US9271110B1 - Location awareness session management and cross application session management - Google Patents

Location awareness session management and cross application session management Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US9271110B1
US9271110B1 US13/544,802 US201213544802A US9271110B1 US 9271110 B1 US9271110 B1 US 9271110B1 US 201213544802 A US201213544802 A US 201213544802A US 9271110 B1 US9271110 B1 US 9271110B1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
mobile device
session
token
application level
location
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Active, expires
Application number
US13/544,802
Inventor
David K. Fultz
Victor Anend Vijayakirthi
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Sprint Communications Co LP
Original Assignee
Sprint Communications Co LP
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Sprint Communications Co LP filed Critical Sprint Communications Co LP
Priority to US13/544,802 priority Critical patent/US9271110B1/en
Assigned to SPRINT COMMUNICATIONS COMPANY L.P. reassignment SPRINT COMMUNICATIONS COMPANY L.P. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: VIJAYAKIRTHI, VICTOR ANEND, FULTZ, DAVID K.
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US9271110B1 publication Critical patent/US9271110B1/en
Assigned to DEUTSCHE BANK TRUST COMPANY AMERICAS reassignment DEUTSCHE BANK TRUST COMPANY AMERICAS GRANT OF FIRST PRIORITY AND JUNIOR PRIORITY SECURITY INTEREST IN PATENT RIGHTS Assignors: SPRINT COMMUNICATIONS COMPANY L.P.
Application status is Active legal-status Critical
Adjusted expiration legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W4/00Services specially adapted for wireless communication networks; Facilities therefor
    • H04W4/02Services making use of location information
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W12/00Security arrangements, e.g. access security or fraud detection; Authentication, e.g. verifying user identity or authorisation; Protecting privacy or anonymity ; Protecting confidentiality; Key management; Integrity; Mobile application security; Using identity modules; Secure pairing of devices; Context aware security; Lawful interception
    • H04W12/06Authentication
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W4/00Services specially adapted for wireless communication networks; Facilities therefor
    • H04W4/02Services making use of location information
    • H04W4/029Location-based management or tracking services
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W64/00Locating users or terminals or network equipment for network management purposes, e.g. mobility management

Abstract

A location aware session token generation and validation system is provided. The system comprises a server system comprising at least one processor. The server system also comprises at least one non-transitory memory. The system further comprises a token component stored on the at least one non-transitory memory that, when executed by the server system, receives a request to initiate an application level session from a mobile device, wherein the request includes an identification of the mobile device and a location of the mobile device, generates a token for the application level session wherein the token is time limited and location limited such that the application level session will expire at the end of a specified period of time or when the mobile device moves from the location.

Description

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

None.

STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

Not applicable.

REFERENCE TO A MICROFICHE APPENDIX

Not applicable.

BACKGROUND

In today's world, information security is a fundamental concern. Tokens are often used to promote information security by providing authentication and managing secure sessions. For example, a token may be used to prove identity or to gain access to a resource.

SUMMARY

In an embodiment, a location aware session token generation and validation system is provided. The system comprises a server system comprising at least one processor. The system also comprises at least one non-transitory memory. The system further comprises a token component stored on the at least one non-transitory memory that, when executed by the server system, receives a request to initiate an application level session from a mobile device, wherein the request includes an identification of the mobile device and a location of the mobile device, generates a token for the application level session wherein the token is time limited and location limited such that the application level session will expire at the end of a specified period of time or when the mobile device moves from the location, sends the token to the mobile device, receives a session message from the mobile device, wherein the session message includes a requested session action, a current location of the mobile device and the token, analyzes the token, performs the requested session action when the specified period of time has not expired and if the current location matches the location, and ends the application level session if the specified period of time has expired or if the current location does not match the location.

In an embodiment, a cross application session management system for a mobile device is provided. The system comprises at least one processor and at least one non-transitory memory. The system also comprises a plurality of tokens stored on the at least one non-transitory memory, wherein each of the plurality of tokens corresponds to a respective one of a plurality of application level sessions. The system further comprises a global session management component stored on the at least one memory that, when executed by the at least one processor, monitors activity on the plurality of application level sessions, wherein activity on one of the plurality of application level sessions maintains the session life for the other ones of the plurality of application level sessions.

In an embodiment, a method for session management on a mobile device is provided. The method comprises receiving at an authenticating server a request for a token to authenticate an application level session with a service provider, wherein the request includes an identification of the mobile device and a location of the mobile device, generating by the authenticating server a token for the application level session wherein the token is time limited and location limited, sending the token to the mobile device, receiving at the authenticating server a session message for the application level session from the mobile device, wherein the session message includes a requested session action for the application level session, a current location of the mobile device, an activity level, and the token, and performing the requested session action when the predefined period of time has not expired and the current location does not match the location and the activity level exceeds a predefined level of activity.

These and other features will be more clearly understood from the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings and claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

For a more complete understanding of the present disclosure, reference is now made to the following brief description, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings and detailed description, wherein like reference numerals represent like parts.

FIG. 1 is a block diagram of a system according to an embodiment of the disclosure.

FIG. 2 is a block diagram a token component according to an embodiment of the disclosure.

FIG. 3, a block diagram of a mobile device according to an embodiment of the disclosure.

FIG. 4 is a flowchart of a method for generating a token according to an embodiment of the disclosure.

FIG. 5 is a flowchart of a method for validating a token according to an embodiment of the disclosure.

FIG. 6 is a pictorial diagram of a mobile device according to an embodiment of the disclosure.

FIG. 7 is a block diagram of a mobile device according to an embodiment of the disclosure.

FIG. 8A illustrates a software environment for a mobile device according to an embodiment of the disclosure.

FIG. 8B illustrates an alternative software environment for a mobile device according to an embodiment of the disclosure.

FIG. 9 illustrates an exemplary computer system suitable for implementing some aspects of the several embodiments of the disclosure.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

It should be understood at the outset that although illustrative implementations of one or more embodiments are illustrated below, the disclosed systems and methods may be implemented using any number of techniques, whether currently known or not yet in existence. The disclosure should in no way be limited to the illustrative implementations, drawings, and techniques illustrated below, but may be modified within the scope of the appended claims along with their full scope of equivalents.

The present disclosure provides systems and methods for location awareness session management and cross application session management. A session may be a semi-permanent application level interactive information interchange, also known as a dialogue, a conversation or a meeting, between two or more communicating devices, or between a computer and a mobile device. An application level session is set up or established at a certain point in time, and ended or torn down at a later point in time. An established application level communication session may involve more than one message in each direction. In order to prolong sessions and allow users of mobile devices greater freedom, in an embodiment, the present disclosure provides that an application level session is both time limited and location limited. However, by limiting the location of the mobile device in which the session is valid, the system promotes a service provider to increase the amount of time the application level session is valid above what the service provider might otherwise be comfortable with. For example, in an embodiment, as long as the mobile device is within the same location for which the application level session was initiated, the service provider may be more comfortable that the mobile device is still in possession of the user and has not been stolen allowing access to an unauthorized person. Thus, in such circumstances, the service provider may be willing to keep the application level session alive for a longer period of time. In an embodiment, if the mobile device moves outside of a specified location, the application level session may end. Moving the mobile device outside of the specified location may indicate that the device may have been stolen and no longer in the possession of the authorized user. In such case, by ending the application level session, fraudulent activity may be inhibited.

The mobile device may send an indication of its current location in each of its session messages. Alternatively, the mobile device may periodically send a distinct current location message to the service provider and/or to a session management server computer or session server. In an embodiment, the location of the mobile device may be determined based on a Global Positioning System (GPS), and the indication of current location that is sent by the mobile device may comprise GPS coordinates.

However, the disclosed systems and methods are not limited to GPS based location determination. In another embodiment, the location of the mobile device may be determined based on an available Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access (WiMAX) access point, an available WiFi access point, an available femtocell access point; or other available wireless access points regardless of whether the mobile device is actually connected to the available wireless access point. For example, the mobile device may receive a broadcast signal from a wireless access point that contains an identifier for the subject access point. In this case, the indication of current location that is sent by the mobile device may comprise an identity of one access point, identities of a plurality of access points, or other information about what wireless access points are in range of the mobile device. The service provider may deem that the mobile device is within an acceptable proximity of a preferred location, such as a retail store location, if the mobile device is in range of one or more predefined wireless access points, where the subject predefined wireless access points are associated with their identities. In an embodiment, the location of the mobile device may be determined based on triangulation of the strength of signals between a plurality of available wireless access points. In an embodiment, the location may be determined based on using combinations of different types of location determination methods. As such, the disclosed methods and systems are not limited to a particular method of determining the location of the mobile device.

In an embodiment, continuing activity or activity exceeding a predetermined threshold may prevent the application level session from being ended even though the mobile device may have moved outside of a specified location. The continuing activity may be taken as an indication that the mobile device is still in the possession of an authorized user and has not been stolen. Thus, continuing the session may be warranted. By continuing the session, the user experience is enhanced since they do not experience the frustration of being disconnected from their session and having to reestablish their session by entering, for example, a user name and password.

In an embodiment, cross application session awareness may provide that activity on one application or session may be sufficient to ensure that another session is not ended. For example, a bank may have enabled a session for a banking customer to access the customer's bank account information. The customer may need to check information in an e-mail as well as access confidential information on another web site through a session on the other web site. For example, the customer may need to access a web site associated with their credit card issuer to locate additional information before completing their session with their bank. Their online session with their bank may have been idle for a significant amount of time that would normally result in the session being ended. However, a trusted global session manager may monitor session and application activity across multiple sessions and/or applications. In such circumstances, the customer's activity on their e-mail and on their credit card issuer's web site may be sufficient to keep their session with their bank active. Such activity may indicate that the customer has not left their mobile device and is still in possession of the device making it unlikely that unauthorized access to the customer's bank account may be granted by keeping the session alive.

In an embodiment, to manage sessions, a token may be generated based on a current location of a mobile device. The token may be provided to the mobile device and provided with all messages transmitted from the mobile device to a session server. A token may be any data used to uniquely identify an individual and/or device and authenticate that individual and/or device for a session. In an embodiment, a token may be a string of characters. In an embodiment, a token may be a cookie, which may also be referred to as an HTTP cookie, a web cookie, or a browser cookie. In an embodiment, the token is a self-expiring token that may end a session after the expiration of a specified amount of time.

Turning now to FIG. 1, a system 100 for location awareness session management and cross application session management is provided. In an embodiment, the system 100 comprises mobile devices 140, a base transceiver station 124, an authentication server 110, a session server 120, a session data store 130, and a network 106. Although shown as two separate machines, authentication server 110 and session server 120 may be implemented on different machines or on the same machine.

In an embodiment, mobile device 140 may be any portable electronic device including a mobile phone, a personal digital assistant (PDA), a smart phone, a tablet computer, and a laptop computer. A smart phone may be a mobile device that includes not only the traditional features of a mobile phone, but also additional functionality such as, for example, providing e-mail service, web access, and still picture and video capture capability via a camera. A smart phone may also run applications including games and productivity applications. Examples of mobile devices include an Android™ enabled phone, an iPhone®, and an iPad®.

The base transceiver station 124 may be any of a cellular wireless base station, for example a Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA), a Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM), a Universal Mobile Communications System (UMTS), and/or Long-term Evolution (LTE) cellular wireless base station; a Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access (WiMAX) base station; a WiFi access point; a femtocell; or other wireless access devices. While FIG. 1 depicts only one base transceiver station 124, in an embodiment a plurality of base transceiver stations 124 may be existent and in operation.

The network 106 promotes communication between the components of the system 100. The network 106 may be any communication network including a public data network (PDN), a public switched telephone network (PSTN), a private network, a local area network (LAN), a wide area network (WAN), an intranet, the Internet and/or a combination of networks.

Authentication server 110 authenticates mobile device 140 to session server 120. Authentication server 110 includes a token component 112 which generates a token which is transmitted to mobile device 140 to use to authenticate itself to a session. In an embodiment, token component 112 receives an indication of the location of mobile device 140. Token component 112 may use the location information from the mobile device 140 to create a token.

Mobile device 140 sends a request for a token to authentication server 110. The request may include location information about the mobile device 140. Mobile device 140 receives the token from authentication server 110. The token may be time and location limited. Additional details concerning time limited tokens may be found in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 13/042,015 to V. Cherukumudi, et al. filed Mar. 7, 2011 and entitled “Password Generation and Validation Method” which is incorporated herein by reference. Mobile device 140 may initiate an application level session with session server 120. Examples of application level sessions may include logging into a bank's web site to check bank account information, checking e-mail through a web site, and performing work related activities on an employer's confidential web site. An application level session is a temporary interactive secure information exchange between collaborating application entities such as an application client and an application server during which the entities may transmit and receive requests and transmit and receive responses in the context of a previously completed authentication and authorization. An application level session is intended to preserve and protect access to and modification of secured information by authorized users and exclude unauthorized users.

An application level session should not be confused with other types of sessions occurring at other layers in an Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) model or in another layered communication stack model where a layer serves the layer above it and is served by the layer below it. For example, an application level session should not be confused with activities that occur at the physical layer, the data link layer, the network layer, the transport layer, the session layer, or the presentation layer. It will be understood that hereinafter references to a “session” mean an application level session as defined above. When communicating with the session server, the mobile device includes the token with each message transmitted. In an embodiment, the token may be communicated directly to the session server 120 which may then communicate with authentication server 110 to verify that the token is valid. In an embodiment, the token may be communicated directly to the authentication server 110 which may then provide an indication to the session server 120 of whether the token is valid and whether the session activity may be continued. If the token is valid, the session server 120 may perform session activities requested by the mobile device 140. In an embodiment, the session server 120 may retrieve, store, or modify data in session data store 130. For example, the data in session data store 130 may be account balance information for a bank account belonging to the user of mobile device 140.

In an embodiment, the mobile device 140 transmits current location information along with the token to the authentication server 110. The authentication server 110 determines whether the location for which the token was granted matches the current location information. If the current location of the mobile device 140 does not match the location information associated with the token, then the session is terminated. In an embodiment, the current location of the mobile device 140 matches the location associated with the token if the mobile device 140 is within an area 150 defined with reference to the location associated with the token. In an embodiment, the area 150 may be specified or defined as a specific or predefined radius extending from a point of a radio transceiver with which the location associated with the token corresponds. In an embodiment, the area 150 may be defined as within the specified building, such as a store location. In an embodiment, the area 150 may be specified as the area within which the mobile device 140 is able to communicate with a specified or predefined transceiver or radio source or one of a plurality of specified or predefined transceivers or radio sources.

In an embodiment, mobile device 140 may transmit session activity information, current location information, the token, and the session message to the authentication server 110 and/or session server 120. In an embodiment, if sufficient activity on the mobile device 140 has occurred within a specified or predefined time prior to the receipt of the session message and token, then the session may be maintained even though the mobile device 140 may be outside of the location specified by the token. For example, if there has been continuing session activity while the mobile device 140 was moved from the location associated with the token to a new location, this activity may be used to infer that the mobile device 140 has not been stolen or otherwise compromised thereby minimizing the risk of unauthorized session activity. In an embodiment sufficient activity will maintain the session outside of a first area 150, but only so long as the mobile device remains within a second area 160. The second area 160 may be defined in a similar manner to that of first area 150.

In an embodiment, lack of sufficient activity by the mobile device 140 on the session will cause the session to terminate at an earlier time than would otherwise be the case. This same concept may be expressed in terms of extending the life of the session if a sufficient amount of activity on the mobile device 140 is detected. In both cases, the session life span is different depending on the level of activity on the mobile device 140. In an embodiment, the mobile device 140 may include a global session manager that monitors activity on several sessions. Activity on one session may provide the sufficient activity necessary to maintain or extend the session on the mobile device 140.

Turning now to FIG. 2, a block diagram of an embodiment of the token component 112 is provided. The token component 112 may comprise an encryption component 202 and may perform one or more steps for processing a plurality of inputs to generate a token 220.

In an embodiment, the plurality of inputs comprises a time input 214 a, a private data input 214 b, and a public data input 214 c which includes a location input 214 d. The time input 214 a may be provided by a clock 212 located on the authentication server 110. The clock 212 may be a system clock. In an embodiment, the time input 214 a is in DDDHHMM format where DDD is the day of the year, HH is the hour, and MM is the minute. Having the time input 214 a in DDDHHMM format rather than some other longer time format helps to reduce the size of the unencrypted token 216. However, the time input 214 a could alternatively be in YYMMDDHHMM format where YYMMDD is year, month, and day, HH is the hour, and MM is the minute or some other time format. The time input 214 a could be a number of seconds elapsed in a predefined epoch, for example seconds elapsed since Jan. 1, 1970. The time input could be represented and/or processed in accordance with a different time keeping convention.

The time input 214 a may be determined by rounding a current time to the nearest predefined time interval. For example, if the predefined time interval is selected to be 5 minutes and the current time is Jan. 17, 2011 at 9:32:23 am, the time input 214 a in DDDHHMM format would be 0170930. Those of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate that the predefined time interval may be selected to be any interval of time. For instance, the predefined time interval may be 60 minutes, 30 minutes, 15 minutes, 5 minutes, 1 minute, or some other time interval. For the sake of simplicity, it may be beneficial to select a time interval that can be evenly divided into 60.

The time rounded to the nearest predefined time interval to determine the time input 214 a may depend upon whether the token component 112 is generating a token 220 or validating a received token. For example, if the token component 112 is generating a token 220, the time that may be rounded to the nearest predefined time interval may be the time that the mobile device 140 invoked the application program interface. In another example, if the token component 112 is validating a received token, the time that may be rounded to the nearest predefined time interval may be the time that the received token was received by the token component 112.

The private data input 214 b may be a secret key or phrase. In an embodiment, the private data input 214 b is stored on the authentication server 110 in a data store or on some other server accessible to the token component 112. The private data input 214 b may be private in that it is accessible to the token component 112, but not to the mobile device 140 and/or session server 120. To help maintain security, the private data input 214 b may be changed by an administrator or some other personnel regularly such as at some periodic time interval or irregularly.

The public data input 214 c may be data that is known to a user of the mobile device 140. The public data input 214 c may include a location input 214 d indicating the location of mobile device 140. The public data input 214 c may vary depending upon the context in which the token generation and validation system and methods disclosed herein are applied. For example, in a retail setting where authentication of an employee is sought, the public data input 214 c may be a consumer ID, a user name, a store ID, a store location, and/or some other data know to the user of the mobile device 140. In an embodiment, the store location may be determined from the store ID. To increase the strength of the generated token, two or more pieces of data can be included in the public data input 214 c. The public data input 214 c may be provided to the token component 112 from the mobile device 140 when the mobile device requests generation of a token 220 or by session server 120 when the session server 120 requests validation of a received token.

In an embodiment, an unencrypted token 216 may be formed from a plurality of inputs. For example, the unencrypted token 216 may be formed from the time input 214 a, the private data input 214 b, and the public data input 214 c, including the location data 214 d. In an embodiment, the unencrypted token 216 may be a string of characters.

The encryption component 202 may alter the unencrypted token 216 by applying a one-way hashing algorithm to the unencrypted token 216. In an embodiment, applying a one-way hashing algorithm to the unencrypted token 216 produces a hashed string of characters that is not easily, if at all, able to be reversed back into the plurality of inputs used to create the unencrypted token 216. For example, the encryption component 202 may apply a one-way hashing algorithm such as SHA-1, MD5, or another hashing algorithm. In some embodiments, the hashed string of characters that results from the encryption component 202 is the token 220. Such an embodiment may be, for example, when the mobile device 140 communicates a token directly to the session server 120. Other encryption techniques other than or in addition to hashing may also be utilized in generating the token 220.

Turning now to FIG. 3, a block diagram of an embodiment of the mobile device 140 is provided. Mobile device 140 may include token 1 302, token 2 304, token 3 306, a location determination component 308, and a global session manager 310. The location determination component 308 may determine the location of the mobile device 140 and provide that information to the authentication server 110. In an embodiment, the location determination component 308 may comprise a Global Positioning System (GPS) component to determine the location of the mobile device 140 based on GPS coordinates. In an embodiment, the location determination component 308 determines the location of the mobile device 140 based on signal strength from one or more radio transceivers. In an embodiment, the location determination component 308 determines the location of the mobile device 140 based on the identity of a transceiver with which the mobile device 140 is in communication.

Global session manager 310 may monitor activity on multiple sessions associated with tokens 302, 304, 306. Global Session Manager 310 may be acquired from a source that is trusted by the originators of the tokens 302, 304, 306. The sessions associated with each of tokens 302, 304, 306 may be time limited and be set to expire unless a sufficient level of activity is maintained within a specified period of time on the mobile device 140. However, since the global session manager 310 may be trusted by the sessions associated with tokens 302, 304, 306, rather than prematurely ending one session due to lack of activity on the mobile device 140, the session may be maintained if sufficient activity occurs on one of the other sessions associated with one of the other tokens 302, 304, 306. During a session, when the mobile device 140 transmits a session message to the authentication server 110 or session server 120, the mobile device 140 may also transmit the corresponding token, the current location of the mobile device 140, and the session activity as determined by the global session manager 310.

Turning to FIG. 4, a flowchart of a method 400 for generating a token is depicted in accordance with an embodiment of the present disclosure. Method 400 begins at block 410 where the authentication server 110 receives a plurality of inputs from the mobile device 140 where the inputs include a device location and a first time. At block 412, the authentication server 110 generates a string of characters from at least some of the plurality of inputs, wherein the inputs include at least the mobile device location and the first time. At block 414, the authentication server 110 hashes the string of characters. At block 416, the authentication server 110 may encode the hashed string of characters, after which the method 400 may end.

Turning to FIG. 5, a flowchart of a method 500 for validating a token is depicted in accordance with an embodiment of the present disclosure. Method 500 begins at block 510 where the authentication server 110 receives a current location of the mobile device 140, an activity level of the mobile device 140, and a token from the mobile device 140 or from the session server 120. At block 512, the authentication server 110 determines whether the token is valid. If the token is not valid, the method 500 proceeds to block 524 where the session is ended at which point method 500 may end. If the authentication server 110 determines that the token is valid at block 512, then the method 500 proceeds to block 514 where the authentication server 110 determines whether the current location matches a location for which the token is valid. If, at block 514, the authentication server 110 determines that the current location does not match the location for which the token is valid, then the method 500 proceeds to block 516 or alternatively, the method 500 may proceed to block 524 where the session is ended and the method 500 may end. At block 516, the authentication server 110 determines whether there has been sufficient continuing activity on the session (or alternatively on the mobile device 140 generally) to warrant allowing the session to continue although the mobile device 140 is outside the location where the token is valid. If, at block 516, sufficient continuing activity has not been maintained on the session or the mobile device 140, then method 500 proceeds to block 524 where the session is ended at which point the method 500 may end.

If, at block 514, the authentication server 110 determines that the current location matches the location for which the token is valid or, at block 516, the authentication server 110 determines that there has been sufficient continuing activity to warrant maintaining the session, the method 500 proceeds to block 518. At block 518, the authentication server 110 determines whether the predefined time limit for which the token is valid has expired. If, at block 518, the authentication server 110 determines that the predefined time limit has not expired, then the method 500 proceeds to block 522 where the token is authenticated allowing the session to continue. Once the token has been authenticated at block 522, the method 500 may end.

If, at block 518, the authentication server 110 determines that the time limit has expired, the method 500 proceeds to block 520. Alternatively, the method 500 may proceed to block 524 if the authentication server 110 determines that the time limit has expired. At block 520, the authentication server 110 determines whether there has been sufficient activity within a predetermined time period to allow the session to be extended. If, at block 520, the authentication server 110 determines that there has been insufficient activity, then the method 500 proceeds to block 524 after which method 500 may end. If, at block 520, the authentication server 110 determines that there has been sufficient activity, then the method 500 may proceed to block 522 where the token is authenticated. Once the token has been authenticated at block 522, the method 500 may end. As discussed above, the activity level may be based solely on the activity level in the session corresponding to the token to be authenticated. However, in an embodiment, also discussed above, the activity level may be based on activity on other sessions not corresponding to the token to be authenticated. Those skilled in the art will recognize that the decision diamonds illustrated in FIG. 5 may be reordered in several ways to implement the checks described therein. For example, in an embodiment, a time limit associated with the token may be checked before the current location is checked against a location associated with the token. In an embodiment, the sufficient continuing activity criteria may be checked before either the current location criteria or the time limit criteria is checked.

FIG. 6 shows a wireless communications system including the mobile device 600. FIG. 6 depicts the mobile device 600, which is operable for implementing aspects of the present disclosure, but the present disclosure should not be limited to these implementations. Though illustrated as a mobile phone, the mobile device 600 may take various forms including a wireless handset, a pager, a personal digital assistant (PDA), a gaming device, or a media player. The mobile device 600 includes a display 602 and a touch-sensitive surface and/or keys 604 for input by a user. The mobile device 600 may present options for the user to select, controls for the user to actuate, and/or cursors or other indicators for the user to direct. The mobile device 600 may further accept data entry from the user, including numbers to dial or various parameter values for configuring the operation of the handset. The mobile device 600 may further execute one or more software or firmware applications in response to user commands. These applications may configure the mobile device 600 to perform various customized functions in response to user interaction. Additionally, the mobile device 600 may be programmed and/or configured over-the-air, for example from a wireless base station, a wireless access point, or a peer mobile device 600. The mobile device 600 may execute a web browser application which enables the display 602 to show a web page. The web page may be obtained via wireless communications with a base transceiver station, a wireless network access node, a peer mobile device 600 or any other wireless communication network or system.

FIG. 7 shows a block diagram of the mobile device 600. While a variety of known components of handsets are depicted, in an embodiment a subset of the listed components and/or additional components not listed may be included in the mobile device 600. The mobile device 600 includes a digital signal processor (DSP) 702 and a memory 704. As shown, the mobile device 600 may further include an antenna and front end unit 706, a radio frequency (RF) transceiver 708, a baseband processing unit 710, an input/output interface 718, a removable memory card 720, a universal serial bus (USB) port 722, an infrared port 724, a vibrator 726, a keypad 728, a touch screen liquid crystal display (LCD) with a touch sensitive surface 730, a touch screen/LCD controller 732, a camera 734, a camera controller 736, a global positioning system (GPS) receiver 738, and a sensor 740. In an embodiment, the mobile device 600 may include another kind of display that does not provide a touch sensitive screen. In an embodiment, the DSP 702 may communicate directly with the memory 704 without passing through the input/output interface 718. Additionally, in an embodiment, the mobile device 600 may comprise other peripheral devices that provide other functionality.

The DSP 702 or some other form of controller or central processing unit operates to control the various components of the mobile device 600 in accordance with embedded software or firmware stored in memory 704 or stored in memory contained within the DSP 702 itself. In addition to the embedded software or firmware, the DSP 702 may execute other applications stored in the memory 704 or made available via information carrier media such as portable data storage media like the removable memory card 720 or via wired or wireless network communications. The application software may comprise a compiled set of machine-readable instructions that configure the DSP 702 to provide the desired functionality, or the application software may be high-level software instructions to be processed by an interpreter or compiler to indirectly configure the DSP 702.

The DSP 702 may communicate with a wireless network via the analog baseband processing unit 710. In some embodiments, the communication may provide Internet connectivity, enabling a user to gain access to content on the Internet and to send and receive e-mail or text messages. The input/output interface 718 interconnects the DSP 702 and various memories and interfaces. The memory 704 and the removable memory card 720 may provide software and data to configure the operation of the DSP 702. Among the interfaces may be the USB port 722 and the infrared port 724. The USB port 722 may enable the mobile device 600 to function as a peripheral device to exchange information with a personal computer or other computer system. The infrared port 724 and other optional ports such as a Bluetooth® interface or an IEEE 702.11 compliant wireless interface may enable the mobile device 600 to communicate wirelessly with other nearby handsets and/or wireless base stations.

The keypad 728 couples to the DSP 702 via the interface 718 to provide one mechanism for the user to make selections, enter information, and otherwise provide input to the mobile device 600. Another input mechanism may be the touch screen LCD 730, which may also display text and/or graphics to the user. The touch screen LCD controller 732 couples the DSP 702 to the touch screen LCD 730. The GPS receiver 738 is coupled to the DSP 702 to decode global positioning system signals, thereby enabling the mobile device 600 to determine its position.

Sensor 740 couples to the DSP 702 via the interface 718 to provide a mechanism to determine movement and/or relative orientation of the mobile device 600. The sensor 740 may provide information to DSP 702 indicating the orientation that the mobile device 600 is being held (e.g., face up, face down, face perpendicular to the ground). Sensor 740 may also provide information indicating whether the mobile device 600 is being moved (e.g., right to left, up to down) and indicate sudden accelerations and/or decelerations. Sudden decelerations may indicate that the mobile device 600 has been dropped. Sensor 740 may include an accelerometer to measure various motions and orientations of the mobile device 600. Measurements from sensor 740 may be provided to DSP 702 which may record the measurement and a time stamp in a log file stored, for example, in memory 704.

In an embodiment, sensor 740 may include other sensors, such as, for example, a temperature sensor and/or a current meter for measuring current flow from the mobile device's 600 battery. The temperature sensor may detect the temperature of the mobile device 600 or various components of the mobile device 600 to indicate whether a component (e.g., an RF circuit) may be over heating. Additionally, in an embodiment, the mobile device 600 may comprise other sensors that provide other functionality.

FIG. 8A illustrates a software environment 802 that may be implemented by the DSP 702. The DSP 702 executes operating system software 804 that provides a platform from which the rest of the software operates. The operating system software 804 may provide a variety of drivers for the handset hardware with standardized interfaces that are accessible to application software. The operating system software 804 may be coupled to and interact with application management services (AMS) 806 that transfer control between applications running on the mobile device 600. Also shown in FIG. 8A are a web browser application 808, a media player application 810, JAVA applets 812, and a global session manager (GSM) 814. The web browser application 808 may be executed by the mobile device 600 to browse content and/or the Internet, for example when the mobile device 600 is coupled to a network via a wireless link. The web browser application 808 may permit a user to enter information into forms and select links to retrieve and view web pages. The media player application 810 may be executed by the mobile device 600 to play audio or audiovisual media. The JAVA applets 812 may be executed by the mobile device 600 to provide a variety of functionality including games, utilities, and other functionality. The GSM 814 may be executed by the mobile device 600 to manage one or more sessions on the mobile device 600. The GSM may monitor session activity on multiple sessions and provide the session activity to other sessions so that a session does not prematurely end due to lack of activity on that particular session when there is still sufficient activity on another session to warrant keeping the particular session alive.

FIG. 8B illustrates an alternative software environment 820 that may be implemented by the DSP 702. The DSP 702 executes operating system software 828 and an execution runtime 830. The DSP 702 executes applications 822 that may execute in the execution runtime 830 and may rely upon services provided by the application framework 824. Applications 822 and the application framework 824 may rely upon functionality provided via the libraries 826.

FIG. 9 illustrates a computer system 980 suitable for implementing one or more embodiments disclosed herein. The computer system 980 includes a processor 982 (which may be referred to as a central processor unit or CPU) that is in communication with memory devices including secondary storage 984, read only memory (ROM) 986, random access memory (RAM) 988, input/output (I/O) devices 990, and network connectivity devices 992. The processor 982 may be implemented as one or more CPU chips.

It is understood that by programming and/or loading executable instructions onto the computer system 980, at least one of the CPU 982, the RAM 988, and the ROM 986 are changed, transforming the computer system 980 in part into a particular machine or apparatus having the novel functionality taught by the present disclosure. It is fundamental to the electrical engineering and software engineering arts that functionality that can be implemented by loading executable software into a computer can be converted to a hardware implementation by well known design rules. Decisions between implementing a concept in software versus hardware typically hinge on considerations of stability of the design and numbers of units to be produced rather than any issues involved in translating from the software domain to the hardware domain. Generally, a design that is still subject to frequent change may be preferred to be implemented in software, because re-spinning a hardware implementation is more expensive than re-spinning a software design. Generally, a design that is stable that will be produced in large volume may be preferred to be implemented in hardware, for example in an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC), because for large production runs the hardware implementation may be less expensive than the software implementation. Often a design may be developed and tested in a software form and later transformed, by well known design rules, to an equivalent hardware implementation in an application specific integrated circuit that hardwires the instructions of the software. In the same manner as a machine controlled by a new ASIC is a particular machine or apparatus, likewise a computer that has been programmed and/or loaded with executable instructions may be viewed as a particular machine or apparatus.

The secondary storage 984 is typically comprised of one or more disk drives or tape drives and is used for non-volatile storage of data and as an over-flow data storage device if RAM 988 is not large enough to hold all working data. Secondary storage 984 may be used to store programs which are loaded into RAM 988 when such programs are selected for execution. The ROM 986 is used to store instructions and perhaps data which are read during program execution. ROM 986 is a non-volatile memory device which typically has a small memory capacity relative to the larger memory capacity of secondary storage 984. The RAM 988 is used to store volatile data and perhaps to store instructions. Access to both ROM 986 and RAM 988 is typically faster than to secondary storage 984. The secondary storage 984, the RAM 988, and/or the ROM 986 may be referred to in some contexts as computer readable storage media and/or non-transitory computer readable media.

I/O devices 990 may include printers, video monitors, liquid crystal displays (LCDs), touch screen displays, keyboards, keypads, switches, dials, mice, track balls, voice recognizers, card readers, paper tape readers, or other well-known input devices.

The network connectivity devices 992 may take the form of modems, modem banks, Ethernet cards, universal serial bus (USB) interface cards, serial interfaces, token ring cards, fiber distributed data interface (FDDI) cards, wireless local area network (WLAN) cards, radio transceiver cards such as code division multiple access (CDMA), global system for mobile communications (GSM), long-term evolution (LTE), worldwide interoperability for microwave access (WiMAX), and/or other air interface protocol radio transceiver cards, and other well-known network devices. These network connectivity devices 992 may enable the processor 982 to communicate with the Internet or one or more intranets. With such a network connection, it is contemplated that the processor 982 might receive information from the network, or might output information to the network in the course of performing the above-described method steps. Such information, which is often represented as a sequence of instructions to be executed using processor 982, may be received from and outputted to the network, for example, in the form of a computer data signal embodied in a carrier wave.

Such information, which may include data or instructions to be executed using processor 982 for example, may be received from and outputted to the network, for example, in the form of a computer data baseband signal or signal embodied in a carrier wave. The baseband signal or signal embedded in the carrier wave, or other types of signals currently used or hereafter developed, may be generated according to several methods well known to one skilled in the art. The baseband signal and/or signal embedded in the carrier wave may be referred to in some contexts as a transitory signal.

The processor 982 executes instructions, codes, computer programs, scripts which it accesses from hard disk, floppy disk, optical disk (these various disk based systems may all be considered secondary storage 984), ROM 986, RAM 988, or the network connectivity devices 992. While only one processor 982 is shown, multiple processors may be present. Thus, while instructions may be discussed as executed by a processor, the instructions may be executed simultaneously, serially, or otherwise executed by one or multiple processors. Instructions, codes, computer programs, scripts, and/or data that may be accessed from the secondary storage 984, for example, hard drives, floppy disks, optical disks, and/or other device, the ROM 986, and/or the RAM 988 may be referred to in some contexts as non-transitory instructions and/or non-transitory information.

In an embodiment, the computer system 980 may comprise two or more computers in communication with each other that collaborate to perform a task. For example, but not by way of limitation, an application may be partitioned in such a way as to permit concurrent and/or parallel processing of the instructions of the application. Alternatively, the data processed by the application may be partitioned in such a way as to permit concurrent and/or parallel processing of different portions of a data set by the two or more computers. In an embodiment, virtualization software may be employed by the computer system 980 to provide the functionality of a number of servers that is not directly bound to the number of computers in the computer system 980. For example, virtualization software may provide twenty virtual servers on four physical computers. In an embodiment, the functionality disclosed above may be provided by executing the application and/or applications in a cloud computing environment. Cloud computing may comprise providing computing services via a network connection using dynamically scalable computing resources. Cloud computing may be supported, at least in part, by virtualization software. A cloud computing environment may be established by an enterprise and/or may be hired on an as-needed basis from a third party provider. Some cloud computing environments may comprise cloud computing resources owned and operated by the enterprise as well as cloud computing resources hired and/or leased from a third party provider.

In an embodiment, some or all of the functionality disclosed above may be provided as a computer program product. The computer program product may comprise one or more computer readable storage medium having computer usable program code embodied therein to implement the functionality disclosed above. The computer program product may comprise data structures, executable instructions, and other computer usable program code. The computer program product may be embodied in removable computer storage media and/or non-removable computer storage media. The removable computer readable storage medium may comprise, without limitation, a paper tape, a magnetic tape, magnetic disk, an optical disk, a solid state memory chip, for example analog magnetic tape, compact disk read only memory (CD-ROM) disks, floppy disks, jump drives, digital cards, multimedia cards, and others. The computer program product may be suitable for loading, by the computer system 980, at least portions of the contents of the computer program product to the secondary storage 984, to the ROM 986, to the RAM 988, and/or to other non-volatile memory and volatile memory of the computer system 980. The processor 982 may process the executable instructions and/or data structures in part by directly accessing the computer program product, for example by reading from a CD-ROM disk inserted into a disk drive peripheral of the computer system 980. Alternatively, the processor 982 may process the executable instructions and/or data structures by remotely accessing the computer program product, for example by downloading the executable instructions and/or data structures from a remote server through the network connectivity devices 992. The computer program product may comprise instructions that promote the loading and/or copying of data, data structures, files, and/or executable instructions to the secondary storage 984, to the ROM 986, to the RAM 988, and/or to other non-volatile memory and volatile memory of the computer system 980.

In some contexts, the secondary storage 984, the ROM 986, and the RAM 988 may be referred to as a non-transitory computer readable medium or a computer readable storage media. A dynamic RAM embodiment of the RAM 988, likewise, may be referred to as a non-transitory computer readable medium in that while the dynamic RAM receives electrical power and is operated in accordance with its design, for example during a period of time during which the computer 980 is turned on and operational, the dynamic RAM stores information that is written to it. Similarly, the processor 982 may comprise an internal RAM, an internal ROM, a cache memory, and/or other internal non-transitory storage blocks, sections, or components that may be referred to in some contexts as non-transitory computer readable media or computer readable storage media.

While several embodiments have been provided in the present disclosure, it should be understood that the disclosed systems and methods may be embodied in many other specific forms without departing from the spirit or scope of the present disclosure. The present examples are to be considered as illustrative and not restrictive, and the intention is not to be limited to the details given herein. For example, the various elements or components may be combined or integrated in another system or certain features may be omitted or not implemented.

Also, techniques, systems, subsystems, and methods described and illustrated in the various embodiments as discrete or separate may be combined or integrated with other systems, modules, techniques, or methods without departing from the scope of the present disclosure. Other items shown or discussed as directly coupled or communicating with each other may be indirectly coupled or communicating through some interface, device, or intermediate component, whether electrically, mechanically, or otherwise. Other examples of changes, substitutions, and alterations are ascertainable by one skilled in the art and could be made without departing from the spirit and scope disclosed herein.

Claims (20)

What is claimed is:
1. A location aware session token generation and validation system, comprising:
a server system comprising at least one processor;
at least one non-transitory memory coupled to the at least one processor; and
a token component stored in the at least one non-transitory memory that, upon execution by the at least one processor of the server system, configures the server system to:
receive a request to initiate an application level session from a mobile device comprising a global session management component stored in non-transitory memory of the mobile device, wherein the request includes an identification of the mobile device and a location of the mobile device within a predefined area of a communication network,
generate a token that initiates the application level session based on the request, wherein the token is time limited to a specified period of time and location limited to the predefined area such that the application level session is designated to expire based on at least one of the end of the specified period of time or the mobile device moving outside of the predefined area,
send the token to the mobile device via the communication network, wherein the mobile device comprises a plurality of tokens that each correspond to a respective one of a plurality of application level sessions, wherein each application level session includes an interactive secure information exchange between an application server and an application via a radio transceiver of the mobile device based on a completed authentication and authorization for the application that is stored in a non-transitory memory of the mobile device,
receive an application level session message from the mobile device using the global session management component, wherein the application level session message includes a requested application level session action associated with the application level session, a current location of the mobile device, and the token for the application level session,
determine, by analysis of the token, that the current location does not match the location associated with the token due to the mobile device moving outside of the predefined area and that a level of activity on the mobile device meets or exceeds a pre-specified level of activity,
responsive to the determination, extend the application level session associated with the token despite the current location of the mobile device being outside of the predefined area, and
perform the requested application level session action based on the extended application level session.
2. The location aware session token generation and validation system of claim 1, wherein determination that the level of activity on the mobile device meets or exceeds the pre-specified level of activity is responsive to the determination that the current location does not match the location.
3. The location aware session token generation and validation system of claim 1, wherein the level of activity on the mobile device that meets or exceeds the pre-specified level of activity is associated with at least one of the plurality of application level sessions.
4. The location aware session token generation and validation system of claim 1, wherein the current location is within a predefined radius from a point corresponding to the determined location associated with the token.
5. The location aware session token generation and validation system of claim 1, wherein the location associated with the token is within the predefined area based on proximity to a predefined radio source of the communication network.
6. The location aware session token generation and validation system of claim 5, wherein the predefined radio source comprises one of a particular local network, a particular WiFi network, and a particular base station tower.
7. The location aware session token generation and validation system of claim 1, wherein the requested session action comprises one of manipulating data on a data store, retrieving data from the data store and sending the data to the mobile device, or receiving data from the mobile device and storing the data on the data store.
8. A cross application session management system for a mobile device, comprising:
a mobile device comprising:
a radio transceiver that couples to a communication network,
at least one processor,
at least one non-transitory memory coupled to the at least one processor,
a plurality of tokens stored in the at least one non-transitory memory, wherein each of the plurality of tokens corresponds to a respective one of a plurality of application level sessions, and each of the plurality of tokens is associated with a location within a predefined area of the communication network, and
a global session management component stored in the at least one non-transitory memory that, upon execution by the at least one processor, configures the mobile device to:
monitor activity on the plurality of application level sessions, wherein each application level session includes an interactive secure information exchange between an application server and an application via the radio transceiver based on a completed authentication and authorization for the application that is stored in the at least one non-transitory memory of the mobile device,
determine that activity on at least one of the plurality of application level sessions meets or exceeds a pre-specified level of activity, and
based on the determination, maintain the application level session life for at least another application level session of the plurality of application level sessions by sending: an application level session message reporting the activity of the at least one of the plurality of application level sessions that meets or exceeds the pre-specified level of activity, a token corresponding to the another application level session, and a current location of the mobile device that is outside of the predefined area associated with the token, wherein the application level session is extended despite the current location of the mobile device being outside of the redefined area.
9. The system of claim 8, wherein the token is designated to end the another application level session responsive to the current location of the mobile device not matching the location associated with the token.
10. The system of claim 9, wherein the another application level session corresponding to the token that includes the location component is extended when the global session management component determines a specified level of activity on one of the plurality of application level sessions during movement of the mobile device.
11. The system of claim 10, wherein the mobile device comprises at least one of a mobile telephone, a tablet computer, or a laptop computer.
12. A method for session management for a mobile device, comprising:
receiving, at an authenticating server executing at least one processor, a request for a token to authenticate an application level session with a communication network of a service provider, wherein the request includes an identification of the mobile device and a location of the mobile device within a predefined area of the communication network;
generating, by the authenticating server executing a token component, a token that initiates the application level session, wherein the token is time limited and location limited to a predefined area associated with the token at the time of generation;
sending, from the authenticating server, the token to the mobile device;
receiving, at the authenticating server, a session message for the application level session from the mobile device, wherein the session message includes a requested session action for the application level session, a current location of the mobile device, an activity level on the mobile device, and the token for the application level session, wherein the application level session includes an interactive secure information exchange between an application server and an application via a radio transceiver of the mobile device based on a completed authentication and authorization for the application that is stored a non-transitory memory of the mobile device;
determining, by the authentication server analyzing the token, that the current location does not match the location associated with the token due to the mobile device moving outside of the predefined area and that the activity level at least meets a pre-specified level of activity;
responsive to the determination, extending, by the authenticating server, the application level session associated with the token despite the current location of the mobile device being outside of the predefined area; and
performing the requested session action based on extending the application level session.
13. The method of claim 12, wherein extending the application level session comprises extending the predefined period of time associated with expiration of the application level session.
14. The method of claim 12, further comprising ending the application level session responsive to expiration of a predefined period of time associated with the token and a level of activity below the pre-specified level for all of a plurality of application level sessions associated with the mobile device.
15. The method of claim 12, further comprising:
ending the application level session responsive to the current location not matching the location of the token and the activity level being less than the pre-specified level of activity.
16. The method of claim 12, wherein the requested session action comprises at least one of manipulating data on a data store, retrieving data from the data store and sending the data to the mobile device, or receiving data from the mobile device and storing the data on the data store.
17. The method of claim 12, wherein the activity level is the activity level corresponding to a different application level session.
18. The method of claim 12, wherein the current location does not match the location when the current location is outside of the predefined area.
19. The method of claim 12, wherein the mobile device comprises at least one of a mobile telephone, a tablet computer, or laptop computer.
20. The method of claim 12, wherein the current location of the mobile device is based on at least one of global positioning system coordinates or triangulation within the communication network.
US13/544,802 2012-07-09 2012-07-09 Location awareness session management and cross application session management Active 2034-05-12 US9271110B1 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US13/544,802 US9271110B1 (en) 2012-07-09 2012-07-09 Location awareness session management and cross application session management

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US13/544,802 US9271110B1 (en) 2012-07-09 2012-07-09 Location awareness session management and cross application session management

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US9271110B1 true US9271110B1 (en) 2016-02-23

Family

ID=55314831

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13/544,802 Active 2034-05-12 US9271110B1 (en) 2012-07-09 2012-07-09 Location awareness session management and cross application session management

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US9271110B1 (en)

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US9355233B1 (en) 2014-01-27 2016-05-31 Sprint Communications Company L.P. Password reset using hash functions
US9374363B1 (en) 2013-03-15 2016-06-21 Sprint Communications Company L.P. Restricting access of a portable communication device to confidential data or applications via a remote network based on event triggers generated by the portable communication device
US10304047B2 (en) * 2012-12-07 2019-05-28 Visa International Service Association Token generating component

Citations (39)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4800590A (en) 1985-01-14 1989-01-24 Willis E. Higgins Computer key and computer lock system
US5588056A (en) 1994-10-25 1996-12-24 Bell Atlantic Network Services, Inc. Method and system for generating pronounceable security passwords
US5592553A (en) 1993-07-30 1997-01-07 International Business Machines Corporation Authentication system using one-time passwords
US6161185A (en) 1998-03-06 2000-12-12 Mci Communications Corporation Personal authentication system and method for multiple computer platform
US6178508B1 (en) 1995-12-28 2001-01-23 International Business Machines Corp. System for controlling access to encrypted data files by a plurality of users
US6470454B1 (en) 1998-03-31 2002-10-22 International Business Machines Corporation Method and apparatus for establishing computer configuration protection passwords for protecting computer configurations
US20020178370A1 (en) 1999-12-30 2002-11-28 Gurevich Michael N. Method and apparatus for secure authentication and sensitive data management
US6496937B1 (en) 1998-01-13 2002-12-17 Nec Corp. Password updating apparatus and recording medium used therefor
US6601175B1 (en) 1999-03-16 2003-07-29 International Business Machines Corporation Method and system for providing limited-life machine-specific passwords for data processing systems
US20030216143A1 (en) 2002-03-01 2003-11-20 Roese John J. Location discovery in a data network
US6731731B1 (en) 1999-07-30 2004-05-04 Comsquare Co., Ltd. Authentication method, authentication system and recording medium
US20050015601A1 (en) 2003-07-17 2005-01-20 International Business Machines Corporation Methods, systems, and media to authenticate a user
US20050239481A1 (en) 2004-04-01 2005-10-27 Seligmann Doree D Location-based command execution for mobile telecommunications terminals
US20050268345A1 (en) 2004-05-29 2005-12-01 Harrison Robert B Method and apparatus for providing temporary access to a network device
US20050272445A1 (en) 2000-12-19 2005-12-08 Bellsouth Intellectual Property Corporation Location-based security rules
US20060212589A1 (en) * 2005-03-18 2006-09-21 Sap Aktiengesellschaft Session manager for web-based applications
US20090047923A1 (en) 2007-08-06 2009-02-19 Telcordia Technologies, Inc. Method and System for Using Cellular/Wireless Phones and Devices for Retrieving Emergency Related Personal Data
US20100077487A1 (en) 2003-06-17 2010-03-25 Cerner Innovation, Inc. Computerized method and system for restricting access to patient protected health information
US7836407B2 (en) 2007-05-02 2010-11-16 Yahoo! Inc. Smart fields
US20110072492A1 (en) 2009-09-21 2011-03-24 Avaya Inc. Screen icon manipulation by context and frequency of use
US20110166883A1 (en) 2009-09-01 2011-07-07 Palmer Robert D Systems and Methods for Modeling Healthcare Costs, Predicting Same, and Targeting Improved Healthcare Quality and Profitability
US20110208797A1 (en) 2010-02-22 2011-08-25 Full Armor Corporation Geolocation-Based Management of Virtual Applications
US20120136572A1 (en) 2010-06-17 2012-05-31 Norton Kenneth S Distance and Location-Aware Reminders in a Calendar System
US20120154413A1 (en) 2010-12-21 2012-06-21 Dongwoo Kim Mobile terminal and method of controlling a mode switching therein
US8331337B2 (en) * 2008-04-18 2012-12-11 Nec Corporation Session management apparatus, communication system, and session clear-out method
US20130074067A1 (en) 2011-08-15 2013-03-21 Empire Technology Development Llc Multimodal computing device
US20130097657A1 (en) 2011-10-17 2013-04-18 Daniel Cardamore Dynamically Generating Perimeters
US20130124583A1 (en) 2011-11-11 2013-05-16 Geordon Thomas Ferguson Presenting Metadata From Multiple Perimeters
US8484482B1 (en) 2011-03-07 2013-07-09 Sprint Communications Company L.P. Password generation and validation system and method
US20130252583A1 (en) * 2012-03-22 2013-09-26 Research In Motion Limited Authentication server and methods for granting tokens comprising location data
US20130290709A1 (en) 2012-04-26 2013-10-31 International Business Machines Corporation Policy-based dynamic information flow control on mobile devices
US8583091B1 (en) 2010-09-06 2013-11-12 Sprint Communications Company L.P. Dynamic loading, unloading, and caching of alternate complete interfaces
US8588749B1 (en) 2011-09-01 2013-11-19 Cellco Partnership Data segmentation profiles
US20140007222A1 (en) 2011-10-11 2014-01-02 Zenprise, Inc. Secure execution of enterprise applications on mobile devices
US20140059642A1 (en) 2012-08-24 2014-02-27 Vmware, Inc. Method and system for facilitating isolated workspace for applications
US20140074508A1 (en) 2001-02-02 2014-03-13 Truven Health Analytics Inc. Method and System for Extracting Medical Information for Presentation to Medical Providers on Mobile Terminals
US8737965B2 (en) * 2007-05-07 2014-05-27 Battelle Energy Alliance, Llc Wireless device monitoring systems and monitoring devices, and associated methods
US20140173747A1 (en) 2012-12-13 2014-06-19 Apple Inc. Disabling access to applications and content in a privacy mode
US8775820B1 (en) 2006-06-02 2014-07-08 Sprint Communications Company L.P. System and method of enterprise administrative password generation and control

Patent Citations (41)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4800590A (en) 1985-01-14 1989-01-24 Willis E. Higgins Computer key and computer lock system
US5592553A (en) 1993-07-30 1997-01-07 International Business Machines Corporation Authentication system using one-time passwords
US5661807A (en) 1993-07-30 1997-08-26 International Business Machines Corporation Authentication system using one-time passwords
US5588056A (en) 1994-10-25 1996-12-24 Bell Atlantic Network Services, Inc. Method and system for generating pronounceable security passwords
US6178508B1 (en) 1995-12-28 2001-01-23 International Business Machines Corp. System for controlling access to encrypted data files by a plurality of users
US6496937B1 (en) 1998-01-13 2002-12-17 Nec Corp. Password updating apparatus and recording medium used therefor
US6161185A (en) 1998-03-06 2000-12-12 Mci Communications Corporation Personal authentication system and method for multiple computer platform
US6470454B1 (en) 1998-03-31 2002-10-22 International Business Machines Corporation Method and apparatus for establishing computer configuration protection passwords for protecting computer configurations
US6601175B1 (en) 1999-03-16 2003-07-29 International Business Machines Corporation Method and system for providing limited-life machine-specific passwords for data processing systems
US6731731B1 (en) 1999-07-30 2004-05-04 Comsquare Co., Ltd. Authentication method, authentication system and recording medium
US20020178370A1 (en) 1999-12-30 2002-11-28 Gurevich Michael N. Method and apparatus for secure authentication and sensitive data management
US20050272445A1 (en) 2000-12-19 2005-12-08 Bellsouth Intellectual Property Corporation Location-based security rules
US20140074508A1 (en) 2001-02-02 2014-03-13 Truven Health Analytics Inc. Method and System for Extracting Medical Information for Presentation to Medical Providers on Mobile Terminals
US20030216143A1 (en) 2002-03-01 2003-11-20 Roese John J. Location discovery in a data network
US20100077487A1 (en) 2003-06-17 2010-03-25 Cerner Innovation, Inc. Computerized method and system for restricting access to patient protected health information
US20050015601A1 (en) 2003-07-17 2005-01-20 International Business Machines Corporation Methods, systems, and media to authenticate a user
US20050239481A1 (en) 2004-04-01 2005-10-27 Seligmann Doree D Location-based command execution for mobile telecommunications terminals
US20050268345A1 (en) 2004-05-29 2005-12-01 Harrison Robert B Method and apparatus for providing temporary access to a network device
US20060212589A1 (en) * 2005-03-18 2006-09-21 Sap Aktiengesellschaft Session manager for web-based applications
US8775820B1 (en) 2006-06-02 2014-07-08 Sprint Communications Company L.P. System and method of enterprise administrative password generation and control
US7836407B2 (en) 2007-05-02 2010-11-16 Yahoo! Inc. Smart fields
US8737965B2 (en) * 2007-05-07 2014-05-27 Battelle Energy Alliance, Llc Wireless device monitoring systems and monitoring devices, and associated methods
US20090047923A1 (en) 2007-08-06 2009-02-19 Telcordia Technologies, Inc. Method and System for Using Cellular/Wireless Phones and Devices for Retrieving Emergency Related Personal Data
US8331337B2 (en) * 2008-04-18 2012-12-11 Nec Corporation Session management apparatus, communication system, and session clear-out method
US20110166883A1 (en) 2009-09-01 2011-07-07 Palmer Robert D Systems and Methods for Modeling Healthcare Costs, Predicting Same, and Targeting Improved Healthcare Quality and Profitability
US20110072492A1 (en) 2009-09-21 2011-03-24 Avaya Inc. Screen icon manipulation by context and frequency of use
US20110208797A1 (en) 2010-02-22 2011-08-25 Full Armor Corporation Geolocation-Based Management of Virtual Applications
US20120136572A1 (en) 2010-06-17 2012-05-31 Norton Kenneth S Distance and Location-Aware Reminders in a Calendar System
US8583091B1 (en) 2010-09-06 2013-11-12 Sprint Communications Company L.P. Dynamic loading, unloading, and caching of alternate complete interfaces
US20120154413A1 (en) 2010-12-21 2012-06-21 Dongwoo Kim Mobile terminal and method of controlling a mode switching therein
US8484482B1 (en) 2011-03-07 2013-07-09 Sprint Communications Company L.P. Password generation and validation system and method
US20130074067A1 (en) 2011-08-15 2013-03-21 Empire Technology Development Llc Multimodal computing device
US8588749B1 (en) 2011-09-01 2013-11-19 Cellco Partnership Data segmentation profiles
US20140007222A1 (en) 2011-10-11 2014-01-02 Zenprise, Inc. Secure execution of enterprise applications on mobile devices
US8886925B2 (en) 2011-10-11 2014-11-11 Citrix Systems, Inc. Protecting enterprise data through policy-based encryption of message attachments
US20130097657A1 (en) 2011-10-17 2013-04-18 Daniel Cardamore Dynamically Generating Perimeters
US20130124583A1 (en) 2011-11-11 2013-05-16 Geordon Thomas Ferguson Presenting Metadata From Multiple Perimeters
US20130252583A1 (en) * 2012-03-22 2013-09-26 Research In Motion Limited Authentication server and methods for granting tokens comprising location data
US20130290709A1 (en) 2012-04-26 2013-10-31 International Business Machines Corporation Policy-based dynamic information flow control on mobile devices
US20140059642A1 (en) 2012-08-24 2014-02-27 Vmware, Inc. Method and system for facilitating isolated workspace for applications
US20140173747A1 (en) 2012-12-13 2014-06-19 Apple Inc. Disabling access to applications and content in a privacy mode

Non-Patent Citations (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
Advisory Action dated Feb. 16, 2010, U.S. Appl. No. 11/446,284, filed Jun. 2, 2006.
Advisory Action dated Jun. 10, 2015, U.S. Appl. No. 13/844,282, filed Mar. 15, 2013.
Examiner's Answer dated Feb. 24, 2011, U.S. Appl. No. 11/446,284, filed Jun. 2, 2006.
FAIPP Pre-Interview Communication dated Jan. 2, 2013, U.S. Appl. No. 13/042,015, filed Mar. 7, 2011.
FAIPP Pre-Interview Communication dated Oct. 29, 2014, U.S. Appl. No. 13/844,282, filed Mar. 15, 2013.
Final Office Action dated Aug. 19, 2010, U.S. Appl. No. 11/446,284, filed Jun. 2, 2006.
Final Office Action dated Dec. 1, 2009, U.S. Appl. No. 11/446,284, filed Jun. 2, 2006.
Final Office Action dated Mar. 24, 2015, U.S. Appl. No. 13/844,282, filed Mar. 15, 2013.
Notice of Allowance dated Feb. 24, 2014, U.S. Appl. No. 11/446,284, filed Jun. 2, 2006.
Notice of Allowance dated Mar. 4, 2013, U.S. Appl. No. 13/042,015, filed Mar. 7, 2011.
Office Action dated Apr. 20, 2010, U.S. Appl. No. 11/446,284, filed Jun. 2, 2006.
Office Action dated Aug. 24, 2015, U.S. Appl. No. 13/844,282, filed Mar. 15, 2013.
Office Action dated Jun. 18, 2009, U.S. Appl. No. 11/446,284, filed Jun. 2, 2006.
Paczkowski, Lyle W., et al., "Restricting Access of a Portable Communication Device to Confidential Data or Applications via a Remote Network Based on Event Triggers Generated by the Portable Communication Device", filed Mar. 15, 2013, U.S. Appl. No. 13/844,282.
Patent Board Decision, Examiner Reversed dated Nov. 22, 2013, U.S. Appl. No. 11/446,284, filed Jun. 2, 2006.

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US10304047B2 (en) * 2012-12-07 2019-05-28 Visa International Service Association Token generating component
US9374363B1 (en) 2013-03-15 2016-06-21 Sprint Communications Company L.P. Restricting access of a portable communication device to confidential data or applications via a remote network based on event triggers generated by the portable communication device
US9355233B1 (en) 2014-01-27 2016-05-31 Sprint Communications Company L.P. Password reset using hash functions

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
Chow et al. Authentication in the clouds: a framework and its application to mobile users
AU2009307827B2 (en) User authentication management
EP2550595B1 (en) System and method for remote maintenance of multiple clients in an electronic network using virtualization and attestation.
JP6332766B2 (en) Trusted Service Manager Trusted Security Zone Container for data protection and confidentiality
JP4960441B2 (en) Secure time function for wireless devices
EP2761429B1 (en) Policy compliance-based secure data access
US8625796B1 (en) Method for facilitating authentication using proximity
US9060273B2 (en) Authentication server and methods for granting tokens comprising location data
US9317689B2 (en) Method and apparatus for secure application execution
US9053304B2 (en) Methods and systems for using derived credentials to authenticate a device across multiple platforms
JP6397956B2 (en) Provision of mobile device management functions
US9521117B2 (en) Providing virtualized private network tunnels
US8931078B2 (en) Providing virtualized private network tunnels
US10044761B2 (en) User authentication based on user characteristic authentication rules
TWI538462B (en) A method for using digital rights management of documents, a non-transitory computer-readable medium and mobile computing devices
US20120254853A1 (en) Customizing mobile applications
KR101671351B1 (en) Privacy enhanced key management for a web service provider using a converged security engine
US8494576B1 (en) Near field communication authentication and validation to access corporate data
TWI478615B (en) Multiple access control management entities
US9443073B2 (en) System and method for verifying status of an authentication device
US20160224961A1 (en) System and method for providing diverse secure data communication permissions to trusted applications on a portable communication device
US8595810B1 (en) Method for automatically updating application access security
TWI483204B (en) Multi user electronic wallet and management thereof
US8644800B2 (en) System and method for identity management for mobile devices
US9867043B2 (en) Secure device service enrollment

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: SPRINT COMMUNICATIONS COMPANY L.P., KANSAS

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:FULTZ, DAVID K.;VIJAYAKIRTHI, VICTOR ANEND;SIGNING DATES FROM 20120601 TO 20120703;REEL/FRAME:028518/0555

STCF Information on status: patent grant

Free format text: PATENTED CASE

AS Assignment

Owner name: DEUTSCHE BANK TRUST COMPANY AMERICAS, NEW YORK

Free format text: GRANT OF FIRST PRIORITY AND JUNIOR PRIORITY SECURITY INTEREST IN PATENT RIGHTS;ASSIGNOR:SPRINT COMMUNICATIONS COMPANY L.P.;REEL/FRAME:041895/0210

Effective date: 20170203