US843909A - Atmosphere-regulating system. - Google Patents

Atmosphere-regulating system. Download PDF

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US843909A
US843909A US16062003A US1903160620A US843909A US 843909 A US843909 A US 843909A US 16062003 A US16062003 A US 16062003A US 1903160620 A US1903160620 A US 1903160620A US 843909 A US843909 A US 843909A
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air
atmosphere
room
current
conduit
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US16062003A
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Henry H Hungerford
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FRANK M PETERS
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Franklin Electric Co Inc
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24FAIR-CONDITIONING; AIR-HUMIDIFICATION; VENTILATION; USE OF AIR CURRENTS FOR SCREENING
    • F24F11/00Control or safety arrangements
    • F24F11/30Control or safety arrangements for purposes related to the operation of the system, e.g. for safety or monitoring
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S138/00Pipes and tubular conduits
    • Y10S138/04Air conditioning
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S236/00Automatic temperature and humidity regulation
    • Y10S236/13Humidithermostat
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S261/00Gas and liquid contact apparatus
    • Y10S261/03Air cooling
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S261/00Gas and liquid contact apparatus
    • Y10S261/34Automatic humidity regulation
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S261/00Gas and liquid contact apparatus
    • Y10S261/43Air coolers

Description

PATENTED FEB.' 12, 1907. F. M. PETERS 65H. H. HUNGERPORD. ATMOSPHERE REGULATING SYSTEM'.

APPLIUATION FILED .TUNE 8. 1903.

To all whom it may concern,.-

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

FRANK M. PETERS AND HENRY n. HUNGERFO'RD', 0F CHICAGO, ILLINos;

SAID. HUNGERFORD ASSIGNOR TO SAIDv PETERS.

ATMOSPHERE-REGULATING SYSTEM.

Specication of Letters Patent.A

Appleman mad June 8,1903. serata. 160,620.

No'. 843,909. Patented Een. 12,1907.

ywhich-(the right-hand end as herein shown) Be it known that we, FRANK M. PETERS, leads to the external atmos here, suchend of and HENRY H. HUNGERFORD, citizens of the :I the lduct being controlled y a pair of dam to its temperature andahumidity.

, accompanying drawing,.whiclizrepesents in employ thermostatically and humidostatic- United States, residing `at Chicago, in the pers`12 and 13, the spindles of which are 'oonb county of Cook and State of Illinois, havein-i nected to operate in unison by arms 12 and vented certain new and useful Improve-i 13, respectively, and a connecting-rod 14. ments in Atmosphcre-.Regulating Systems, 'lhe air-duct 11 between the damper-valves of which the following is a specification. l2 and 13 1s tapped by the intake duet 15 ef Our invention relates 'go-improvements 1n: a fan or blower, (indicated at 16.) The dissystems and devices for regulating gatnuosw; charge side of said blower has connected pheric conditions, and more particularly to ap thereto a pipe-section 17, leading into a box system which includes as features thereof q or cyhn de1: 18, containing a series of cooling-J meansl for controlling and regulatmg the c ollS, (IndICaGd at 18,) whence a .seicond temperature, the humidity, and the vent1lal curved pipe extension 19 leads into a Secund tion, any or all, of the room or chamber subnolx er cylinder 20 eenteining n Series of jootod to thoinuonoo of tho Plfml'll-S- heating-coils, -(indicated at 20,) whence a lbiporionoe has Shown that 1n ba'kol'los, short section 21 communicates with an alrbreweries, and similar establishments certain Conduit nine 22, leading up behind ene end of Processes of manufacture or oortam Steps the apartment and above vthe ceiling thereof, therein require a more 01` -1oss Ploiraoted ,said'pipe terminatingr in a group of discharge maintenance of atmospheric conditions of branches 23y 24, end 25, depending through Substantial uniformity as @goro-9 tempera 'the ceiling, .said discharge-pipes preferably tufo; humidity, and VooPlla'Jlon, o1 on or all lbeing provided with defiectors 23, 24, and f these @Onditions Whllo 1n, Sollool' ousos .25, respectively, designed to regulate the hQS itals, theaters, and the hko, 1t 1S also do' ivolume of air discharged into the apartment Sla 16 and advantageous: fol: 9 Vollotyf iand likewise to thoroughly disperse and difreasons, to maintain substantlal uniformlty ifuee the Seme of such atmospheric condltions. Between the In carrying'out our invention We employ lby-pass 26 arou the air-cooler 18, and bemeans for maintaining 'a `circulation of all tween the sections 19 and the `junction oi the through a room o1 Chamber; WhlCh means sections 21 'and 22 is a second by-pass 27 are regulable to maintain a constant flOW 0f around the air-heater 20. In the pipe-sccfleSh all', 8, HOW 0ffresh all' 111 8.SS`0(1&10I1 tion 17 is inte Osed a, balanced VValve 01' with air that has already paSSP/d through the ldamper 28, whic is normally closed except apartment, or avcontinuous circulation and when the current 0f air is to be directed reuse of the Same or Substantially the same through the cooler 18, while the adjacent body ofair, and in connection therewith we ends of the ,section 19 and bypass 26 are Providedlwith damper-valves 29 and 30, rell ..\controlled agencies for maintaining spectively, the 'spindles'of which are consugstantially constant a desired character or nected to operate in unison-by arms 29a and condition ofthe airlllglllatcd with 'reference 30 and a connectng-linkl and so set that ,when either is wide open vthe other is closed. Similarly, in the pipe 21 and by-pass 27 are interposed dampervalves 32 and 33, respecdiaglammatic fOI'lIl the Val'OlS aglloies'emtiv'ely, the spindles of Which are connected ployed in carrying out `our. invention and "to operate in unison by arms 32 and 33 and their relation t0 each other. la connecting-rod 34, said valves also being so Referring to the drawing, may' repre.- sent a room or apartment designed to be con- Atrolled as to its atmospheric condition; l I0 may represent the floor, llltlie ceiling, and 10 the side and end walls, cf the apartwhich are lndicated at 35 and 36, and a air Our invention is graphicallwlslidv'vn inthe closed. 4 I

In the apartment 1()` are suitably 'located ment 10. Directly beneath theI ioor 10 is yot humidostats, the expqsedlmts of W ich an air return. and vent duct 11, che end of l are indicated atA-ST 38'., 1e thermostat ,ra pair of thermostats, the expose parts ofI pipe-sections 17 and 19 is a n IOO set that when one fully opened the other is IOS 2 s leading thence through the iioor into the re- Y 35 and humidostat 37 ma operate through a similarly connected, through its pressure-pipe ""thfermostats have been set, the latter will so ed, through a counterweighted lever 41 and `its lower end taps the duct 1'1 inwardly of -extendino throu h the ceiling of the apartance damper-valve 54, the counterweight 55 3S lows: Assuming that the damper-valves 12 cumulative controller A(in icated at 39) and a pressureipe 39 on a dia hragln-,chamber I 40, the diaphragm of which atter is connectg link 42,with the rod 3l,connecting the damper-valves 29 and 30. The thermostat 36. is

36, diaphragm-chamber 43, a counterweighted lever 44, and link 45, with the rod 34, connecting the damper-valves 32 and 33. i 'lhe humidostat 38, through its pressure-pi e' 38 and valve 46, governs the admissiolro a steam-jet through a pipe 47 and nozzle 43, which enters the air-conduit at any suitable, oint between the air-blower and the chamer, said nozzle being herein shown as penetrating the lower end of the'section 22in such a manner as to discharge the steam-va or directly into the current of air.. traveling therethrough. l

The outlet for the air in the apartment is provided for b one or more, fines 49, 50, and 5,1, opening t rough the inner surfaces of the side and end walls ofthe apartment and turn and vent duct 11. A- vent-pipe 52 at the innermost damper-valve 12, said pipe ment and throug the superposed roof of the building, (indicated at 53.) At anv suit-V able int 1n the vent-pipe 52 is placed a balof whichis so arranged as to normally maintain the valve closed, butpermit it to open more or less, accordingly as the return-passage for the air to the fan is closed or o ened. The cooler box or cylinder has tappmg its bottom `a trapped discharge-pipe 56 for a p ose hereinafter described.

e operation of our im roved system of atmosphere regulation is su stantially as fol-- andA 13 are so set as to close the valve 12 and open wide the valve 13 and the fan having been set in operation, a current of-resh air from outside isdrawn into and forced throu h the fan. f Assuming that thisair is at or su stantially at the predetermined temperature desired within the apartment 10 to which the operate as to maintain closed the valves 29 and 32 and maintain open the valves 3() and 33, under which condition of the apparatus the current will flow directly through the bypasses 26 and 27, the section 22, and the discharge-sections 23, 24, and into thech amber 10, the air passing thence through thel this operation have the effect of too discharge-fines 49, 50, and 51 into the return and vent duct 11, whence the current'rises y and p'asses off throu h the ventpipe 52, the

force of the current eing sufficient to swing ,V the balanced valve`54 open suliiciently to permit its passage. If, however, the air;

drawn from outside through the fan exceeds the desired temperature limit of the chamber 10, the thermostat indicated at 35 promptly reverses the dampers 29 30,' thus causing the current of ai'r from the blower lto pass through Vthe cooler 13, the closing of the damper 30 creating sufficient pressure to open the balanced valve 28,and permit the flow of air past the same. lf, on the other hand, the air from outsidey is cooler than-is desired to be maintained in the chamber 10, the thermostat indicated at 36 acts to reverse the valves 32. and 33, thereby causing a current of air emerging from the by-pass 26 to travel throughthe heater 20. By means of the steam-pipe 47 and jet 48 a supply of aqueous vapor may bc furnlshed to the current of air on its way to the apartment, and if the incoming air proves to be too dry or if its travel through the cooler 18 has extracted too much of the humidity therefrom the current of air can be moistened to the re uired` degree by this means, which is contro led bythe humidostat on the valves or dempers 29 and 30.to direct the air'' current throughf. the .cooler 18, by which the moisture ,inthe air is partially or wholly condensed, thedeposited moisture be ing drained off through thepipe 56. Should Ureatly cooling the air, the thermostat 36 willaact at the same time upon the valves 32 and 33 to direct .the dried cold current of air through the heater 20.

The thermostat 35 and humidost'at 37 con- -trol independent valves that admit com# pressed air through the pipe 39l to the diaphragm-chamber 40. If'the conditions in the 'chamber 10 are toohot and too moist, both valves will open,` admitting compressed air cumulatively to the diaphragm-chamber, and thereby shifting the dempers to direct the incoming air through the cooler, which is also a condenser and extracts the moisture. If the conditions in chamber 10 are too coldandtoo dry, neither the thermostat 35nor the humidostat 37 'will act, but these conditions willbe regulated by the'thrmostat 36 and the humidostat 38. If the air in chamber 10 is too hot, but hygroscopically correct, the thermostat 35 alone will act, the humidestat 37 being idle. On the other hand, if the x29(T air in theehamber 10 is too moist, but of correct temperature, the humidostat 37 will acti and the thermostat 35 will be idle. It will thus be seen that the thermostat 35 and hu- Amidostat 37 control ,only the positive condi- 125 other the falling of the temperature relax crease and the other the decrease of humidity relatively to a given point or percentage ofv There is no interference in the acthe same.

since the humidostat of tion of, these parts,

either pair will promptly act to correct any change of hygroscopic conditions incidentally created by the action of the thermostat of the other air, and vice versa.

Un er some conditions it is feasible and practicable in order to 4a. void the necessity of either heating or cooling a stream of air constantly flowing from the outside to maintain a closed circulation of the air in the apart- `ment, and this may readily be done by reversing the valves -12 and 13, to open the former and close the latter. In this case the air-eurrent discharged from the apartment through the return-duct 11 is obviously reconveyed l to the inlet-pipe ofthe blower and -forced circuit.

y shown by thence to' and through the circulation-pipes and the alartment in a continuous and closed inatically closes andgprevents the induction ofexternal "air through said vent. In still other circumstances lit may be feasible and desirable to maintain in part a closed circuit, permitting the introduction, however, of a certain proportion of external air.- For this purpose the valves 12 and 13 may be set partially open to any desired extent or degree, as u the full lines in the drawin in which case the blower draws in air from both the return and vent duct 11 and from the outer atmosphere', a certain portion ofthe air discharged from the apartment rising through the vent 52.

From the uniform flow of air through an apartment or storage-chamber and a consequent constant change of the air therein, butmay also provide for the maintenance of constant and uniform thermal or hygroscopic conditions, or both, within said apartment, irrespective of such yconditions prevailing outside. Obviously' for the reservation of goods and materialssential for the comfort land health of human beings to have perfectly-"contrc/lled atmospheric conditions such conditions may be insured by the em loyment ofthe apparatus or system hereins own.

, It is evident that'numerous changes andv modifications, particularly in the' relative detail larrangement of the air-forcing device,

n this case, there being no'pressure .on the valve 54 in the vent 52, this valve auto'- foregoing it will be seen that ourinvention provides a system of ventilation ywhich not. only maintains a constant and or other inclosed.

l .the air-conduits, the heater, the cooler the moistener, and other appurtenances of the system,'might be employed Without de arting from the'spirit or lessening the a van- `tages of the invenion, and hence we do not limit ourselves to the particular construc tion or relative arrangement of the elements of the system as shown` and described, except to the' extent indicated in specific claims.

1. In an atmosphere-regulating system for rooms, the combination with an ,air-forcing device and a conduit extending from the discharge side thereof to and through a wall of the room, of an air-heater interposed in said conduit, a by-pass around said heater, an air-cooler also interposed in said conduit, a by-pass around said cooler, and separate thermostatically-operated means serving to con rol the passage of the air-currentthrough said heater and cooler and their respective by-passes respectivel, according to the tem-- perature in the room, one of said means operating when the maximum and the lother when the minimum" desired temperature is attained, substantiallyas deselibed.

2. In an atmosphere-regularigsystem for rooms, the combination with anvjair-forcing device and a condui extending from the discharge side thereof to and through a wall of the room, of an air-cooler interposed in said conduit, a by-pass around said cooler, an airheatr also interposed in 'said conduit, a bypass around said heater, thermostaticallyoperated means serving to control the passage of the air-current through said heater' and cooler and their by-passes according to the temperature in the room, and humidostatically-controlled means also serving to control the passage of the air-current through said cooler, substantially as described.

3. In an atmosphere-regulating system for rooms, the combination with an air-forcing.

device and a conduit extending from the discharge sidethereof to and through a Wall of the room, of a moisture-condenser inter osed insaid conduit, a b v-pass around sai con. denser, and means operated by a humidostat .f

located in the room serving to direct the aircurrent through said condenser or said bypass, substantiallyv asdescribed.y l

4. In an atmosphere-regulating system for rooms, the combination with an air-forcing device'hnd a conduit extending from the discharge side thereof to and through a wall of the room, of a moisture-condenser inte osed in said conduit, a by-pass around sai condenser, nieans operated by a humidostat located in the room serving to direct the aircurrent through said condenser when the humidity of the air in the room exceedsapre- Vdetermined point, a vapor-injector inter posed in saidconduit, and means operated by the humidostat located in the room serving xo alr-forcing the umldity of the air in the room falls below apredetermined point, substantially as described.

*5 5, In'an atmosphere-regulating.system V signed to maintain substantially constant temperature and'humidit `conditions in a room, the combmation wit an air conduit or circuit in which the room is interposed, of an device in said conduit, air heatin and cooling means also interposed in sai conduit, valve-controlled by-passes around thesame, therinostatically-controlled means for controlling the engagement of the circu- 15 lating current with said heating and cooling means, and humidostatically-controlled means for injecting steam or other vapor into the circulatingair-current, substantially as '"described. zo 6. In an atmosphere-regulatin system de'- l signed to maintain substantial y constant temperature and humidity conditions in aroom, aswell as to control the ventilation thereof, the combination with air air conduit 2-5 or circuitin which the room is interposed, Vof

an air-forcingdev'ice in said' conduit, air heatlng and cooling means also interposed in sald 3o. forcontrolling the engagement of the circulating current withsald heating and'cooling p means, -humidostaticallyfcontrolled means .take member of said' air-forcing device havclrcuit, valve-controlled by-passes .around the same, thermostatically-controlledmeans,

for controlling the engagement ofthe circulating current with said coolinl'F means, and other humidostat'icall -contro e'd means for 35 .extracting moistureA lm saidair-current, air .inlet and outletpassages also communi- `eating with said circuit, and means whereb the circuit may be'maintained open, close or partially opened and closed relatively to vthe outer air, substantially as described.

7. In an atmosphere-regulating system for rooms, the combmation'withan air conduit or circuit in which the room is interposed, of an air-forcing device in said circuit,'the ining means. whereby it may be connected wholly with the circuit or wholly with the external atmosphere,lor partially with both, air heating and cooling means interposedA in 5o said circuit, valve-controlled byasses Varound the same, separate thermostatlcallycontrolled means for controlling the engagement of the circulating current with saidl heating and cooling means res tively, 'and` 55 avent-pi e tapping said'condult between the room an the-air-forcing device, substantially as described., I .p

, .FRANK M. PETERS.

HENRY H. HUNGERFORD. Witnesses:

.FREDERICK (I. Goonwm.

SAMUEL N. ROND'.

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Cited By (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2439793A (en) * 1944-02-22 1948-04-20 Sperry Corp Pressure regulator for instrument housings
US2451566A (en) * 1945-04-16 1948-10-19 Vapor Heating Corp Automatic panel circuit for air reheat control
US2459463A (en) * 1944-05-05 1949-01-18 Delaware Engineering Corp Gas treating method and apparatus
US2486472A (en) * 1946-05-18 1949-11-01 Birlec Ltd Air conditioning apparatus
US2521866A (en) * 1946-09-09 1950-09-12 Oran W Ott Air-heating furnace with automatically controlled air by-pass for preventing condensation
US2538498A (en) * 1948-09-03 1951-01-16 Benesh Matthew Edward Method and apparatus for determining toxicity
US2588189A (en) * 1945-06-06 1952-03-04 Wilson Broadus Apparatus for precooling
US2598397A (en) * 1949-10-05 1952-05-27 Gen Electric Air-cooling attachment for warm air furnace systems
US2671643A (en) * 1949-10-18 1954-03-09 Jr Thurlow M Gordon Constant temperature box
US2685433A (en) * 1950-09-21 1954-08-03 Ewald L Wintermann Method and apparatus for air conditioning enclosures
US2699922A (en) * 1951-06-23 1955-01-18 Gen Electric Air conditioning system
US2721449A (en) * 1951-07-19 1955-10-25 Kenneth R Dennick Year'round air conditioning system
US2763195A (en) * 1951-07-16 1956-09-18 William J Caldwell Air conditioning of entrance areas
US2770445A (en) * 1953-06-22 1956-11-13 Jet Heet Inc Air conditioning apparatus
US2855839A (en) * 1953-03-09 1958-10-14 D M Russell Method of treating perishable onions in storage
US2870964A (en) * 1956-01-27 1959-01-27 Fairchild Engine & Airplane Pneumatic cabin temperature control system
US3323580A (en) * 1964-02-29 1967-06-06 Werner Georg Christian System for controlling the climatic conditions in a plurality of controlled areas
US3667370A (en) * 1970-01-13 1972-06-06 Stone & Webster Eng Corp Nuclear containment emergency ventilating system
US4453591A (en) * 1980-04-30 1984-06-12 Suddeutsche Kuhlerfabrik Julius Fr. Behr Gmbh & Co. Kg Air-conditioning apparatus for motor vehicles
US5107687A (en) * 1989-03-12 1992-04-28 Ventilplafon, S.A. Air conditioning system
US5188169A (en) * 1991-01-31 1993-02-23 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Heater-humidifier-dehumidifier unit
US6059196A (en) * 1996-11-11 2000-05-09 Kongo Co., Ltd. Storage system with ambience conditioning facilities
US20100083673A1 (en) * 2008-10-02 2010-04-08 Island Sky Corporation Water production system and method with air bypass

Cited By (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2439793A (en) * 1944-02-22 1948-04-20 Sperry Corp Pressure regulator for instrument housings
US2459463A (en) * 1944-05-05 1949-01-18 Delaware Engineering Corp Gas treating method and apparatus
US2451566A (en) * 1945-04-16 1948-10-19 Vapor Heating Corp Automatic panel circuit for air reheat control
US2588189A (en) * 1945-06-06 1952-03-04 Wilson Broadus Apparatus for precooling
US2486472A (en) * 1946-05-18 1949-11-01 Birlec Ltd Air conditioning apparatus
US2521866A (en) * 1946-09-09 1950-09-12 Oran W Ott Air-heating furnace with automatically controlled air by-pass for preventing condensation
US2538498A (en) * 1948-09-03 1951-01-16 Benesh Matthew Edward Method and apparatus for determining toxicity
US2598397A (en) * 1949-10-05 1952-05-27 Gen Electric Air-cooling attachment for warm air furnace systems
US2671643A (en) * 1949-10-18 1954-03-09 Jr Thurlow M Gordon Constant temperature box
US2685433A (en) * 1950-09-21 1954-08-03 Ewald L Wintermann Method and apparatus for air conditioning enclosures
US2699922A (en) * 1951-06-23 1955-01-18 Gen Electric Air conditioning system
US2763195A (en) * 1951-07-16 1956-09-18 William J Caldwell Air conditioning of entrance areas
US2721449A (en) * 1951-07-19 1955-10-25 Kenneth R Dennick Year'round air conditioning system
US2855839A (en) * 1953-03-09 1958-10-14 D M Russell Method of treating perishable onions in storage
US2770445A (en) * 1953-06-22 1956-11-13 Jet Heet Inc Air conditioning apparatus
US2870964A (en) * 1956-01-27 1959-01-27 Fairchild Engine & Airplane Pneumatic cabin temperature control system
US3323580A (en) * 1964-02-29 1967-06-06 Werner Georg Christian System for controlling the climatic conditions in a plurality of controlled areas
US3667370A (en) * 1970-01-13 1972-06-06 Stone & Webster Eng Corp Nuclear containment emergency ventilating system
US4453591A (en) * 1980-04-30 1984-06-12 Suddeutsche Kuhlerfabrik Julius Fr. Behr Gmbh & Co. Kg Air-conditioning apparatus for motor vehicles
US5107687A (en) * 1989-03-12 1992-04-28 Ventilplafon, S.A. Air conditioning system
US5188169A (en) * 1991-01-31 1993-02-23 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Heater-humidifier-dehumidifier unit
US6059196A (en) * 1996-11-11 2000-05-09 Kongo Co., Ltd. Storage system with ambience conditioning facilities
US20100083673A1 (en) * 2008-10-02 2010-04-08 Island Sky Corporation Water production system and method with air bypass

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