US8408925B2 - Visible open for switchgear assembly - Google Patents

Visible open for switchgear assembly Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US8408925B2
US8408925B2 US13018899 US201113018899A US8408925B2 US 8408925 B2 US8408925 B2 US 8408925B2 US 13018899 US13018899 US 13018899 US 201113018899 A US201113018899 A US 201113018899A US 8408925 B2 US8408925 B2 US 8408925B2
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
portion
conductor
assembly
contact portion
end
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Active
Application number
US13018899
Other versions
US20110189887A1 (en )
Inventor
Alan D. Borgstrom
Kieran P. Higgins
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Thomas and Betts International LLC
Original Assignee
Thomas and Betts International LLC
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01RLINE CONNECTORS; CURRENT COLLECTORS
    • H01R13/00Details of coupling devices of the kinds covered by groups H01R12/70 or H01R24/00-H01R33/00
    • H01R13/46Bases; Cases
    • H01R13/53Bases or cases for heavy duty; Bases or cases for high voltage with means for preventing corona or arcing
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01HELECTRIC SWITCHES; RELAYS; SELECTORS; EMERGENCY PROTECTIVE DEVICES
    • H01H33/00High-tension or heavy-current switches with arc-extinguishing or arc-preventing means
    • H01H33/02Details

Abstract

An electrical connector assembly may include a connector body having a conductor receiving end, a first connector end, and a visible open port. A contact assembly may extend axially within the connector body from the conductor receiving end to the first connector end. A conductive insert may be inserted into the visible open port. At least a portion of the contact assembly is visible through the visible open port prior to insertion of the conductive insert or following removal of the conductive insert. The portion of the contact assembly visible through the visible open port includes a first contact portion and a second contact portion separated by a gap. A portion of the conductive insert is received in the gap between the first contact portion and the second contact portion to allow current to flow from the second contact portion to the first contact portion upon insertion of the conductive insert into the visible open port.

Description

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

This application claims priority under 35. U.S.C. §119, based on U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 61/300,852 filed Feb. 3, 2010, the disclosure of which is hereby incorporated by reference herein.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to electrical cable connectors, such as loadbreak connectors and deadbreak connectors. More particularly, aspects described herein relate to an electrical cable connector, such as a power cable elbow or T-connector connected to electrical switchgear assembly.

High and medium voltage switch assemblies may include sub-atmospheric or vacuum type circuit interrupters, switches, or circuit breakers for use in electric power circuits and systems. Insulated vacuum bottles switches in such systems typically do not provide means for visual inspection of the contacts to confirm whether they are open (visible break) or closed. Non-vacuum bottle type switches previously used were designed to include contacts in a large gas or oil filled cabinet that allowed a glass window to be installed for viewing the contacts. However, with vacuum type switches, there is typically provided no means of directly viewing contacts in the vacuum bottles since the bottles are made of metal and ceramic nontransparent materials.

Typically, conventional insulated switches using vacuum technology are sealed inside the vacuum bottle and hidden from view. The voltage source and the load are connected to the switch, but the switch contacts are not visible. The only means for determining the status of the switch contacts is the position of a switch handle associated with the switch. If the linkage between the handle and the switch contacts is inoperative or defective, there is no positive indication that allows the operating personnel to accurately determine the position of the contacts. This can result in false readings, which can be very dangerous to anyone operating the switch or working on the lines.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a schematic cross-sectional diagram illustrating an electrical connector consistent with implementations described herein;

FIG. 2A is top view of the electrical connector of FIG. 1;

FIG. 2B is a side view of the electrical connector of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is an isometric view of the electrical connector of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4A is a side view of the conductor spade assembly of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4B is a top view of the conductor spade assembly of FIG. 1;

FIGS. 4C-4E are schematic cross-sectional diagrams of exemplary implementations of the conductor spade assembly of FIG. 1;

FIG. 5A is a side view of the visible open conductor plug of FIG. 1;

FIG. 5B is a schematic cross-sectional diagram of the visible open conductor plug of FIG. 5A;

FIG. 6A is a schematic cross-sectional diagram illustrating an electrical connector consistent with implementations described herein;

FIG. 6B is a schematic cross-sectional diagram of a top view of the conductor spade assembly of FIG. 6A;

FIGS. 7A and 7B are schematic cross-sectional diagrams illustrating an electrical connector consistent with implementations described herein in conductive and non-conductive modes;

FIG. 8 is a schematic cross-sectional diagram illustrating an electrical connector consistent with another implementation described herein; and

FIG. 9 is a schematic cross-sectional diagram illustrating an electrical connector consistent with still another implementation described herein.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

The following detailed description refers to the accompanying drawings. The same reference numbers in different drawings may identify the same or similar elements.

FIG. 1 is a schematic cross-sectional diagram illustrating a power cable elbow connector 100 configured in a manner consistent with implementations described herein. FIGS. 2A, 2B, and 3 illustrate top, side, and isometric views, respectively, of connector 100. As shown in FIG. 1, power cable elbow connector 100 may include a conductor receiving end 105 for receiving a power cable 110 therein, first and second T ends 115/120 that include openings for receiving a deadbreak transformer bushing or other high or medium voltage terminal, such as an insulating plug, or other power equipment, and a visible open port 122. Each of first T end 115, second T end 120, and visible open port 122 may include a flange or elbow cuff 125 surrounding the open receiving end thereof. Conductor receiving end 105 may extend substantially axially and may include a bore extending therethrough. First and second T ends 115/120 and visible open port 122 may project substantially perpendicularly from conductor receiving end 105, as illustrated in FIGS. 2B and 3.

Power cable elbow connector 100 may include an electrically conductive outer shield 130 formed from, for example, a conductive peroxide-cured synthetic rubber, commonly referred to as EPDM (ethylene-propylene-dienemonomer). Within shield 130, power cable elbow connector 100 may include an insulative inner housing 135, typically molded from an insulative rubber or epoxy material. Within insulative inner housing 135, power cable elbow connector 100 may include a conductive or semi-conductive insert 140 that surrounds the connection portion of power cable 110.

Conductor receiving end 105 of power cable elbow connector 100 may be configured to receive power cable 110 therein. As described below with respect to FIGS. 4A-4E, a forward end of power cable 110 may be prepared by connecting power cable 110 to a conductor spade assembly 145. As illustrated in FIG. 1, conductor spade assembly 145 may include a modular configuration. More specifically, conductor spade assembly 145 may include a crimp connector portion 150, a rearward conductor portion 155, a body portion 160, and a spade portion 162.

Crimp connector portion 150 may include a substantially cylindrical assembly configured to receive a center conductor 165 of power cable 110 therein. Crimp connector portion 150 may be securely fastened to rearward conductor portion 155, such as via a threaded stud 170 threaded into each of crimp connector portion 150 and rearward conductor portion 155. Upon insertion of cable 110, crimp connector portion 150 may be crimped onto power cable 110 prior to insertion into conductor receiving end 105.

Exemplary embodiments of body portion 160 are described in detail below with respect to FIGS. 4A-4E and may be configured to maintain a forward end 175 of rearward conductor portion 155 and a rearward end 180 of spade portion 162 in a spaced relationship relative to each other for providing an open break 185 in the conductor. Consistent with implementations described herein, open break 185 may be visible by a user or installer by looking into visible open port 122. Visually identifying an open break in the conductor enables the installer to ensure that the connector is de-energized prior to interacting with connector 100. In one exemplary implementation, body portion 160 may be formed of an insulative material such as EPDM, or any suitably insulative material. Rearward conductor portion 155 and spade portion 162 may be formed of a suitably conductive material, such as copper, or aluminum, or a conductive alloy.

As shown in FIGS. 1 and 2B, first T end 115 and/or second T end 120 may each include a substantially cylindrical configuration having a bore therein for receiving a deadbreak bushing, insulating plug, or other electrical device (not shown) having a probe or contact extending into connector 100. The probe may be connected to power cable 110 via a cable connector engaged with conductor spade assembly 145. In some implementations, the probe may be coupled to conductor spade assembly 145 via a threaded engagement, e.g., via a threaded stud adapted for coupling to the insert and spade portion 162 of conductor spade assembly 145.

Consistent with implementations described herein, visible open port 122 may be configured as a substantially cylindrical extension projecting from conductor receiving end 105 to form an aperture or bore 190 in conductive outer shield 130 through which break 185 in conductor spade assembly 145 may be viewed. As with first T end 115 and second T end 120, bore 190 may be configured to receive a plug or other electrical device therein for use when power cable elbow connector 100 is energized.

As illustrated in FIG. 1, in one exemplary implementation, bore 190 may be configured to receive a visible open conductor plug 200 therein. Visible open conductor plug 200 may include an insulating body portion 205, a conductive core portion 610 secured within a lower portion of insulating body portion 205, and an assembly facilitating element 215 secured within an upper portion of insulating body portion 205. Prior to re-energizing power cable elbow connector 100, visible open conductor plug 200 may be inserted into bore 190. In one exemplary implementation, visible open conductor plug 200 may be secured to connector 100 via a threaded engagement, e.g., between exterior threads on conductive core portion 210 and corresponding threads on facing surfaces of rearward conductor portion 155 and spade portion 162. For example, visible open conductor plug 200 may be rotated by a suitable tool applied to assembly facilitating element 215. In one embodiment, bore 190 of connector 100 may include a substantially conical configuration, tapering from a first diameter at an outer end of bore 190, to a second diameter smaller than the first diameter at an inner end of bore 190. An outer surface of body portion 205 may include a corresponding conical configuration and may be formed of an insulating material, such as insulative rubber or epoxy.

Consistent with implementations described herein, conductive core portion 210 may be formed of a conductive material, such as copper or aluminum, and may be configured to electrically connect rearward conductor portion 155 and spade portion 162 upon insertion of insulating plug 200 into bore 190. More specifically, conductive core portion 210 may be received in break 185, such that an external surface of conductive core portion 210 contacts opposing surfaces of rearward conductor portion 155 and spade portion 162. In this manner, break 185 may be “closed” upon insertion of insulating plug 200 into bore 190. Additional details and exemplary embodiments of insulating plug 200 and conductor spade assembly 145 are set forth below in FIGS. 4A-4E and 5A-5B.

As shown in FIG. 1, first T end 115 and visible open port 122 may be configured to receive or otherwise couple with a caps 220. Each of caps 220 may be configured to sealingly engage a portion of outer shield 130 about T end 115 or visible open port 122 to protect the terminal from environmental conditions. In some implementations, cap 220 may be further configured to securely engage a feature associated with an electrical device seated within first T end 115, such as assembly facilitating element 215 on visible open conductor plug 200. Caps 220 may each include an aperture 222 for facilitating removal of caps 220, e.g., using a hooked lineman's tool. Alternatively, caps 220 may be removed by hand.

In one exemplary implementation, power cable elbow connector 100 may include a voltage detection test point assembly 225 for sensing a voltage in connector 100. Voltage detection test point assembly 225 may be configured to allow an external voltage detection device, to detect and/or measure a voltage associated with connector 100.

For example, as illustrated in FIG. 1, voltage detection test point assembly 225 may include a test point terminal 230 embedded in a portion of insulative inner housing 135 and extending through an opening within outer shield 130. In one exemplary embodiment, test point terminal 230 may be formed of a conductive metal or other conductive material. In this manner, test point terminal 230 may be capacitively coupled to the electrical conductor elements (e.g., power cable 110) within the connector 100.

Consistent with implementations described herein, a test point cap 235 may sealingly engage portion test point terminal 230 and outer shield 130. In one implementation, test point cap 235 may be formed of a semi-conductive material, such as EPDM. When test point terminal 230 is not being accessed, test point cap 235 may be mounted on test point assembly 225. Because test point cap 235 is formed of a conductive or semiconductive material, test point cap 235 may ground the test point when in position. Test point cap 235 may include an aperture 240 for facilitating removal of test point cap 235, e.g., using a hooked lineman's tool.

FIGS. 4A-4C are side, top, and cross-sectional views respectively, of conductor spade assembly 145 according to one exemplary implementation. As shown, body portion 160 of conductor spade assembly 145 may include a substantially cylindrical form having apertures 405 and 410 provided therein for allowing viewing of open break 185 via visible open port 120 in connector 100. As described above, spade portion 162 may extend from body portion 160 and may be separated from rearward conductor portion 155 by break 185.

In one implementation, as shown in FIGS. 4B and 4C, rearward end 180 of spade portion 162 and forward end 175 of rearward conductor portion 155 may be separated by a distance D and may include semicircular cutouts 415-A and 415-B therein configured to receive conductive core portion 210 of visible open conductor plug 200. In an exemplary embodiment, distance D may be approximately 0.600 inches. It should be understood that D may be any suitable distance. In one implementation, as shown in FIGS. 1 and 4B, semicircular cutouts 415 may include internal threads 417-A and 417-B configured to engage corresponding external threads (e.g., threads 515 in FIG. 5B) in conductive core portion 210.

FIG. 4D is a cross-sectional illustration of another exemplary implementation of conductor spade assembly 145. As shown in FIG. 4D, body portion 160 of conductor spade assembly 145 may include a plug receiving portion 420 having internal threads 422 thereon. In this implementation, rearward end 180 of spade portion 162 and forward end 175 of rearward conductor portion 155 may be separated by a distance D and may include semicircular cutouts 415; However, cutouts 415 may not include the interior threads of the embodiment of FIG. 4C. Rather, cutouts 415 may be configured to engage a smooth lower surface of conductive core portion 210 (not shown in FIG. 1). In another exemplary implementation, plug receiving portion 420 may be formed as an insert into body portion 160, rather than being integral with body portion 160. In such an implementation, body portion 160 and plug receiving portion 420 may be suitably shaped to resist rotational movement therebetween upon insertion of visible open insulating plug 200.

FIG. 4E is a cross-sectional illustration of another exemplary implementation of conductor spade assembly 145. As shown in FIG. 4E, rearward end 180 of spade portion 162 and forward end 175 of rearward conductor portion 155 may each have a thickness H configured to raise break 185 within aperture 405, thereby increasing the visibility of break 185 upon removal of visible open conductor plug 200. In an exemplary embodiment, thickness H may be approximately 0.5 inches to 1.0 inches. Similar to the embodiment of FIG. 4B, opposing surfaces of spade portion 162 and rearward conductor portion 155 may include semicircular cutouts 425 therein configured to receive conductive core portion 210 of visible open conductor plug 200. In one implementation, as shown in FIG. 4E, semicircular cutouts 425 may include internal threads configured to engage corresponding external threads in conductive core portion 210.

FIGS. 5A and 5B are side and cross-section views of a visible open conductor plug 200 consistent with implementations described herein. As shown, visible open conductor plug 200 may include an insulative body portion 505 configured in a substantially conical shape for reception in bore 190 of visible open port 122. Visible open conductor plug 200 may include a conductive core portion 510 embedded within body portion 505 and extending outwardly from body portion 505. Body portion 505 may include rubber, plastic, or some other non-conductive material. As described above, connector 100 and conductor spade assembly 145 may be configured to receive conductive core portion 510 to electrically close break 185 formed between rearward end 180 of spade portion 162 and forward end 175 of rearward conductor portion 155.

As illustrated in FIGS. 5A and 5B, an outer surface of conductive core portion 510 that extends from body portion 505 may be configured to include external threads 515 for engaging corresponding internal threads in conductor spade assembly 145, as described above in relation to FIGS. 1 and 4A-4E. Visible open conductor plug 200 may further include an assembly facilitating element 520 embedded within and extending outwardly from body portion 505. As illustrated in FIG. 5B, assembly facilitating element 520 may extend from a surface of visible open conductor plug 200 opposite from conductive core portion 510.

Further, assembly facilitating element 520 may include a tool engagement surface 525 thereon for receiving a suitable tool. Exemplary tool engagement surfaces 525 may include slots, grooves, ribs, knurls, or a hexagonal or octagonal configuration. Application of force by a suitable tool on tool engagement surface 525 may cause visible open conductor plug 200 to rotate within bore 190 relative to conductor spade assembly 145. In some implementations, visible open conductor plug may be inserted by hand and may not require tool tightening. External threads 515 may engage corresponding internal threads of conductor spade assembly 145 (e.g., threads 417-A and 417-B) during the rotation, causing the visible open conductor plug 200 to become seated within connector 100.

In addition to a visible open conductor plug (e.g., plug 200), other devices may be used in accordance with the embodiments described herein. For example, additional accessories may be modified to include a conductive core portion similar to conductive core portion 510 described above. Exemplary accessories may include a voltage sensor assembly, a surge arrester, a tap plug (e.g., a 600 Amp tap plug), etc.

FIG. 6A is a schematic cross-sectional diagram illustrating an electrical connector consistent with implementations described herein. More specifically, FIG. 6A illustrates electrical connector 100 having a conductive plug 600 and spade conductor assembly 645 and that are different from conductive plug 600 and spade conductor assembly 145 of FIGS. 1, 4A-4E, and 5A-5B. The same reference numbers in FIGS. 1-6B may identify the same or similar elements.

As illustrated in FIG. 6A, spade conductor assembly 645 may include a crimp connector portion 650, a rearward conductor portion 655, a body portion 660, and a spade portion 662. Similar to crimp connector portion 150 described above, crimp connector portion 650 may include a substantially cylindrical assembly configured to receive a center conductor 165 of power cable 110 therein.

Crimp connector portion 650 may be securely fastened to rearward conductor portion 655, such as via a stud or bolt 670 threaded into spade ends 671/672 that extend from each of crimp connector portion 650 and rearward conductor portion 655, respectively. As illustrated, upon insertion of cable 110, crimp connector portion 650 may be crimped onto power cable 110 prior to insertion into conductor receiving end 105 of connector 100.

Body portion 660 may be configured to maintain a forward end 675 of rearward conductor portion 655 and a rearward end 680 of spade portion 662 in a spaced relationship relative to each other for providing an open break 685 in the conductor. Consistent with implementations described herein, open break 685 may be visible by a user or installer by looking into visible open port 122. Visually identifying an open break in the conductor enables the installer to ensure that the connector is de-energized prior to interacting with connector 100. In one exemplary implementation, body portion 660 may be formed of an insulative material such as EPDM, or any suitably insulative material. Rearward conductor portion 655 and spade portion 662 may be formed of a suitably conductive material, such as copper, or aluminum, or a conductive alloy.

As shown in FIG. 6A, visible open conductor plug 600 may include an insulating body portion 605, an intermediate insulating portion 607, a conductive core portion 610 secured within a lower portion of insulating body portion 605 and intermediate insulating portion 607, and an assembly facilitating element 615 secured within an upper portion of insulating body portion 605 and intermediate insulating portion 607. Prior to re-energizing power cable elbow connector 100, visible open conductor plug 600 may be inserted into bore 190. In one exemplary implementation, visible open conductor plug 600 may be secured to connector 100 via a friction engagement, as described in additional detail below. In one embodiment, bore 190 of connector 100 may include a substantially conical configuration, tapering from a first diameter at an outer end of bore 190, to a second diameter smaller than the first diameter at an inner end of bore 190. An outer surface of body portion 605 may include a corresponding conical configuration and may be formed of an insulating material, such as insulative rubber or epoxy.

Consistent with the embodiment of FIGS. 6A and 6B, conductive core portion 610 may include a substantially tubular projection 617 extending from a lower portion of insulating body portion 605. As will be described in additional detail below, tubular projection 617 may be configured to engage conductive portions 675 and 680 of body portion 660, effectively spanning the break between conductive portions 675 and 680 and allowing current to flow thereacross. In this manner, break 185 may be “closed” upon insertion of insulating plug 600 into bore 190.

FIG. 6B is a cross-sectional top view of body portion 660 taken along the line A-A in FIG. 6A. In contrast to body portion 160 described above, body portion 660 may include a centering pin 620 and an outer insulative portion 625 formed over and between conductive portions 675 and 680. As shown in FIG. 6B, insulative portion 625 may include substantially circular groove 627 formed thereon. Circular groove 627 may expose underlying portions of conductive portions 675 and 680. Following insertion of conductive plug 600 into bore 190, tubular projection 617 and, optionally, a portion of insulating body portion 605 may be received within circular groove 627, allowing conductive core portion 610 of conductive plug 600 to close the electrical gap between conductive portions 675 and 680.

As described briefly above, a friction engagement between conductive plug 600 and body portion 660 may be enabled by sizing a lower portion of insulating body portion 605 slightly larger than circular groove 627. In an additional implementation, a substantially cylindrical cavity within a lower portion of conductive core portion 610 may receive centering pin 620 therein. To further assist in the friction engagement between conductive plug 600 and body portion 660, a diameter of the cylindrical cavity within a lower portion of conductive core portion 610 may be sized slightly smaller than a diameter of centering pin 620.

FIGS. 7A and 7B are schematic cross-sectional diagrams illustrating an electrical connector consistent with another implementation described herein. More specifically, FIG. 7A illustrates electrical connector 100 having an insulating plug 700 with an insulative core portion 710 in place of conductive core portion 210 of FIG. 1. By receiving insulating plug 700 into bore 190, it may be ensured that electrical connector 100 is in a non-conducting state, and that current is not passing between a forward end 775 of rearward conductor portion 755 and a rearward end 780 of spade portion 762 of body portion 760.

When in a non-conducting state (e.g., with insulating plug 700 positioned in bore 190), it may be possible to test electrical power cable 110 while maintaining the remainder of electrical connector 100 in a grounded state. For example, a load (e.g., a transformer, etc.) may be connected to connector 100 via T end 115 and a ground may be connected to connector 100 via T end 120. In this case, the presence of insulating plug 700 enables in bore 190 enables the power cable 110 to be tested without affecting the other portions of connector 100.

When connectivity is desired, insulating plug 700 may be removed and replaced with conducting plug 720 (illustrated in FIG. 7B). Similar to conducting plug 200 described above, conducting plug 720 may include a conductive core portion 725 projecting from a lower end of conducting plug 720. The extending portion of conductive core portion 725 may be received into a central opening 765 in body portion 760. For insulating plug 700, an extending portion of insulative core portion 710 may be received in central opening, thereby ensuring that current does not pass between forward end 775 of rearward conductor portion 755 and a rearward end 780 of spade portion 762.

In the embodiment of FIGS. 7A and 7B, body portion 760 may be similar to body portion 660 of FIGS. 6A and 6B and may include an outer insulative portion 725 formed over and between conductive portions 775 and 780 with central opening 765 formed therein that exposes portions 775 and 780. As shown, body portion 760 may include an insulative portion 777 interposed between conductive portions 775 and 780. When receiving insulating plug 700 into bore 190, insulative core portion 710 may be received into central opening 765, such that a portion of insulative core portion 710 extending from conducting plug 720 may contact exposed portions 775/780, thereby placing connector 100 into an insulative state.

Alternatively, when conducting plug 720 into bore 190, conductive core portion 725 may be received into central opening 765, such that the portion of conductive core portion 725 extending from conducting plug 720 may contact exposed portions 775/780, thereby placing connector 100 into a conducting state.

In one implementation, relative diameters of insulative core portion 710 in insulating plug 700 and conductive core portion 725 in conductive plug, and central opening 765 may be sized to provide a friction engagement between plugs 700/720 and connector 100. Alternatively, central opening 765 and plugs 700/720 may be provided with correspondingly threaded portions, such as in the embodiments of FIGS. 1-5B. In still other implementations, other securing mechanisms may be used to secure plugs 700/720 within bore 190, such as clamps, straps, clips, etc.

FIG. 8 is a schematic cross-sectional diagram illustrating an electrical connector consistent with another implementation described herein. More specifically, FIG. 8 illustrates electrical connector 100 having a bushing interface 800 in place of bore 190 of FIGS. 1-3 and 6A-7B. As shown, bushing interface 800 may correspond to a conventional deadbreak or loadbreak bushing insert and may include a substantially cylindrical configuration having a device receiving cavity 810 extending along a length of bushing interface 800 for receiving a conductor for a connected device, such as an elbow or other switchgear component. Similar to the embodiment of FIGS. 1-4E, body portion 160 may include an open break 185 between forward end 175 of rearward conductor portion 155 and rearward end 180 of spade portion 162. Consistent with implementations described herein, open break 185 may be visible by a user or installer by looking into bushing cavity 810.

When it is desired to restore conductivity to connector 100, a suitable loadbreak or deadbreak device (not shown), such as a 600 Amp elbow, a surge arrestor, etc., may be installed within bushing interface 800 in a known manner. The leading end of the installed device may include a conductive portion that contacts forward end 175 of rearward conductor portion 155 and rearward end 180 of spade portion 162, thereby enabling current transmission across connector 100.

FIG. 9 is a schematic cross-sectional diagram illustrating an electrical connector consistent with still another implementation described herein. More specifically, FIG. 9 illustrates electrical connector 100 having a bushing well interface 900 in place of bore 190 of FIGS. 1-3 and 6A-7B and bushing interface 800 on FIG. 8. As shown, bushing well interface 900 may correspond to a conventional deadbreak or loadbreak bushing interface and may include a substantially cylindrical configuration having an insert receiving cavity 910 formed therein.

Similar to busing interface 800 described above, body portion 160 may include an open break 185 between forward end 175 of rearward conductor portion 155 and rearward end 180 of spade portion 162. Consistent with implementations described herein, open break 185 may be visible by a user or installer by looking into insert receiving cavity 910.

When it is desired to restore conductivity to connector 100, a suitable loadbreak or deadbreak device (not shown), such as a 600 Amp elbow, a surge arrestor, a feed-thru insert, etc., may be installed within bushing well interface 900 in a known manner.

By providing an effective and safe mechanism for monitoring an open break in an electrical connector without requirement removal of switchgear components, various personnel may be more easily able to safely identify and confirm a de-energized condition in a switchgear assembly. More specifically, consistent with aspects described herein, personnel may be able to view a physical open break, and not merely an indicator of an open status, thereby more fully ensuring the personnel that the equipment is, in fact, de-energized. Furthermore, by providing the visible open on an elbow connector connected to the switchgear, existing or legacy switchgear may be easily retrofitted and the entire system may maintain a ground connection throughout operation.

The foregoing description of exemplary implementations provides illustration and description, but is not intended to be exhaustive or to limit the embodiments described herein to the precise form disclosed. Modifications and variations are possible in light of the above teachings or may be acquired from practice of the embodiments. For example, implementations may also be used for other devices, such as other high voltage switchgear equipment, such as any 15 kV, 25 kV, or 35 kV equipment.

For example, various features have been mainly described above with respect to elbow power connectors. In other implementations, other medium/high voltage power components may be configured to include the visible open port configuration described above.

Although the invention has been described in detail above, it is expressly understood that it will be apparent to persons skilled in the relevant art that the invention may be modified without departing from the spirit of the invention. Various changes of form, design, or arrangement may be made to the invention without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. Therefore, the above-mentioned description is to be considered exemplary, rather than limiting, and the true scope of the invention is that defined in the following claims.

No element, act, or instruction used in the description of the present application should be construed as critical or essential to the invention unless explicitly described as such. Also, as used herein, the article “a” is intended to include one or more items. Further, the phrase “based on” is intended to mean “based, at least in part, on” unless explicitly stated otherwise.

Claims (16)

What is claimed is:
1. An electrical connector assembly, comprising:
a connector having a conductor receiving end, a first T end, and a visible open port;
a conductor spade assembly extending axially within the connector from the conductor receiving end to the first T end; and
a conductive plug for insertion into the visible open port,
wherein at least a portion of the conductor spade assembly is visible through the visible open port prior to insertion of the conductive plug or following removal of the conductive plug,
wherein the portion of the conductor spade assembly visible through the visible open port includes a rear conductor having a first contact portion and a front conductor having a second contact portion separated by an open break therebetween, and
wherein a portion of the conductive plug is received in the open break between the first contact portion and the second contact portion to allow current to flow from the second contact portion to the first contact portion upon insertion of the conductive plug into the visible open port,
wherein the conductor spade assembly further comprises a body portion having an aperture formed therein,
wherein the body portion is configured to support the first contact portion and the second contact portion,
wherein the aperture in the body portion is aligned with the visible open port, and
wherein the open break between the first contact portion and the second contact portion is provided in the aperture, such that the open break is visible through the visible open port.
2. The electrical connector assembly of claim 1, wherein the body portion of the conductor spade assembly, comprises an insulative material.
3. The electrical connector assembly of claim 1, wherein the conductor spade assembly further comprises a cable receiving portion connected to the second contact portion.
4. The electrical connector assembly of claim 3, wherein the cable receiving portion of the conductor spade assembly comprises a crimp connector configured to receive and securely attach to an electrical cable.
5. The electrical connector assembly of claim 1, wherein the first contact portion and the second contact portion comprise copper or aluminum.
6. The electrical connector assembly of claim 1, wherein the conductor spade assembly comprises a spade portion that includes the first contact portion on one end and a connector end distal from the first contact portion, wherein the connector end is configured to attach to an electrical device via the first connector end.
7. The electrical connector assembly of claim 1, wherein the visible open port projects from the conductor receiving end and includes a bore therein, wherein the bore is aligned with the portion of the conductor spade assembly that includes the open break.
8. The electrical connector assembly of claim 7, wherein the conductive plug is received in the bore.
9. The electrical connector assembly of claim 8, wherein the conductive plug further comprises:
a body portion; and
a core conductor portion extending from the body portion,
wherein the body portion comprises an insulative material and the core conductor portion comprises a conductive material,
wherein a portion of the core conductor portion is received in the open break between the first contact portion and the second contact portion to allow current to flow from the second contact portion to the first contact portion.
10. The electrical connector assembly of claim 8,
wherein the conductor spade assembly includes internal threads, and
wherein the core conductor portion of the conductive plug includes external threads for securing the conductive plug to the contact assembly via the internal threads in the contact assembly.
11. The electrical connector assembly of claim 10, wherein the body portion of the conductor spade assembly includes the internal threads.
12. The electrical connector assembly of claim 10, wherein the first contact portion and the second contact portion of the conductor spade assembly include the internal threads.
13. The electrical connector assembly of claim 10, further comprising:
an insert included in the aperture in the body portion of the conductor spade assembly,
wherein the insert includes the internal threads.
14. The electrical connector assembly of claim 1, wherein the first contact portion and the second contact portion have a thickness ranging from about 0.5 inches to about 1.0 inches to increase a visibility of the open break via the visible open port.
15. A power cable elbow connector assembly, comprising:
a connector body having a conductor receiving opening, a first T end projecting substantially perpendicularly from the connector, and a visible open port projecting substantially perpendicularly from the connector between the first T end and the conductor receiving opening; and
a conductor spade assembly extending axially within the connector body and including a rear conductor having a first contact and a front conductor having a second contact separated by an open break therebetween,
wherein the open break is visible through the visible open port following removal of a device from the visible open port or prior to insertion of the device in the visible open port, thereby enabling visual confirmation of a de-energized condition of the power cable elbow connector assembly,
wherein the device comprises a conductive plug received in the open break for allowing energizing of the power cable elbow connector assembly, and
wherein the first contact and the second contact together comprise internal threads for receiving external threads on a conductive portion of the device.
16. A system, comprising:
an electrical connector comprising:
a conductor receiving end for receiving a cable,
wherein the conductor receiving end includes an axial bore therethrough and an and opening at one end thereof for receiving the cable;
a first T end projecting substantially perpendicularly from the conductor receiving end at an end distal from the opening, and
a viewing port projecting substantially perpendicularly from the conductor receiving end between the opening and the first T end;
a conductor spade assembly extending axially within the axial bore from the opening to the first T end,
wherein the conductor spade assembly comprises:
a body portion having an aperture therein configured to align with the viewing port upon insertion of the conductor spade assembly into the axial bore;
a spade portion extending from the body portion toward the first T end,
wherein the spade portion includes a first contact portion extending into the aperture;
a rearward contact portion extending from the body portion toward the conductor receiving end,
wherein the rearward contact portion includes a second contact portion extending into the aperture,
wherein the first contact portion and the second contact portion are separated by an open break visible through the viewing port;
a conductive plug for insertion into the viewing port,
wherein the conductive plug includes a conductor portion that extends into the open break between the first contact portion and the second contact portion and allows current to flow from the rearward contact portion to the spade portion.
US13018899 2010-02-03 2011-02-01 Visible open for switchgear assembly Active US8408925B2 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US30085210 true 2010-02-03 2010-02-03
US13018899 US8408925B2 (en) 2010-02-03 2011-02-01 Visible open for switchgear assembly

Applications Claiming Priority (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US13018899 US8408925B2 (en) 2010-02-03 2011-02-01 Visible open for switchgear assembly
CA 2731085 CA2731085C (en) 2010-02-03 2011-02-02 Visible open for switchgear assembly

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20110189887A1 true US20110189887A1 (en) 2011-08-04
US8408925B2 true US8408925B2 (en) 2013-04-02

Family

ID=44342077

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13018899 Active US8408925B2 (en) 2010-02-03 2011-02-01 Visible open for switchgear assembly

Country Status (2)

Country Link
US (1) US8408925B2 (en)
CA (1) CA2731085C (en)

Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20120214336A1 (en) * 2010-03-03 2012-08-23 Thomas & Betts International, Inc. Electrical connector with sacrificial appendage
US20120234795A1 (en) * 2009-07-20 2012-09-20 Abb Technology Ag Method of manufacturing a current terminal for embedded pole part, and pole part itself
US20150087171A1 (en) * 2013-09-25 2015-03-26 Thomas & Betts International Llc Permanent Ground Point for Splicing Connectors
US20150295372A1 (en) * 2014-04-10 2015-10-15 S&C Electric Company Adjustable bus bar for power distribution equipment
US20150318635A1 (en) * 2013-01-14 2015-11-05 Tyco Electronics Raychem Gmbh Detachable Cable Joint With Three Sockets
US20160141801A1 (en) * 2014-11-17 2016-05-19 Thomas & Betts International, Llc Grounding link for electrical connector mechanism
US20170070005A1 (en) * 2014-05-16 2017-03-09 Pyungil Co., Ltd. Grounding type elbow connector having electroscope therein

Families Citing this family (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8408925B2 (en) 2010-02-03 2013-04-02 Thomas & Betts International, Inc. Visible open for switchgear assembly
US8388381B2 (en) * 2010-07-21 2013-03-05 Thomas & Betts International, Inc. Visible open for switchgear assembly
US8128423B2 (en) * 2010-07-29 2012-03-06 Thomas & Betts International, Inc. Visible open for switchgear assembly
US8979590B2 (en) 2012-07-26 2015-03-17 Thomas & Betts International, Llc Cable gland for electrical cable fitting
US9325104B2 (en) 2013-05-24 2016-04-26 Thomas & Betts International, Inc. Gelatinous dielectric material for high voltage connector
US9437374B2 (en) 2013-05-24 2016-09-06 Thomas & Betts International Llc Automated grounding device with visual indication
EP2819250A1 (en) * 2013-06-26 2014-12-31 3M Innovative Properties Company Cable connection device
US9443681B2 (en) 2013-07-29 2016-09-13 Thomas & Betts International Llc Flexible dielectric material for high voltage switch

Citations (72)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2870298A (en) 1956-08-27 1959-01-20 Schwager Wood Corp Encapsulated vacuum insulated circuit breaker
US3399286A (en) 1966-03-07 1968-08-27 Powerdyne Inc High voltage electric swtich
US3471669A (en) 1968-01-16 1969-10-07 Chance Co Ab Encapsulated switch assembly for underground electric distribution service
US3740700A (en) * 1972-05-11 1973-06-19 E Robertson Safety connector
US3812314A (en) 1971-08-23 1974-05-21 Gen Electric High power electrical bushing having a vacuum switch encapsulated therein
US3932717A (en) 1974-10-30 1976-01-13 The United States Of America As Represented By The United States Energy Research And Development Administration High-explosive driven crowbar switch
US3955167A (en) 1975-01-08 1976-05-04 Mcgraw-Edison Company Encapsulated vacuum fuse assembly
US3956721A (en) 1975-04-16 1976-05-11 Rte Corporation Fault interrupter
US3980374A (en) * 1975-02-26 1976-09-14 International Telephone And Telegraph Corporation Separable splice connector
US4124790A (en) 1975-03-06 1978-11-07 Mcgraw-Edison Company Protective switch device and operating mechanism therefor
US4150270A (en) 1976-02-23 1979-04-17 Mcgraw-Edison Company Encapsulated high voltage switching device
US4202591A (en) 1978-10-10 1980-05-13 Amerace Corporation Apparatus for the remote grounding, connection and disconnection of high voltage electrical circuits
US4220942A (en) 1978-05-24 1980-09-02 S & C Electric Company Circuit interrupting device
US4249050A (en) 1977-12-30 1981-02-03 Tokyo Shibaura Denki Kabushiki Kaisha Vacuum switch
US4256938A (en) 1977-09-03 1981-03-17 Wickmann-Werke Boblingen Gmbh Electrical control device for high and low voltage installations
US4316646A (en) 1980-02-04 1982-02-23 Amerace Corporation Laterally flexible electrical connector assembly
US4323874A (en) 1980-07-28 1982-04-06 Rte Corporation Blown fuse indicator
US4484046A (en) 1983-01-14 1984-11-20 Power Distribution Products, Inc. Vacuum load break switch
US4568804A (en) 1983-09-06 1986-02-04 Joslyn Mfg. And Supply Co. High voltage vacuum type circuit interrupter
US4596906A (en) 1985-04-10 1986-06-24 S&C Electric Company Arrangement for providing independent rotary and linear drive outputs for high-voltage switches
US4600260A (en) 1981-12-28 1986-07-15 Amerace Corporation Electrical connector
US4645888A (en) 1984-04-09 1987-02-24 Raychem Corporation Load break switch with safety mechanism
US4799895A (en) 1987-06-22 1989-01-24 Amerace Corporation 600-Amp hot stick operable screw-assembled connector system
US4865559A (en) 1983-12-14 1989-09-12 Raychem Limited High voltage connector
US4888455A (en) 1989-02-27 1989-12-19 Hanson James B Water leak detector and method therefor
US4891016A (en) 1989-03-29 1990-01-02 Amerace Corporation 600-Amp hot stick-operable pin-and-socket assembled connector system
US4910367A (en) 1988-03-07 1990-03-20 Joslyn Corporation Visible break switch
US4955823A (en) 1989-10-10 1990-09-11 Amerace Corporation 600-Amp hot stick-operable screw and pin-and-socket assembled connector system
US5089931A (en) 1989-02-07 1992-02-18 Gec Alsthom Sa Safety device for electrical apparatus containing a dielectric gas, in particular circuit breakers or voltage-droppers for measurement purposes
US5387772A (en) 1993-11-01 1995-02-07 Cooper Industries, Inc. Vacuum switch
US5578805A (en) 1994-06-13 1996-11-26 Abb Management Ag Metal-enclosed gas-filled switchgear units
US5641306A (en) 1995-06-08 1997-06-24 Amerace Corporation Indicator bands which show rating and proper assembly of high voltage accessories
US5667060A (en) 1995-12-26 1997-09-16 Amerace Corporation Diaphragm seal for a high voltage switch environment
US5721412A (en) 1995-05-26 1998-02-24 Asea Brown Boveri Ag Disconnector for a metal encapsulated, gas insulated high voltage switchgear
US5790041A (en) 1995-02-14 1998-08-04 Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. Apparatus and method to display network connection status on a jack panel
US5795180A (en) 1996-12-04 1998-08-18 Amerace Corporation Elbow seating indicator
US5808258A (en) 1995-12-26 1998-09-15 Amerace Corporation Encapsulated high voltage vacuum switches
US5912604A (en) 1997-02-04 1999-06-15 Abb Power T&D Company, Inc. Molded pole automatic circuit recloser with bistable electromagnetic actuator
US5917167A (en) 1996-09-13 1999-06-29 Cooper Industries, Inc. Encapsulated vacuum interrupter and method of making same
US5957712A (en) 1997-07-30 1999-09-28 Thomas & Betts International, Inc. Loadbreak connector assembly which prevents switching flashover
US6130394A (en) 1996-08-26 2000-10-10 Elektrotechnische Weke Fritz Driescher & Sohne GmbH Hermetically sealed vacuum load interrupter switch with flashover features
US6168447B1 (en) 1997-07-30 2001-01-02 Thomas & Betts International, Inc. Loadbreak connector assembly which prevents switching flashover
US6213799B1 (en) 1998-05-27 2001-04-10 Hubbell Incorporated Anti-flashover ring for a bushing insert
US6319051B1 (en) 2000-05-23 2001-11-20 Speed Tech Corp. Electric connector with a light penetrable socket shell
US6364216B1 (en) * 2001-02-20 2002-04-02 G&W Electric Co. Universal power connector for joining flexible cables to rigid devices in any of many configurations
US6482049B1 (en) 1999-07-16 2002-11-19 Amphenol Corporation Radially resilient electrical connector
US6491548B2 (en) 2000-04-04 2002-12-10 Thomas & Betts International, Inc. Elbow canister fuseholder
US6504103B1 (en) 1993-03-19 2003-01-07 Cooper Industries, Inc. Visual latching indicator arrangement for an electrical bushing and terminator
US6561841B2 (en) 2001-08-27 2003-05-13 Trompeter Electronics, Inc. Connector assembly having visual indicator
WO2003096504A1 (en) 2002-05-13 2003-11-20 Eaton Electric N.V. Switching installation provided with an electrically insulating barrier
US6761577B1 (en) 2003-01-06 2004-07-13 Molex Incorporated Mating detection system for an electrical connector assembly
US6825426B2 (en) 2002-10-02 2004-11-30 Mcgraw-Edison Company Make-before-break selector switch
US6843685B1 (en) 2003-12-24 2005-01-18 Thomas & Betts International, Inc. Electrical connector with voltage detection point insulation shield
US6864456B1 (en) 1999-02-26 2005-03-08 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Vacuum interrupter chamber with ring-shaped insulator
US6883804B2 (en) 2002-07-11 2005-04-26 Parker-Hannifin Corporation Seal ring having secondary sealing lips
US6939151B2 (en) 1997-07-30 2005-09-06 Thomas & Betts International, Inc. Loadbreak connector assembly which prevents switching flashover
US6984791B1 (en) 1993-03-19 2006-01-10 Cooper Technologies Company Visual latching indicator arrangement for an electrical bushing and terminator
US7144279B2 (en) 2004-12-30 2006-12-05 Homac Mfg. Company Electrical connector including viewing windows and associated methods
US7182647B2 (en) 2004-11-24 2007-02-27 Cooper Technologies Company Visible break assembly including a window to view a power connection
US7262362B2 (en) 2004-02-27 2007-08-28 Abb Technology Ag High voltage device with a particle trap
US7397012B2 (en) 2005-05-31 2008-07-08 Thomas & Betts International, Inc. High current switch and method of operation
US20080311779A1 (en) 2007-06-14 2008-12-18 Nordson Corporation High-voltage electrical connector with visual indicator
US7501598B2 (en) 2006-05-31 2009-03-10 Thomas & Betts International, Inc. Connector system for an insulated switch with provision for grounding and visible break
US7503785B2 (en) 2005-12-21 2009-03-17 Thomas & Betts International, Inc. Separable electrical connector component having a voltage output branch and a direct access point
US7520773B2 (en) 2007-01-08 2009-04-21 Thomas & Betts International, Inc. Flap seating indicator
US20090149064A1 (en) 2007-12-11 2009-06-11 Johann Schuster High current coaxial connection with two plug elements, and gradient coil conductor
US7579571B2 (en) 2006-05-31 2009-08-25 Thomas & Betts International, Inc. Visible open indicator
US7648376B1 (en) 2008-07-28 2010-01-19 Thomas & Betts International, Inc. 25kV loadbreak elbow and bushing increased flashover distance
US7695291B2 (en) 2007-10-31 2010-04-13 Cooper Technologies Company Fully insulated fuse test and ground device
US7883361B2 (en) * 2005-10-27 2011-02-08 Mitsubishi Cable Industries, Ltd. Connection member and harness connection body using the connection member
US20110189887A1 (en) 2010-02-03 2011-08-04 Thomas & Betts International, Inc. Visible open for switchgear assembly
US8128423B2 (en) 2010-07-29 2012-03-06 Thomas & Betts International, Inc. Visible open for switchgear assembly

Patent Citations (80)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2870298A (en) 1956-08-27 1959-01-20 Schwager Wood Corp Encapsulated vacuum insulated circuit breaker
US3399286A (en) 1966-03-07 1968-08-27 Powerdyne Inc High voltage electric swtich
US3471669A (en) 1968-01-16 1969-10-07 Chance Co Ab Encapsulated switch assembly for underground electric distribution service
US3812314A (en) 1971-08-23 1974-05-21 Gen Electric High power electrical bushing having a vacuum switch encapsulated therein
US3740700A (en) * 1972-05-11 1973-06-19 E Robertson Safety connector
US3932717A (en) 1974-10-30 1976-01-13 The United States Of America As Represented By The United States Energy Research And Development Administration High-explosive driven crowbar switch
US3955167A (en) 1975-01-08 1976-05-04 Mcgraw-Edison Company Encapsulated vacuum fuse assembly
US3980374A (en) * 1975-02-26 1976-09-14 International Telephone And Telegraph Corporation Separable splice connector
US4124790A (en) 1975-03-06 1978-11-07 Mcgraw-Edison Company Protective switch device and operating mechanism therefor
US3956721A (en) 1975-04-16 1976-05-11 Rte Corporation Fault interrupter
US4150270A (en) 1976-02-23 1979-04-17 Mcgraw-Edison Company Encapsulated high voltage switching device
US4256938A (en) 1977-09-03 1981-03-17 Wickmann-Werke Boblingen Gmbh Electrical control device for high and low voltage installations
US4249050A (en) 1977-12-30 1981-02-03 Tokyo Shibaura Denki Kabushiki Kaisha Vacuum switch
US4220942A (en) 1978-05-24 1980-09-02 S & C Electric Company Circuit interrupting device
US4202591A (en) 1978-10-10 1980-05-13 Amerace Corporation Apparatus for the remote grounding, connection and disconnection of high voltage electrical circuits
US4316646A (en) 1980-02-04 1982-02-23 Amerace Corporation Laterally flexible electrical connector assembly
US4323874A (en) 1980-07-28 1982-04-06 Rte Corporation Blown fuse indicator
US4600260A (en) 1981-12-28 1986-07-15 Amerace Corporation Electrical connector
US4484046A (en) 1983-01-14 1984-11-20 Power Distribution Products, Inc. Vacuum load break switch
US4568804A (en) 1983-09-06 1986-02-04 Joslyn Mfg. And Supply Co. High voltage vacuum type circuit interrupter
US4865559A (en) 1983-12-14 1989-09-12 Raychem Limited High voltage connector
US4645888A (en) 1984-04-09 1987-02-24 Raychem Corporation Load break switch with safety mechanism
US4596906A (en) 1985-04-10 1986-06-24 S&C Electric Company Arrangement for providing independent rotary and linear drive outputs for high-voltage switches
US4799895A (en) 1987-06-22 1989-01-24 Amerace Corporation 600-Amp hot stick operable screw-assembled connector system
US4910367A (en) 1988-03-07 1990-03-20 Joslyn Corporation Visible break switch
US5089931A (en) 1989-02-07 1992-02-18 Gec Alsthom Sa Safety device for electrical apparatus containing a dielectric gas, in particular circuit breakers or voltage-droppers for measurement purposes
US4888455A (en) 1989-02-27 1989-12-19 Hanson James B Water leak detector and method therefor
US4891016A (en) 1989-03-29 1990-01-02 Amerace Corporation 600-Amp hot stick-operable pin-and-socket assembled connector system
US4955823A (en) 1989-10-10 1990-09-11 Amerace Corporation 600-Amp hot stick-operable screw and pin-and-socket assembled connector system
US6984791B1 (en) 1993-03-19 2006-01-10 Cooper Technologies Company Visual latching indicator arrangement for an electrical bushing and terminator
US6504103B1 (en) 1993-03-19 2003-01-07 Cooper Industries, Inc. Visual latching indicator arrangement for an electrical bushing and terminator
US5387772A (en) 1993-11-01 1995-02-07 Cooper Industries, Inc. Vacuum switch
US5578805A (en) 1994-06-13 1996-11-26 Abb Management Ag Metal-enclosed gas-filled switchgear units
US5790041A (en) 1995-02-14 1998-08-04 Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. Apparatus and method to display network connection status on a jack panel
US5721412A (en) 1995-05-26 1998-02-24 Asea Brown Boveri Ag Disconnector for a metal encapsulated, gas insulated high voltage switchgear
US5641306A (en) 1995-06-08 1997-06-24 Amerace Corporation Indicator bands which show rating and proper assembly of high voltage accessories
US5808258A (en) 1995-12-26 1998-09-15 Amerace Corporation Encapsulated high voltage vacuum switches
US5667060A (en) 1995-12-26 1997-09-16 Amerace Corporation Diaphragm seal for a high voltage switch environment
US5864942A (en) 1995-12-26 1999-02-02 Thomas & Betts International Inc. Method of making high voltage switches
US6130394A (en) 1996-08-26 2000-10-10 Elektrotechnische Weke Fritz Driescher & Sohne GmbH Hermetically sealed vacuum load interrupter switch with flashover features
US5917167A (en) 1996-09-13 1999-06-29 Cooper Industries, Inc. Encapsulated vacuum interrupter and method of making same
US5795180A (en) 1996-12-04 1998-08-18 Amerace Corporation Elbow seating indicator
US5912604A (en) 1997-02-04 1999-06-15 Abb Power T&D Company, Inc. Molded pole automatic circuit recloser with bistable electromagnetic actuator
US6585531B1 (en) 1997-07-30 2003-07-01 Thomas & Betts International, Inc. Loadbreak connector assembly which prevents switching flashover
US6168447B1 (en) 1997-07-30 2001-01-02 Thomas & Betts International, Inc. Loadbreak connector assembly which prevents switching flashover
US6939151B2 (en) 1997-07-30 2005-09-06 Thomas & Betts International, Inc. Loadbreak connector assembly which prevents switching flashover
US5957712A (en) 1997-07-30 1999-09-28 Thomas & Betts International, Inc. Loadbreak connector assembly which prevents switching flashover
US6213799B1 (en) 1998-05-27 2001-04-10 Hubbell Incorporated Anti-flashover ring for a bushing insert
US6864456B1 (en) 1999-02-26 2005-03-08 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Vacuum interrupter chamber with ring-shaped insulator
US6482049B1 (en) 1999-07-16 2002-11-19 Amphenol Corporation Radially resilient electrical connector
US6491548B2 (en) 2000-04-04 2002-12-10 Thomas & Betts International, Inc. Elbow canister fuseholder
US6319051B1 (en) 2000-05-23 2001-11-20 Speed Tech Corp. Electric connector with a light penetrable socket shell
US6364216B1 (en) * 2001-02-20 2002-04-02 G&W Electric Co. Universal power connector for joining flexible cables to rigid devices in any of many configurations
US6561841B2 (en) 2001-08-27 2003-05-13 Trompeter Electronics, Inc. Connector assembly having visual indicator
WO2003096504A1 (en) 2002-05-13 2003-11-20 Eaton Electric N.V. Switching installation provided with an electrically insulating barrier
US6883804B2 (en) 2002-07-11 2005-04-26 Parker-Hannifin Corporation Seal ring having secondary sealing lips
US6825426B2 (en) 2002-10-02 2004-11-30 Mcgraw-Edison Company Make-before-break selector switch
US6761577B1 (en) 2003-01-06 2004-07-13 Molex Incorporated Mating detection system for an electrical connector assembly
US6843685B1 (en) 2003-12-24 2005-01-18 Thomas & Betts International, Inc. Electrical connector with voltage detection point insulation shield
US7262362B2 (en) 2004-02-27 2007-08-28 Abb Technology Ag High voltage device with a particle trap
US7182647B2 (en) 2004-11-24 2007-02-27 Cooper Technologies Company Visible break assembly including a window to view a power connection
US7144279B2 (en) 2004-12-30 2006-12-05 Homac Mfg. Company Electrical connector including viewing windows and associated methods
US7397012B2 (en) 2005-05-31 2008-07-08 Thomas & Betts International, Inc. High current switch and method of operation
US7754992B2 (en) 2005-05-31 2010-07-13 Thomas & Betts International, Inc. High current switch and method of operation
US7579572B2 (en) 2005-05-31 2009-08-25 Thomas & Betts International, Inc. High current switch and method of operation
US7883361B2 (en) * 2005-10-27 2011-02-08 Mitsubishi Cable Industries, Ltd. Connection member and harness connection body using the connection member
US7503785B2 (en) 2005-12-21 2009-03-17 Thomas & Betts International, Inc. Separable electrical connector component having a voltage output branch and a direct access point
US7501598B2 (en) 2006-05-31 2009-03-10 Thomas & Betts International, Inc. Connector system for an insulated switch with provision for grounding and visible break
US7579571B2 (en) 2006-05-31 2009-08-25 Thomas & Betts International, Inc. Visible open indicator
US7520773B2 (en) 2007-01-08 2009-04-21 Thomas & Betts International, Inc. Flap seating indicator
US20080311779A1 (en) 2007-06-14 2008-12-18 Nordson Corporation High-voltage electrical connector with visual indicator
US7497723B2 (en) 2007-06-14 2009-03-03 Nordson Corporation High-voltage electrical connector with visual indicator
US7901228B2 (en) * 2007-10-31 2011-03-08 Cooper Technologies Company Fully insulated fuse test and ground device
US7891999B2 (en) 2007-10-31 2011-02-22 Cooper Technologies Company Fully insulated fuse test and ground device
US7695291B2 (en) 2007-10-31 2010-04-13 Cooper Technologies Company Fully insulated fuse test and ground device
US20090149064A1 (en) 2007-12-11 2009-06-11 Johann Schuster High current coaxial connection with two plug elements, and gradient coil conductor
US20100022111A1 (en) 2008-07-28 2010-01-28 Thomas & Betts International, Inc. 25kv loadbreak elbow and bushing increased flashover distance
US7648376B1 (en) 2008-07-28 2010-01-19 Thomas & Betts International, Inc. 25kV loadbreak elbow and bushing increased flashover distance
US20110189887A1 (en) 2010-02-03 2011-08-04 Thomas & Betts International, Inc. Visible open for switchgear assembly
US8128423B2 (en) 2010-07-29 2012-03-06 Thomas & Betts International, Inc. Visible open for switchgear assembly

Non-Patent Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
"Oil and Vacuum-Break Switches" Cooper Power Systems, Electrical Apparatus 260-20, Feb. 2002.

Cited By (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20120234795A1 (en) * 2009-07-20 2012-09-20 Abb Technology Ag Method of manufacturing a current terminal for embedded pole part, and pole part itself
US8729417B2 (en) * 2009-07-20 2014-05-20 Abb Technology Ag Method of manufacturing a current terminal for embedded pole part, and pole part itself
US8616908B2 (en) * 2010-03-03 2013-12-31 Thomas & Betts International, Inc. Electrical connector with a cap with a sacrificial conductor
US20120214336A1 (en) * 2010-03-03 2012-08-23 Thomas & Betts International, Inc. Electrical connector with sacrificial appendage
US20150318635A1 (en) * 2013-01-14 2015-11-05 Tyco Electronics Raychem Gmbh Detachable Cable Joint With Three Sockets
US9537247B2 (en) * 2013-01-14 2017-01-03 Tyco Electronics Raychem Gmbh Detachable cable joint with three sockets
US20150087171A1 (en) * 2013-09-25 2015-03-26 Thomas & Betts International Llc Permanent Ground Point for Splicing Connectors
US9472868B2 (en) * 2013-09-25 2016-10-18 Thomas & Betts International Llc Permanent ground point for splicing connectors
US9660402B2 (en) * 2014-04-10 2017-05-23 S&C Electric Company Conductor assembly for power distribution equipment
US9385493B2 (en) * 2014-04-10 2016-07-05 S&C Electric Company Adjustable bus bar for power distribution equipment
US20150295372A1 (en) * 2014-04-10 2015-10-15 S&C Electric Company Adjustable bus bar for power distribution equipment
US20170070005A1 (en) * 2014-05-16 2017-03-09 Pyungil Co., Ltd. Grounding type elbow connector having electroscope therein
US9806463B2 (en) * 2014-05-16 2017-10-31 Pyungil Co., Ltd. Grounding type elbow connector having electroscope therein
US20160141801A1 (en) * 2014-11-17 2016-05-19 Thomas & Betts International, Llc Grounding link for electrical connector mechanism
US9954315B2 (en) * 2014-11-17 2018-04-24 Thomas & Betts International Llc Grounding link for electrical connector mechanism

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
CA2731085A1 (en) 2011-08-03 application
US20110189887A1 (en) 2011-08-04 application
CA2731085C (en) 2014-01-28 grant

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3513425A (en) Modular electrical conductor termination system
US3509518A (en) High voltage cable connectors
US3509516A (en) High voltage connector and entrance bushing assembly
US3343153A (en) Cable connector having means for indicating when cable is energized
US8827729B2 (en) Electrical connector system
US4865559A (en) High voltage connector
US4799895A (en) 600-Amp hot stick operable screw-assembled connector system
US4946393A (en) Separable connector access port and fittings
US6227908B1 (en) Electric connection
US6332785B1 (en) High voltage electrical connector with access cavity and inserts for use therewith
US5421750A (en) 200 AMP bolted elbow with a loadbreak tap
US20040121657A1 (en) Switchgear using modular push-on deadfront bus bar system
US7494355B2 (en) Thermoplastic interface and shield assembly for separable insulated connector system
US7212389B2 (en) Over-voltage protection system
US20050024218A1 (en) Fault monitoring apparatus and method
US3602872A (en) Electrical connector for tapping shielded high voltage cable
US3727108A (en) Surge arrester
US6744255B1 (en) Grounding device for electric power distribution systems
US7503785B2 (en) Separable electrical connector component having a voltage output branch and a direct access point
US4767351A (en) High voltage externally-separable bushing
US3513394A (en) Insulated voltage source for high voltage conductor terminations
US7695291B2 (en) Fully insulated fuse test and ground device
US3686604A (en) Current interrupting safe break terminator
US7381103B2 (en) Multiple bore termination system having an integrally formed component
US3414868A (en) Terminator for connecting a plurality of electrical cables to a secondary of an electrical apparatus

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: THOMAS & BETTS INTERNATIONAL, INC., DELAWARE

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:BORGSTROM, ALAN D.;HIGGINS, KIERAN P.;REEL/FRAME:025728/0254

Effective date: 20110201

AS Assignment

Owner name: THOMAS & BETTS INTERNATIONAL LLC, DELAWARE

Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:THOMAS & BETTS INTERNATIONAL, INC.;REEL/FRAME:032388/0428

Effective date: 20130321

FPAY Fee payment

Year of fee payment: 4