US9320112B2 - Control system for lighting assembly - Google Patents

Control system for lighting assembly Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US9320112B2
US9320112B2 US13/839,561 US201313839561A US9320112B2 US 9320112 B2 US9320112 B2 US 9320112B2 US 201313839561 A US201313839561 A US 201313839561A US 9320112 B2 US9320112 B2 US 9320112B2
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
light
level
plurality
controller
fluorescent lights
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Active, expires
Application number
US13/839,561
Other versions
US20130257291A1 (en
Inventor
Kent Tabor
Original Assignee
Kent Tabor
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US201261619226P priority Critical
Application filed by Kent Tabor filed Critical Kent Tabor
Priority to US13/839,561 priority patent/US9320112B2/en
Publication of US20130257291A1 publication Critical patent/US20130257291A1/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US9320112B2 publication Critical patent/US9320112B2/en
Application status is Active legal-status Critical
Adjusted expiration legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05BELECTRIC HEATING; ELECTRIC LIGHTING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05B37/00Circuit arrangements for electric light sources in general
    • H05B37/02Controlling
    • H05B37/0209Controlling the instant of the ignition or of the extinction
    • H05B37/0218Controlling the instant of the ignition or of the extinction by the ambient light
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05BELECTRIC HEATING; ELECTRIC LIGHTING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05B37/00Circuit arrangements for electric light sources in general
    • H05B37/02Controlling
    • H05B37/0209Controlling the instant of the ignition or of the extinction
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05BELECTRIC HEATING; ELECTRIC LIGHTING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05B37/00Circuit arrangements for electric light sources in general
    • H05B37/02Controlling
    • H05B37/0209Controlling the instant of the ignition or of the extinction
    • H05B37/0227Controlling the instant of the ignition or of the extinction by detection only of parameters other than ambient light, e.g. by sound detectors, by passive infra-red detectors
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02BCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO BUILDINGS, e.g. HOUSING, HOUSE APPLIANCES OR RELATED END-USER APPLICATIONS
    • Y02B20/00Energy efficient lighting technologies
    • Y02B20/40Control techniques providing energy savings
    • Y02B20/44Control techniques providing energy savings based on detection of the user
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02BCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO BUILDINGS, e.g. HOUSING, HOUSE APPLIANCES OR RELATED END-USER APPLICATIONS
    • Y02B20/00Energy efficient lighting technologies
    • Y02B20/40Control techniques providing energy savings
    • Y02B20/46Control techniques providing energy savings based on detection of the illumination level

Abstract

A lighting system includes a light emitting element operable to emit light at a level between zero and 100 percent, a light level sensor positioned to detect a total level of light, and a motion detector positioned to detect a motion in a predefined space. A controller is coupled to the light emitting element, the light level sensor, and the motion detector and is operable to compare a measured total level of light to a set point and to activate the light emitting element in response to the measured total light level being below the setpoint. The controller is further operable to activate the light emitting element in response to the detection of motion within the space.

Description

RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims priority to U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 61/619,226, filed on Apr. 2, 2012, the entire contents of which are incorporated herein by reference.

BACKGROUND

The present invention relates to a control system for a lighting assembly, and more particularly to an infrared (IR) remote control system for a lighting assembly.

Lighting systems for lighting large facilities, such as warehouses and factories, typically utilize fluorescent or light-emitting diode (LED) lights to illuminate certain portions of space under certain conditions. Control of these lighting systems is important not only tier proper illumination but to minimize energy usage. To that end, environmental sensors, such as motion sensors, are often used to activate lights in only those areas specifically occupied, serving both purposes.

Electronic switches, for example DIP switches, incorporated on a circuit board of a. lighting controller are often used to set lighting function parameters such as the threshold level of motion at which the lights will activate and/or the duration the lights will remain on in the absence of motion. Due to the physical location of the lights and the controller(s) within such facilities, i.e., at or near the ceiling, adjusting the sensors and other lighting parameters is often difficult, time consuming, and carries a degree of safety risk.

SUMMARY

The present invention provides a method of controlling lighting parameters, to include various sensor thresholds for light activation and timing intervals for light deactivation, from a position distant from the lighting controller. A remote control device using infrared (IR) signaling permits a user to quickly and safely communicate with the lighting controller to adjust such parameters. Moreover, the lighting controller also includes an ambient light sensor and a dimmer that work in conjunction to maintain the light intensity of an activated light at a predetermined level.

In one construction, the invention provides a. lighting system that includes a light emitting element operable to emit light at a level between zero and 100 percent, a light level sensor positioned to detect a total level of light, and a motion detector positioned to detect a motion in a predefined space. A controller is coupled to the light emitting element, the light level sensor, and the motion detector and is operable to compare a measured total level of light to a set point and to activate the light emitting element in response to the measured total light level being below the setpoint. The controller is further operable to activate the light emitting element in response to the detection of motion within the space.

In another construction, the invention provides a lighting system that includes a plurality of fluorescent light emitting units arranged to emit light in an area between a level of zero and 100 percent. A light level sensor is positioned to detect a total level of light and transmit a signal indicative of a measured light level and a controller is operable to receive the measured light level and compare the measured light level to a preset desired light level and to adjust the plurality of fluorescent light emitting units in response to that comparison to emit a level of light between zero and 100 percent in order to change the measured light level to substantially match the preset desired light level. A remote control device is operable from a position apart from the controller to change the preset desired light level.

In another construction, the invention provides a method of controlling a light level within a space. The method includes sensing a current light level at a predetermined location, storing a first desired light level in a controller, comparing the sensed light level with the first desired light level, and adjusting the light output of a plurality of fluorescent lights in response to the comparison of the sensed light level to the first desired light level until the sensed light level is about equal to the first desired light level. The method also includes remotely adjusting the desired light level to a second desired light level and adjusting the light output of the plurality of fluorescent lights in response to a comparison of the sensed light level to the second desired light level until the sensed light level is about equal to the second desired light level.

Other aspects of the invention will become apparent by consideration of the detailed description and accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a schematic illustration of a room including the lighting assembly.

FIG. 2 is a schematic diagram of the layout of the lighting assembly of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a flow chart of a control algorithm for the lighting assembly of FIG. 1.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Before any embodiments of the invention are explained in detail, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited in its application to the details of construction and the arrangement of components set forth in the following description or illustrated in the following drawings. The invention is capable of other embodiments and of being practiced or of being carried out in various ways. Also, it is to be understood that the phraseology and terminology used herein is for the purpose of description and should not be regarded as limiting. The use of “including,” “comprising,” or “having” and variations thereof herein is meant to encompass the items listed thereafter and equivalents thereof as well as additional items. And as used herein and in the appended claims, the terms “upper”, “lower”, “top”, “bottom”, “front”, “back”, and other directional terms are not intended to require any particular orientation, but are instead used for purposes of description only.

FIG. 1 schematically shows a portion 10 of a large building and a lighting assembly 100 for that portion 10 The lighting assembly 100 includes one or more groups of lights 110 positioned at or near the ceiling 112 to maximize the illumination of objects in an area 40 below. The lights 110 can be of any known type, for example, fluorescent lights or LED lights.

Referring also to FIG. 2, the lights 110 are controlled by a controller 120. As illustrated, the lights 110 are integrated with the controller 120, but in other constructions the controller 120 is spaced apart from the lights 110. The controller 120 includes electrical and electronic components to power and control the lights 110 which, if of the fluorescent type, will include a ballast 130 to regulate the voltage and current supplied to the lights 110. One or more groups of lights 110 for lighting the area 40 can be controlled by the same controller 120.

The controller 120 includes a power supply 140 that receives alternating current (AC) power and transforms the power to direct current (DC) for use within the controller 120. Such power supplies are known to those of skill in the art and need not be further detailed. A microprocessor 150 controls all functions within the controller 120 hereinafter described.

Referring also to FIG. 1, the building portion 10 utilizes motion control to control the activation and duration of the lights 110. A motion detector or sensor 160 is positioned and oriented to detect motion in the area 40. Motion sensors suitable for use with the lighting assembly 100 include those that utilize IR, ultrasonic, electric eye, visual systems (cameras) or a combination thereof to detect motion. One of ordinary skill in the art will recognize that the suitability of any motion detector is dependent on the circumstances of use and, for example, a sensor that uses infrared technology to detect the heat signature of a person entering a space, or that uses a camera to detect motion through frame comparison, may be more suitable for daytime use. As illustrated, the motion sensor is incorporated into the controller 120 but in some constructions, the motion sensor 160 is positioned at another point in the building a distance from the lighting assembly 100 and provides remote signaling back to the controller 120. The controller 120 activates one or more of the groups of lights 110 in response to motion detected in the area 40 by sending a discrete signal to the ballast 130 through a relay output 170.

The controller 120 stores a threshold level of motion that, if not detected by the motion detector 160, will initiate deactivation of the lights 110. To reduce nuisance deactivation, the controller 120 includes an internal timer or other device that measures or calculates the passage of time. If the timer commences due to sub-threshold motion, the lights 110 will remain on for a pre-selected time duration, or interval. As an example, in one construction the lights 110 may stay on for one minute after the motion sensor 160 has stopped detecting the threshold level motion. If within that minute the motion detector 160 detects motion in the area 40, the tinier will reset or, alternatively, could incrementally increase by one minute or any other period of time determined by the user. If the timer times out, the relay output 170 will cease sending a signal to the ballast 130.

An ambient light sensor 180 is positioned to detect ambient light in the area 40. The ambient light includes light entering area 40 from all sources, natural and artificial, and is used to adjust the light emitted from the lights 110. In some constructions, the ambient light sensor 180 is positioned at another point in the building a distance from the lighting assembly 100 and provides remote signaling back to the controller 120.

At least two modes of light control are contemplated with the ambient light sensor 180. If the groups of lights 110 to be controlled are stoppable light sources, i.e., the ballast 130 permits either “on” or “off” states of the lights 110, the controller 120 will operate in a first mode. In this mode, if an ambient light level threshold stored in the controller 120 is not net by the detected light level, the controller 120 will output a discrete signal through the relay output 170 to the ballast 130. in one construction, a single signal is sent by the relay output 170 to the ballast 130. For example, if the threshold setpoint for turning on the lights 110 is 100 lux, lighting levels detected by the sensor 180 at or below 100 lux will trigger a signal from the relay output 170. In another construction, the lights 110 can be configured such that one group of lights 110 is powered with a first signal from the relay output 170 and, if the resultant lighting does not meet a second threshold value stored in the controller 120 (as determined by the ambient light sensor 180), an additional group of lights 110 of the assembly 100 is powered with a second discrete signal from the relay output 170. For example, if the ambient light sensor 180 does not detect adequate light levels after the first relay is energized, the controller 120 will output a second discrete signal to the ballast 130 to control the activation of a second group of lights 110. In yet another construction, the first discrete signal from the relay output 170 only partially powers a group of lights 110 (e.g., 50%), and a second discrete signal sent from the relay output 170 in response to insufficient lighting levels fully powers that group of lights 110.

If the group of lights 110 to be controlled are dimmable light sources, i.e., if the ballast 130 is a dimmable ballast or includes dimming functionality for receiving an analog input control signal, the controller 120 will operate in a second mode. In the second mode, if the ambient light level threshold is not met, the controller 120 will generate an analog signal from an analog output 190 to the dimmable ballast 130. The analog signal can be, for example, a 0-20 mA, 4-20 mA, or 0-10 VDC signal. Upon receiving an analog signal, the dimmable ballast 130 adjusts the voltage and current supplied to the lights 110 accordingly. Specifically, if the ambient light sensor 180 detects a level of light below the threshold level set in the controller 120, the analog output 190 provides a signal within the analog range, e.g., 0-10 VDC, to the ballast 130. In this mode of operation, a separate predetermined light intensity level can be set within the controller 120 and the ambient light sensor 180 operated to continually monitor the light level within the area 40. The controller 120 will adjust the analog output signal to maintain a level of light in the area 40 commensurate with the predetermined light intensity level setpoint. A control algorithm, such as PI or PID control, is used for this purpose to reach and maintain the light illumination at or near the light intensity level setpoint. The controller 120 can also measure the ambient light levels received from the sensor 180 during periods when no lights 110 from any groups are activated in order to determine the amount of natural light available in the area 40. For example, where pulse width modulation control is utilized, the sensor 180 can measure the varying light levels between pulses, i.e., the high/low pulses of the ballast 130, to differentiate brightness due to the lights 110 versus brightness from other sources. In some instances, a second sensor 180 is used for this differential detection and positioned such that one sensor 180 is above the assembly 100 and one below the assembly 100.

Motion control and ambient light level control can be implemented separately or together. In some constructions, the controller 120 can control both steppable lights and dimmable lights and is therefore configured to generate both relay and analog outputs. For example, motion control can be used to initially turn on groups of lights 110 that are then controlled with the ambient light sensor 160 while motive activity is ongoing within the area 40.

Referring to FIG. 3, in one embodiment of a control algorithm using both motion control and ambient light level control for dimmable lights, the routine begins at step 300, in which the area 40 is monitored by the motion sensor 160. During this monitoring, the values received from the motion sensor 160 are evaluated within the controller 120. If motion is detected above the threshold level stored in the controller 120 (step 304), then the controller generates a signal from the analog output 190 to the ballast 130 (step 308). In most applications, the analog signal generated will initially be nearer to the low output value, e.g., nearer 0 volts in a 0-10 VDC output range, in order to slowly ramp up the illumination level after the lights 110 have been off. As the light levels in the area 40 are now also monitored by the ambient light sensor 180 (step 312), if the light intensity has not reached the predetermined light intensity level the analog output signal is adjusted until the setpoint is reached.

If motion within the area 40 ceases to be above the threshold level (step 316), the timer within the controller 120 will reset and commence counting time (step 320) for the predetermined time duration, or interval, throughout which the lights 110 will remain on and controlled. If no motion above the threshold level is detected by the sensor 160 during the timing period (step 324) and the timer times out (step 328), the lights 110 will be deactivated (step 332). If motion is detected above the threshold level during the timer interval, however, the controller 120 stops the timer (step 336) and continues with analog output signal control.

The controller 120 stores multiple setpoints to control different lighting parameters, including any and all of the setpoints previously identified, e.g., the threshold level of motion, the time duration or interval for light activation after cessation of motion, the ambient light level threshold, and the light intensity level.

In order to efficiently adjust these setpoints, the controller 120 is responsive to an IR remote control 200 (FIG. 2). The remote control 200 can be activated from a position distant from, but within the line of sight of, the controller 120. When activated by a user, the remote control 200 sends out a signal consisting of a series of infrared pulses. An IR receiver 210 in the controller 120 receives these pulses and accordingly adjusts the appropriate setpoints. For example, a user may decide to increase the sensitivity of the light assembly 100 to motion within the area 40. By depressing the correct series or sequence of buttons on the remote control 200, the user can adjust the motion setpoint within the controller 120 down, i.e., to require less motion to activate the lights 110. The user can similarly adjust the light intensity level setpoint from the remote control 200 to increase or decrease the amount of illumination maintained by the controller 120. The user can also adjust the duration, or time interval, after which the controller 120 will turn off the lights 110 if no motion in the area 40 is detected by the motion sensor 160 and in turn, can adjust the function of the tinier to reset or instead increase the time duration by a fixed amount if motion is detected in the area 40 within the interval. The user can additionally adjust the mode of light control from the remote control 200 to change between the first mode of control and the second mode of control previously identified. Though described using infrared technology, other wireless control systems are possible for the remote control 200.

In some applications, a separate IR transmitter or beacon can be coupled directly to either a person or to material handling equipment, such as a forklift, or be incorporated within the remote control 200. The IR beacon signals the controller 120, through the IR receiver 210, of the presence of the person or equipment. For example, if the IR beacon is located on a forklift that enters the area 40 or is within the line of sight of the controller 120, the controller 120 will automatically activate the lights 110 and commence lighting control as previously described. When the forklift exits the area 40, the controller 120 initiates deactivation of the lights. As the forklift enters and exits additional areas, lights will be activated and deactivated in turn.

The controller 120 also includes an LED display 230 consisting of a plurality of LEDs that provide a visual cue of the current status of the controller 120. Besides confirming the operational condition of the controller 120, to include the various modes of operation, the LED display 230 can show concurrent responsiveness to signals from the remote control 200.

The controller 120 can further include a radio frequency (RE) transceiver 240. The transceiver 240, which has both a transmitter portion and a receiver portion, is able to transmit and receive radio signals and permits communication between similarly configured controllers 120 within other lighting areas of the building. When the motion detector 160 detects motion at the threshold level, the controller 120 activates its associated lights 110 and further signals the transceiver 240 to generate a radio signal at a pre-selected power level. A corresponding RF transceiver 240 at a second controller 120 within the broadcast range of the generated signal receives the transmitted signal and activates additional lights 110 in communication with additional lighting assemblies 100. As a result, motion within the area 40 activates not only the lights 110 for the area 40, but additional lights in surrounding areas. Pre-selection of the surrounding areas is accomplished by changing the power level transmitted by the transceiver 240, which can be adjusted through the remote control 200.

In addition, the transceiver 240 permits communication of operational data of the controller 120 for logging purposes. For example, current setpoints stored within the controller 120 and historical power usage of the lights 110 are transmittable through the transceiver 240 to a receiver incorporated with a computer, where such data can be logged and analyzed. In such a manner, safe, efficient, and economical operation and adjustment of the lighting assembly 100 is achieved.

Thus, the invention provides, among other things, a lighting system. Although the invention has been described in detail with reference to certain preferred constructions, variations and modifications exist within the scope and spirit of one or more independent aspects of the invention as described.

Claims (14)

What is claimed is:
1. A lighting system comprising:
a light emitting element operable to emit light at a level between zero and 100 percent;
a light level sensor positioned to detect a total level of light;
a motion detector positioned to detect a motion in a predefined space;
a controller coupled to the light emitting element, the light level sensor, and the motion detector and operable to compare a measured total level of light to a set point and to activate the light emitting element in response to the measured total light level being below the setpoint, the controller further operable to activate the light emitting element in response to the detection of motion within the space;
wherein the controller is operable in a first mode and a second mode;
wherein in the first mode, the controller activates the light emitting elements using a discrete signal;
wherein in the second mode, the controller activates the light emitting elements using an analog signal.
2. The lighting system of claim 1, wherein the light emitting element includes a plurality of fluorescent lights.
3. The lighting system of claim 2, wherein the plurality of fluorescent lights are operable to emit an amount of light between zero and 100 percent.
4. The lighting system of claim 3, wherein each of the fluorescent lights of the plurality of fluorescent lights is operable to emit one of no light or 100 percent of its capacity and wherein a portion of the plurality of fluorescent lights are operated at 100 percent to achieve a level of emitted light from the plurality of fluorescent lights that is below 100 percent.
5. The lighting system of claim 3, wherein each of the fluorescent lights of the plurality of fluorescent lights is operable to emit a level of light between zero and 100 percent such that the level of emitted light from the plurality of fluorescent lights can be set at any point between zero and 100 percent.
6. The lighting system of claim 1, further comprising a remote sensor coupled to the controller, the remote sensor operable to remove a signal indicative of the setpoint, the controller operable to adjust the setpoint in response to receipt of the signal.
7. The lighting system of claim 6, wherein the remote sensor is an infrared (IR) sensor operable to detect an infrared signal.
8. The lighting system of claim 6, wherein the remote sensor is a radio frequency (RF) sensor operable to detect a radio frequency.
9. A method of controlling a light level within a space, the method comprising:
sensing a current light level at a predetermined location;
storing a first desired light level in a controller operable in a first mode and a second mode;
comparing the sensed light level with the first desired light level;
adjusting the light output of a plurality of fluorescent lights in response to the comparison of the sensed light level to the first desired light level until the sensed light level is about equal to the first desired light level;
remotely adjusting the desired light level to a second desired light level; and
adjusting the light output of the plurality of fluorescent lights in response to a comparison of the sensed light level to the second desired light level until the sensed light level is about equal to the second desired light level;
wherein in the first mode, the controller adjusts the light output of the plurality of fluorescent lights using a discrete signal;
wherein in the second mode, the controller adjusts the light output of the plurality of fluorescent lights using an analog signal.
10. The method of claim 9, wherein the adjusting the light output of the plurality of fluorescent lights includes activating a portion of the plurality of fluorescent lights at 100 percent of their light emitting capacity and deactivating the remainder of the plurality of fluorescent lights such that the total amount of light emitted by the plurality of fluorescent lights is less than 100 percent of the total possible amount of light emitted from the plurality of fluorescent lights.
11. The method of claim 9, wherein the adjusting the light output of the plurality of fluorescent lights includes dimming each of the plurality of fluorescent lights such that each light emits light at a level between zero and 100 percent of its capacity and the total amount of light emitted by the plurality of fluorescent lights is between zero and 100 percent of the total capacity.
12. The method of claim 9, wherein the remotely adjusting step includes emitting an infrared signal from a remote transmitter and receiving that signal at an infrared receiver, the infrared receiver communicating with a controller to adjust the desired light level in response to the signal.
13. The method of claim 9, wherein the remotely adjusting step includes emitting a radio-frequency signal from a remote transmitter and receiving that signal at a radio-frequency receiver, the radio-frequency receiver communicating with a controller to adjust the desired light level in response to the signal.
14. The method of claim 9, further comprising detecting motion within a predefined area and activating a portion of the plurality of fluorescent lights in response to the detected motion.
US13/839,561 2012-04-02 2013-03-15 Control system for lighting assembly Active 2034-03-21 US9320112B2 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US201261619226P true 2012-04-02 2012-04-02
US13/839,561 US9320112B2 (en) 2012-04-02 2013-03-15 Control system for lighting assembly

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US13/839,561 US9320112B2 (en) 2012-04-02 2013-03-15 Control system for lighting assembly

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20130257291A1 US20130257291A1 (en) 2013-10-03
US9320112B2 true US9320112B2 (en) 2016-04-19

Family

ID=49233988

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13/839,561 Active 2034-03-21 US9320112B2 (en) 2012-04-02 2013-03-15 Control system for lighting assembly

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US9320112B2 (en)

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20160262245A1 (en) * 2015-03-05 2016-09-08 Panasonic Intellectual Property Management Co., Ltd. Lighting device

Families Citing this family (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US9781814B2 (en) * 2014-10-15 2017-10-03 Abl Ip Holding Llc Lighting control with integral dimming
US9693428B2 (en) 2014-10-15 2017-06-27 Abl Ip Holding Llc Lighting control with automated activation process
WO2016100567A1 (en) 2014-12-16 2016-06-23 Hampton Products International Corporation Security lighting fixture
US20170140738A1 (en) * 2015-11-16 2017-05-18 Yahoo!, Inc. Orientation selection

Citations (90)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3151854A (en) 1959-06-22 1964-10-06 Felburn John Phil Running gear for vehicles
US3154300A (en) 1961-12-04 1964-10-27 Ford Motor Co Vehicle suspension construction
US3251608A (en) 1963-10-28 1966-05-17 John E Raidel Tandem suspensions
US3386724A (en) 1965-11-04 1968-06-04 Fruehauf Corp Vehicle construction spring-to-axle mounting
US3971028A (en) 1974-12-26 1976-07-20 Larry L. Funk Remote light control system
US4242614A (en) 1979-02-26 1980-12-30 General Electric Company Lighting control system
US4368406A (en) 1980-12-29 1983-01-11 Ford Motor Company Lamp dimmer control with integral ambient sensor
US4538973A (en) 1984-04-26 1985-09-03 Angott Paul G Remotely controlled ceiling fan and light circuit
US5099193A (en) 1987-07-30 1992-03-24 Lutron Electronics Co., Inc. Remotely controllable power control system
US5160924A (en) 1988-09-20 1992-11-03 Telemecanique Remote control system, particularly for lighting, in premises incorporating controllable distribution zones with variable conformations
US5210467A (en) 1991-08-30 1993-05-11 Pioneer Electronic Corporation Illumination control circuit using a photoreceptor built-in a remote control device
US5455487A (en) 1993-09-22 1995-10-03 The Watt Stopper Moveable desktop light controller
US5470096A (en) 1994-03-25 1995-11-28 The Binkley Company Wheeled vehicle suspension
US5506715A (en) 1993-10-28 1996-04-09 Philips Electronics North America Corporation Lighting system having a remotely controlled electric lamp and an infrared remote controller with improved infrared filter
US5596247A (en) * 1994-10-03 1997-01-21 Pacific Scientific Company Compact dimmable fluorescent lamps with central dimming ring
US5648656A (en) 1994-11-11 1997-07-15 U.S. Philips Corporation System to optimize artificial lighting levels with increasing daylight level
US5661468A (en) 1994-12-15 1997-08-26 Marcoux; Paul Alfred Radio paging electrical load control system and device
US5689261A (en) 1994-07-12 1997-11-18 Hunter Fan Company Remote control system for ceiling fan and light
US5701058A (en) 1996-01-04 1997-12-23 Honeywell Inc. Method of semiautomatic ambient light sensor calibration in an automatic control system
US5921570A (en) 1996-11-21 1999-07-13 The Boler Company Weld-on axle bracket with U-bolt connection
US5933091A (en) 1996-08-12 1999-08-03 Mccaslin; Robert E. Remotely-actuated infrared-sensitive switch
US6114812A (en) 1999-02-01 2000-09-05 Kijin Electronics Co., Ltd. Remote control unit for incandescent lamp
US6153984A (en) * 1998-03-12 2000-11-28 Ein Hashofet Electrical Accesseries Dimmable lighting system for a plurality of gas discharge lamps
US6163275A (en) 1995-02-15 2000-12-19 Charles James Hartzell Remotely controlled dimmer
US6169377B1 (en) 1996-03-13 2001-01-02 Lutron Electronics Co., Inc. Lighting control with wireless remote control and programmability
US6174073B1 (en) 1996-01-02 2001-01-16 Bernard Regan Radio frequency remote-controllable lighting system having plurality of lighting units
US6340864B1 (en) 1999-08-10 2002-01-22 Philips Electronics North America Corporation Lighting control system including a wireless remote sensor
US6348768B1 (en) 2001-01-03 2002-02-19 Hugewin Electronics Co., Ltd. Remote control device of lamp tube
US6394630B1 (en) 2000-05-19 2002-05-28 The Coleman Company, Inc. Remote control lantern with automatic shut-off feature
US6424660B2 (en) 1997-10-10 2002-07-23 Intel Corporation Addressable distributed wireless remote control system
US20030111143A1 (en) 2001-10-23 2003-06-19 Consolidated Metal Products, Inc. Flattened U-bolt and method
US6630800B2 (en) 2002-01-04 2003-10-07 Hugewin Electronics Co., Ltd. Remote-control device of lamp series control box
US6636005B2 (en) 2001-11-14 2003-10-21 Koninklijke Philips Eletronics N.V. Architecture of ballast with integrated RF interface
US20030209999A1 (en) 2002-05-09 2003-11-13 E.Energy Technology Limited Wireless remote control systems for dimming electronic ballasts
US20030210167A1 (en) 2002-05-08 2003-11-13 Linsong Weng Wireless remote-control light adjuster
US6655817B2 (en) 2001-12-10 2003-12-02 Tom Devlin Remote controlled lighting apparatus and method
US6667578B2 (en) 1996-01-11 2003-12-23 Lutron Electronics, Co., Inc. System for individual and remote control of spaced lighting fixtures
US6674255B2 (en) 1996-01-05 2004-01-06 Decotex 2000 Corporation Remote controlled window treatment and/or lighting system
US6700334B2 (en) 2002-07-08 2004-03-02 Hugewin Electronics Co., Ltd. RF wireless remote-control brightness-adjustable energy-saving lamp
US6703788B1 (en) 2002-07-12 2004-03-09 John F. Miller Wireless lighting system
US6759966B1 (en) 2000-09-01 2004-07-06 Linsong Weng Wireless remote control bulb device
US6771256B1 (en) 1999-10-14 2004-08-03 Igraphics, Llc Remotely programmable control device for use in electroluminescent display and lighting applications
US6771182B1 (en) 1999-11-15 2004-08-03 Intelligent Control Technology (M) Sdn Bhd Wireless remote control for alternate current (A.C.) electrical lighting and appliances with learn function
US6774582B1 (en) 2003-01-17 2004-08-10 Regal King Manufacturing Limited Light dimming control method and apparatus
US20040196140A1 (en) 2002-02-08 2004-10-07 Alberto Sid Controller panel and system for light and serially networked lighting system
US20040201491A1 (en) 2002-04-24 2004-10-14 Linsong Weng Lamp set remote control system
US6828733B1 (en) 1998-10-30 2004-12-07 David B. Crenshaw Remote lamp control apparatus
US6831569B2 (en) 2001-03-08 2004-12-14 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. Method and system for assigning and binding a network address of a ballast
US6912429B1 (en) 2000-10-19 2005-06-28 Destiny Networks, Inc. Home automation system and method
US20060012317A1 (en) 2004-07-14 2006-01-19 Shin-Yung Chiu RF remote dimmer controller
US7024119B1 (en) 2001-11-02 2006-04-04 Genlyte Thomas Group Llc Addressable light fixture module
US7027736B1 (en) 2001-11-02 2006-04-11 Genlyte Thomas Group, Llc Addressable system for light fixture modules
US7111952B2 (en) 2003-03-24 2006-09-26 Lutron Electronics Co., Inc. System to control daylight and artificial illumination and sun glare in a space
US7148628B2 (en) 2004-07-30 2006-12-12 Desa Ip, Llc Photosensitive control with dynamic calibration
US20070171028A1 (en) 2000-09-14 2007-07-26 Musco Corporation Apparatus, system and method for wide area networking to control sports lighting
US7312585B2 (en) 2001-05-26 2007-12-25 William George Wilhelm Remote control of electronic light ballast and other devices
US7355523B2 (en) 2004-04-15 2008-04-08 Alberto Sid Remote controlled intelligent lighting system
US20080088435A1 (en) 2005-03-12 2008-04-17 Lutron Electronics Co., Inc. Handheld programmer for lighting control system
US7417556B2 (en) 2001-04-24 2008-08-26 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. Wireless addressable lighting method and apparatus
US20080265799A1 (en) 2007-04-20 2008-10-30 Sibert W Olin Illumination control network
US7463164B2 (en) 2004-02-13 2008-12-09 Williams Don P Method and apparatus for remote control of electronic equipment
US20080303451A1 (en) 2005-06-06 2008-12-11 Lutron Electronics Co., Inc. Radio-frequency dimmer having a slider control
US20080304833A1 (en) 2006-02-17 2008-12-11 Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd. Illumination Light Wireless Communication System
US20090058681A1 (en) 2006-04-10 2009-03-05 Carmanah Technologies Corp. Method and System for the Wireless Remote Control of Marker Lights
US7521872B2 (en) 2003-09-09 2009-04-21 Koninklijke Philips Electronics, N.V. Integrated lamp with feedback and wireless control
US7573208B2 (en) 2007-03-05 2009-08-11 Lutron Electronics Co., Inc. Method of programming a lighting preset from a radio-frequency remote control
US7598681B2 (en) 2001-05-30 2009-10-06 Philips Solid-State Lighting Solutions, Inc. Methods and apparatus for controlling devices in a networked lighting system
US7597452B2 (en) 2007-08-20 2009-10-06 Avertronics Inc. Dimmable lamp set with remotely group setting function
US7603184B2 (en) 2005-09-12 2009-10-13 Abl Ip Holding Llc Light management system having networked intelligent luminaire managers
US7656098B2 (en) 2008-03-10 2010-02-02 Tseng Teng-San Brightness control apparatus of light bulb module
US7659674B2 (en) 1997-08-26 2010-02-09 Philips Solid-State Lighting Solutions, Inc. Wireless lighting control methods and apparatus
US7677753B1 (en) 2006-10-18 2010-03-16 Wills Michael H Programmable remote control electrical light operating system
US20100066267A1 (en) 2008-09-16 2010-03-18 Meyer A Corydon Remotely controllable track lighting system
US20100141153A1 (en) 2006-03-28 2010-06-10 Recker Michael V Wireless lighting devices and applications
US7781713B2 (en) 2006-02-08 2010-08-24 The Regents Of The University Of California Method for calibrating a lighting control system that facilitates daylight harvesting
US7812549B2 (en) 2005-08-29 2010-10-12 Erg Shenzhen Ltd. Remote dimmable energy-saving device for fluorescent lamps
US7812543B2 (en) 2006-11-15 2010-10-12 Budike Jr Lothar E S Modular wireless lighting control system using a common ballast control interface
WO2010116283A2 (en) 2009-04-09 2010-10-14 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. Intelligent lighting control system
US7839017B2 (en) 2009-03-02 2010-11-23 Adura Technologies, Inc. Systems and methods for remotely controlling an electrical load
US7843353B2 (en) 2007-09-13 2010-11-30 Industrial Technology Reseacrh Institute Automatic lighting control system and method
US20110017014A1 (en) 2009-07-21 2011-01-27 International Truck Intellectual Property Company, Llc Oval axle housing and clamp assembly
US7880638B2 (en) 2004-12-14 2011-02-01 Lutron Electronics Co., Inc. Distributed intelligence ballast system
US7880394B2 (en) 2008-04-17 2011-02-01 Heathco Llc Lighting system to facilitate remote modification of a light fixture modifiable operating parameter
US7938562B2 (en) 2008-10-24 2011-05-10 Altair Engineering, Inc. Lighting including integral communication apparatus
US7948189B2 (en) * 2006-09-26 2011-05-24 Siemens Industry, Inc. Application of microsystems for lighting control
US7961075B2 (en) 2007-05-30 2011-06-14 Glp German Light Products Gmbh Programmable lighting unit and remote control for a programmable lighting unit
US8009042B2 (en) 2008-09-03 2011-08-30 Lutron Electronics Co., Inc. Radio-frequency lighting control system with occupancy sensing
US8604701B2 (en) * 2011-03-22 2013-12-10 Neal R. Verfuerth Systems and method for lighting aisles
US8853965B2 (en) * 2010-02-01 2014-10-07 Twisthink, L.L.C. Luminary control systems
US8866392B2 (en) * 2011-08-31 2014-10-21 Chia-Teh Chen Two-level LED security light with motion sensor

Patent Citations (97)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3151854A (en) 1959-06-22 1964-10-06 Felburn John Phil Running gear for vehicles
US3154300A (en) 1961-12-04 1964-10-27 Ford Motor Co Vehicle suspension construction
US3251608A (en) 1963-10-28 1966-05-17 John E Raidel Tandem suspensions
US3386724A (en) 1965-11-04 1968-06-04 Fruehauf Corp Vehicle construction spring-to-axle mounting
US3971028A (en) 1974-12-26 1976-07-20 Larry L. Funk Remote light control system
US4242614A (en) 1979-02-26 1980-12-30 General Electric Company Lighting control system
US4368406A (en) 1980-12-29 1983-01-11 Ford Motor Company Lamp dimmer control with integral ambient sensor
US4538973A (en) 1984-04-26 1985-09-03 Angott Paul G Remotely controlled ceiling fan and light circuit
US5099193A (en) 1987-07-30 1992-03-24 Lutron Electronics Co., Inc. Remotely controllable power control system
US5160924A (en) 1988-09-20 1992-11-03 Telemecanique Remote control system, particularly for lighting, in premises incorporating controllable distribution zones with variable conformations
US5210467A (en) 1991-08-30 1993-05-11 Pioneer Electronic Corporation Illumination control circuit using a photoreceptor built-in a remote control device
US5455487A (en) 1993-09-22 1995-10-03 The Watt Stopper Moveable desktop light controller
US5506715A (en) 1993-10-28 1996-04-09 Philips Electronics North America Corporation Lighting system having a remotely controlled electric lamp and an infrared remote controller with improved infrared filter
US5470096A (en) 1994-03-25 1995-11-28 The Binkley Company Wheeled vehicle suspension
US5689261A (en) 1994-07-12 1997-11-18 Hunter Fan Company Remote control system for ceiling fan and light
US5596247A (en) * 1994-10-03 1997-01-21 Pacific Scientific Company Compact dimmable fluorescent lamps with central dimming ring
US5648656A (en) 1994-11-11 1997-07-15 U.S. Philips Corporation System to optimize artificial lighting levels with increasing daylight level
US5661468A (en) 1994-12-15 1997-08-26 Marcoux; Paul Alfred Radio paging electrical load control system and device
US6163275A (en) 1995-02-15 2000-12-19 Charles James Hartzell Remotely controlled dimmer
US6174073B1 (en) 1996-01-02 2001-01-16 Bernard Regan Radio frequency remote-controllable lighting system having plurality of lighting units
US5701058A (en) 1996-01-04 1997-12-23 Honeywell Inc. Method of semiautomatic ambient light sensor calibration in an automatic control system
US6674255B2 (en) 1996-01-05 2004-01-06 Decotex 2000 Corporation Remote controlled window treatment and/or lighting system
US6667578B2 (en) 1996-01-11 2003-12-23 Lutron Electronics, Co., Inc. System for individual and remote control of spaced lighting fixtures
US6300727B1 (en) 1996-03-13 2001-10-09 Lutron Electronics Co., Inc. Lighting control with wireless remote control and programmability
US6169377B1 (en) 1996-03-13 2001-01-02 Lutron Electronics Co., Inc. Lighting control with wireless remote control and programmability
US5933091A (en) 1996-08-12 1999-08-03 Mccaslin; Robert E. Remotely-actuated infrared-sensitive switch
US5921570A (en) 1996-11-21 1999-07-13 The Boler Company Weld-on axle bracket with U-bolt connection
US7659674B2 (en) 1997-08-26 2010-02-09 Philips Solid-State Lighting Solutions, Inc. Wireless lighting control methods and apparatus
US6424660B2 (en) 1997-10-10 2002-07-23 Intel Corporation Addressable distributed wireless remote control system
US6153984A (en) * 1998-03-12 2000-11-28 Ein Hashofet Electrical Accesseries Dimmable lighting system for a plurality of gas discharge lamps
US6828733B1 (en) 1998-10-30 2004-12-07 David B. Crenshaw Remote lamp control apparatus
US6114812A (en) 1999-02-01 2000-09-05 Kijin Electronics Co., Ltd. Remote control unit for incandescent lamp
US6340864B1 (en) 1999-08-10 2002-01-22 Philips Electronics North America Corporation Lighting control system including a wireless remote sensor
US6771256B1 (en) 1999-10-14 2004-08-03 Igraphics, Llc Remotely programmable control device for use in electroluminescent display and lighting applications
US6771182B1 (en) 1999-11-15 2004-08-03 Intelligent Control Technology (M) Sdn Bhd Wireless remote control for alternate current (A.C.) electrical lighting and appliances with learn function
US6394630B1 (en) 2000-05-19 2002-05-28 The Coleman Company, Inc. Remote control lantern with automatic shut-off feature
US6759966B1 (en) 2000-09-01 2004-07-06 Linsong Weng Wireless remote control bulb device
US20070171028A1 (en) 2000-09-14 2007-07-26 Musco Corporation Apparatus, system and method for wide area networking to control sports lighting
US6912429B1 (en) 2000-10-19 2005-06-28 Destiny Networks, Inc. Home automation system and method
US6348768B1 (en) 2001-01-03 2002-02-19 Hugewin Electronics Co., Ltd. Remote control device of lamp tube
US6831569B2 (en) 2001-03-08 2004-12-14 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. Method and system for assigning and binding a network address of a ballast
US7417556B2 (en) 2001-04-24 2008-08-26 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. Wireless addressable lighting method and apparatus
US7312585B2 (en) 2001-05-26 2007-12-25 William George Wilhelm Remote control of electronic light ballast and other devices
US7598681B2 (en) 2001-05-30 2009-10-06 Philips Solid-State Lighting Solutions, Inc. Methods and apparatus for controlling devices in a networked lighting system
US20030111143A1 (en) 2001-10-23 2003-06-19 Consolidated Metal Products, Inc. Flattened U-bolt and method
US7024119B1 (en) 2001-11-02 2006-04-04 Genlyte Thomas Group Llc Addressable light fixture module
US7027736B1 (en) 2001-11-02 2006-04-11 Genlyte Thomas Group, Llc Addressable system for light fixture modules
US6636005B2 (en) 2001-11-14 2003-10-21 Koninklijke Philips Eletronics N.V. Architecture of ballast with integrated RF interface
US6655817B2 (en) 2001-12-10 2003-12-02 Tom Devlin Remote controlled lighting apparatus and method
US6630800B2 (en) 2002-01-04 2003-10-07 Hugewin Electronics Co., Ltd. Remote-control device of lamp series control box
US20040196140A1 (en) 2002-02-08 2004-10-07 Alberto Sid Controller panel and system for light and serially networked lighting system
US20040201491A1 (en) 2002-04-24 2004-10-14 Linsong Weng Lamp set remote control system
US20030210167A1 (en) 2002-05-08 2003-11-13 Linsong Weng Wireless remote-control light adjuster
US20030209999A1 (en) 2002-05-09 2003-11-13 E.Energy Technology Limited Wireless remote control systems for dimming electronic ballasts
US6700334B2 (en) 2002-07-08 2004-03-02 Hugewin Electronics Co., Ltd. RF wireless remote-control brightness-adjustable energy-saving lamp
US6703788B1 (en) 2002-07-12 2004-03-09 John F. Miller Wireless lighting system
US6774582B1 (en) 2003-01-17 2004-08-10 Regal King Manufacturing Limited Light dimming control method and apparatus
US7111952B2 (en) 2003-03-24 2006-09-26 Lutron Electronics Co., Inc. System to control daylight and artificial illumination and sun glare in a space
US7521872B2 (en) 2003-09-09 2009-04-21 Koninklijke Philips Electronics, N.V. Integrated lamp with feedback and wireless control
US7463164B2 (en) 2004-02-13 2008-12-09 Williams Don P Method and apparatus for remote control of electronic equipment
US7355523B2 (en) 2004-04-15 2008-04-08 Alberto Sid Remote controlled intelligent lighting system
US20060012317A1 (en) 2004-07-14 2006-01-19 Shin-Yung Chiu RF remote dimmer controller
US7148628B2 (en) 2004-07-30 2006-12-12 Desa Ip, Llc Photosensitive control with dynamic calibration
US7880638B2 (en) 2004-12-14 2011-02-01 Lutron Electronics Co., Inc. Distributed intelligence ballast system
US7764162B2 (en) 2005-03-12 2010-07-27 Lutron Electronics Co., Inc. Handheld programmer for lighting control system
US20080088435A1 (en) 2005-03-12 2008-04-17 Lutron Electronics Co., Inc. Handheld programmer for lighting control system
US7936281B2 (en) 2005-03-12 2011-05-03 Lutron Electronics Co., Inc. Method and apparatus for maintaining device information in a lighting control system
US7391297B2 (en) 2005-03-12 2008-06-24 Lutron Electronics Co., Inc. Handheld programmer for lighting control system
US20080303451A1 (en) 2005-06-06 2008-12-11 Lutron Electronics Co., Inc. Radio-frequency dimmer having a slider control
US7812549B2 (en) 2005-08-29 2010-10-12 Erg Shenzhen Ltd. Remote dimmable energy-saving device for fluorescent lamps
US8010319B2 (en) 2005-09-12 2011-08-30 Abl Ip Holding Llc Light management system having networked intelligent luminaire managers
US7603184B2 (en) 2005-09-12 2009-10-13 Abl Ip Holding Llc Light management system having networked intelligent luminaire managers
US7911359B2 (en) 2005-09-12 2011-03-22 Abl Ip Holding Llc Light management system having networked intelligent luminaire managers that support third-party applications
US7781713B2 (en) 2006-02-08 2010-08-24 The Regents Of The University Of California Method for calibrating a lighting control system that facilitates daylight harvesting
US20080304833A1 (en) 2006-02-17 2008-12-11 Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd. Illumination Light Wireless Communication System
US20100141153A1 (en) 2006-03-28 2010-06-10 Recker Michael V Wireless lighting devices and applications
US20090058681A1 (en) 2006-04-10 2009-03-05 Carmanah Technologies Corp. Method and System for the Wireless Remote Control of Marker Lights
US7948189B2 (en) * 2006-09-26 2011-05-24 Siemens Industry, Inc. Application of microsystems for lighting control
US7677753B1 (en) 2006-10-18 2010-03-16 Wills Michael H Programmable remote control electrical light operating system
US7812543B2 (en) 2006-11-15 2010-10-12 Budike Jr Lothar E S Modular wireless lighting control system using a common ballast control interface
US7573208B2 (en) 2007-03-05 2009-08-11 Lutron Electronics Co., Inc. Method of programming a lighting preset from a radio-frequency remote control
US7902759B2 (en) 2007-03-05 2011-03-08 Lutron Electronics Co., Inc. Method of programming a lighting preset from a radio-frequency remote control
US20080265799A1 (en) 2007-04-20 2008-10-30 Sibert W Olin Illumination control network
US7961075B2 (en) 2007-05-30 2011-06-14 Glp German Light Products Gmbh Programmable lighting unit and remote control for a programmable lighting unit
US7597452B2 (en) 2007-08-20 2009-10-06 Avertronics Inc. Dimmable lamp set with remotely group setting function
US7843353B2 (en) 2007-09-13 2010-11-30 Industrial Technology Reseacrh Institute Automatic lighting control system and method
US7656098B2 (en) 2008-03-10 2010-02-02 Tseng Teng-San Brightness control apparatus of light bulb module
US7880394B2 (en) 2008-04-17 2011-02-01 Heathco Llc Lighting system to facilitate remote modification of a light fixture modifiable operating parameter
US8009042B2 (en) 2008-09-03 2011-08-30 Lutron Electronics Co., Inc. Radio-frequency lighting control system with occupancy sensing
US20100066267A1 (en) 2008-09-16 2010-03-18 Meyer A Corydon Remotely controllable track lighting system
US7938562B2 (en) 2008-10-24 2011-05-10 Altair Engineering, Inc. Lighting including integral communication apparatus
US7839017B2 (en) 2009-03-02 2010-11-23 Adura Technologies, Inc. Systems and methods for remotely controlling an electrical load
WO2010116283A2 (en) 2009-04-09 2010-10-14 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. Intelligent lighting control system
US20110017014A1 (en) 2009-07-21 2011-01-27 International Truck Intellectual Property Company, Llc Oval axle housing and clamp assembly
US8853965B2 (en) * 2010-02-01 2014-10-07 Twisthink, L.L.C. Luminary control systems
US8604701B2 (en) * 2011-03-22 2013-12-10 Neal R. Verfuerth Systems and method for lighting aisles
US8866392B2 (en) * 2011-08-31 2014-10-21 Chia-Teh Chen Two-level LED security light with motion sensor

Non-Patent Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
Easydim Versatile Local Light Control; Aug. 2011; 12 pages.
E-Matic Energy Management Solutions, PMCSS Ceiling Sensor Surface C/W Remote Control; 4 pages.

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20160262245A1 (en) * 2015-03-05 2016-09-08 Panasonic Intellectual Property Management Co., Ltd. Lighting device
US9693432B2 (en) * 2015-03-05 2017-06-27 Panasonic Intellectual Property Management Co., Ltd. Lighting device

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
US20130257291A1 (en) 2013-10-03

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US8427076B2 (en) Intelligent area lighting system
US8067906B2 (en) Multi-way sensor switch
EP1711038A1 (en) Intelligent light degradation sensing LED Traffic signal
JP4374472B2 (en) Lighting control system
US10326301B2 (en) Two-level LED security light with motion sensor
US6466826B1 (en) Apparatus and method for providing bypass functions for a motion sensor switch
US20050243556A1 (en) Lighting system and method
US5651384A (en) Control for a sanitary fixture
US7880394B2 (en) Lighting system to facilitate remote modification of a light fixture modifiable operating parameter
CA2750619C (en) Multi-modal load control system having occupancy sensing
RU2561494C2 (en) Smart lighting control system
US10117315B2 (en) Network of motion sensor lights with synchronized operation
US9510426B2 (en) Methods, systems, and apparatus for intelligent lighting
US6522078B1 (en) Remotely controlled power supply switching system
US20070114225A1 (en) De-icing system for traffic signals
JP2009520316A (en) Method and apparatus for lighting control
US6275163B1 (en) Automatic switch dimmer device
US5489827A (en) Light controller with occupancy sensor
US8497634B2 (en) Wireless lighting system for staircases and passageways
US8970372B2 (en) Occupancy sensor with dimmer feature and night light and method of lighting control using the same
WO2006121793A3 (en) Programmable power controller
CN103534432A (en) Low power radio frequency receiver
US7079027B2 (en) Motion detector and illumination apparatus and method
JP4089370B2 (en) Lighting device and lighting system
US20130169430A1 (en) Apparatus and method for smoke detection & alarm

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
STCF Information on status: patent grant

Free format text: PATENTED CASE

MAFP Maintenance fee payment

Free format text: PAYMENT OF MAINTENANCE FEE, 4TH YR, SMALL ENTITY (ORIGINAL EVENT CODE: M2551); ENTITY STATUS OF PATENT OWNER: SMALL ENTITY

Year of fee payment: 4