US81767A - Willaed m - Google Patents

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US81767A
US81767A US81767DA US81767A US 81767 A US81767 A US 81767A US 81767D A US81767D A US 81767DA US 81767 A US81767 A US 81767A
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pipe
kettle
water
case
air
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B01PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES OR APPARATUS IN GENERAL
    • B01LCHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL LABORATORY APPARATUS FOR GENERAL USE
    • B01L3/00Containers or dishes for laboratory use, e.g. laboratory glassware; Droppers
    • B01L3/50Containers for the purpose of retaining a material to be analysed, e.g. test tubes
    • B01L3/502Containers for the purpose of retaining a material to be analysed, e.g. test tubes with fluid transport, e.g. in multi-compartment structures
    • B01L3/5027Containers for the purpose of retaining a material to be analysed, e.g. test tubes with fluid transport, e.g. in multi-compartment structures by integrated microfluidic structures, i.e. dimensions of channels and chambers are such that surface tension forces are important, e.g. lab-on-a-chip
    • B01L3/50273Containers for the purpose of retaining a material to be analysed, e.g. test tubes with fluid transport, e.g. in multi-compartment structures by integrated microfluidic structures, i.e. dimensions of channels and chambers are such that surface tension forces are important, e.g. lab-on-a-chip characterised by the means or forces applied to move the fluids

Definitions

  • dip fitlphulz breath is in time some tiniest autumn and at tip tilmt.
  • Figure 1 represents a vertical section
  • Figure 2 is an outside view
  • Figure 3 a top view.
  • the nature and object of my invention consist in a new arrangement or device for drawing off the'tailings, so as to insure an uninterrupted working of the apparatus or machine, in heating the a nalganiatingagent enclosed within an outer shell or case, bythe employment of a steam-jacket, and in so arranging the induction and eductionpipes that the amalgamator can be used either as an air-vacuum amalgamator, by the use of an air-pump, or operated entirely by water, as maybe desired or may be most convenient.
  • the outer case or shell B is made of cast iron or other suitable material, either in the form shown or in such other form as maybe desired, It made of cast iron, it will be made .in two or more parts, and secured together by suitable flanches and bolts, and made air-tight by iron filings .rusted in, or by other suitableceinent, or the parts may be ground togethenas shown.
  • the upper portion is turned at the top and carried down near the bottom of the kettle C, so as to form a funnel-shaped inlet or induction-pipe A, or such inlet-pipe may be made separate and in any other suitablefortn,
  • this inlet-pipe or chute A I attach a deflector, H, which extends out from the pipe sufficiently fanto distribute the comminuterl quartz or gold-bearing substance through the amalgamating-agent, and to prevent such substance or material from passing by the side of or against such pipe.
  • a shaft, F which is supported in place by the arms or braces G, and is provided'with a screw-thread where it passes through their connection, and at its lower end is provided with a valve or stop, I, by means of which the'flow through the inlet is regulated, controlled, or stopped, as desired.
  • an amalgamating-kettle, G which is so located that its bottomivill be near the lower end of thei nlet-pip'e audits upper edge near the top of the shell, as shown.
  • "he amalgumating agent is placed in this kettle, in a quantity sufiicient to come above the deflector H.
  • a steam-jacket, D which is made to fit as far up the kettle as may bcdcsired, and is alsoso located as to leave a spacebetween it and the case B, and is supported in place by pendants, braces, or other suitable means.
  • the apparatus is more especially adapted to the use of mercury as the amalgamatingagent, and for this purpose itmay be advisableto make the kettle of copper.
  • the application of steam is for the purpose of keeping the mercury at an elevated temperature, as in a heated condition it combines with the precious metals more readily and more rapidly, and its specific gravity in proportion tc its original bulk reduced somewhat, and to that extent is more easily operated or used in the apparatus.
  • the size of the amalgamator will depend upon its use. From two to three feet in diameter will be sufficient. When complete, it is mountedin suitable masonry, and any well-known device can be used for feeding the prepared material.
  • the quartz orother material is commiuuted in any of the machines in use for that purpose, and is fed into funnel or tube A, mixed with water, and passes from the tube into a bath of mercury, through which it rises, and passing over the upper edge of kettle C, passes down the annular space between the kettle and the shell, into the pipe E, from which-it is discharged.
  • the shell or case B when provided with pipes E, L, and A, so that itcan be operated interchangeably, either by water or by exhausting the air, substantially as specified.

Description

W. M. FULLER.
"Ore Amalgamator. No. 81,767. PatentedSept. 1, 1868.
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WILLARD M, FULLER, OF onicAeo, ILLINOIS.
Letters Patent No. 81,767, dated September 1,1868;- articulated August 28, 1868.
dip fitlphulz breath is in time some tiniest autumn and at tip tilmt.
TO ALL WHOM IT MAY CONCiERN: Be it known that I", WILLARD M. FULLER, of the city of Chicago, in the county of Cook, and State of Illinois, have inventedcertain new and useful Improvements in Amalgamators for Gold and Silver; and I do hereby declare that the following is a full, clear, and exaet deseription thereof, reference being bad to the accompanying drawings, making a part of this specification, in which i and be attached to the shell-by any well-known means.
Figure 1 represents a vertical section,
Figure 2 is an outside view, and
Figure 3 a top view. 1
Like letters refer to tho same parts in all of the figures. i
The nature and object of my invention consist in a new arrangement or device for drawing off the'tailings, so as to insure an uninterrupted working of the apparatus or machine, in heating the a nalganiatingagent enclosed within an outer shell or case, bythe employment of a steam-jacket, and in so arranging the induction and eductionpipes that the amalgamator can be used either as an air-vacuum amalgamator, by the use of an air-pump, or operated entirely by water, as maybe desired or may be most convenient. I p
;To enable others skilled in the art to make and use my invention, I will proceed to-desc ribe its construction and operation. i r r The outer case or shell B is made of cast iron or other suitable material, either in the form shown or in such other form as maybe desired, It made of cast iron, it will be made .in two or more parts, and secured together by suitable flanches and bolts, and made air-tight by iron filings .rusted in, or by other suitableceinent, or the parts may be ground togethenas shown.
The upper portion is turned at the top and carried down near the bottom of the kettle C, so as to form a funnel-shaped inlet or induction-pipe A, or such inlet-pipe may be made separate and in any other suitablefortn,
,At, the lower end of this inlet-pipe or chute A, I attach a deflector, H, which extends out from the pipe sufficiently fanto distribute the comminuterl quartz or gold-bearing substance through the amalgamating-agent, and to prevent such substance or material from passing by the side of or against such pipe. In this pipe I insert a shaft, F, which is supported in place by the arms or braces G, and is provided'with a screw-thread where it passes through their connection, and at its lower end is provided with a valve or stop, I, by means of which the'flow through the inlet is regulated, controlled, or stopped, as desired.
Inside of this case or shell I suspendor support, by suitable means, an amalgamating-kettle, G, which is so located that its bottomivill be near the lower end of thei nlet-pip'e audits upper edge near the top of the shell, as shown. "he amalgumating agent is placed in this kettle, in a quantity sufiicient to come above the deflector H. To the bottom and around this kettle is placed a steam-jacket, D, which is made to fit as far up the kettle as may bcdcsired, and is alsoso located as to leave a spacebetween it and the case B, and is supported in place by pendants, braces, or other suitable means. l
Steam is admitted through. the induction-pipe J, and passes out with the water of condensation through pipe K. i 7
At the lower point or extremity of the case B, I attach the cduction or escape-pipe E, through which the tailings are discharged. This pipe or tube is made of "considerable length, long enough-to prevent a suction of water from the tank M in case an air-pump is applied to pipe L, and also to insure the descent of the prepared material through inlet A in case pipe L is closed and water only used. v i
i The apparatus, as so far described, is more especially adapted to the use of mercury as the amalgamatingagent, and for this purpose itmay be advisableto make the kettle of copper.
The application of steam is for the purpose of keeping the mercury at an elevated temperature, as in a heated condition it combines with the precious metals more readily and more rapidly, and its specific gravity in proportion tc its original bulk reduced somewhat, and to that extent is more easily operated or used in the apparatus. i
When used with molten lead as an amalgarnating agent some changes of structure will be advisable.
It will be found best to make the kettle C apart of the shell or case, and connect the upper space with pipe E by three or four flues, for by this change'it can be operated with less fuel than will be required when they (B and are entirely disconnected.
The size of the amalgamator will depend upon its use. From two to three feet in diameter will be sufficient. When complete, it is mountedin suitable masonry, and any well-known device can be used for feeding the prepared material.
In operation, the quartz orother material is commiuuted in any of the machines in use for that purpose, and is fed into funnel or tube A, mixed with water, and passes from the tube into a bath of mercury, through which it rises, and passing over the upper edge of kettle C, passes down the annular space between the kettle and the shell, into the pipe E, from which-it is discharged.
When used with water, it will be best to let the air out at L and fill it entire, and. then it. will continue to operate without pump or other aid so long as a supply of material is furnished.
When used with'dry or heated material, water is placed in the tank M, so as to efl'ectually close the pipe E against the admission of air, and an air-pump is applied to pipe L, so as to form a vacuum suilicient to force the material through the pipe A and the amalgamating-agent,.as shown in Letters Patent heretofore granted to me on the 2d day of January and the 17th day of April, A. D. 1856.
In either case, when the material is wet or dry, or the machine operated by water or by exhausting the air, it will be found advantageous tc'have an interior kettle, and the tailings discharged over its sides and out at the bottom, for when particles are introduced, too heavy to be carried in water, or drawn oil at one side by this arrangement, they will fall over the side of the kettle and out at the bottom, so that the machine will not clog, and will operate without interruption.
It is found to be diflicult to pass sand or pulverized stone through a'tube dry, as it will clog, but the water in the tube and tank will prevent it clogging in pipe E; but to insure its perfect workingfor dry material, a rod may be run up through the tank M into pipe E.
When operated with water, no tank will be required.
Having thus fully described my invention, what I claim asnew, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is-
1 I. Discharging the tailings of an amalgamator through a conduit or outlet, the mouth of which is immersed in liquid, so that it will close such conduit against the admission of air, and at the same time afford a free and uninterrupted passage for the tailing-s, substantially as specified.
2. The steam-jacket D, in combination with the kettle or vessel G and shell or case B, substantially as described.
3. The shell or case B, when provided with pipes E, L, and A, so that itcan be operated interchangeably, either by water or by exhausting the air, substantially as specified.
4. Placing thekettle 0 within an air-tight case, B, so as to leave an annular space or flues between them, and connecting such space or flues with a discharge-pipe, E, placed below, substantially as specified.
WILLARD M. FULLER. Witnesses:
L. L. Bonn, p E. A. WEST.
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