US8303699B2 - Photo-erasable ink for full color printing - Google Patents

Photo-erasable ink for full color printing Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US8303699B2
US8303699B2 US12/103,368 US10336808A US8303699B2 US 8303699 B2 US8303699 B2 US 8303699B2 US 10336808 A US10336808 A US 10336808A US 8303699 B2 US8303699 B2 US 8303699B2
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
ink
functionalized
photocatalytically active
active semiconductor
semiconductor nanoparticles
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Fee Related, expires
Application number
US12/103,368
Other versions
US20090258156A1 (en
Inventor
Michelle N. CHRETIEN
Gabriel Iftime
Tyler B. NORSTEN
Peter M. Kazmaier
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Xerox Corp
Original Assignee
Xerox Corp
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Xerox Corp filed Critical Xerox Corp
Priority to US12/103,368 priority Critical patent/US8303699B2/en
Assigned to XEROX CORPORATION reassignment XEROX CORPORATION ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: CHRETTEN, MICHELLE N., IFTIME, GABRIEL, KAZMAIER, PETER M., NORSTEN, TYLER B.
Publication of US20090258156A1 publication Critical patent/US20090258156A1/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US8303699B2 publication Critical patent/US8303699B2/en
Expired - Fee Related legal-status Critical Current
Adjusted expiration legal-status Critical

Links

Classifications

    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C09DYES; PAINTS; POLISHES; NATURAL RESINS; ADHESIVES; COMPOSITIONS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; APPLICATIONS OF MATERIALS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • C09DCOATING COMPOSITIONS, e.g. PAINTS, VARNISHES OR LACQUERS; FILLING PASTES; CHEMICAL PAINT OR INK REMOVERS; INKS; CORRECTING FLUIDS; WOODSTAINS; PASTES OR SOLIDS FOR COLOURING OR PRINTING; USE OF MATERIALS THEREFOR
    • C09D11/00Inks
    • C09D11/50Sympathetic, colour changing or similar inks

Abstract

An ink compatibility including a dye and surface functionalized photocatalytically active semiconductor nanoparticles is provided. This ink composition enables the reuse of a print substrate, because the surface functionalized photocatalytically active semiconductor nanoparticles bleach the dye under an activating radiation.

Description

TECHNICAL FIELD
This disclosure is generally directed to improved photo-erasable inks. In particular, this disclosure provides an improved ink composition containing a dye and photocatalytically active semiconductor nanoparticles that are surface functionalized.
BACKGROUND
Reusable document technologies allow a print substrate, such as paper, to be printed upon more than one time. Whereas non-reusable document printing has a high environmental impact as a result of disposal of the substrate, reusable paper (for example) can provide economic and environmental advantages for routine printing needs. One method of reusable printing is to bleach the ink printed onto the substrate, such that new ink can be printed on top of the non-visible bleached ink.
Semiconductor metal oxides are among the most commonly used photocatalytic materials for the decomposition of organic molecules. Such semiconductor metal oxides have been used for the photodegradation of a variety of compounds, including surfactants, pesticides, and dyes. In the presence of air, humidity, and light, many semiconductor metal oxides produce reactive species that can initiate the photodegradation of organic molecules such as dyes.
For example, doped and undoped titanium dioxide (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (30-50 nm) have been extensively applied to the photobleaching of dyes in wastewater from textile processing and the photocatalytic removal of other aqueous pollutants. For example, Agostiano et al. have shown that titanium dioxide can be used to bleach textile dye Uniblue A. P. D. Cozzoli, R. Comparelli, E. Fanizza, M. L. Cut, A. Agostiano (2003) Mater. Sci. Eng. C 23 707-713, the text of which is hereby incorporated in its entirety. The generation of reactive species is a surface phenomenon, so the catalytic efficiency of these materials can be improved through the use of nanoparticle-sized materials.
A variety of publications discuss the use of photocatalytic particles in the context of printing. For example, U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2006/0137841 to Chatani et al. describes a printing paper substrate that is coated with photocatalytically active titanium dioxide particles. The titanium dioxide provides an “air cleaning effect” as well as “good printability” and “good color print quality.” Chatani does not discuss reusing the substrate by utilizing the photocatalytically active particles to bleach an ink.
In Japanese Patent Application Publication No. 2003-073587, there is provided an ink composition that is erasable by light irradiation. Specifically, there is provided an aqueous ink composition comprising a dye and titanium oxide nanoparticles that act as photocatalysts.
However, dye based inks may comprise a wide variety of solvents, not merely aqueous solutions, in order to achieve particular desired compositions or drying properties. Solvent-based inks are popular for numerous printing applications. On the other hand, the ink disclosed by JP 2003-073587 is limited to aqueous solutions, because titanium oxide is not easily disperable in other systems such as organic solutions.
Furthermore, titanium oxide is poorly disperable even in aqueous environments, thus requiring the use of a wetting agent as disclosed in JP 2003-073587. The use of a wetting agent is unlikely to achieve the dispersion quality and stability necessary for demanding print applications, such as ink jet. As a result of poor dispersability, the photocatalytic bleaching effect may be uneven. Such unevenness can result in portions of the printed image remaining visible, thus making the substrate not reusable, and thereby defeating the purpose of using such a system.
Therefore, there exists in the art a need for improved photo-erasable inks.
SUMMARY
The present disclosure addresses these and other needs, by providing an improved photo-erasable ink composition. More particularly, this disclosure provides an improved photo-erasable ink composition containing photocatalytically active semiconductor nanoparticles that are surface functionalized so as to make the nanoparticles disperable in a wide variety of ink media.
In embodiments, the disclosure provides an ink comprising a dye, a carrier and surface functionalized photocatalytically active semiconductor nanoparticles, wherein the dye is bleached by the surface functionalized photocatalytically active semiconductor nanoparticles upon exposure of the ink to an activating radiation.
In other embodiments, the disclosure provides a printer comprising a full color ink set made from the ink composition comprising a dye, a carrier and surface functionalized photocatalytically active semiconductor nanoparticles. In another embodiment, the disclosure provides a printed document wherein the ink composition comprising a dye, a carrier and surface functionalized photocatalytically active semiconductor nanoparticles is printed on a substrate.
Finally, in another embodiment, the disclosure provides a method of printing a substrate comprising printing a substrate with the ink composition comprising a dye, a carrier and surface functionalized photocatalytically active semiconductor nanoparticles to form a printed substrate having a first printed image, exposing the printed substrate to an activating radiation such that the ink is substantially wholly bleached, and then printing the substrate again to form a printed substrate having a second printed image.
EMBODIMENTS
This disclosure is not limited to particular embodiments described herein, and some components and processes may be varied by one of ordinary skill in the art, based on this disclosure. The terminology used herein is for the purpose of described particular embodiments only, and is not intended to be limiting.
In this specification and the claims that follow, singular forms such as “a,” “an,” and “the” include plural forms unless the content clearly dictates otherwise. In addition, reference may be made to a number of terms that shall be defined as follows:
The term “bleaching” is defined as the disappearance of all or substantially all color contrast, as between an ink exposed to an activating radiation and an unexposed ink. For example, bleaching is said to occur when the color contrast between the substrate and the erased image is no longer perceptible to the viewer. Specifically, bleaching at least includes any color difference between the substrate and the erased image that is measured to be less than about ΔE=5 where ΔE is defined according to CIE76 as ΔE=√{square root over ((L*2−L*1)2+(a*2−a*1)2+(b*2−b*1)2)}{square root over ((L*2−L*1)2+(a*2−a*1)2+(b*2−b*1)2)}{square root over ((L*2−L*1)2+(a*2−a*1)2+(b*2−b*1)2)}.
An improved ink composition comprising a dye and surface functionalized photocatalytically active semiconductor nanoparticles, wherein the dye is bleached by the surface functionalized photocatalytically active semiconductor nanoparticles upon exposure of the ink to an activating radiation, is provided.
An ink, as is generally known, is a printable composition containing a colorant that is used to colorize a print substrate. In embodiments, the ink of the present disclosure may take any of various known forms, for example the ink may be a liquid ink, a solid ink, a gel ink or a radiation curable ink. The ink of the present disclosure may also comprise any of various known solvent bases as a carrier. For example, in embodiments, the carrier may be an aqueous solvent. In other embodiments, the carrier may be an organic phase, or wax or gel based.
A dye, as is generally known, is a type of colorant that is soluble in an ink. Any desired or effective colorant can be employed in the ink compositions, including dye, mixtures of dyes, and the like, provided that the colorant can be dissolved or dispersed in the ink vehicle. The compositions can be used in combination with conventional ink colorant materials, such as Color Index (C.I.) Solvent Dyes, Disperse Dyes, modified Acid and Direct Dyes, Basic Dyes, Sulphur Dyes, Vat Dyes, and the like. Dyes are classified into several dye classes, for example acid or base dyes, reactive dyes, sulfur dyes or azo dyes. In the present disclosure, the dye may be a member of any of the various known dye classes, as the photo-bleaching mechanism is relatively insensitive to the dye structure. The choice of dye structure will ultimately depend on the desired color and ink vehicle.
Examples of dyes include EASTMAN olefin, USHARECT Blue 86 (Direct Blue 86), available from USHANTI Color; INTRALITE Turquoise 8GL (Direct Blue 86), available from Classic Dyestuffs; CHEMICTIVE Brilliant Red 7BH Reactive Red 4), available from Chemiequip; LEVAFIX Black EB, available from Bayer; REACTRON Red H8B (Reactive Red 31), available from Atlas Dye-Chem; D&C Red #28 (Acid Red 92), available from Warner-Jenkinson; Direct Brilliant Pink B, available from Global Colors; Acid Tartrazine, available from Metrochem Industries; CARTASOL Yellow 6GF, available from Clariant; CARTA Blue 2GL, available from Clariant; and the like. Examples of suitable spirit solvent dyes include NEOZAPON Red 492 (BASF); ORASOL Red G (Ciba); Direct Brilliant Pink B (Global Colors); AIZEN SPILON Red C-BH (Hodogaya Chemical); KAYANOL Red 3BL (Nippon Kayaku); Spirit Fast Yellow 3G; AIZEN SPILON Yellow C-GNH (Hodogaya Chemical); CARTASOL Brilliant Yellow 4GF (Clariant); PERGASOL Yellow CGP (Ciba); ORASOL Black RLP (Ciba); SAVINYL Black RLS (Clariant); MORFAST Black Conc. A (Rohm and Haas); ORASOL Blue GN (Ciba); SAVINYL Blue GLS (Sandoz); LUXOL Fast Blue MBSN (Pylam); SEVRON Blue 5GMF (Classic Dyestuffs); BASACID Blue 750 (BASF), and the like. NEOZAPON Black X51 (C.I. Solvent Black, C.I. 12195) (BASF), Sudan Blue 670 (C.I. 61554) (BASF), Sudan Yellow 146 (C.I. 12700) (BASF), and Sudan Red 462 (C.I. 260501) (BASF) are particularly suitable in some embodiments. This list is not intended to be comprehensive or limiting. These dyes may be used singly or in combination.
The surface functionalized photocatalytically active semiconductor nanoparticles can be any of various known semiconductor materials that are photocatalytically active. For example, in embodiments, the photocatalytically active semiconductor nanoparticles can be made from titanium oxides (TiO, TiO2, Ti2O3), zinc oxide (ZnO), Nb2O5, SrTiO3, SnO2, ZrO2, ZnS, α-Fe2O3, CeO2, CdS, GaP, WO3, Fe2O3, CdSe, InTaO4, MoO3, WS2, MoS2, Ta2O5, Si, and mixtures thereof. In a particular embodiment, the semiconductor nanoparticles are made of titanium dioxide.
The photocatalytically active semiconductor material is in the form of nanoparticles in order to enhance surface reactivity by providing an increased surface area to volume ratio. In embodiments, the nanoparticles have an average diameter of less than about 300 nm. A average diameter of less than 200 nm, for example, ensures that the nanoparticles are not visible to the naked eye. In particular embodiments, the nanoparticles have an average diameter of between about 5 nm and 30 nm.
The “average” nanoparticle size, which is typically represented as d50, is defined as the median particle size value at the 50th percentile of the particle size distribution, wherein 50% of the particles in the distribution are greater than the d50 particle size value and the other 50% of the particles in the distribution are less than the d50 value. Average particle size can be measured by methods that use light scattering technology to infer particle size, such as Dynamic Light Scattering. The term “particle diameter” as used herein refers to the length of the nanoparticle at the longest dimension (in the case of acicular shaped particles) as derived from images of the particles generated by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM).
The photocatalytically active semiconductor nanoparticles may be doped or undoped, depending on the desired redox properties. If doped, the photocatalytically active semiconductor nanoparticles may be doped with various known dopants, as is generally known in the art. In embodiments, the photocatalytically active semiconductor nanoparticles may be doped with silicon, silicon oxides, chromium, manganese, cobalt, nitrogen, lanthanide oxides, iron, vanadium, silver, copper, gold, carbon, fluorine, sulfur and mixtures thereof. In some embodiments, the inclusion of dopants may affect the photocatalytic activity of the semiconductor nanoparticles by, for example, shifting the wavelength of the activating radiation or by improving catalytic efficiency.
The surface functionalizing compound that makes the photocatalytically active semiconductor nanoparticles surface functionalized may be any of a variety of known compounds having a first portion that bonds with the semiconductor nanoparticles and a second portion that is compatible with the ink vehicle. The surface functionalization may take place through processes such as, for example, direct chemical bonding, chemisorption or physisorption.
Generally, the surface functionalizing compound may be one or more of alcohols, diols, polyols, acrylates, acrylic acid, polyacrylates, substituted primary amines, secondary amines, carboxylic acids, trihalo-silyl groups, trialkyl-silyl groups, trialkoxy silyl groups, sulfonic acids, ethylene oxides and propylene oxides. Each of the forgoing may be long or short chain, branched, and substituted or ethylenically unsaturated, as desired and generally known in the art. A long chain compound generally has between about 4 and about 20 carbon atoms, while a short chain compound generally has at most 12 carbon atoms.
Examples of the surface functionalizing compounds include ethanol, isopopanol, butanol, glycol, glycols, polyethylene glycol or diethylene glycol; primary and secondary amines of structure type R1-NHR2 where R1 is any long or short chain, branched, or substituted alkyl, aryl, alkoxy, aryloxy, or ethylenically unsaturated group, such as butyl amine, tributylamine or aminobutylacrylate; mono- and di-carboxylic acids; 3-(methoxysilyl)propyl (meth)acrylate; mono- and di-sulfonic acids; and polyethyleneoxide or polypropyleneoxide.
The specific surface functionalizing compound used depends on both the ink vehicle environment and the semiconductor material comprising the nanoparticle. Specifically, different types of ink solvent environment will require different types of surface functionalizing compounds in order to make the semiconductor nanoparticles dispersable therein.
The surface functionalization compound may be added to the semiconductor material in an amount such that from about 0.01% to about 75% of the total surface area of an average semiconductor nanoparticle is surface functionalized.
As a result of being surface functionalized, the semiconductor nanoparticles are highly dispersed throughout the ink. This increased dispersion may affect the photocatalytic bleaching in a variety of ways. For example, it is believed that because the nanoparticles are uniformly dispersed throughout the ink, fewer nanoparticles may be used than would be required with non-surface functionalized nanoparticles in order to achieve the same level of bleaching. In this way, the ink may comprise a weight percent of surface functionalized photocatalytically active semiconductor nanoparticles of from about 0.5% to about 50%. In embodiments, the weight percent of surface functionalized photocatalytically active semiconductor nanoparticles may be from about 1 to about 20%.
Additionally, it is believed that the presence of the surface functionalization compound on the semiconductor materials may also result in faster bleaching. It is hypothesized that the surface functionalizing species could be oxidized or reduced by the semiconductor nanoparticles to generate a reactive species, which is more active towards the dye or has a longer lifetime, giving it a higher probability of reacting with the dye.
The above discussed features and advantages were highly unexpected because surface functionalization has been applied to modulate or reduce the photocatalytic activity of semiconductor nanoparticles, in applications such as sunscreens. On the other hand, in this case, the amount of surface functionalization necessary to achieve dispersability did not negatively impact the catalytic effect.
The activating radiation may be any radiation known to activate the semiconductor material in the ink composition. As is generally known in photocatalytic semiconductor systems, the activating radiation causes photogenerated electrons and holes to migrate to the surface of the semiconductor nanoparticle where they act as sources of redox species ultimately leading to the destruction of the dye.
In embodiments, the activating radiation may one or more types of radiation selected from the group consisting of: ultraviolet radiation (having a wavelength of about 100 nm to about 400 nm), visible radiation (having a wavelength of about 400 nm to about 700 nm), infrared radiation (having a wavelength of about 700 nm—to about 1*106 nm), thermal radiation, and microwave radiation (having a wavelength of about 1*106 nm to about 0.1 m). In a particular embodiment, the activating radiation is ultraviolet radiation having a wavelength, or a band of wavelengths, ranging from about 200 nm to about 380 mm.
The ink composition is exposed to the activating radiation for a time period sufficient to substantially wholly bleach the ink. In embodiments, substantially complete bleaching takes place in a time period of less than about five minutes of exposure to the activating radiation. In particular embodiments, the time period of exposure to the activating radiation sufficient to substantially wholly bleach the ink is about 1 minute.
As various semiconductor materials are activated by different types of radiation, the activating radiation should be suitably chosen according to the semiconductor material species used. Alternatively, the species of semiconductor material used may be chosen depending on a desired type of activating radiation. For example, in embodiments, when the activating radiation is ultraviolet radiation, the semiconductor material is one having a band gap between about 6.6 eV and about 3.0 eV. Such semiconductor materials responsive to ultraviolet activating radiation include, for example, titanium oxides (TiO, TiO2, Ti2O3), zinc oxide (ZnO), Nb2O5 and niobium oxides, SrTiO3, SnO2, ZrO2 ZnS, α-Fe2O3, and CeO2. In other embodiments, when the activating radiation is infrared radiation, the semiconductor material is one having a band gap between about 3.0 eV and about 1.0 eV. Examples of semiconductor materials that are responsive to visible radiation include CdS, GaP, WO3, Fe2O3, CdSe, InTaO4, MoO3, WS2, MoS2, Ta2O5, and Si.
Finally, the ink may also further comprise an optional surfactant. The surfactant may enable catalytic systems such as in the present disclosure to be more efficient, by acting as a carrier of reactive radical species. In embodiments, the ink may comprise from about 1% to about 30% of a surfactant. For example, the surfactant may be, in embodiments alkyl sulfate or sulfonate salts, alkylammonium salts, alkyl esters, fatty alcohols such as cetyl or oleyl alcohol, alkyl poly(ethylene oxide) and copolymers of poly(ethylene oxide) and poly(propylene oxide) (commercially called Poloxamers or Poloxamines), alkyl polyglucosides, polyether modified polydimethylsiloxanes, having the stricture:
Figure US08303699-20121106-C00001

wherein the R groups are functional modifications, and fluorosurfactants.
The ink composition of the present disclosure, as described above, may be incorporated into a full color ink set. A full color ink set, made up of at least two inks each comprising substantially similar components but differently colored dyes, can easily be manufactured. In this way, a full color ink set comprising, for example, a cyan ink, a magenta ink, a yellow ink and a black ink can be made wherein each of the four inks, or any subset thereof, is an ink according the present disclosure containing surface functionalized photocatalytically active semiconductor nanoparticles.
The full color ink set may then be included in an ink printer. The ink printer may be any type of ink printer, such as, for example, a desktop ink-jet printer or a web offset press. In embodiments, the printer may be a conventional printer wherein the ink set of the present disclosure is substituted for a conventional ink set. In other embodiments, the printer may be a printer further including an activating radiation source such that reused documents may be both bleached and re-printed within one system. The ink may also optionally be applied to substrate using, for example, a fountain pen or felt-tip pen.
The printer may then print the ink of the present disclosure on a print substrate to create a printed document. The print substrate may be any conventional print substrate, such as white or colored paper, or clear or colored plastic.
Accordingly, a method of printing a substrate using the above described photo-erasable ink is also provided. The method includes the steps of printing a substrate using the above described ink with a first image to form a printed substrate, exposing the printed substrate to an activating radiation such that the ink is substantially wholly bleached, and then printing the substrate with a second image. In this way, an individual substrate may be reused at least two times. The above method may be repeated several times using the same substrate, although the substrate may eventually degrade as a result of becoming saturated with the ink.
The disclosure will be illustrated in greater detail with reference to the following Example, but the disclosure should not be construed as being limited thereto. In the following example, all the “parts” are given by weight unless otherwise indicated.
EXAMPLE
A first ink composition was made as a comparative example. Ink 1 was made by dissolving 15 mg of crystal violet (available commercially from Sigma-Aldrich) in 5 ml distilled water.
A second ink composition made according to the present disclosure. Ink 2 was made by dissolving 15 mg of crystal violet and 200 mg of surface functionalized titanium dioxide nanoparticles in 5 ml distilled water. The titanium dioxide nanoparticles were surface functionalized with diethylene glycol, and had a average particle size of 16 nm (as measured by dynamic light scattering).
Each ink was placed in between two glass slides to obtain a film. About half of each sample was exposed to ultraviolet light (having a wavelength of 312 nm) for about 1 minute. It was observed that the radiation exposed areas of the sample containing the nanoparticles faded completely, while there is no visible fading of the exposed area of the ink containing no nanoparticles. In this way, the surface treated titanium dioxide achieved substantially complete bleaching in a short period of time.
This demonstrates the bleaching process based on the photo-catalytic effect obtained by using invisible surface functionalized titanium dioxide nanoparticles.
It will be appreciated that various of the above-disclosed and other features and functions, or alternatives thereof, may be desirably combined into many other different systems or applications. Also, various presently unforeseen or unanticipated alternatives, modifications, variations or improvements therein may be subsequently made by those skilled in the art, and are also intended to be encompassed by the following claims.

Claims (26)

1. An ink comprising:
a dye;
a carrier; and
surface functionalized photocatalytically active semiconductor nanoparticles;
wherein the dye is substantially completely bleached by the surface functionalized photocatalytically active semiconductor nanoparticles upon exposure of the ink to an activating radiation within a time period of less than about 5 minutes.
2. The ink of claim 1, wherein the surface functionalized photocatalytically active semiconductor nanoparticles are dispersible in at least one of a carrier material selected from the group consisting of a wax, a gel, an organic solvent, an aqueous solvent, and mixtures thereof.
3. The ink of claim 2, wherein the surface functionalized photocatalytically active semiconductor nanoparticles are dispersible in an organic solvent carrier.
4. The ink of claim 1, wherein the surface functionalized photocatalytically active semiconductor nanoparticles are comprised of a material having a band gap between about 6.6 eV and about 1.0 eV.
5. The ink of claim 1, wherein the surface functionalized photocatalytically active semiconductor nanoparticles are comprised of a material selected from the group consisting of TiO, TiO2, Ti2O3, ZnO, Nb2O5, SrTiO3, SnO2, ZrO2, ZnS, α-Fe2O3, CeO2, CdS, GaP, WO3, Fe2O3, CdSe, InTaO4, MoO3, WS2, MoS2, Ta2O5, Si, and mixtures thereof.
6. The ink of claim 5, wherein the surface functionalized photocatalytically active semiconductor nanoparticles are titanium dioxide nanoparticles.
7. The ink of claim 1, wherein the surface functionalized photocatalytically active semiconductor nanoparticles are surface functionalized with one or more compounds selected from the group consisting of alcohols, diols, polyols, acrylates, acrylic acid, polyacrylates, substituted primary amines, secondary amines, carboxylic acids, trihalo-silyl groups, trialkyl-silyl groups, trialkoxy silyl groups, sulfonic acids, ethylene oxides and propylene oxides.
8. The ink of claim 1, wherein the surface functionalized photocatalytically active semiconductor nanoparticles are surface functionalized through one or more processes selected from the group consisting of direct chemical bonding, chemisorption and physisorption.
9. The ink of claim 1, wherein the surface functionalized photocatalytically active semiconductor nanoparticles are surface functionalized with an amount of a surface functionalization compound ranging from about 0.01% to about 75% of the total surface area of the semiconductor nanoparticle.
10. The ink of claim 1, wherein the surface functionalized photocatalytically active semiconductor nanoparticles comprise a doped semiconductor material.
11. The ink of claim 10, wherein the surface functionalized photocatalytically active semiconductor nanoparticles are doped with a material selected from the group consisting of silicon, silicon oxides, chromium, manganese, cobalt, nitrogen, lanthanide oxides, iron, vanadium, silver, copper, gold, carbon, fluorine and sulfur.
12. The ink of claim 1, wherein the surface functionalized photocatalytically active semiconductor nanoparticles comprise an undoped semiconductor material.
13. The ink of claim 1, wherein the ink further comprises a surfactant.
14. The ink of claim 1, wherein the surface functionalized photocatalytically active semiconductor nanoparticles have an average diameter of less than about 300 nm.
15. The ink of claim 1, wherein the surface functionalized photocatalytically active semiconductor nanoparticles have an average diameter of from about 10 nm to about 30 nm.
16. The ink of claim 1, wherein the ink is one of a liquid ink, a solid ink, a gel ink, and a radiation curable ink.
17. The ink of claim 1, wherein the activating radiation is one or more types of radiation selected from the group consisting of ultraviolet radiation, visible radiation, infrared radiation, thermal radiation, and microwave radiation.
18. The ink of claim 17, wherein the activating radiation is ultraviolet radiation having a wavelength, or a band of wavelengths, ranging from about 200 nm to about 380 nm.
19. An ink comprising:
a dye;
surface functionalized photocatalytically active titanium dioxide nanoparticles; and
an aqueous or organic solvent;
wherein the dye is substantially completely bleached by the surface functionalized photocatalytically active titanium dioxide nanoparticles upon exposure of the ink set to radiation within a time period of less than about 5 minutes; and
wherein the surface functionalized photocatalytically active titanium dioxide nanoparticles are surface functionalized with diethylene glycol.
20. A full color ink set comprising first and second inks of claim 1, wherein the first ink comprises a dye having a first color; and the second ink comprises a dye having a second color, the second color being different from the first color.
21. A printer comprising the full color ink set of claim 20.
22. A printed document wherein the ink of claim 1 is printed on a substrate.
23. The printed document of claim 22, wherein the substrate is a material selected from the group consisting of white paper, colored paper, clear plastic and colored plastic.
24. The printed document of claim 22, wherein the bleaching results in a color difference between the substrate and the ink that is less than about ΔE=5.
25. A method of printing a substrate comprising printing a substrate with the ink of claim 1 to form a printed substrate having a first printed image, exposing the printed substrate to an activating radiation such that the ink is substantially completely bleached, and then printing the substrate to form a printed substrate having a second printed image.
26. An ink comprising:
a dye;
surface functionalized photocatalytically active titanium dioxide nanoparticles; and
an organic solvent;
wherein
the dye is substantially completely bleached by the surface functionalized photocatalytically active titanium dioxide nanoparticles upon exposure of the ink set to ultraviolet radiation ranging from about 200 nm to about 380 nm within a time period of less than about 5 minutes;
the surface functionalized photocatalytically active titanium dioxide nanoparticles are surface functionalized with diethylene glycol; and
the ink comprises a weight percent of the surface functionalized photocatalytically active semiconductor nanoparticles of from about 0.5% to about 50%.
US12/103,368 2008-04-15 2008-04-15 Photo-erasable ink for full color printing Expired - Fee Related US8303699B2 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12/103,368 US8303699B2 (en) 2008-04-15 2008-04-15 Photo-erasable ink for full color printing

Applications Claiming Priority (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12/103,368 US8303699B2 (en) 2008-04-15 2008-04-15 Photo-erasable ink for full color printing
EP09153626A EP2110417A1 (en) 2008-04-15 2009-02-25 Photo-erasable ink for full color printing
JP2009093845A JP2009256676A (en) 2008-04-15 2009-04-08 Photo-erasable ink for full color printing

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20090258156A1 US20090258156A1 (en) 2009-10-15
US8303699B2 true US8303699B2 (en) 2012-11-06

Family

ID=40848714

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12/103,368 Expired - Fee Related US8303699B2 (en) 2008-04-15 2008-04-15 Photo-erasable ink for full color printing

Country Status (3)

Country Link
US (1) US8303699B2 (en)
EP (1) EP2110417A1 (en)
JP (1) JP2009256676A (en)

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20120244650A1 (en) * 2011-03-21 2012-09-27 The Board of Turstees of the Leland Stanford Junior University Air-Stable Ink for Scalable, High-Throughput Layer Deposition

Families Citing this family (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8915583B2 (en) * 2008-05-27 2014-12-23 Avery Dennison Corporation Systems, methods, and materials for temporary printing and indicia
US8289352B2 (en) * 2010-07-15 2012-10-16 HJ Laboratories, LLC Providing erasable printing with nanoparticles
FR2963016B1 (en) 2010-07-22 2013-09-27 Centre Nat Rech Scient PROCESSING THE PRINTING OF A SURFACE WITH A REVERSIBLE INK.
JP5625607B2 (en) * 2010-08-12 2014-11-19 セイコーエプソン株式会社 Ink composition and printed matter
EP2671119B1 (en) * 2011-01-31 2018-10-24 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. Liquid electrophotographic ink and method for making the same
US9315042B2 (en) 2011-06-03 2016-04-19 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. Systems for erasing an ink from a medium
US9523006B2 (en) 2011-06-03 2016-12-20 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. Erasure fluid
WO2012166160A1 (en) 2011-06-03 2012-12-06 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. Method of erasing an ink from a medium
WO2012166149A1 (en) * 2011-06-03 2012-12-06 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. Method of formulating an erasable ink
US9708497B2 (en) 2012-04-20 2017-07-18 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. Color-to-color ink bleed control on media
CN103254676B (en) * 2013-02-05 2014-07-02 陕西科技大学 Cadmium sulfide-containing two-wavelength light absorption aqueous anti-counterfeiting ink additive preparation process
CN103611170B (en) * 2013-11-21 2015-08-26 南通南京大学材料工程技术研究院 Have the W of photo-thermal therapy and CT contrast ability concurrently 18o 49the preparation method of nano-particle
CN109370313A (en) * 2018-09-10 2019-02-22 天津大学 Photocatalyst ink and preparation method thereof
US10934175B1 (en) * 2019-12-02 2021-03-02 King Saud University Method of making zinc oxide nanoparticles using red sand

Citations (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5534051A (en) * 1995-07-11 1996-07-09 Hewlett-Packard Company Specific dye set for thermal ink-jet printing
US6060223A (en) 1993-08-05 2000-05-09 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Plastic article for colored printing and method for printing on a colored plastic article
US6120839A (en) 1995-07-20 2000-09-19 E Ink Corporation Electro-osmotic displays and materials for making the same
JP2003073587A (en) 2001-08-30 2003-03-12 Sakura Color Prod Corp Ink composition erasable by light irradiation
WO2004053938A2 (en) 2002-12-09 2004-06-24 Pixelligent Technologies Llc Programmable photolithographic mask based on nano-sized semiconductor particles
WO2005014736A1 (en) 2003-08-12 2005-02-17 Mitsubishi Pencil Co., Ltd. Water-based ink composition for fine pointed ballpoint pen and fine pointed ballpoint pen
US20050191492A1 (en) 2003-09-26 2005-09-01 Nanoproducts Corporation Titanium comprising nanoparticles and related nanotechnology
US20060137841A1 (en) 2004-12-02 2006-06-29 Nippon Paper Industries Co., Ltd. Coated printing papers
US20060210798A1 (en) * 2005-03-16 2006-09-21 Clemens Burda Doped metal oxide nanoparticles and methods for making and using same
WO2007130561A2 (en) 2006-05-05 2007-11-15 E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And Company Curable white inkjet ink
US20100255215A1 (en) * 2007-10-25 2010-10-07 Jong-Soo Han Composition of Decolorable Ink and Decoloring Method

Family Cites Families (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JP4036530B2 (en) * 1998-05-27 2008-01-23 大日本塗料株式会社 Recycling method of printing substrate
ITFI20040252A1 (en) * 2004-12-06 2005-03-06 Colorobbia Italiana Spa PROCESS FOR THE PREPARATION OF TI02 DISPERSIONS IN THE FORM OF NANOPARTICLES, AND DISPERSIONS OBTAINABLE WITH THIS PROCESS

Patent Citations (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6060223A (en) 1993-08-05 2000-05-09 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Plastic article for colored printing and method for printing on a colored plastic article
US5534051A (en) * 1995-07-11 1996-07-09 Hewlett-Packard Company Specific dye set for thermal ink-jet printing
US6120839A (en) 1995-07-20 2000-09-19 E Ink Corporation Electro-osmotic displays and materials for making the same
JP2003073587A (en) 2001-08-30 2003-03-12 Sakura Color Prod Corp Ink composition erasable by light irradiation
WO2004053938A2 (en) 2002-12-09 2004-06-24 Pixelligent Technologies Llc Programmable photolithographic mask based on nano-sized semiconductor particles
WO2005014736A1 (en) 2003-08-12 2005-02-17 Mitsubishi Pencil Co., Ltd. Water-based ink composition for fine pointed ballpoint pen and fine pointed ballpoint pen
US20050191492A1 (en) 2003-09-26 2005-09-01 Nanoproducts Corporation Titanium comprising nanoparticles and related nanotechnology
US20060137841A1 (en) 2004-12-02 2006-06-29 Nippon Paper Industries Co., Ltd. Coated printing papers
US20060210798A1 (en) * 2005-03-16 2006-09-21 Clemens Burda Doped metal oxide nanoparticles and methods for making and using same
WO2007130561A2 (en) 2006-05-05 2007-11-15 E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And Company Curable white inkjet ink
US20100255215A1 (en) * 2007-10-25 2010-10-07 Jong-Soo Han Composition of Decolorable Ink and Decoloring Method

Non-Patent Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
A. Hagffeldt, M. Gratzel (1995) Chem. Rev. 95 49-68.
A. Linsebigler (1995) Chem. Rev. 95 735-758.
Database WPI Week 200333, Thomson Scientific, London, GB; AN 2003-347440, XP002537900.
M. Stylidi, D.I. Kondarides, Z.E. Verykios (2003) Appl. Catal. B 40 271.286.
P.D. Cozzoli, R. Comparelli, e. Fanizza, M.L. Curri, A. Agostiano (2003) Mater. Sci. Eng. C 23 707-713.
T. Trinidade, P. O'Brien, N.L. Pickett (2001) Chem. Mater. 13 3843-3858.
Y. Wang (2000) Water Res. 34 990-994.

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20120244650A1 (en) * 2011-03-21 2012-09-27 The Board of Turstees of the Leland Stanford Junior University Air-Stable Ink for Scalable, High-Throughput Layer Deposition
US8647897B2 (en) * 2011-03-21 2014-02-11 The Board Of Trustees Of The Leland Stanford Junior University Air-stable ink for scalable, high-throughput layer deposition

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
US20090258156A1 (en) 2009-10-15
EP2110417A1 (en) 2009-10-21
JP2009256676A (en) 2009-11-05

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US8303699B2 (en) Photo-erasable ink for full color printing
CN102585596B (en) Uv-curing type ink jet ink composite, the ink-jet recording device using it, ink jet recording method and ink group
US8142007B2 (en) Ink-jet recording method and ink composition set
KR101942589B1 (en) Photochromic security enabled ink for digital offset printing applications
CN101014670B (en) Active energy ray-curable ink composition
JP3912075B2 (en) UV-curable ink composition for inkjet recording
KR20040045395A (en) Waterfast ink jet inks containing a uv curable resin
JP5711970B2 (en) Erasable ink composition and erasing method
CN101555365A (en) Curable overcoat compositions
CN101547984A (en) Ink for inkjet applications
CN1301284A (en) Radiation curable ink jet ink compositions
CN107379803A (en) Ink jet recording method, ultraviolet curable ink, ink-jet recording apparatus
JP2006241435A (en) Ink composition, inkjet recording method, printed article, method for producing planographic printing plate and planographic printing plate
US9080071B2 (en) Inkjet ink composition and method for producing the same, inkjet recording method, pigment dispersion for inkjet ink and method for producing the same
CN104797665A (en) Ink composition for photocurable inkjet printing and printed matter
CN104231742A (en) Ultraviolet-curable aqueous ink, ink cartridge, recording apparatus and recording method
CN1791648A (en) Ink-jet recording ink, ink-jet recording method, recording medium, and ink-jet recording device
JP6376505B2 (en) Magenta ink for inkjet
JP2002179968A (en) Fluorescent ink for ink jet printer
US20070142493A1 (en) Radiation-curable inks
JP5617228B2 (en) UV-curable ink composition for inkjet recording
WO2016133171A1 (en) Ink set for ink-jet recording
TWI252245B (en) Ink composition for inkjet printing and inkjet printing method for increasing smear resistance of ink
JP2005138346A (en) Color proof formation method
TW201307405A (en) Resin composition for image formation purposes which can be used in inkjet method, and display element

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: XEROX CORPORATION, CONNECTICUT

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:CHRETTEN, MICHELLE N.;IFTIME, GABRIEL;NORSTEN, TYLER B.;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:020809/0492

Effective date: 20080409

STCF Information on status: patent grant

Free format text: PATENTED CASE

FPAY Fee payment

Year of fee payment: 4

FEPP Fee payment procedure

Free format text: MAINTENANCE FEE REMINDER MAILED (ORIGINAL EVENT CODE: REM.); ENTITY STATUS OF PATENT OWNER: LARGE ENTITY

LAPS Lapse for failure to pay maintenance fees

Free format text: PATENT EXPIRED FOR FAILURE TO PAY MAINTENANCE FEES (ORIGINAL EVENT CODE: EXP.); ENTITY STATUS OF PATENT OWNER: LARGE ENTITY

STCH Information on status: patent discontinuation

Free format text: PATENT EXPIRED DUE TO NONPAYMENT OF MAINTENANCE FEES UNDER 37 CFR 1.362

FP Lapsed due to failure to pay maintenance fee

Effective date: 20201106