US8007A - crosby - Google Patents

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US8007A
US8007A US8007DA US8007A US 8007 A US8007 A US 8007A US 8007D A US8007D A US 8007DA US 8007 A US8007 A US 8007A
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pins
rollers
fillet
pin
sticking
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65BMACHINES, APPARATUS OR DEVICES FOR, OR METHODS OF, PACKAGING ARTICLES OR MATERIALS; UNPACKING
    • B65B15/00Attaching articles to cards, sheets, strings, webs, or other carriers
    • B65B15/02Attaching small articles, e.g. buttons, to cards

Description

UNITED sTATEs l. o o. CROSBY, OE NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT.

MACHINE FOB`STICKING PIN`S ONT PAPER.

specification of Letieisratent No. 8,007, dated April 1, 1851. l

To' all whom imag concern:

- Be itlknown that I, CHAUNGEY O. CROSBY,

jofNew Haven, inthe county ofA New Haven,

in `the State of Connecticut, have. invented a new. and useful machine for. sticking pins crosswise` of narrow` fillets or ribbons of paper inl order for andA preparatory to winding` the llet endwise, `and so rolling, coiling, or wrapping ittogether in that direction into compact body by consecutive and suc` i the sheet,-for this is old and well known,-

cessive operations of the same machine` The nature of this machine is to receive the pins in` a promiscuous mass,that is, heads` and points `lyingin all directions `ir regularly,an d reducing them to order, `and bringing them` forward `from the shoe through. a feeding channel to a separator, which drops them separatelyf-one by one, at `regular intervals of time, into a proper channel before the punch, which thrusts forward at corresponding intervals, and at each thrust shoves a pin, pointforward, across the face, orperipheryof the large crimping roller,` which carriesthe fillet paper,-which has just passedunder `the upper or smaller crimping roller, the` two projecting `ribs around which have depressed two longitudinalfcrimps of the llet into the two channels in the face Of the large `one and the 1` i dress-makers,-and for all the various purl poses for which pins are used.4 And my macrirnps in the filletremain in their channels tothe sticking point`,or where thepin, be-` ing` thrust across theiface of thelarge crimpingf roller, pierces the two crimps and thus is stuck, or attached to the llet,-which still moves forward. `with the `face o f thel large crimpingwheel or roller, by an inter-1 niitting nivementffs'tanding still a moment at the sticking of each pin, and `progressing always ha y in the times between the stickingof each,

to the place where` the fillet, with the pins inserted in it, is coiled, or wound up, into compact body, or bodies of any convenient size, and by any ofthe devices which are common to machinists `zf--thoughlf preferto move the revolving` coil by the moving face ofthe crimpingfwheel or roller which will ethe proper superficial speed of motion."`

The pins being stuck. at right angles or transversely` across both the. fillet` and the longitudinal crilnps Orridges 1n it, and their.

bodies lying parallel to the axis of the coil,

will ofcourse presentl their heads` on the Piel-1e@ Perhaps eemimes@ little Cemex or conical) faceor facesof, the coil, on one or both edges `(as the case may be)l ofthe llet, whether it may be rolled. up, `coiled or p wrapped together in the foregolng manner, or `in other regular ways.

The novelty of my `invention consists not in sticking or inserting the pins through two parallel ridges,` crimps, or folds of paper raised crosswise of the broad sheet, the length of the pin lyinglengthwise of crimps lengthwise and the pins crosswise,`

not Of a sheen-but a narrow ribbon or llet ofpaper, not necessarily much wider than the length of a pin of suchsize as is intendi ed to be stuck in it :.-And by the old modes thepins and their heads are altogether en-l out unfolding it; and the sheets are `folded endwise'of jthe pins from both the ends of the sheet to its center, and this folding up has been hitherto performed` by hand. i But by Vmy improvedmachine and method, the fillet and pins are so" combined as aforesaid for coiling, and coiled into compact bodies or l rolls,so rendering them much more conven-` ienltly accessible for use in the toilet,-for

rbuti'on of the pins, and to their liability to.A

obstructions by trifling want of straightness, or other'small defects in them,-which Obstructions A.and interruptions are in a great `measure obviated by my separators, and

other improved arrangements hereinafter" described. i i i l Toenable Others skilled in machinery for sticking or papering pins, to make `andfuse this machine, Inow proceed to `describe the parts, construction and `operation thereof.

In the "sectional drawings hereto annexed andforming a part ofthis description- Fig-- ure l, represents a perpendicular `view or planI of` the` machine, in which A, A, show the two plates or sides of the frame; .and B, shows one of the four studs which bind the folded into'the parcel, and, inaccessible with` f frame together :-the principal parts I make of cast iron,-the frame is about two feet high and two feet wide, and about l foot deep, exclusive of the high post, which stands about two feet in the rear of the principal frame, marked E.

c, c, c, c, represent braces to sustain the high post, and connect it to the frame ;-in this, or other suitable frame the principal moving parts are,-a main shaft F, with cams and pulleys on it ,-the smallest cam is placed at g, and gives two motions to a Vleverandr urger, or lever with elbow in it,

shown at z', z', in Fig. 3 which moves a dog e, which acts upon a large ratchet-wheel H, I-I, in front of the machine, and moves it forward two notches for each revolution of F, the main shaft g-in this large ratchet wheel it is proper to have about 288 teeth or notches, or as many, or a few more, than the number of pins generally stuck in what is called a paper of pins, and for that. number the wheel may be about 2O inches diameter,-but these numbers and dimensions may be varied at discretion. The wheel is, by the dog, made to revolve with an intermitting motion,-and while it rests, a pin is stuckit. then moves forward one notch and rests, and another pin is stuck, and so on in like manner. On the shaft S, of the ratchetwheel is the large crimping wheel J, which is about the same diameter as the ratchetwheel, and about one inch thick, or broad on its face or periphery, having two channels turned around it in its face, as at 0, o, of the form of a transverse section of the fillet after it is suitably crimped. Above or upon this large crimping wheel is placed a smaller one of like breadth of face, and having two projections around it to match the depressions in the large one-the small roller is marked K, in Figs. l and 3. The fillet is crimped by running between these 'wheels as rollers, moderately pressed together, in alengthwise direction.

Vhen the first end of the fillet is entered between the crimping rollers at K, it passes onward and the ridges of pape-r are pressed into the channels of the large wheel continuously, and remain and pass on with lthe wheel to the place where the pin is stuck at which place the pin is thrust forward from the channel into which it had been dropped by the separator,-and being thrust forward across, and close in contact with, the face of the channeled crimping wheel, and under the main breadth of the fillet, while its criinps are depressed, and the pin pierces through the bases of the crnnps or ridges and so is stuck.

In this machine I have no need of clamps, bars, nor jaws to open and shut to form the crimped ridges and to hold the paper while the pins are inserted-as have been needed and used heretofore in all other kinds of pin-sticking machines ;-but

my crimping wheels or rollers, before described, press only one point at a time, which is continually moving lengthwise,-or the fillet by moving past this point forms the lines of crimped ridges. It should be further known, that the greatest pressure between the rollers should be on the middle part of the fillet, between the two ridges,- for if otherwise, it were to be pressed and -holden by its edges, the raising of the ridges might split and tear the paper.

To describe more particularly the feedingV Y parts and movements of this machina-,by which the pins are reduced to order` and brought forward through the feed channel to the separator, and by this to the place where they are dropped for sticking-I will describe the parts and their uses.

The long conical rollers R, R, extend backward and upward to the high post E, and are geared together at their upperand largest ends at X, X. and one of them has a neck bearing extending back, beyond the post, to receive a pulley by which both are moved z-these rollers may vary in dimensions,-but I make them about 2 feet long and from 1J,- to 2 inches diameter at their longest ends,-and about one half or threeeighths of an inch at their smallest ends,- with straight sides,-or regularly tapered from end to end,-and set at a small distance apart on their inner sidesbut little more than the diameter of the pin-wire, but not far enough to permit the heads of the pins to fall through between them ,-they must revolve upward upon their inner sides, tending to lift thepins, and have a moderate motion from the pulley u, u. The elevation of these rollers may vary considerably, depending on the speed at which they revolve,-and tmay be between 15o and 25 from horizontal, so that pins thrown promiscuously upon the trough-like depression between them at the higher ends-being agitated by the revolving rollers, the wire or body of them will successively fall through the free space between them, and hanging by their heads, will descend through this whole length of the channel.

I prefer the conical form of feeding rollers for several reasons as being much lbetter suited to this use than cylindric rollers would be, because I want a diminishing velocit-y in the descent of the column of pins in the feed channels,-which is the free space or opening between the rollers,-and although different degrees of elevation will produce different degrees of rapidity in the descent of the column, yetit will be accelerated or retarded alike in its whole length; and increased rotary velocity of cylindric rollers will also increase the velocity of de-v scent,-and still in like manner uniformlybut the superficial rotary velocity of conesl diminishes from the largest to the smallest were to arrange several pairs of them in suc-A ends,-and at any suitable elevation, will cause the upper part of the column to advance faster than the lower end of it, tending thereby, naturally, and of its own accord to bring the pins in the column into close order at its lower end,-which it is desirable and beneficial to do in order that the separator may be sure to have its regular supplyg-'and to do this without too much pressure on the lowest pins of the column-for if they are too much crowded anywhere in the lower: part of the column, some of them will rise up out of their regular rank in the 'column and produce "dis-` order. t y

It is also desirable and benecial to have a. wider and deeper troughl or depression between the rollers at their upper` ends, where the `pins are first fed in, or laid on in a promiscuous manner,-and there `let as many as will take their orderly position, and the whole, whether reducedto order ornot should pass oft descendingly, as soon as may be, to give place to a new supply of feed:-l

and it is desirable also thatthe trough-like depression between the rollers should be narrower and shallower below,lin`order more conveniently, tothrow off the unarranged and surplus pins, laterally over one or both of the cones ,-andthe greater part of such must be consistent with itself, and can be so, because the separator controls the number l and times of delivery of the pins.

surplus` will throwitself oby this means, where the cones are small. icial resultsarefobtained (and more might be named if necessary) by `using the conical form of rollers, which wouldV not be as well obtained by usingcylindric ones ;-v`unle`ss` I cession,-of different diameters,-`and geared to revolveat differentrates of speechand lapping like steps, one pair above anothen T 7. Harvey@ cylindric rollers maylarl-` swer his purposewell enough l for arrangt ing screw-blanks t and other similar articles,-which `have `heads but no lsharp points,-because such articles can be fenced in and'retainedV within properor assigned limits,--but pins are not easily so rest-rained because their sharp points will enter, wedgelikef under almost any fences which will permit the free motion of the rollers,especially when the motion of the rollers tends to draw the points under the `fence or fences, and by so doing thepins are liable tolodge, and make obstructions to the `feed,-which any articles not having sharp points would not do; The upper ends'of` my cones form a depression between `them large enoughto form all the hopper I need, and I use nothing like fences. l

At the lower t ends of the cones, orthe lower end of the feeding channel andf eX- tending from that point nearto the punch channel, where the pins vare droppedfor sticking, and inclining in the same direction as the feed roller, but nearer perpendicular,

All these beneseparator, which is marked a, and b, in Figs. t

l and 3, and consists of a screw a, much resembling a wood-screw, which has a sharp knife-like thread, `especially at its upper end, and the channel between its threads should be cut deep as compared with the body and thread remaining ;-yet not so deep' and broad as to permit the head of a pin to pass through it.' This screw is set a few degrees from perpendicular, inclining towardl the feed channel, and made `to revolve close to a small stud ofbrass or steel, 6,-the upper andouter corner of which stud ranges a little forward of `its nearest approximation to the screw,-this screw and stud, or the spaces between them, connect-or form a continuation and termination of` the feedchannel, and although its first `or upper thread, obstructs and prevents the decent of the column of pins above it, when the screw is not revolvingyet when it is revolving,

itwill take one pin, and only one (if it is single threaded)` at each revolution, carrying andholding as many pins as there are threads in its lengt-h, and depositing them regularly as they arerequired to be inserted or stuck; and though the train of calculation may be varied like clock-work, at the discretion of the machinist, yeteach-train t I `have arranged this machine to stick two pins at 'each turn of the main shaft, and as .the screw 1s single threaded, it revolves twice! for each turn of it, and as I use a single punch to thrust in the pins, it must t act twice for one of the main shaft,-and

the largeratchetwheel and the crimping wheel must be moved twice,'a`nd rest twice in the Sametime ,-and in like manner, differing according to different calculationswhich may be easily made and equally good.

I find it best to cut 0H' the thread of the screw, leaving only its body `or stem for about half an inch at its upper .and lower ends, so that the pin (especially its head end) may fall a little way by its own gravity from the feed channel into the separator, and also from the separator into the punchchannel, because the pins hang so that the points advance a little forward of the head ends in both of these places.

The upper end of the separator should be set a little backward and under the lower endsof the conical rollersV-.and the screw is made to revolve (outward, on t-he side near the stud) by a bevel gear, f, on the main shaft I*`,\which connects with another bevel gear d, on a shaft inclined downward,

extending? under the table,-showing, by

gearing are partially shown in side eleva' tion F ig. 2 at a and J-and also in front elevation F ig. 8 at and a.

The main shaft F, has on it the large sidecam M, which gives two motions to a turn, to the lever P, and thence moves the thrusting punch which slides between the plates at a in the channel where the pin is dropped for sticking; this punch has an endwise motion full equal to three-fourths of the length of a pin. The main shaft has also upon it a cam g, shown by dotted lines behind the main pulleys, which gives two motions to a turn, to a bent lever or elbow mark z', z', which moves the dog, which moves forward the ratchet wheel as before described. The main shaft has also upon it the pulleys s, s, which by a band, drives the under shaft D,-which shaft extends back to and by the high post E,*and on the back end of D, is a pulley which bands upward to pulley V, and drives the conical feed rollers R, R, before described.

To wind up the fillet, after it is stuck or set with the pins-it is carried onward by the large crimping roller, beyond the sticking point, or place of insertion, to any convenient place on the periphery of it, where a small shaft or spindle may be laid across the face of this roller, and the weight of the coiling spindle resting upon the face of the rollen-the first end of the fillet being slightly attached to the spindle, it will revolve by its contact with t-he face of this crimping roller, and so roll or coil the fillet into a compact body as fast as it is stuck and brought forward ,-and the movement of the face of this roller is always right for this purpose, if there is no slipping at the place of contactr-it is obvious that the ceiling spindle must be so hung as to permit it to rise from the roller as the coil accumulates, and its ra dius of course increases.

IVith this machine it may often be desirable to wind up the coils in a much larger body than the contents of a common paper of pins, with a View to re-rolling them afterwards;-by that means it can be left at work for considerable time without personal attendance, for it can be worked by water or other power as hereinbefore suggested.

There isrepresented in Fig. 3, as seen at L, a small plain hand roller to hold the fillet down to the large crimping roller, at, or very near the place where the pin is being inserted, this small roller is nearly if not altogether useless, and I generally leave it off. In the machine which I have now fully and exactly described for sticking pins crosswise of narrow fillets of paper, to pre,- pare it when so stuck, for windingg-and winding the same into coils,-there are several parts which are common, or such as have been used by others-*which I do not claim separately nor in other combinations.

I do not claim the upper feeding channel, or inclined conductors when made of straight bars,--nor cylinders with parallel sides,which have been used for conducting wood screws and similar headed articles, nor the downward curved conductors, nor any other feeding channels, unless they are combined with the conical form of rollers, or the separator.

I do not claim the crimps, nor any peculiarity in inserting the pins through them, if made crosswise of the sheet and the pins inserted lengthwise of it,-and not crosswise of both the crimps and fillet, or ridges raised in it.

I do not claim nor use any kind of crimping bars, jaws, or clamps, as they have been heretofore used. And generally I wish it to be distinctly understood thatI do not limit myself to the precise form or arrangement of parts, nor the particular devices for moving them for these may be much varied without changing the principle of my invention as set forth ,-nor do I limit myself to the single process of inserting only one pin at once, on only one edge of the fillet, for on the same principles, with only circumstantial variations ofthe machinery I can insert several pins at once on the same edge of the fillet,-or on both edges of it ;-and other similar variations can be made by any competent machinist withoutany essential or substantial variation from the character of my invention, as vherein described and setforth.

l. I do claim the conical form of rollers to constitute my feeding channel fo-r arranging the pins and moving' them forward` in the channel, with the most suitably decreasing rates of descending velocity as herein described. y

2. I do claim also as my improvement and invention, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, the combination of the parts and the adaptation of my machine for feeding the pins, separating and delivering them, crimping the fillet, and sticking the pins crosswise of such llet and finally rolling the fillet into a` coil, substantially in the manner described.

3. -I claim also the screw separator as described, placed in the feeding channel, to restrain the natural descent of the column of pins, so that they may be delivered as fast, and no faster than they are required for sticking, substantially as herein described and set forth.

C. O. CROSBY. Vitnesses:

IsAAo KELLOGG, JAMES D. WooDroRn.

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JP2011031048A (en) * 2009-08-03 2011-02-17 Tyco Healthcare Group Lp Power level transitioning in surgical instrument
JP2011121859A (en) * 2009-11-10 2011-06-23 Mitsubishi Chemicals Corp Method for producing aluminosilicate
JP2011520970A (en) * 2008-05-19 2011-07-21 オーエスアイ・フアーマスーテイカルズ・インコーポレーテツド Substituted imidazopyrazines and imidazotriazines
JP2011527786A (en) * 2008-06-30 2011-11-04 マイクロソフト コーポレーション Providing multiple levels of context for content consumed on computers and media players
JP2012514738A (en) * 2009-01-05 2012-06-28 コーニンクレッカ フィリップス エレクトロニクス エヌ ヴィ System and method for dynamic metal strain compensation of electromagnetic tracking system
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JP2012525544A (en) * 2009-04-27 2012-10-22 エマーソン プロセス マネージメント レギュレーター テクノロジーズ インコーポレイテッド Self-aligning spring seat for fluid regulator and fluid regulator with self-aligning spring seat
JP2012531936A (en) * 2009-06-29 2012-12-13 コーニンクレッカ フィリップス エレクトロニクス エヌ ヴィ Visualization of surgical trajectory
JP2012249610A (en) * 2011-06-06 2012-12-20 Kubota Corp Walking type working machine
JPWO2011086612A1 (en) * 2010-01-15 2013-05-16 パナソニック株式会社 Semiconductor device
JP2013524098A (en) * 2010-04-14 2013-06-17 スネクマ Turbomachinery rectifier
JP2013529034A (en) * 2010-05-18 2013-07-11 クゥアルコム・インコーポレイテッドQualcomm Incorporated Method and apparatus for caller number display solution for 1xCSFB
JP2013176054A (en) * 2008-11-17 2013-09-05 Qualcomm Inc Remote access to local network
JP2013538499A (en) * 2010-08-12 2013-10-10 聯發科技股▲ふん▼有限公司Mediatek Inc. Trigger method for reducing coexistence interference in mobile communication devices
JP2013541243A (en) * 2010-08-13 2013-11-07 ゼット ティー イー コーポレイションZte Corporation Method, system, and wireless communication apparatus for performing auxiliary transmission to adjacent channel
JP2013243739A (en) * 2008-04-10 2013-12-05 Qualcomm Inc Advanced interpolation techniques for motion compensation in video coding

Cited By (20)

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JP2011520970A (en) * 2008-05-19 2011-07-21 オーエスアイ・フアーマスーテイカルズ・インコーポレーテツド Substituted imidazopyrazines and imidazotriazines
JP2011527786A (en) * 2008-06-30 2011-11-04 マイクロソフト コーポレーション Providing multiple levels of context for content consumed on computers and media players
JP2013176054A (en) * 2008-11-17 2013-09-05 Qualcomm Inc Remote access to local network
JP2012514738A (en) * 2009-01-05 2012-06-28 コーニンクレッカ フィリップス エレクトロニクス エヌ ヴィ System and method for dynamic metal strain compensation of electromagnetic tracking system
JP2012516058A (en) * 2009-01-22 2012-07-12 クアルコム,インコーポレイテッド Low leakage high performance static random access memory cells using dual technology transistors.
JP2012525544A (en) * 2009-04-27 2012-10-22 エマーソン プロセス マネージメント レギュレーター テクノロジーズ インコーポレイテッド Self-aligning spring seat for fluid regulator and fluid regulator with self-aligning spring seat
JP2012531936A (en) * 2009-06-29 2012-12-13 コーニンクレッカ フィリップス エレクトロニクス エヌ ヴィ Visualization of surgical trajectory
JP2011031048A (en) * 2009-08-03 2011-02-17 Tyco Healthcare Group Lp Power level transitioning in surgical instrument
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