example, to constitute a particular hardware module at one instance of time and to constitute a different hardware module at a different instance of time.

Hardware modules can provide information to, and receive information from, other hardware modules. Accordingly, the described hardware modules may be regarded as being communicatively coupled. Where multiple hardware modules exist contemporaneously, communications may be achieved through signal transmission (e.g., over appropriate circuits and buses) that connect the hardware modules. In embodiments in which multiple hardware modules are configured or instantiated at different times, communications between such hardware modules may be achieved, for example, through the storage and retrieval of information in memory structures to which the multiple hardware modules have access. For example, one hardware module may perform an operation and store the output of that operation in a memory device to which it is communicatively coupled. A further hardware module may then, at a later time, access the memory device to retrieve and process the stored output. Hardware modules may also initiate communications with input or output devices, and can operate on a resource (e.g., a collection of information).

The various operations of example methods described herein may be performed, at least partially, by one or more processors that are temporarily configured (e.g., by software) or permanently configured to perform the relevant operations. Whether temporarily or permanently configured, such processors may constitute processor-implemented modules that operate to perform one or more operations or functions described herein. As used herein, “processor-implemented module” refers to a hardware module implemented using one or more processors.

Similarly, the methods described herein may be at least partially processor-implemented. For example, at least some of the operations of a method may be performed by one or more processors or processor-implemented modules. The performance of certain of the operations may be distributed among the one or more processors, not only residing within a single machine, but deployed across a number of machines. In some example embodiments, the processor or processors may be located in a single location (e.g., within a home environment, an office environment or as a server farm), while in other embodiments the processors may be distributed across a number of locations.

The one or more processors may also operate to support performance of the relevant operations in a “cloud computing” environment or as a “software as a service” (SaaS). For example, at least some of the operations may be performed by a group of computers (as examples of machines including processors), these operations being accessible via a network (e.g., the Internet) and via one or more appropriate interfaces (e.g., an application program interface (API)).

The performance of certain of the operations may be distributed among the one or more processors, not only residing within a single machine, but deployed across a number of machines. In some example embodiments, the one or more processors or processor-implemented modules may be located in a single geographic location (e.g., within a home environment, an office environment, or a server farm). In other example embodiments, the one or more processors or processor-implemented modules may be distributed across a number of geographic locations.

Some portions of this specification are presented in terms of algorithms or symbolic representations of operations on data stored as bits or binary digital signals within a machine memory (e.g., a computer memory). These algorithms or symbolic representations are examples of techniques used by those of ordinary skill in the data processing arts to convey the substance of their work to others skilled in the art. As used herein, an “algorithm” is a self-consistent sequence of operations or similar processing leading to a desired result. In this context, algorithms and operations involve physical manipulation of physical quantities. Typically, but not necessarily, such quantities may take the form of electrical, magnetic, or optical signals capable of being stored, accessed, transferred, combined, compared, or otherwise manipulated by a machine. It is convenient at times, principally for reasons of common usage, to refer to such signals using words such as “data,” “content,” “bits,” “values,” “elements,” “symbols,” “characters,” “terms,” “numbers,” “numerals,” or the like. These words, however, are merely convenient labels and are to be associated with appropriate physical quantities.

Unless specifically stated otherwise, discussions herein using words such as “processing,” “computing,” “calculating,” “determining,” “presenting,” “displaying,” or the like may refer to actions or processes of a machine (e.g., a computer) that manipulates or transforms data represented as physical (e.g., electronic, magnetic, or optical) quantities within one or more memories (e.g., volatile memory, non-volatile memory, or any suitable combination thereof), registers, or other machine components that receive, store, transmit, or display information. Moreover, unless specifically stated otherwise, the terms “first,” “second,” “third,” and the like do not necessarily imply an order or sequence. Furthermore, unless specifically stated otherwise, the terms “a” or “an” are herein used, as is common in patent documents, to include one or more than one instance. Finally, as used herein, the conjunction “or” refers to a non-exclusive “or,” unless specifically stated otherwise.

Claims (21)

What is claimed is:
1. A computer-implemented method comprising:
accessing, by a transfer machine, a first database hosted by a first machine in response to a request identifying authorization data, the first database including a first plurality of records, the first plurality of records including a first record that includes a first data field of a data type from a plurality of data types per record, the data type corresponding to the request;
accessing, by the transfer machine, the authorization data identified in the request, the authorization data representing an authorization by a user to transfer data between the first database and a second database hosted by a second machine communicatively coupled to the first machine via a network, wherein the authorization data represents the user's credentials and defines the user's scope of access to the second database, the second machine being remote with respect to the first machine;
accessing, by the transfer machine, the second database using the authorization data, the second database including a second plurality of records, the second plurality of records including a second record that includes a second data field of the data type from a plurality of data types per record;
determining, by the transfer machine, match statuses of the first and second records based on the first data field of the first record and the second data field of the second record, the match statuses being indicative of whether the first record corresponds to a least one of the second plurality of records or the second record corresponds to at least one of the first plurality of records, the match statuses comprising a fuzzy match, the determining of the match statuses being performed using a processor of the transfer machine;
storing, by the transfer machine, the match statuses of the first and second records, wherein each match status is a data record that is stored separate from the first record and the second record, the storing including storing a copy of the match status on each of the first machine and the second machine;
determining, by the transfer machine, which record in the first database and in the second database is most current for at least one pair of corresponding first and second records based on a comparison of a first timestamp indicating when the first record was last updated and a second timestamp indicating when the second record was last updated;
identifying, by the transfer machine, the first record for updating the second record in response to a determination that the first timestamp is most current; and
identifying, by the transfer machine, the second record for updating the first record in response to a determination that the second timestamp is most current.
2. The computer-implemented method of claim 1 further comprising:
receiving the authorization data from a client machine of the user; wherein:
the authorization data includes authentication data of the user;
the authentication data authenticates the user to the second machine for access to the second database; and
the client machine is communicatively coupled to at least one of the first machine or the second machine.
3. The computer-implemented method of claim 1, wherein:
the match status of the second record indicates that the second record does correspond to the first record;
the first data field stores first data of the data type; and the method further comprises
causing the second machine to write a copy of the first data into the second data field.
4. The computer-implemented method of claim 3, wherein:
a client machine of the user transmits a request to update the second record using the first record;
the causing of the second machine to write the copy is responsive to the request; and the method further comprises
receiving the request from the client machine.
5. The computer-implemented method of claim 3, wherein:
the second data field stores second data of the data type; and the method further comprises
determining that the first data is current and that the second data is not current.
6. The computer-implemented method of claim 1, wherein:
the match status indicates that the second record does not correspond to any of the first plurality of records;
a client machine of the user transmits a request to copy the second record to the first database; and the method further comprises:
receiving the request from the client machine; and
causing the first machine to add a copy of the second record to the first database.
7. The computer-implemented method of claim 1, wherein:
the match status of the first record indicates that the first record does not correspond to any of the second plurality of records; and the method further comprises
causing the second machine to add a copy of the first record to the second database.
8. The computer-implemented method of claim 7, wherein:
a client machine of the user transmits a request to copy the first record to the second database;
the causing of the second machine to add the copy is responsive to the request; and the method further comprises
receiving the request from the client machine.
9. The computer-implemented method of claim 8 further comprising:
receiving a search query from the client machine; and
providing search results in response to the search query; wherein:
the search results include a reference to the first record; and
the causing of the second machine to add the copy is based on the reference to the first record.
10. The computer-implemented method of claim 1 further comprising:
generating a first summary of the first database;
generating a second summary of the second database; and
providing the first and second summaries to a client machine for presentation at the client machine.
11. The computer-implemented method of claim 10, wherein
at least one of the first summary or the second summary is based on a parameter selected from a group consisting of:
a first number of records that have a particular match status;
a second number of records determined to be current;
a third number of records determined to be not current; and
a fourth number of records updated during a period of time.
12. The computer-implemented method of claim 1, wherein:
the match status of the second record is a first match status;
the second plurality of records includes a third record having a second match status;
the first match status indicates that the second record corresponds to the first record;
the second match status indicates that the third record corresponds to the first record; and the method further comprises:
determining that the second and third records are duplicate records.
13. The computer-implemented method of claim 1, wherein
determining the match status includes at least one of:
determining that first data stored in the first data field is identical to second data stored in the second data field, whereby the match status is determined to be an identical match;
determining that a similarity score calculated based on the first data and on the second data transgresses a similarity threshold to indicate a correspondence between the first and second records, whereby the match status is determined to be a fuzzy match; or
determining that the similarity score does not transgress the similarity threshold, whereby the match status is determined to be unmatched.
14. A system comprising:
a processor-based application, which when executed on a computer having one or more processors, will cause the one or more processors to:
access, by a transfer machine, a first database hosted by a first machine in response to a request identifying authorization data, the first database including a first plurality of records, the first plurality of records including a first record that includes a first data field of a data type from a plurality of data types per record, the data type corresponding to the request;
access, by the transfer machine, the authorization data identified in the request, the authorization data representing of an authorization by a user to transfer data between the first database and a second database hosted by a second machine communicatively coupled to the first machine via a network, wherein the authorization data represents the user's credentials and defines the user's scope of access to the second database, the second machine being remote with respect to the first machine;
access, by the transfer machine, the second database using the authorization data, the second database including a second plurality of records, the second plurality of records including a second record that includes a second data field of the data type from a plurality of data types per record;
determine, by the transfer machine, match statuses of the first and second records based on the first data field of the first record and the second data field of the second record, the match statuses being indicative of whether the first record corresponds to a least one of the second plurality of records or the second record corresponds to at least one of the first plurality of records, the match statuses comprising a fuzzy match, the determining of the match statuses being performed using a processor of a machine, wherein a most current record in the first database and in the second database is determined for at least one pair of corresponding first and second records based on a comparison of a first timestamp indicating when the first record was last updated and a second timestamp indicating when the second record was last updated,
identify, by the transfer machine, the first record for updating the second record in response to a determination that the first timestamp is most current, and
identify, by the transfer machine, the second record for updating the first record in response to a determination that the second timestamp is most current; and
store, by the transfer machine, the match statuses of the first and second records, wherein each match status is a data record that is stored separate from the first record and the second record, the storing including storing a copy of the match status on each of the first machine and the second machine.
15. The system of claim 14, wherein:
the match status indicates that the second record corresponds to the first record;
the first data field stores first data of the data type; and the system further comprises
a transfer module to cause the second machine to write a copy of the first data into the second data field.
16. The system of claim 15, wherein:
a client machine of the user transmits a request to update the second record using the first record;
the transfer module is to cause the second machine to write the copy in response to the request; and the system further comprises
a reception module to receive the request from the client machine.
17. The system of claim 14, wherein:
the match status indicates that the second record does not correspond to any of the first plurality of records;
a client machine of the user transmits a request to copy the second record to the first database; and the system further comprises:
a reception module to receive the request from the client machine; and
a transfer module to cause the first machine to add a copy of the second record to the first database.
18. The system of claim 14, wherein:
the match status of the first record indicates that the first record does not correspond to any of the second plurality of records; and the system further comprises
a transfer module to cause the second machine to add a copy of the first record to the second database.
19. The system of claim 18, wherein:
a client machine of the user transmits a request to copy the first record to the second database;
the transfer module is to cause the second machine to add the copy in response to the request; and the system further comprises
a reception module to receive the request from the client machine.
20. A non-transitory machine-readable storage medium comprising instructions that, when executed by one or more processors of a machine, cause the machine to perform a method comprising:
accessing, by a transfer machine, a first database hosted by a first machine in response to a request identifying authorization data, the first database including a first plurality of records, the first plurality of records including a first record that includes a first data field of a data type from a plurality of data types per record, the data type corresponding to the request;
accessing, by the transfer machine, the authorization data identified in the request, the authorization data representing an authorization by a user to transfer data between the first database and a second database hosted by a second machine communicatively coupled to the first machine via a network, wherein the authorization data represents the user's credentials and defines the user's scope of access to the second database, the second machine being remote with respect to the first machine;
accessing, by the transfer machine, the second database using the authorization data, the second database including a second plurality of records, the second plurality of records including a second record that includes a second data field of the data type from a plurality of data types per record;
determining, by the transfer machine, match statuses of the first and second records based on the first data field of the first record and the second data field of the second record, the match statuses being indicative of whether the first record corresponds to a least one of the second plurality of records or the second record corresponds to at least one of the first plurality of records, the match statuses comprising a fuzzy match, the determining of the match statuses being performed using a processor of the transfer machine;
storing, by the transfer machine, the match statuses of the first and second records, wherein each match status is a data record that is stored separate from the first record and the second record, the storing including storing a copy of the match status on each of the first machine and the second machine;
determining, by the transfer machine, which record in the first database and in the second database is most current for at least one pair of corresponding first and second records based on a comparison of a first timestamp indicating when the first record was last updated and a second timestamp indicating when the second record was last updated;
identifying, by the transfer machine, the first record for updating the second record in response to a determination that the first timestamp is most current; and
identifying, by the transfer machine, the second record for updating the first record in response to a determination that the second timestamp is most current.
21. The non-transitory machine readable storage medium of claim 20, wherein:
the method further comprises:
generating a first summary of the first database;
generating a second summary of the second database; and
providing the first and second summaries to a client machine for presentation at the client machine;
at least one of the first summary or the second summary is based on a parameter selected from a group consisting of:
a first number of records that have a particular match status;
a second number of records determined to be current;
a third number of records determined to be not current; and
a fourth number of records updated during a period of time; and
the determining of the match status includes at least one of:
determining that first data stored in the first data field is identical to second data stored in the second data field, whereby the match status is determined to be an identical match;
determining that a similarity score calculated based on the first data and on the second data transgresses a similarity threshold to indicate a correspondence between the first and second records, whereby the match status is determined to be a fuzzy match; or
determining that the similarity score does not transgress the similarity threshold, whereby the match status is determined to be unmatched.
US12/732,267 2010-03-26 2010-03-26 Data transfer between first and second databases Active 2031-10-06 US9361350B2 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12/732,267 US9361350B2 (en) 2010-03-26 2010-03-26 Data transfer between first and second databases

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12/732,267 US9361350B2 (en) 2010-03-26 2010-03-26 Data transfer between first and second databases

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20110238620A1 US20110238620A1 (en) 2011-09-29
US9361350B2 true US9361350B2 (en) 2016-06-07

Family

ID=44657508

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12/732,267 Active 2031-10-06 US9361350B2 (en) 2010-03-26 2010-03-26 Data transfer between first and second databases

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US9361350B2 (en)

Families Citing this family (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US9817898B2 (en) 2011-11-14 2017-11-14 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Locating relevant content items across multiple disparate content sources
EP2901303A4 (en) 2012-09-25 2016-06-01 Moneydesktop Inc Aggregation source routing
US9189503B2 (en) 2012-12-06 2015-11-17 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Database scale-out
US20140344029A1 (en) 2013-05-14 2014-11-20 Moneydesktop, Inc. Proactive bill pay method and system
US9692815B2 (en) 2015-11-12 2017-06-27 Mx Technologies, Inc. Distributed, decentralized data aggregation

Citations (126)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5577188A (en) 1994-05-31 1996-11-19 Future Labs, Inc. Method to provide for virtual screen overlay
US5608872A (en) 1993-03-19 1997-03-04 Ncr Corporation System for allowing all remote computers to perform annotation on an image and replicating the annotated image on the respective displays of other comuters
US5649104A (en) 1993-03-19 1997-07-15 Ncr Corporation System for allowing user of any computer to draw image over that generated by the host computer and replicating the drawn image to other computers
US5715450A (en) 1995-09-27 1998-02-03 Siebel Systems, Inc. Method of selecting and presenting data from a database using a query language to a user of a computer system
US5821937A (en) 1996-02-23 1998-10-13 Netsuite Development, L.P. Computer method for updating a network design
US5831610A (en) 1996-02-23 1998-11-03 Netsuite Development L.P. Designing networks
US5873096A (en) 1997-10-08 1999-02-16 Siebel Systems, Inc. Method of maintaining a network of partially replicated database system
US5918159A (en) 1997-08-04 1999-06-29 Fomukong; Mundi Location reporting satellite paging system with optional blocking of location reporting
US5963953A (en) 1998-03-30 1999-10-05 Siebel Systems, Inc. Method, and system for product configuration
US6092083A (en) 1997-02-26 2000-07-18 Siebel Systems, Inc. Database management system which synchronizes an enterprise server and a workgroup user client using a docking agent
US6161149A (en) 1998-03-13 2000-12-12 Groupserve, Inc. Centrifugal communication and collaboration method
US6169534B1 (en) 1997-06-26 2001-01-02 Upshot.Com Graphical user interface for customer information management
US6178425B1 (en) 1997-02-26 2001-01-23 Siebel Systems, Inc. Method of determining the visibility to a remote database client of a plurality of database transactions using simplified visibility rules
US6216135B1 (en) 1997-02-26 2001-04-10 Siebel Systems, Inc. Method of determining visibility to a remote database client of a plurality of database transactions having variable visibility strengths
US6233617B1 (en) 1997-02-26 2001-05-15 Siebel Systems, Inc. Determining the visibility to a remote database client
US6266669B1 (en) 1997-02-28 2001-07-24 Siebel Systems, Inc. Partially replicated distributed database with multiple levels of remote clients
US6295530B1 (en) 1995-05-15 2001-09-25 Andrew M. Ritchie Internet service of differently formatted viewable data signals including commands for browser execution
US20010044791A1 (en) 2000-04-14 2001-11-22 Richter James Neal Automated adaptive classification system for bayesian knowledge networks
US6324568B1 (en) 1999-11-30 2001-11-27 Siebel Systems, Inc. Method and system for distributing objects over a network
US6324693B1 (en) 1997-03-12 2001-11-27 Siebel Systems, Inc. Method of synchronizing independently distributed software and database schema
US6336137B1 (en) 2000-03-31 2002-01-01 Siebel Systems, Inc. Web client-server system and method for incompatible page markup and presentation languages
USD454139S1 (en) 2001-02-20 2002-03-05 Rightnow Technologies Display screen for a computer
US6367077B1 (en) 1997-02-27 2002-04-02 Siebel Systems, Inc. Method of upgrading a software application in the presence of user modifications
US6389429B1 (en) * 1999-07-30 2002-05-14 Aprimo, Inc. System and method for generating a target database from one or more source databases
US6393605B1 (en) 1998-11-18 2002-05-21 Siebel Systems, Inc. Apparatus and system for efficient delivery and deployment of an application
US20020072951A1 (en) 1999-03-03 2002-06-13 Michael Lee Marketing support database management method, system and program product
US20020083325A1 (en) * 2000-11-03 2002-06-27 Bharat Mediratta Updating security schemes for remote client access
US20020082892A1 (en) 1998-08-27 2002-06-27 Keith Raffel Method and apparatus for network-based sales force management
US6434550B1 (en) 2000-04-14 2002-08-13 Rightnow Technologies, Inc. Temporal updates of relevancy rating of retrieved information in an information search system
US6446089B1 (en) 1997-02-26 2002-09-03 Siebel Systems, Inc. Method of using a cache to determine the visibility to a remote database client of a plurality of database transactions
US20020140731A1 (en) 2001-03-28 2002-10-03 Pavitra Subramaniam Engine to present a user interface based on a logical structure, such as one for a customer relationship management system, across a web site
US20020143997A1 (en) 2001-03-28 2002-10-03 Xiaofei Huang Method and system for direct server synchronization with a computing device
US20020162090A1 (en) 2001-04-30 2002-10-31 Parnell Karen P. Polylingual simultaneous shipping of software
US20020165742A1 (en) 2000-03-31 2002-11-07 Mark Robins Feature centric release manager method and system
US20030004971A1 (en) 2001-06-29 2003-01-02 Gong Wen G. Automatic generation of data models and accompanying user interfaces
US20030018830A1 (en) 2001-02-06 2003-01-23 Mingte Chen Adaptive communication application programming interface
US20030018705A1 (en) 2001-03-31 2003-01-23 Mingte Chen Media-independent communication server
US6535909B1 (en) 1999-11-18 2003-03-18 Contigo Software, Inc. System and method for record and playback of collaborative Web browsing session
US20030066031A1 (en) 2001-09-28 2003-04-03 Siebel Systems, Inc. Method and system for supporting user navigation in a browser environment
US20030066032A1 (en) 2001-09-28 2003-04-03 Siebel Systems,Inc. System and method for facilitating user interaction in a browser environment
US20030070004A1 (en) 2001-09-29 2003-04-10 Anil Mukundan Method, apparatus, and system for implementing a framework to support a web-based application
US20030070005A1 (en) 2001-09-29 2003-04-10 Anil Mukundan Method, apparatus, and system for implementing view caching in a framework to support web-based applications
US20030070000A1 (en) 2001-09-29 2003-04-10 John Coker Computing system and method to implicitly commit unsaved data for a World Wide Web application
US20030069936A1 (en) 2001-10-09 2003-04-10 Warner Douglas K. Method for routing electronic correspondence based on the level and type of emotion contained therein
US20030074418A1 (en) 2001-09-29 2003-04-17 John Coker Method, apparatus and system for a mobile web client
US6553563B2 (en) 1998-11-30 2003-04-22 Siebel Systems, Inc. Development tool, method, and system for client server applications
US6560461B1 (en) 1997-08-04 2003-05-06 Mundi Fomukong Authorized location reporting paging system
US6574635B2 (en) 1999-03-03 2003-06-03 Siebel Systems, Inc. Application instantiation based upon attributes and values stored in a meta data repository, including tiering of application layers objects and components
US6577726B1 (en) 2000-03-31 2003-06-10 Siebel Systems, Inc. Computer telephony integration hotelling method and system
US6601087B1 (en) 1998-11-18 2003-07-29 Webex Communications, Inc. Instant document sharing
US6604117B2 (en) 1996-03-19 2003-08-05 Siebel Systems, Inc. Method of maintaining a network of partially replicated database system
US20030151633A1 (en) 2002-02-13 2003-08-14 David George Method and system for enabling connectivity to a data system
US20030159136A1 (en) 2001-09-28 2003-08-21 Huang Xiao Fei Method and system for server synchronization with a computing device
US6621834B1 (en) 1999-11-05 2003-09-16 Raindance Communications, Inc. System and method for voice transmission over network protocols
US20030189600A1 (en) 2002-03-29 2003-10-09 Prasad Gune Defining an approval process for requests for approval
US20030204427A1 (en) 2002-03-29 2003-10-30 Prasad Gune User interface for processing requests for approval
US20030206192A1 (en) 2001-03-31 2003-11-06 Mingte Chen Asynchronous message push to web browser
US6654032B1 (en) 1999-12-23 2003-11-25 Webex Communications, Inc. Instant sharing of documents on a remote server
US6665648B2 (en) 1998-11-30 2003-12-16 Siebel Systems, Inc. State models for monitoring process
US6665655B1 (en) 2000-04-14 2003-12-16 Rightnow Technologies, Inc. Implicit rating of retrieved information in an information search system
US20040001092A1 (en) 2002-06-27 2004-01-01 Rothwein Thomas M. Prototyping graphical user interfaces
US20040015981A1 (en) 2002-06-27 2004-01-22 Coker John L. Efficient high-interactivity user interface for client-server applications
US20040027388A1 (en) 2002-06-27 2004-02-12 Eric Berg Method and apparatus to facilitate development of a customer-specific business process model
US6711565B1 (en) 2001-06-18 2004-03-23 Siebel Systems, Inc. Method, apparatus, and system for previewing search results
US6724399B1 (en) 2001-09-28 2004-04-20 Siebel Systems, Inc. Methods and apparatus for enabling keyboard accelerators in applications implemented via a browser
US6728960B1 (en) 1998-11-18 2004-04-27 Siebel Systems, Inc. Techniques for managing multiple threads in a browser environment
US6728702B1 (en) 2001-06-18 2004-04-27 Siebel Systems, Inc. System and method to implement an integrated search center supporting a full-text search and query on a database
US6732095B1 (en) 2001-04-13 2004-05-04 Siebel Systems, Inc. Method and apparatus for mapping between XML and relational representations
US6732100B1 (en) 2000-03-31 2004-05-04 Siebel Systems, Inc. Database access method and system for user role defined access
US6732111B2 (en) 1998-03-03 2004-05-04 Siebel Systems, Inc. Method, apparatus, system, and program product for attaching files and other objects to a partially replicated database
US20040128001A1 (en) 2002-08-28 2004-07-01 Levin Issac Stephen Method and apparatus for an integrated process modeller
US6763351B1 (en) 2001-06-18 2004-07-13 Siebel Systems, Inc. Method, apparatus, and system for attaching search results
US6763501B1 (en) 2000-06-09 2004-07-13 Webex Communications, Inc. Remote document serving
US6768904B2 (en) 2000-10-11 2004-07-27 Lg Electronics Inc. Data communication method using mobile terminal
US6772229B1 (en) 2000-11-13 2004-08-03 Groupserve, Inc. Centrifugal communication and collaboration method
US6782383B2 (en) 2001-06-18 2004-08-24 Siebel Systems, Inc. System and method to implement a persistent and dismissible search center frame
US20040186860A1 (en) 2003-03-21 2004-09-23 Wen-Hsin Lee Method and architecture for providing data-change alerts to external applications via a push service
US20040193510A1 (en) 2003-03-25 2004-09-30 Catahan Nardo B. Modeling of order data
US20040199536A1 (en) 2003-03-24 2004-10-07 Barnes Leon Maria Theresa Product common object
US20040199489A1 (en) 2003-03-24 2004-10-07 Barnes-Leon Maria Theresa Custom common object
US6804330B1 (en) 2002-01-04 2004-10-12 Siebel Systems, Inc. Method and system for accessing CRM data via voice
US6826745B2 (en) 1998-11-30 2004-11-30 Siebel Systems, Inc. System and method for smart scripting call centers and configuration thereof
US6826582B1 (en) 2001-09-28 2004-11-30 Emc Corporation Method and system for using file systems for content management
US6829655B1 (en) 2001-03-28 2004-12-07 Siebel Systems, Inc. Method and system for server synchronization with a computing device via a companion device
US20040249854A1 (en) 2003-03-24 2004-12-09 Barnes-Leon Maria Theresa Common common object
US20040260659A1 (en) 2003-06-23 2004-12-23 Len Chan Function space reservation system
US20040260534A1 (en) 2003-06-19 2004-12-23 Pak Wai H. Intelligent data search
US20040268299A1 (en) 2003-06-30 2004-12-30 Shu Lei Application user interface template with free-form layout
US6842748B1 (en) 2000-04-14 2005-01-11 Rightnow Technologies, Inc. Usage based strength between related information in an information retrieval system
US6850895B2 (en) 1998-11-30 2005-02-01 Siebel Systems, Inc. Assignment manager
US6850949B2 (en) 2002-06-03 2005-02-01 Right Now Technologies, Inc. System and method for generating a dynamic interface via a communications network
US20050038823A1 (en) * 2003-08-13 2005-02-17 Wade Amy L. Methods, systems, and computer program products for synchronizing records in billing and service databases
US20050050555A1 (en) 2003-08-28 2005-03-03 Exley Richard Mark Universal application network architecture
US7062502B1 (en) 2001-12-28 2006-06-13 Kesler John N Automated generation of dynamic data entry user interface for relational database management systems
US20070260611A1 (en) * 2006-05-02 2007-11-08 James John Bohannon Method for providing the appearance of a single data repository for queries initiated in a system incorporating distributed member server groups
US7340411B2 (en) 1998-02-26 2008-03-04 Cook Rachael L System and method for generating, capturing, and managing customer lead information over a computer network
US7356482B2 (en) 1998-12-18 2008-04-08 Alternative Systems, Inc. Integrated change management unit
US20090063415A1 (en) 2007-08-31 2009-03-05 Business Objects, S.A. Apparatus and method for dynamically selecting componentized executable instructions at run time
US20090100342A1 (en) 2007-10-12 2009-04-16 Gabriel Jakobson Method and system for presenting address and mapping information
US20090177744A1 (en) 2008-01-04 2009-07-09 Yahoo! Inc. Identifying and employing social network relationships
US7620655B2 (en) 2003-05-07 2009-11-17 Enecto Ab Method, device and computer program product for identifying visitors of websites
US20090287746A1 (en) * 2008-05-15 2009-11-19 International Business Machines Corporation Apparatus, system, and method for dynamic database driven document synchronization
US20100082842A1 (en) * 2008-09-30 2010-04-01 Latista Technologies Computer program product, system and method for field management and mobile inspection
US7698160B2 (en) 1999-05-07 2010-04-13 Virtualagility, Inc System for performing collaborative tasks
US7779475B2 (en) 2006-07-31 2010-08-17 Petnote Llc Software-based method for gaining privacy by affecting the screen of a computing device
US20100309933A1 (en) * 2009-06-03 2010-12-09 Rebelvox Llc Method for synchronizing data maintained at a plurality of nodes
US7851004B2 (en) 2001-07-19 2010-12-14 San-Ei Gen F.F.I., Inc. Taste-improving composition and application of the same
US8010663B2 (en) 2008-11-21 2011-08-30 The Invention Science Fund I, Llc Correlating data indicating subjective user states associated with multiple users with data indicating objective occurrences
US8014943B2 (en) 2008-05-08 2011-09-06 Gabriel Jakobson Method and system for displaying social networking navigation information
US8032297B2 (en) 2008-05-08 2011-10-04 Gabriel Jakobson Method and system for displaying navigation information on an electronic map
US8082301B2 (en) 2006-11-10 2011-12-20 Virtual Agility, Inc. System for supporting collaborative activity
US8095413B1 (en) 1999-05-07 2012-01-10 VirtualAgility, Inc. Processing management information
US8209308B2 (en) 2006-05-01 2012-06-26 Rueben Steven L Method for presentation of revisions of an electronic document
US20120233137A1 (en) 2006-05-01 2012-09-13 Gabriel Jakobson Presentation of document history in a web browsing application
US8490025B2 (en) 2008-02-01 2013-07-16 Gabriel Jakobson Displaying content associated with electronic mapping systems
US8504945B2 (en) 2008-02-01 2013-08-06 Gabriel Jakobson Method and system for associating content with map zoom function
US8510664B2 (en) 2008-09-06 2013-08-13 Steven L. Rueben Method and system for displaying email thread information
US20130218949A1 (en) 2012-02-17 2013-08-22 Gabriel Jakobson Collaborative web browsing system integrated with social networks
US20130218948A1 (en) 2012-02-17 2013-08-22 Gabriel Jakobson Variable speed collaborative web browsing system
US20130218966A1 (en) 2012-02-17 2013-08-22 Gabriel Jakobson Collaborative web browsing system having document object model element interaction detection
US8566301B2 (en) 2006-05-01 2013-10-22 Steven L. Rueben Document revisions in a collaborative computing environment
US8646103B2 (en) 2008-06-30 2014-02-04 Gabriel Jakobson Method and system for securing online identities
US20140359537A1 (en) 2008-02-01 2014-12-04 Gabriel Jackobson Online advertising associated with electronic mapping systems
US20150007050A1 (en) 2013-07-01 2015-01-01 Gabriel Jakobson Method and system for processing and displaying email thread information
US20150095162A1 (en) 2013-09-27 2015-04-02 Gabriel Jakobson Method and systems for online advertising to users using fictitious user idetities
US20150172563A1 (en) 2013-12-18 2015-06-18 Gabriel Jakobson Incorporating advertising content into a digital video

Patent Citations (145)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5608872A (en) 1993-03-19 1997-03-04 Ncr Corporation System for allowing all remote computers to perform annotation on an image and replicating the annotated image on the respective displays of other comuters
US5649104A (en) 1993-03-19 1997-07-15 Ncr Corporation System for allowing user of any computer to draw image over that generated by the host computer and replicating the drawn image to other computers
US5761419A (en) 1993-03-19 1998-06-02 Ncr Corporation Remote collaboration system including first program means translating user inputs into annotations and running on all computers while second program means runs on one computer
US5819038A (en) 1993-03-19 1998-10-06 Ncr Corporation Collaboration system for producing copies of image generated by first program on first computer on other computers and annotating the image by second program
US5577188A (en) 1994-05-31 1996-11-19 Future Labs, Inc. Method to provide for virtual screen overlay
US6826565B2 (en) 1995-05-15 2004-11-30 Ablaise Limited Method and apparatus for serving files to browsing clients
US6295530B1 (en) 1995-05-15 2001-09-25 Andrew M. Ritchie Internet service of differently formatted viewable data signals including commands for browser execution
US5715450A (en) 1995-09-27 1998-02-03 Siebel Systems, Inc. Method of selecting and presenting data from a database using a query language to a user of a computer system
US5821937A (en) 1996-02-23 1998-10-13 Netsuite Development, L.P. Computer method for updating a network design
US5831610A (en) 1996-02-23 1998-11-03 Netsuite Development L.P. Designing networks
US6189011B1 (en) 1996-03-19 2001-02-13 Siebel Systems, Inc. Method of maintaining a network of partially replicated database system
US6604117B2 (en) 1996-03-19 2003-08-05 Siebel Systems, Inc. Method of maintaining a network of partially replicated database system
US6233617B1 (en) 1997-02-26 2001-05-15 Siebel Systems, Inc. Determining the visibility to a remote database client
US6092083A (en) 1997-02-26 2000-07-18 Siebel Systems, Inc. Database management system which synchronizes an enterprise server and a workgroup user client using a docking agent
US6684438B2 (en) 1997-02-26 2004-02-03 Siebel Systems, Inc. Method of using cache to determine the visibility to a remote database client of a plurality of database transactions
US6446089B1 (en) 1997-02-26 2002-09-03 Siebel Systems, Inc. Method of using a cache to determine the visibility to a remote database client of a plurality of database transactions
US6216135B1 (en) 1997-02-26 2001-04-10 Siebel Systems, Inc. Method of determining visibility to a remote database client of a plurality of database transactions having variable visibility strengths
US6178425B1 (en) 1997-02-26 2001-01-23 Siebel Systems, Inc. Method of determining the visibility to a remote database client of a plurality of database transactions using simplified visibility rules
US6367077B1 (en) 1997-02-27 2002-04-02 Siebel Systems, Inc. Method of upgrading a software application in the presence of user modifications
US20020129352A1 (en) 1997-02-27 2002-09-12 Brodersen Robert A. Method and apparatus for upgrading a software application in the presence of user modifications
US6266669B1 (en) 1997-02-28 2001-07-24 Siebel Systems, Inc. Partially replicated distributed database with multiple levels of remote clients
US6405220B1 (en) 1997-02-28 2002-06-11 Siebel Systems, Inc. Partially replicated distributed database with multiple levels of remote clients
US6754681B2 (en) 1997-02-28 2004-06-22 Siebel Systems, Inc. Partially replicated distributed database with multiple levels of remote clients
US6324693B1 (en) 1997-03-12 2001-11-27 Siebel Systems, Inc. Method of synchronizing independently distributed software and database schema
US6169534B1 (en) 1997-06-26 2001-01-02 Upshot.Com Graphical user interface for customer information management
US5918159A (en) 1997-08-04 1999-06-29 Fomukong; Mundi Location reporting satellite paging system with optional blocking of location reporting
US6560461B1 (en) 1997-08-04 2003-05-06 Mundi Fomukong Authorized location reporting paging system
US5873096A (en) 1997-10-08 1999-02-16 Siebel Systems, Inc. Method of maintaining a network of partially replicated database system
US7340411B2 (en) 1998-02-26 2008-03-04 Cook Rachael L System and method for generating, capturing, and managing customer lead information over a computer network
US6732111B2 (en) 1998-03-03 2004-05-04 Siebel Systems, Inc. Method, apparatus, system, and program product for attaching files and other objects to a partially replicated database
US6161149A (en) 1998-03-13 2000-12-12 Groupserve, Inc. Centrifugal communication and collaboration method
US8015495B2 (en) 1998-03-13 2011-09-06 Groupserve It Trust Llc Centrifugal communication and collaboration method
US5963953A (en) 1998-03-30 1999-10-05 Siebel Systems, Inc. Method, and system for product configuration
US20020082892A1 (en) 1998-08-27 2002-06-27 Keith Raffel Method and apparatus for network-based sales force management
US6549908B1 (en) 1998-11-18 2003-04-15 Siebel Systems, Inc. Methods and apparatus for interpreting user selections in the context of a relation distributed as a set of orthogonalized sub-relations
US6393605B1 (en) 1998-11-18 2002-05-21 Siebel Systems, Inc. Apparatus and system for efficient delivery and deployment of an application
US6728960B1 (en) 1998-11-18 2004-04-27 Siebel Systems, Inc. Techniques for managing multiple threads in a browser environment
US6601087B1 (en) 1998-11-18 2003-07-29 Webex Communications, Inc. Instant document sharing
US6553563B2 (en) 1998-11-30 2003-04-22 Siebel Systems, Inc. Development tool, method, and system for client server applications
US6826745B2 (en) 1998-11-30 2004-11-30 Siebel Systems, Inc. System and method for smart scripting call centers and configuration thereof
US20050091098A1 (en) 1998-11-30 2005-04-28 Siebel Systems, Inc. Assignment manager
US6850895B2 (en) 1998-11-30 2005-02-01 Siebel Systems, Inc. Assignment manager
US6665648B2 (en) 1998-11-30 2003-12-16 Siebel Systems, Inc. State models for monitoring process
US8484111B2 (en) 1998-12-18 2013-07-09 Applications In Internet Time, Llc Integrated change management unit
US7356482B2 (en) 1998-12-18 2008-04-08 Alternative Systems, Inc. Integrated change management unit
US6574635B2 (en) 1999-03-03 2003-06-03 Siebel Systems, Inc. Application instantiation based upon attributes and values stored in a meta data repository, including tiering of application layers objects and components
US20020072951A1 (en) 1999-03-03 2002-06-13 Michael Lee Marketing support database management method, system and program product
US20030120675A1 (en) 1999-03-03 2003-06-26 Siebel Systems, Inc. Application instantiation based upon attributes and values stored in a meta data repository, including tiering of application layers, objects, and components
US7698160B2 (en) 1999-05-07 2010-04-13 Virtualagility, Inc System for performing collaborative tasks
US8275836B2 (en) 1999-05-07 2012-09-25 Virtualagility Inc. System and method for supporting collaborative activity
US8095413B1 (en) 1999-05-07 2012-01-10 VirtualAgility, Inc. Processing management information
US8095594B2 (en) 1999-05-07 2012-01-10 VirtualAgility, Inc. System for performing collaborative tasks
US6389429B1 (en) * 1999-07-30 2002-05-14 Aprimo, Inc. System and method for generating a target database from one or more source databases
US6621834B1 (en) 1999-11-05 2003-09-16 Raindance Communications, Inc. System and method for voice transmission over network protocols
US6535909B1 (en) 1999-11-18 2003-03-18 Contigo Software, Inc. System and method for record and playback of collaborative Web browsing session
US20030187921A1 (en) 1999-11-30 2003-10-02 Siebel Systems, Inc. Method and system for distributing objects over a network
US6604128B2 (en) 1999-11-30 2003-08-05 Siebel Systems, Inc. Method and system for distributing objects over a network
US6324568B1 (en) 1999-11-30 2001-11-27 Siebel Systems, Inc. Method and system for distributing objects over a network
US6654032B1 (en) 1999-12-23 2003-11-25 Webex Communications, Inc. Instant sharing of documents on a remote server
US20020165742A1 (en) 2000-03-31 2002-11-07 Mark Robins Feature centric release manager method and system
US6609150B2 (en) 2000-03-31 2003-08-19 Siebel Systems, Inc. Web client-server system and method for incompatible page markup and presentation languages
US6732100B1 (en) 2000-03-31 2004-05-04 Siebel Systems, Inc. Database access method and system for user role defined access
US6336137B1 (en) 2000-03-31 2002-01-01 Siebel Systems, Inc. Web client-server system and method for incompatible page markup and presentation languages
US6577726B1 (en) 2000-03-31 2003-06-10 Siebel Systems, Inc. Computer telephony integration hotelling method and system
US6842748B1 (en) 2000-04-14 2005-01-11 Rightnow Technologies, Inc. Usage based strength between related information in an information retrieval system
US20010044791A1 (en) 2000-04-14 2001-11-22 Richter James Neal Automated adaptive classification system for bayesian knowledge networks
US6434550B1 (en) 2000-04-14 2002-08-13 Rightnow Technologies, Inc. Temporal updates of relevancy rating of retrieved information in an information search system
US6665655B1 (en) 2000-04-14 2003-12-16 Rightnow Technologies, Inc. Implicit rating of retrieved information in an information search system
US6763501B1 (en) 2000-06-09 2004-07-13 Webex Communications, Inc. Remote document serving
US6768904B2 (en) 2000-10-11 2004-07-27 Lg Electronics Inc. Data communication method using mobile terminal
US20020083325A1 (en) * 2000-11-03 2002-06-27 Bharat Mediratta Updating security schemes for remote client access
US6772229B1 (en) 2000-11-13 2004-08-03 Groupserve, Inc. Centrifugal communication and collaboration method
US20030018830A1 (en) 2001-02-06 2003-01-23 Mingte Chen Adaptive communication application programming interface
USD454139S1 (en) 2001-02-20 2002-03-05 Rightnow Technologies Display screen for a computer
US20020143997A1 (en) 2001-03-28 2002-10-03 Xiaofei Huang Method and system for direct server synchronization with a computing device
US20020140731A1 (en) 2001-03-28 2002-10-03 Pavitra Subramaniam Engine to present a user interface based on a logical structure, such as one for a customer relationship management system, across a web site
US6829655B1 (en) 2001-03-28 2004-12-07 Siebel Systems, Inc. Method and system for server synchronization with a computing device via a companion device
US20030018705A1 (en) 2001-03-31 2003-01-23 Mingte Chen Media-independent communication server
US20030206192A1 (en) 2001-03-31 2003-11-06 Mingte Chen Asynchronous message push to web browser
US6732095B1 (en) 2001-04-13 2004-05-04 Siebel Systems, Inc. Method and apparatus for mapping between XML and relational representations
US20020162090A1 (en) 2001-04-30 2002-10-31 Parnell Karen P. Polylingual simultaneous shipping of software
US6711565B1 (en) 2001-06-18 2004-03-23 Siebel Systems, Inc. Method, apparatus, and system for previewing search results
US6728702B1 (en) 2001-06-18 2004-04-27 Siebel Systems, Inc. System and method to implement an integrated search center supporting a full-text search and query on a database
US6763351B1 (en) 2001-06-18 2004-07-13 Siebel Systems, Inc. Method, apparatus, and system for attaching search results
US6782383B2 (en) 2001-06-18 2004-08-24 Siebel Systems, Inc. System and method to implement a persistent and dismissible search center frame
US20030004971A1 (en) 2001-06-29 2003-01-02 Gong Wen G. Automatic generation of data models and accompanying user interfaces
US7851004B2 (en) 2001-07-19 2010-12-14 San-Ei Gen F.F.I., Inc. Taste-improving composition and application of the same
US6826582B1 (en) 2001-09-28 2004-11-30 Emc Corporation Method and system for using file systems for content management
US20030066032A1 (en) 2001-09-28 2003-04-03 Siebel Systems,Inc. System and method for facilitating user interaction in a browser environment
US6724399B1 (en) 2001-09-28 2004-04-20 Siebel Systems, Inc. Methods and apparatus for enabling keyboard accelerators in applications implemented via a browser
US20030066031A1 (en) 2001-09-28 2003-04-03 Siebel Systems, Inc. Method and system for supporting user navigation in a browser environment
US20030159136A1 (en) 2001-09-28 2003-08-21 Huang Xiao Fei Method and system for server synchronization with a computing device
US20030070004A1 (en) 2001-09-29 2003-04-10 Anil Mukundan Method, apparatus, and system for implementing a framework to support a web-based application
US20030070000A1 (en) 2001-09-29 2003-04-10 John Coker Computing system and method to implicitly commit unsaved data for a World Wide Web application
US20030074418A1 (en) 2001-09-29 2003-04-17 John Coker Method, apparatus and system for a mobile web client
US20030070005A1 (en) 2001-09-29 2003-04-10 Anil Mukundan Method, apparatus, and system for implementing view caching in a framework to support web-based applications
US20030069936A1 (en) 2001-10-09 2003-04-10 Warner Douglas K. Method for routing electronic correspondence based on the level and type of emotion contained therein
US7401094B1 (en) 2001-12-28 2008-07-15 Kesler John N Automated generation of dynamic data entry user interface for relational database management systems
US7062502B1 (en) 2001-12-28 2006-06-13 Kesler John N Automated generation of dynamic data entry user interface for relational database management systems
US6804330B1 (en) 2002-01-04 2004-10-12 Siebel Systems, Inc. Method and system for accessing CRM data via voice
US20030151633A1 (en) 2002-02-13 2003-08-14 David George Method and system for enabling connectivity to a data system
US20030204427A1 (en) 2002-03-29 2003-10-30 Prasad Gune User interface for processing requests for approval
US20030189600A1 (en) 2002-03-29 2003-10-09 Prasad Gune Defining an approval process for requests for approval
US6850949B2 (en) 2002-06-03 2005-02-01 Right Now Technologies, Inc. System and method for generating a dynamic interface via a communications network
US20040001092A1 (en) 2002-06-27 2004-01-01 Rothwein Thomas M. Prototyping graphical user interfaces
US20040015981A1 (en) 2002-06-27 2004-01-22 Coker John L. Efficient high-interactivity user interface for client-server applications
US20040027388A1 (en) 2002-06-27 2004-02-12 Eric Berg Method and apparatus to facilitate development of a customer-specific business process model
US20040128001A1 (en) 2002-08-28 2004-07-01 Levin Issac Stephen Method and apparatus for an integrated process modeller
US20040186860A1 (en) 2003-03-21 2004-09-23 Wen-Hsin Lee Method and architecture for providing data-change alerts to external applications via a push service
US20040199536A1 (en) 2003-03-24 2004-10-07 Barnes Leon Maria Theresa Product common object
US20040249854A1 (en) 2003-03-24 2004-12-09 Barnes-Leon Maria Theresa Common common object
US20040199489A1 (en) 2003-03-24 2004-10-07 Barnes-Leon Maria Theresa Custom common object
US20040193510A1 (en) 2003-03-25 2004-09-30 Catahan Nardo B. Modeling of order data
US7620655B2 (en) 2003-05-07 2009-11-17 Enecto Ab Method, device and computer program product for identifying visitors of websites
US20040260534A1 (en) 2003-06-19 2004-12-23 Pak Wai H. Intelligent data search
US20040260659A1 (en) 2003-06-23 2004-12-23 Len Chan Function space reservation system
US20040268299A1 (en) 2003-06-30 2004-12-30 Shu Lei Application user interface template with free-form layout
US20050038823A1 (en) * 2003-08-13 2005-02-17 Wade Amy L. Methods, systems, and computer program products for synchronizing records in billing and service databases
US20050050555A1 (en) 2003-08-28 2005-03-03 Exley Richard Mark Universal application network architecture
US8566301B2 (en) 2006-05-01 2013-10-22 Steven L. Rueben Document revisions in a collaborative computing environment
US20120233137A1 (en) 2006-05-01 2012-09-13 Gabriel Jakobson Presentation of document history in a web browsing application
US8209308B2 (en) 2006-05-01 2012-06-26 Rueben Steven L Method for presentation of revisions of an electronic document
US20070260611A1 (en) * 2006-05-02 2007-11-08 James John Bohannon Method for providing the appearance of a single data repository for queries initiated in a system incorporating distributed member server groups
US7779475B2 (en) 2006-07-31 2010-08-17 Petnote Llc Software-based method for gaining privacy by affecting the screen of a computing device
US8082301B2 (en) 2006-11-10 2011-12-20 Virtual Agility, Inc. System for supporting collaborative activity
US20090063415A1 (en) 2007-08-31 2009-03-05 Business Objects, S.A. Apparatus and method for dynamically selecting componentized executable instructions at run time
US20090100342A1 (en) 2007-10-12 2009-04-16 Gabriel Jakobson Method and system for presenting address and mapping information
US20090177744A1 (en) 2008-01-04 2009-07-09 Yahoo! Inc. Identifying and employing social network relationships
US8490025B2 (en) 2008-02-01 2013-07-16 Gabriel Jakobson Displaying content associated with electronic mapping systems
US20140359537A1 (en) 2008-02-01 2014-12-04 Gabriel Jackobson Online advertising associated with electronic mapping systems
US8504945B2 (en) 2008-02-01 2013-08-06 Gabriel Jakobson Method and system for associating content with map zoom function
US8032297B2 (en) 2008-05-08 2011-10-04 Gabriel Jakobson Method and system for displaying navigation information on an electronic map
US8014943B2 (en) 2008-05-08 2011-09-06 Gabriel Jakobson Method and system for displaying social networking navigation information
US20090287746A1 (en) * 2008-05-15 2009-11-19 International Business Machines Corporation Apparatus, system, and method for dynamic database driven document synchronization
US8646103B2 (en) 2008-06-30 2014-02-04 Gabriel Jakobson Method and system for securing online identities
US8510664B2 (en) 2008-09-06 2013-08-13 Steven L. Rueben Method and system for displaying email thread information
US20100082842A1 (en) * 2008-09-30 2010-04-01 Latista Technologies Computer program product, system and method for field management and mobile inspection
US8010663B2 (en) 2008-11-21 2011-08-30 The Invention Science Fund I, Llc Correlating data indicating subjective user states associated with multiple users with data indicating objective occurrences
US20100309933A1 (en) * 2009-06-03 2010-12-09 Rebelvox Llc Method for synchronizing data maintained at a plurality of nodes
US20130218948A1 (en) 2012-02-17 2013-08-22 Gabriel Jakobson Variable speed collaborative web browsing system
US20130218966A1 (en) 2012-02-17 2013-08-22 Gabriel Jakobson Collaborative web browsing system having document object model element interaction detection
US20130218949A1 (en) 2012-02-17 2013-08-22 Gabriel Jakobson Collaborative web browsing system integrated with social networks
US20150007050A1 (en) 2013-07-01 2015-01-01 Gabriel Jakobson Method and system for processing and displaying email thread information
US20150095162A1 (en) 2013-09-27 2015-04-02 Gabriel Jakobson Method and systems for online advertising to users using fictitious user idetities
US20150172563A1 (en) 2013-12-18 2015-06-18 Gabriel Jakobson Incorporating advertising content into a digital video

Non-Patent Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
U.S. Appl. No. 13/986,251, filed Apr. 16, 2013.

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
US20110238620A1 (en) 2011-09-29

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US8108339B2 (en) Implementing formulas for custom fields in an on-demand database
US8682863B2 (en) Methods and systems for bulk row save logic in an object relational mapping layer and application framework
US7890516B2 (en) Recommending queries when searching against keywords
US9348648B2 (en) Providing a routing framework for facilitating dynamic workload scheduling and routing of message queues for fair management of resources for application servers in an on-demand services environment
US10079732B2 (en) Calculating trust scores based on social graph statistics
US20130018893A1 (en) Method and system for determining a user's brand influence
WO2013097026A1 (en) Systems and methods for visualizing social graphs
US20170206269A1 (en) Trust scores and/or competence ratings of any entity
US9002868B2 (en) Systems and methods for secure access of data
WO2014165601A1 (en) Data center analytics and dashboard
US8112404B2 (en) Providing search results for mobile computing devices
US9235721B2 (en) Mechanism for facilitating management of data in an on-demand services enviroment
US8521780B2 (en) Methods and systems for sharing email in a multi-tenant database system
CN101206641A (en) System and method for adaptive spell checking
US8219752B1 (en) System for caching data
US8543576B1 (en) Classification of clustered documents based on similarity scores
US8468153B2 (en) Information service for facts extracted from differing sources on a wide area network
US20110302327A1 (en) System, method and computer program product for performing a synchronization of data
US20120317238A1 (en) Secure cross-domain communication
US20120041945A1 (en) Mechanism for facilitating efficient collection and presentation of business activity monitoring data
US8688640B2 (en) System, method and computer program product for distributed execution of related reports
US20080104089A1 (en) System and method for distributing queries to a group of databases and expediting data access
US8185546B2 (en) Enhanced control to users to populate a cache in a database system
US8898656B2 (en) Mechanism for facilitating dynamic format transformation of software applications in an on-demand services environment
US9380073B2 (en) Reputation system in a default network

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: JIGSAW DATA CORPORATION, CALIFORNIA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:RAMINENI, NAVIN KUMAR;NACHNANI, PAWAN;MADHAVAN, RAJAN;REEL/FRAME:024145/0968

Effective date: 20100324

AS Assignment

Owner name: SALESFORCE.COM, INC., CALIFORNIA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:JIGSAW DATA CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:025063/0379

Effective date: 20100920