US7643055B2 - Motion detecting camera system - Google Patents

Motion detecting camera system Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US7643055B2
US7643055B2 US10/423,523 US42352303A US7643055B2 US 7643055 B2 US7643055 B2 US 7643055B2 US 42352303 A US42352303 A US 42352303A US 7643055 B2 US7643055 B2 US 7643055B2
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
resolution
high
camera
low
plurality
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Active, expires
Application number
US10/423,523
Other versions
US20040212677A1 (en
Inventor
John J. Uebbing
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Aptina Imaging Corp
Original Assignee
Aptina Imaging Corp
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Aptina Imaging Corp filed Critical Aptina Imaging Corp
Priority to US10/423,523 priority Critical patent/US7643055B2/en
Assigned to AGILENT TECHNOLOGIES, INC. reassignment AGILENT TECHNOLOGIES, INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: UEBBING, JOHN J.
Publication of US20040212677A1 publication Critical patent/US20040212677A1/en
Assigned to AVAGO TECHNOLOGIES GENERAL IP PTE. LTD. reassignment AVAGO TECHNOLOGIES GENERAL IP PTE. LTD. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: AGILENT TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
Assigned to AVAGO TECHNOLOGIES IMAGING IP (SINGAPORE) PTE. LTD. reassignment AVAGO TECHNOLOGIES IMAGING IP (SINGAPORE) PTE. LTD. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: AVAGO TECHNOLOGIES GENERAL IP (SINGAPORE) PTE. LTD.
Assigned to AVAGO TECHNOLOGIES SENSOR IP PTE. LTD. reassignment AVAGO TECHNOLOGIES SENSOR IP PTE. LTD. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: AVAGO TECHNOLOGIES IMAGING IP (SINGAPORE) PTE. LTD.
Assigned to MICRON TECHNOLOGY, INC. reassignment MICRON TECHNOLOGY, INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: AVAGO TECHNOLOGIES IMAGING HOLDING CORPORATION
Assigned to MICRON TECHNOLOGY, INC. reassignment MICRON TECHNOLOGY, INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: AVAGO TECHNOLOGIES IMAGING HOLDING CORPORATION
Assigned to AVAGO TECHNOLOGIES IMAGING HOLDING CORPORATION reassignment AVAGO TECHNOLOGIES IMAGING HOLDING CORPORATION ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: AVAGO TECHNOLOGIES SENSOR IP PTE. LTD.
Assigned to APTINA IMAGING CORPORATION reassignment APTINA IMAGING CORPORATION ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: MICRON TECHNOLOGY, INC.
Publication of US7643055B2 publication Critical patent/US7643055B2/en
Application granted granted Critical
Assigned to AVAGO TECHNOLOGIES GENERAL IP (SINGAPORE) PTE. LTD. reassignment AVAGO TECHNOLOGIES GENERAL IP (SINGAPORE) PTE. LTD. CORRECTIVE ASSIGNMENT TO CORRECT THE ASSIGNEE NAME PREVIOUSLY RECORDED AT REEL: 017206 FRAME: 0666. ASSIGNOR(S) HEREBY CONFIRMS THE ASSIGNMENT. Assignors: AGILENT TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
Application status is Active legal-status Critical
Adjusted expiration legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04NPICTORIAL COMMUNICATION, e.g. TELEVISION
    • H04N7/00Television systems
    • H04N7/18Closed circuit television systems, i.e. systems in which the signal is not broadcast
    • H04N7/181Closed circuit television systems, i.e. systems in which the signal is not broadcast for receiving images from a plurality of remote sources
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04NPICTORIAL COMMUNICATION, e.g. TELEVISION
    • H04N5/00Details of television systems
    • H04N5/222Studio circuitry; Studio devices; Studio equipment ; Cameras comprising an electronic image sensor, e.g. digital cameras, video cameras, TV cameras, video cameras, camcorders, webcams, camera modules for embedding in other devices, e.g. mobile phones, computers or vehicles
    • H04N5/225Television cameras ; Cameras comprising an electronic image sensor, e.g. digital cameras, video cameras, camcorders, webcams, camera modules specially adapted for being embedded in other devices, e.g. mobile phones, computers or vehicles
    • H04N5/247Arrangements of television cameras

Abstract

A camera system includes a first camera having a low-resolution image sensor with a plurality of image sensing regions. The camera system includes a plurality of high-resolution cameras. Each of the high-resolution cameras is associated with a set of the plurality of image sensing regions. The first camera is configured to detect motion based on sensed images, identify a set of the image sensing regions based on the motion, and power on the high-resolution camera associated with the identified set of image sensing regions.

Description

THE FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates generally to camera systems, and relates more particularly to a motion detecting camera system.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

For video security camera systems, it is desirable to capture high-resolution images for various reasons, such as to be able to recognize the faces of individuals appearing in the images. Security camera systems that capture high-resolution images typically consume relatively large amounts of power, and are usually not battery-powered, or if they are battery-powered, the battery life is relatively short due to the large power consumption. Some security camera systems are also configured to record at all times, rather than only when there is activity, which wastes video tape or digital recording space.

Some security camera systems use passive infrared (PIR) motion detectors to detect motion and trigger a security camera. PIR motion detectors detect radiated energy, such as energy radiated by a human or animal. PIR motion detection devices typically cost about $20, and usually draw ten to twenty milliamps at twelve volts (i.e., 120-240 milliwatts (mW)). A typical nine-volt battery offers 565 milliamp hours (mAH), which would provide about five hours of continual operation for such PIR devices—a relatively short duration.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

One form of the present invention provides a camera system including a first camera having a low-resolution image sensor with a plurality of image sensing regions. The camera system also includes a plurality of high-resolution cameras. Each of the high-resolution cameras is associated with a set of the plurality of image sensing regions. The first camera is configured to detect motion based on sensed images, identify a set of the image sensing regions based on the motion, and power on the high-resolution camera associated with the identified set of image sensing regions.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a low power security camera system according to one embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is block diagram illustrating major components of the camera system shown in FIG. 1 according to one embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 3 is a block diagram illustrating major components of the detection camera shown in FIG. 1 according to one embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 4 is a diagram illustrating pixels of the sensor array shown in FIG. 3 according to one embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 5 is a flow diagram illustrating a method for detecting motion and capturing high-resolution images based on the detected motion according to one embodiment of the present invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

In the following detailed description of the preferred embodiments, reference is made to the accompanying drawings, which form a part hereof, and in which is shown by way of illustration specific embodiments in which the invention may be practiced. It is to be understood that other embodiments may be utilized and structural or logical changes may be made without departing from the scope of the present invention. The following detailed description, therefore, is not to be taken in a limiting sense, and the scope of the present invention is defined by the appended claims.

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a low power security camera system 100 according to one embodiment of the present invention. Camera system 100 includes mounting apparatus 102, detection camera 104, and fifteen tracking cameras 106A-106O (collectively referred to as tracking cameras 106). Detection camera 104 and tracking cameras 106 are mounted on a mounting surface 114 of mounting apparatus 102. In one form of the invention, detection camera 104 and tracking cameras 106 each include a housing 110, and a lens assembly 108 attached to the housing 110.

In one form of the invention, each tracking camera 106 has a field of view of about thirty degrees horizontally and twenty degrees vertically, and tracking cameras 106 have a combined field of view of about one hundred fifty degrees by sixty degrees. In one embodiment, detection camera 104 has a field of view that encompasses the fields of view of all of the tracking cameras 106 (e.g., a field of view greater than or equal to one hundred fifty degrees by sixty degrees in one embodiment). In one form of the invention, the fields of view of adjacent tracking cameras 106 partially overlap. In other embodiments of the present invention, camera system 100 may incorporate a number of detection cameras 104 and tracking cameras 106 that is different than the number illustrated in FIG. 1, and detection camera 104 and tracking cameras 106 may have fields of view that are larger or smaller than the values provided above for one embodiment.

In one form of the invention, tracking cameras 106 are normally off to conserve power. Detection camera 104 detects when motion occurs within the field of view of camera 104, and turns on appropriate ones of the tracking cameras 106 to record high-resolution images of the event that triggered the motion detection. In one embodiment, each tracking camera 106 includes a high-resolution complimentary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor with hundreds of thousands, or millions of pixels, (e.g., a 640×480 pixel sensor), and detection camera 104 includes a low-resolution CMOS image sensor with less than 1000 pixels (e.g., a 30×12 pixel sensor). In another embodiment, the high-resolution CMOS image sensor of each tracking camera 106 is implemented with a plurality of lower resolution CMOS image sensors.

FIG. 2 is block diagram illustrating major components of the camera system 100 shown in FIG. 1 according to one embodiment of the present invention. Camera system 100 includes the detection camera 104, the fifteen tracking cameras 106, and storage media 202. As shown in FIG. 2, detection camera 104, storage media 202, and tracking cameras 106 are communicatively coupled together via communication bus 204. In one form of the invention, detection camera 104 and tracking cameras 106 output captured images to storage media 202 via communication bus 204. In one form of the invention, detection camera 104 transmits control signals to tracking cameras 106 via communication bus 204 based on detected motion, as described in further detail below. In one embodiment, the storage media 202 is positioned within mounting apparatus 102 (FIG. 1), and includes one or more devices for storing received images, such as a conventional video cassette recorder (VCR), digital video disk recorder (DVD recorder), hard disk drive, or other device for storing images.

In one form of the invention, storage media 202 is coupled to a data link 205 for transmitting stored images to a user. In one embodiment, communication link 205 is a wired communication link. In another embodiment, communication link 205 is a wireless communication link, such as a digital radio link.

In one embodiment, system 100 includes a single set of batteries 200 at the site of storage media 202 for powering detection camera 104, tracking cameras 106, and data link 205.

FIG. 3 is a block diagram illustrating major components of the detection camera 104 shown in FIG. 1 according to one embodiment of the present invention. Detection camera 104 includes lens 302, sensor array 304, motion detecting processor 306, memory 308, and input/output (I/O) interface 312. Control software 310 for controlling processor 306 is stored in memory 308. In one embodiment, memory 308 includes some type of random access memory (RAM) and non-volatile memory, but can include any known type of memory storage.

In operation, according to one embodiment, optical images within the field of view of detection camera 104 are directed by lens 302 onto sensor array 304. In one embodiment, sensor array 304 continually captures images at a programmed frame rate and digitizes the captured images. Successive digital images are compared to each other in processor 306 to identify whether motion has occurred. Motion flags are set in processor 306 when motion is detected. In one embodiment, the motion flags include location identification information that identifies where the motion occurred. Based on the motion flags, processor 306 identifies particular tracking cameras 106 to power on to record the event that triggered the motion flag.

In one embodiment, sensor array 304 is implemented with an Agilent low-power CMOS image sensor, such as the Agilent ADNS-2020 image sensor. In one embodiment, the number of frames captured per second by sensor array 304 is programmable from processor 306. Sensor array 304 can be programmed to capture any number of frames per second, up to several thousand frames per second.

In one embodiment, sensor array 304 is configured to capture one frame per second. In one form of the invention, sensor array 304 is operated primarily in a low power consumption sleep mode, and includes an internal timer (not shown) to wake the sensor array 304 once per second. Each time that sensor array 304 wakes up, the array 304 captures another image. This image is transferred to processor 306, which determines whether motion has occurred, and then sensor array 304 goes back into sleep mode if no motion has occurred. In one form of the invention, during each second of operation, sensor array 304 is in sleep mode for about nine tenths of a second, and then wakes up for about one tenth of a second to capture an image. Processor 306 compares the captured image to a previously captured image to determine whether motion has occurred. Operating sensor array 304 at a low frame rate and in the sleep mode in this manner provides significant power savings. In another embodiment, sensor array 304 is configured to capture more or less than one frame per second.

I/O interface 312 of detection camera 104 is configured to be coupled to communication bus 204 (FIG. 2) to allow detection camera 104 to communicate with storage media 202 and tracking cameras 106. In one embodiment, when processor 306 generates a motion flag, processor 306 sends a control signal to an appropriate one of the tracking cameras 106 via I/O interface 312, which causes the tracking camera 106 to be powered on and begin capturing images.

Processor 306 may use a variety of different techniques for determining whether motion has occurred. Some example motion detection techniques are described below. The motion detection techniques are generally directed at identifying changes between two images, quantifying the amount of change, and comparing the amount of change to a threshold value to determine whether the change is significant enough to generate a motion flag. In one embodiment, the threshold values used by processor 306 are user programmable, and may be set on a pixel by pixel basis, or for entire frames, depending upon the particular motion detection technique used. For example, if one or two pixels repeatedly result in the false generation of motion flags, the threshold values for those specific pixels can be set higher.

In one embodiment, motion detection is accomplished by processor 306 by comparing a newly captured sample frame with a previously captured reference frame. In one form of the invention, processor 306 calculates one or more average intensity values for each sample frame, and compares the average intensity values to values calculated for a previously captured reference frame. If the difference between the average intensity values for the two frames is greater than a predetermined threshold, processor 306 generates a motion flag. The value chosen for the threshold depends upon the desired sensitivity of motion detection. By using a relatively large threshold value, motion flags will only be generated for large movements, such as movements of a human, and motion flags will not be generated for smaller movements, such as those of small animals.

In another embodiment, motion detection is accomplished by processor 306 by comparing a sample frame with a previously captured reference frame on a pixel by pixel basis to determine whether there has been any change between the two frames.

In yet another embodiment, motion detection is accomplished by processor 306 by performing various trial shifts or translations for each frame, where all of the pixels in the frame are shifted in a certain direction. Each of the shifted frames and the original (unshifted) frame are individually correlated with a previously captured reference frame. If the original (unshifted) frame provides the best correlation with the reference frame, no motion flag is generated. If one of the shifted frames provides the best correlation with the reference frame, processor 306 creates a motion flag.

FIG. 4 is a diagram illustrating pixels of the sensor array 300 shown in FIG. 3 according to one embodiment of the present invention. Sensor array 300 includes a plurality of pixel circuits (pixels) 402. In the illustrated embodiment, sensor array 300 includes a 15×15 array of pixels 402. As shown in FIG. 4, the pixels 402 are grouped into fifteen regions 404, with each region 404 including a 3×5 sub-array of pixels 402. In one embodiment, each region 404 corresponds to one of the fifteen tracking cameras 106. In one form of the invention, the optical image portion focused onto each individual region 404 of sensor array 300 is substantially the same as the image viewed by the tracking camera 106 corresponding to that region 404. In another embodiment, multiple regions 404 correspond to a single tracking camera 106. In yet another embodiment, each region 404 corresponds to multiple tracking cameras 106.

In one embodiment, in addition to comparing or correlating digital images to identify when motion has occurred, processor 306 (FIG. 3) also identifies the particular region(s) 404 of the sensor array 300 where the motion occurred. In one form of the invention, processor 306 calculates an average intensity value for each region 404 of each captured frame. For each pair of frames, processor 306 compares the average intensity values for the reference frame with the corresponding average intensity values for the sample frame. If the difference between the average intensity value of a given region 404 in a reference frame and the average intensity value of that same region 404 in a sample frame is greater than a predetermined threshold value, processor 306 identifies that motion has occurred in that particular region 404.

In one form of the invention, each motion flag created by processor 306 includes a region identifier that identifies one or more regions 404 where motion was detected. Processor 306 powers on the tracking camera(s) 106 corresponding to the one or more regions 404 identified in the motion flag. In one embodiment, after turning on one of the tracking cameras 106, if processor 306 does not create another motion flag identifying a region 404 corresponding to that tracking camera 106 within a predetermined period of time, processor 306 sends a control signal to that tracking camera 106, causing that tracking camera 106 to be powered off.

In one embodiment, each tracking camera 106 that is powered on by processor 306 transmits high-resolution images to storage media 202 (FIG. 2), where the images are stored. By turning on appropriate tracking cameras 106 only when there is activity, as is done in one form of the invention, power consumption is reduced, and less recording space (e.g., video tape or digital recording space) is consumed, making the recorded images easier to search.

FIG. 5 is a flow diagram illustrating a method 500 for detecting motion and capturing high-resolution images based on the detected motion according to one embodiment of the present invention. In one embodiment, camera system 100 is configured to perform method 500. In step 502, detection camera 104 captures low-resolution images of the scene within its field of view. In step 504, processor 306 compares two successively captured low-resolution images. In step 508, based on the comparison in step 504, processor 306 determines whether motion has occurred. If it is determined in step 508 that no motion has occurred, the method moves to step 506. In step 506, processor 306 causes any tracking cameras 106 that are currently on to be powered off, and the method returns to step 502.

If it is determined in step 508 that motion has occurred, in step 510, processor 306 identifies a location of the motion. Based on the identified location, in step 512, processor 306 identifies one or more tracking cameras 106 corresponding to the identified location. In step 514, processor 306 causes the tracking camera(s) 106 identified in step 512 to be powered on. In step 516, if any tracking cameras 106 are currently on other than the tracking cameras identified in step 512, processor 306 powers off these tracking cameras 106. In step 518, the tracking camera(s) 106 powered on by processor 306 in step 514 begin capturing high-resolution images. The method 500 then returns to step 502.

In one form of the invention, a subset of the pixels 402 in array 300 are “masked out”, or programmed to be inactive. For example, the images directed onto some of the pixels 402 in array 300 may be from an area where motion is unlikely to occur (e.g., a ceiling in a room).

One form of the present invention provides electronic pan, zoom, and tilt (PZT) functionality, without the motors used in existing cameras that provide such functionality. For example, if an object moves across a room covered by camera system 100, the object will cross the field of view of multiple ones of the tracking cameras 106. As the object crosses the field of view of each tracking camera 106, that tracking camera 106 is turned on to capture high-resolution, zoomed-in images of the object. When the object exits the field of view of one of the tracking cameras 106, and enters the field of view of a second one of the tracking cameras 106, the first camera 106 is turned off, and the second camera 106 is turned on to continue to capture high-resolution, zoomed-in images of the object. Thus, the object is tracked by multiple high-resolution cameras 106 as it moves across the room, without the need to provide motors to change the position of the cameras 106.

It will be understood by a person of ordinary skill in the art that functions performed by camera system 100 may be implemented in hardware, software, firmware, or any combination thereof. The implementation may be via a microprocessor, programmable logic device, or state machine. Components of the present invention may reside in software on one or more computer-readable mediums. The term computer-readable medium as used herein is defined to include any kind of memory, volatile or non-volatile, such as floppy disks, hard disks, CD-ROMs, flash memory, read-only memory (ROM), and random access memory.

One form of the present invention provides a motion detecting security camera system that consumes a relatively small amount of power, and that captures high-resolution images. The security camera system of one form of the invention uses relatively low-cost and low power consumption CMOS image sensors. The camera system of one embodiment of the present invention is battery powered. One form of the present invention provides a camera system with more power savings than prior art camera systems. The power savings provided by embodiments of the present invention provide for longer battery life, and/or the ability to use smaller batteries.

One form of the present invention uses a low power, low cost, motion detector that is less expensive and consumes less power than existing motion detectors. In one embodiment, the motion detector is based on an Agilent ADNS 2020 image sensor chip operated primarily in a low power sleep mode, and consumes about 500 microamps at 3.3 volts (1.5 milliwatts), thereby providing about 386 hours of usage using a 9-volt cell, or about 11,400 hours of usage using two battery “D” cells. In one form of the invention, the low power motion detector can be optimized for a particular application to further reduce the power consumption, and provide up to about five years or more of usage from two battery “D” cells. For example, the number of gates in the image sensor chip can be reduced, and the sleep time can be increased, to further reduce power consumption.

The image sensor (e.g., ADNS 2020) used in the motion detector according to one aspect of the invention uses only a limited amount of supporting hardware (e.g., inexpensive optical lens, batteries, circuit board, and housing), thereby providing a low cost motion detecting solution. In addition, the motion detector used in one embodiment of the present invention provides better detection of smaller scene details than a typical PIR motion detector.

Although specific embodiments have been illustrated and described herein for purposes of description of the preferred embodiment, it will be appreciated by those of ordinary skill in the art that a wide variety of alternate and/or equivalent implementations may be substituted for the specific embodiments shown and described without departing from the scope of the present invention. Those with skill in the mechanical, electromechanical, electrical, and computer arts will readily appreciate that the present invention may be implemented in a very wide variety of embodiments. This application is intended to cover any adaptations or variations of the preferred embodiments discussed herein. Therefore, it is manifestly intended that this invention be limited only by the claims and the equivalents thereof.

Claims (16)

1. A camera system, comprising:
a low-resolution camera;
a plurality of high-resolution cameras, the low-resolution camera and plurality of high-resolution cameras sharing a common image sensor, a plurality of image sensing regions of the common image sensor being associated with the low-resolution camera, the low resolution camera having a lower resolution than each of the high resolution cameras such that each high-resolution camera includes a respectively different image sensing region of the plurality of image sensing regions of the common image sensor; and
wherein the low-resolution camera is configured to: (1) detect motion of an object across fields of view of a series of image sensing regions based on sensed images, (2) identify a composite region encompassing a plurality of image sensing regions associated with the detected motion of the object (3) power on individual ones of the high-resolution cameras corresponding to the composite region, and (4) power off each of the individual ones of the powered on high-resolution cameras after the object is not within the field of view of a respective image sensing region.
2. The camera system of claim 1, and further comprising:
storage media coupled to the high-resolution cameras for storing high-resolution images captured by the high-resolution cameras.
3. The camera system of claim 1, wherein the plurality of image sensing regions associated with the low-resolution camera have less than about 1000 pixels.
4. The camera system of claim 1, wherein the plurality of image sensing regions associated with the low-resolution camera have less than about 300 pixels.
5. The camera system of claim 1, wherein each of the high-resolution cameras includes at least about 300,000 respectively different pixels of the common image sensor.
6. The camera system of claim 1, wherein the common image sensor is a CMOS image sensor.
7. The camera system of claim 1, wherein the low-resolution camera has a field of view that is substantially the same as a combined field of view of the plurality of high-resolution cameras.
8. A method of automatically capturing high-resolution images of a moving object, the method comprising:
sharing a common image sensor among a low-resolution camera and a plurality of high-resolution cameras, the low resolution camera having a lower resolution than each of the high resolution cameras;
associating a plurality of image sensing regions of the common image sensor with the low-resolution camera such that each high-resolution camera includes a respectively different image sensing region of the plurality of image sensing regions of the common image sensor;
capturing, using the low-resolution camera, a plurality of low-resolution images of a scene;
detecting motion of an object across fields of view of a series of image sensing regions based on a comparison of the low-resolution images using the plurality of image sensing regions;
identifying a composite region encompassing a plurality of image sensing regions associated with the detected motion of the object;
selectively powering on individual ones of the high-resolution cameras associated with the composite region
selectively powering off each of the individual ones of the powered on high-resolution cameras after the object is not within the field of view of a respective image sensing region; and
capturing high-resolution images of the object with the powered on high-resolution cameras.
9. The method of claim 8, wherein the low-resolution camera has a first field of view, and each of the high-resolution cameras has a respective field of view that is a subset of the first field of view.
10. The method of claim 8, and further comprising:
storing the captured high-resolution images on a storage medium.
11. A low-power security camera system, comprising:
a low-resolution camera configured to capture low-resolution images of a scene, and detect motion of an object moving within the scene based on the captured images;
a plurality of high-resolution cameras, each high-resolution camera configured to capture high-resolution images of a subset of the scene; and
wherein the low-resolution camera and plurality of high-resolution cameras share a common image sensor, a plurality of image sensing regions of the common image sensor being associated with the low-resolution camera, the low resolution camera having a lower resolution than each of the high resolution cameras such that each high-resolution camera includes a respectively different image sensing region of the plurality of image sensing regions of the common image sensor, the low-resolution camera, using the plurality of associated image sensing regions to detect the motion of the object across fields of view of a series of image sensing regions based on sensed images, is configured to identify a composite region encompassing a plurality of image sensing regions associated with the detected motion of the object, to selectively power on individual ones of the high-resolution cameras corresponding to the composite region and to selectively power off each of the individual ones of the powered on high-resolution cameras after the object is not within the field of view of a respective image sensing region.
12. The camera system of claim 11, further comprising:
storage media coupled to the high-resolution cameras for storing high-resolution images captured by the high-resolution cameras.
13. The camera system of claims 11, wherein the low-resolution camera uses a portion of a CMOS image sensor with between about 250 and 1000 pixels.
14. The camera system of claim 11, wherein each of the high-resolution cameras uses a portion of an image sensor with at least about 300,00 pixels.
15. The camera system of claim 14, wherein the image sensor of each of the high-resolution cameras is a CMOS image sensor.
16. The camera system of claim 11, wherein the low-resolution camera has a field of view that is substantially the same as a combined field of view of the plurality of high-resolution cameras.
US10/423,523 2003-04-25 2003-04-25 Motion detecting camera system Active 2026-03-15 US7643055B2 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10/423,523 US7643055B2 (en) 2003-04-25 2003-04-25 Motion detecting camera system

Applications Claiming Priority (4)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10/423,523 US7643055B2 (en) 2003-04-25 2003-04-25 Motion detecting camera system
DE102004002237A DE102004002237B4 (en) 2003-04-25 2004-01-15 Motion detection camera system
GB0406035A GB2400999B (en) 2003-04-25 2004-03-17 Motion detecting camera system
JP2004125704A JP4437257B2 (en) 2003-04-25 2004-04-21 Motion detection camera system and image acquisition method

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20040212677A1 US20040212677A1 (en) 2004-10-28
US7643055B2 true US7643055B2 (en) 2010-01-05

Family

ID=32176748

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10/423,523 Active 2026-03-15 US7643055B2 (en) 2003-04-25 2003-04-25 Motion detecting camera system

Country Status (4)

Country Link
US (1) US7643055B2 (en)
JP (1) JP4437257B2 (en)
DE (1) DE102004002237B4 (en)
GB (1) GB2400999B (en)

Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20050018049A1 (en) * 2003-07-22 2005-01-27 Sony Corporation Imaging apparatus, imaging system and method thereof
US20070052803A1 (en) * 2005-09-08 2007-03-08 Objectvideo, Inc. Scanning camera-based video surveillance system
US20080024619A1 (en) * 2006-07-27 2008-01-31 Hiroaki Ono Image Processing Apparatus, Image Processing Method and Program
US20090154549A1 (en) * 2007-12-18 2009-06-18 Yang Yinxia Michael Direct mode module with motion flag precoding and methods for use therewith
US20110150434A1 (en) * 2009-12-23 2011-06-23 Empire Technology Development Llc A Pan camera controlling method
US20110176708A1 (en) * 2003-12-01 2011-07-21 Omnivision Technologies, Inc. Task-Based Imaging Systems
US20120327218A1 (en) * 2011-06-21 2012-12-27 Microsoft Corporation Resource conservation based on a region of interest
US20130188045A1 (en) * 2012-01-20 2013-07-25 Nokia Corporation High Resolution Surveillance Camera
US20150189176A1 (en) * 2013-12-30 2015-07-02 Lyve Minds, Inc. Domain aware camera system
US20160050889A1 (en) * 2014-08-21 2016-02-25 Identiflight, Llc Imaging array for bird or bat detection and identification
US20160182818A1 (en) * 2013-12-27 2016-06-23 Panasonic Intellectual Property Management Co., Ltd. Video capturing apparatus, video capturing system and video capturing method
US9583133B2 (en) 2012-06-11 2017-02-28 Sony Corporation Image generation device and image generation method for multiplexing captured images to generate an image stream
EP3282225A4 (en) * 2015-04-06 2018-12-26 Sony Corporation Control device and method, and program

Families Citing this family (59)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP1447774B1 (en) * 2003-02-13 2018-03-07 ATI Technologies Inc. Method and apparatus for sampling on a non-power-of-two pixel grid
JP2005175853A (en) * 2003-12-10 2005-06-30 Canon Inc Imaging apparatus and imaging system
WO2005089417A2 (en) * 2004-03-17 2005-09-29 Tenebreax Corporation Color images from monochromatic electro-optical channels
US7395696B2 (en) * 2004-06-07 2008-07-08 Acushnet Company Launch monitor
US7837572B2 (en) 2004-06-07 2010-11-23 Acushnet Company Launch monitor
US8475289B2 (en) * 2004-06-07 2013-07-02 Acushnet Company Launch monitor
US8556267B2 (en) 2004-06-07 2013-10-15 Acushnet Company Launch monitor
US8018489B2 (en) * 2005-02-04 2011-09-13 Mccutchen David Surveillance system
US7643056B2 (en) * 2005-03-14 2010-01-05 Aptina Imaging Corporation Motion detecting camera system
GB0507869D0 (en) * 2005-04-19 2005-05-25 Wqs Ltd Automated surveillance system
EP1900216A2 (en) * 2005-05-12 2008-03-19 Tenebraex Corporation Improved methods of creating a virtual window
JP2007019621A (en) * 2005-07-05 2007-01-25 Fujinon Corp Lens system
EP1748378B1 (en) * 2005-07-26 2009-09-16 Canon Kabushiki Kaisha Image capturing apparatus and image capturing method
JP2007049222A (en) 2005-08-05 2007-02-22 Canon Inc Imaging apparatus and method
US7777781B2 (en) * 2005-08-26 2010-08-17 Avago Technologies Ecbu Ip (Singapore) Pte. Ltd. Method and system for determining the motion of an imaging apparatus
JP2007116208A (en) * 2005-10-17 2007-05-10 Funai Electric Co Ltd Compound eye imaging apparatus
US8072493B2 (en) * 2005-11-03 2011-12-06 Barry Stuecker Security system
US20070126867A1 (en) * 2005-12-02 2007-06-07 Mccutchen David High resolution surveillance camera
KR101198157B1 (en) * 2005-12-22 2012-11-12 엘지전자 주식회사 Method for changing record frame rate in digital video recorder and reproducing method therof
JP4836633B2 (en) * 2006-03-31 2011-12-14 株式会社東芝 Face authentication device, face authentication method, and entrance / exit management device
JP4650367B2 (en) * 2006-07-26 2011-03-16 船井電機株式会社 Motion detection imaging device
US8013895B2 (en) 2006-08-07 2011-09-06 Avago Technologies General Ip (Singapore) Pte. Ltd. Optical motion sensing
US8446509B2 (en) * 2006-08-09 2013-05-21 Tenebraex Corporation Methods of creating a virtual window
US8775452B2 (en) 2006-09-17 2014-07-08 Nokia Corporation Method, apparatus and computer program product for providing standard real world to virtual world links
US20080267504A1 (en) * 2007-04-24 2008-10-30 Nokia Corporation Method, device and computer program product for integrating code-based and optical character recognition technologies into a mobile visual search
US20080268876A1 (en) * 2007-04-24 2008-10-30 Natasha Gelfand Method, Device, Mobile Terminal, and Computer Program Product for a Point of Interest Based Scheme for Improving Mobile Visual Searching Functionalities
US20080267521A1 (en) * 2007-04-24 2008-10-30 Nokia Corporation Motion and image quality monitor
US8233094B2 (en) * 2007-05-24 2012-07-31 Aptina Imaging Corporation Methods, systems and apparatuses for motion detection using auto-focus statistics
US20100283843A1 (en) * 2007-07-17 2010-11-11 Yang Cai Multiple resolution video network with eye tracking based control
US20090290033A1 (en) * 2007-11-16 2009-11-26 Tenebraex Corporation Systems and methods of creating a virtual window
US8564640B2 (en) * 2007-11-16 2013-10-22 Tenebraex Corporation Systems and methods of creating a virtual window
US8791984B2 (en) * 2007-11-16 2014-07-29 Scallop Imaging, Llc Digital security camera
US8041077B2 (en) * 2007-12-18 2011-10-18 Robert Bosch Gmbh Method of motion detection and autonomous motion tracking using dynamic sensitivity masks in a pan-tilt camera
WO2009123705A2 (en) * 2008-03-31 2009-10-08 Tenebraex Corporation Systems and methods of creating a virtual window
TW200951884A (en) * 2008-06-02 2009-12-16 Asia Optical Co Inc Monitoring systems and control methods thereof
US9141862B2 (en) * 2008-09-26 2015-09-22 Harris Corporation Unattended surveillance device and associated methods
US8633894B1 (en) 2008-10-15 2014-01-21 Marvell International Ltd. Folded focal length optics for an optical movement sensor
US8788977B2 (en) 2008-11-20 2014-07-22 Amazon Technologies, Inc. Movement recognition as input mechanism
JP5205303B2 (en) * 2009-02-25 2013-06-05 株式会社日立製作所 Monitoring system and monitoring device
US20110069148A1 (en) * 2009-09-22 2011-03-24 Tenebraex Corporation Systems and methods for correcting images in a multi-sensor system
US9049663B2 (en) * 2010-12-10 2015-06-02 Qualcomm Incorporated Processing involving multiple sensors
US9177988B2 (en) 2011-12-16 2015-11-03 Chromatra, Llc. Systems and methods for creating full-color image in low light
TW201419036A (en) * 2012-11-06 2014-05-16 Pixart Imaging Inc Sensor array and method of controlling sensing device and related electronic apparatus
US9325792B2 (en) * 2012-11-07 2016-04-26 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Aggregation framework using low-power alert sensor
US20140282868A1 (en) * 2013-03-15 2014-09-18 Micah Sheller Method And Apparatus To Effect Re-Authentication
US9590966B2 (en) * 2013-03-15 2017-03-07 Intel Corporation Reducing authentication confidence over time based on user history
US9282265B2 (en) * 2013-09-09 2016-03-08 Omnivision Technologies, Inc. Camera devices and systems based on a single image sensor and methods for manufacturing the same
CN104516474B (en) * 2013-10-08 2017-12-26 联想(北京)有限公司 An information processing method and an electronic device
US9348405B2 (en) * 2013-12-24 2016-05-24 Intel Corporation Systems and techniques for control of storage device power states
US9560273B2 (en) * 2014-02-21 2017-01-31 Apple Inc. Wearable information system having at least one camera
US9609234B1 (en) * 2014-12-24 2017-03-28 Vecna Technologies, Inc. Camera module and operating method
JP2016178348A (en) * 2015-03-18 2016-10-06 キヤノン株式会社 Information processing device, control method therefor and program
US9716876B2 (en) * 2015-04-01 2017-07-25 Sony Corporation Power efficient multiple camera system
US9800866B2 (en) * 2015-04-08 2017-10-24 Algolux Inc. Method for providing an estimation of a point spread function indicative of intrinsic camera blur
US9743013B1 (en) * 2015-06-05 2017-08-22 Kontek Industries, Inc Security systems having evasive sensors
US10419540B2 (en) 2015-10-05 2019-09-17 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Architecture for internet of things
WO2018106716A2 (en) * 2016-12-09 2018-06-14 Ring Inc Audio/video recording and communication devices with multiple cameras
WO2018129063A1 (en) * 2017-01-03 2018-07-12 Ring Inc. Streaming video from audio/video recording and communication devices
WO2018132839A1 (en) * 2017-01-16 2018-07-19 Ring Inc. Audio/video recording and communication devices in network communication with additional cameras

Citations (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JPS62265880A (en) 1986-05-13 1987-11-18 Sony Corp Monitor device
US5365597A (en) * 1993-06-11 1994-11-15 United Parcel Service Of America, Inc. Method and apparatus for passive autoranging using relaxation
US5434617A (en) * 1993-01-29 1995-07-18 Bell Communications Research, Inc. Automatic tracking camera control system
JPH08317378A (en) 1995-05-19 1996-11-29 Fujitsu General Ltd Video camera switching device
WO1998008208A2 (en) 1996-08-22 1998-02-26 Footfall Limited Video imaging systems
JPH10191304A (en) 1996-12-26 1998-07-21 Matsushita Electric Ind Co Ltd Supervisory system using moving image signal coder
EP0889452A2 (en) 1997-07-02 1999-01-07 Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. Remote monitoring system and method
US5898459A (en) * 1997-03-26 1999-04-27 Lectrolarm Custom Systems, Inc. Multi-camera programmable pan-and-tilt apparatus
US6028626A (en) * 1995-01-03 2000-02-22 Arc Incorporated Abnormality detection and surveillance system
US6079862A (en) * 1996-02-22 2000-06-27 Matsushita Electric Works, Ltd. Automatic tracking lighting equipment, lighting controller and tracking apparatus
US6215519B1 (en) * 1998-03-04 2001-04-10 The Trustees Of Columbia University In The City Of New York Combined wide angle and narrow angle imaging system and method for surveillance and monitoring
US6295064B1 (en) * 1997-04-03 2001-09-25 Konami Co., Ltd. Image perspective control for video game images
US6326994B1 (en) * 1997-01-22 2001-12-04 Sony Corporation Matched field-of-view stereographic imaging apparatus
US6392694B1 (en) * 1998-11-03 2002-05-21 Telcordia Technologies, Inc. Method and apparatus for an automatic camera selection system
US6392632B1 (en) * 1998-12-08 2002-05-21 Windbond Electronics, Corp. Optical mouse having an integrated camera
US6473122B1 (en) * 1999-12-06 2002-10-29 Hemanth G. Kanekal Method and apparatus to capture high resolution images using low resolution sensors and optical spatial image sampling
GB2378339A (en) 2001-07-31 2003-02-05 Hewlett Packard Co Predictive control of multiple image capture devices.
US20030071891A1 (en) * 2001-08-09 2003-04-17 Geng Z. Jason Method and apparatus for an omni-directional video surveillance system
US20030095186A1 (en) * 1998-11-20 2003-05-22 Aman James A. Optimizations for live event, real-time, 3D object tracking
US6646264B1 (en) * 2000-10-30 2003-11-11 Monsanto Technology Llc Methods and devices for analyzing agricultural products
US20040001149A1 (en) * 2002-06-28 2004-01-01 Smith Steven Winn Dual-mode surveillance system
US6677979B1 (en) * 2001-06-12 2004-01-13 Cisco Technology, Inc. Method and apparatus for dual image video teleconferencing
US6677990B1 (en) * 1993-07-27 2004-01-13 Canon Kabushiki Kaisha Control device for image input apparatus

Family Cites Families (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JP2004515251A (en) * 2000-12-19 2004-05-27 ファゲテック,インコーポレイティド Staphylococcus aureus essential gene and compositions and methods associated with the encoded protein staau_r9
US7130490B2 (en) * 2001-05-14 2006-10-31 Elder James H Attentive panoramic visual sensor
JP2005181355A (en) * 2003-12-15 2005-07-07 Canon Inc Imaging apparatus
JP4710648B2 (en) * 2006-02-23 2011-06-29 オムロン株式会社 Safety switch
CN104093031B (en) * 2006-10-16 2018-07-20 诺基亚技术有限公司 Implement the system and method for decoded buffer management in multiple view video coding
EP2587706B1 (en) * 2007-10-23 2018-03-07 Nokia Technologies Oy Improved re-transmission capability in semi-persistent transmission

Patent Citations (25)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JPS62265880A (en) 1986-05-13 1987-11-18 Sony Corp Monitor device
US5434617A (en) * 1993-01-29 1995-07-18 Bell Communications Research, Inc. Automatic tracking camera control system
US5365597A (en) * 1993-06-11 1994-11-15 United Parcel Service Of America, Inc. Method and apparatus for passive autoranging using relaxation
US6677990B1 (en) * 1993-07-27 2004-01-13 Canon Kabushiki Kaisha Control device for image input apparatus
US6028626A (en) * 1995-01-03 2000-02-22 Arc Incorporated Abnormality detection and surveillance system
JPH08317378A (en) 1995-05-19 1996-11-29 Fujitsu General Ltd Video camera switching device
US6079862A (en) * 1996-02-22 2000-06-27 Matsushita Electric Works, Ltd. Automatic tracking lighting equipment, lighting controller and tracking apparatus
WO1998008208A2 (en) 1996-08-22 1998-02-26 Footfall Limited Video imaging systems
JPH10191304A (en) 1996-12-26 1998-07-21 Matsushita Electric Ind Co Ltd Supervisory system using moving image signal coder
US6326994B1 (en) * 1997-01-22 2001-12-04 Sony Corporation Matched field-of-view stereographic imaging apparatus
US5898459A (en) * 1997-03-26 1999-04-27 Lectrolarm Custom Systems, Inc. Multi-camera programmable pan-and-tilt apparatus
US6295064B1 (en) * 1997-04-03 2001-09-25 Konami Co., Ltd. Image perspective control for video game images
EP0889452A2 (en) 1997-07-02 1999-01-07 Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. Remote monitoring system and method
US6215519B1 (en) * 1998-03-04 2001-04-10 The Trustees Of Columbia University In The City Of New York Combined wide angle and narrow angle imaging system and method for surveillance and monitoring
US6392694B1 (en) * 1998-11-03 2002-05-21 Telcordia Technologies, Inc. Method and apparatus for an automatic camera selection system
US20030095186A1 (en) * 1998-11-20 2003-05-22 Aman James A. Optimizations for live event, real-time, 3D object tracking
US6392632B1 (en) * 1998-12-08 2002-05-21 Windbond Electronics, Corp. Optical mouse having an integrated camera
US6473122B1 (en) * 1999-12-06 2002-10-29 Hemanth G. Kanekal Method and apparatus to capture high resolution images using low resolution sensors and optical spatial image sampling
US6646264B1 (en) * 2000-10-30 2003-11-11 Monsanto Technology Llc Methods and devices for analyzing agricultural products
US6677979B1 (en) * 2001-06-12 2004-01-13 Cisco Technology, Inc. Method and apparatus for dual image video teleconferencing
GB2379354A (en) 2001-07-31 2003-03-05 Hewlett Packard Co Monitoring system with motion-dependent resolution selection
GB2378339A (en) 2001-07-31 2003-02-05 Hewlett Packard Co Predictive control of multiple image capture devices.
US20030025800A1 (en) * 2001-07-31 2003-02-06 Hunter Andrew Arthur Control of multiple image capture devices
US20030071891A1 (en) * 2001-08-09 2003-04-17 Geng Z. Jason Method and apparatus for an omni-directional video surveillance system
US20040001149A1 (en) * 2002-06-28 2004-01-01 Smith Steven Winn Dual-mode surveillance system

Non-Patent Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
Agilent data sheet entitled "Agilent ADNS 2030 Low Power Optical Mouse Sensor"; Mar. 12, 2003; 36 pgs.
Agilent product information and literature webpage entitled "ADNS-2030 High-Performance, Low Power Optical Mouse Sensor (Optimized for Cordless Mouse Applications)"; 2000; 2 pgs.
Agilent product information packet entitled "Optical Mice and How They Work"; Nov. 5, 2001; 4 pgs.
Agilent product overview entitled "Agilent ADNA-2030 Optical Mouse Sensor"; Mar. 10, 2003; 4 pgs.
Examiner of JPO Suzuki, Akira, Notice of Rejection Ground for Japanese patent application No. 2004-125704 and English Translation, Japanese Patent Office, Jul. 21, 2009, pp.1-2, JPO, Japan.
MCM Electronics homepage (www.mcmelectronics.com); Apr. 25, 2003; 1 pg.
MCM Electronics product catalog; pp. 564-565.

Cited By (24)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8144763B2 (en) * 2003-07-22 2012-03-27 Sony Corporation Imaging apparatus, imaging system and method thereof
US20050018049A1 (en) * 2003-07-22 2005-01-27 Sony Corporation Imaging apparatus, imaging system and method thereof
US20110176708A1 (en) * 2003-12-01 2011-07-21 Omnivision Technologies, Inc. Task-Based Imaging Systems
US8760516B2 (en) * 2003-12-01 2014-06-24 Omnivision Technologies, Inc. Task-based imaging systems
US20070052803A1 (en) * 2005-09-08 2007-03-08 Objectvideo, Inc. Scanning camera-based video surveillance system
US9805566B2 (en) * 2005-09-08 2017-10-31 Avigilon Fortress Corporation Scanning camera-based video surveillance system
US20160321888A1 (en) * 2005-09-08 2016-11-03 Avigilon Fortress Corporation Scanning camera-based video surveillance system
US9363487B2 (en) * 2005-09-08 2016-06-07 Avigilon Fortress Corporation Scanning camera-based video surveillance system
US20080024619A1 (en) * 2006-07-27 2008-01-31 Hiroaki Ono Image Processing Apparatus, Image Processing Method and Program
US8564679B2 (en) * 2006-07-27 2013-10-22 Sony Corporation Image processing apparatus, image processing method and program
US8885061B2 (en) 2006-07-27 2014-11-11 Sony Corporation Image processing apparatus, image processing method and program
US8743952B2 (en) * 2007-12-18 2014-06-03 Vixs Systems, Inc Direct mode module with motion flag precoding and methods for use therewith
US20090154549A1 (en) * 2007-12-18 2009-06-18 Yang Yinxia Michael Direct mode module with motion flag precoding and methods for use therewith
US20110150434A1 (en) * 2009-12-23 2011-06-23 Empire Technology Development Llc A Pan camera controlling method
US20120327218A1 (en) * 2011-06-21 2012-12-27 Microsoft Corporation Resource conservation based on a region of interest
US20130188045A1 (en) * 2012-01-20 2013-07-25 Nokia Corporation High Resolution Surveillance Camera
US9583133B2 (en) 2012-06-11 2017-02-28 Sony Corporation Image generation device and image generation method for multiplexing captured images to generate an image stream
US9826146B2 (en) * 2013-12-27 2017-11-21 Panasonic Intellectual Property Management Co., Ltd. Video capturing apparatus, video capturing system and video capturing method
US20160182818A1 (en) * 2013-12-27 2016-06-23 Panasonic Intellectual Property Management Co., Ltd. Video capturing apparatus, video capturing system and video capturing method
US20150189176A1 (en) * 2013-12-30 2015-07-02 Lyve Minds, Inc. Domain aware camera system
US20160050889A1 (en) * 2014-08-21 2016-02-25 Identiflight, Llc Imaging array for bird or bat detection and identification
US9856856B2 (en) * 2014-08-21 2018-01-02 Identiflight International, Llc Imaging array for bird or bat detection and identification
US20180163700A1 (en) * 2014-08-21 2018-06-14 Identiflight International, Llc Imaging array for bird or bat detection and identification
EP3282225A4 (en) * 2015-04-06 2018-12-26 Sony Corporation Control device and method, and program

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
DE102004002237A1 (en) 2004-11-25
GB2400999B (en) 2006-08-23
GB2400999A (en) 2004-10-27
DE102004002237B4 (en) 2007-03-01
GB0406035D0 (en) 2004-04-21
US20040212677A1 (en) 2004-10-28
JP4437257B2 (en) 2010-03-24
JP2004328736A (en) 2004-11-18

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
EP1433148B1 (en) Automatic shut-off light system when user sleeps
US10006896B2 (en) Method, apparatus and system for food intake and physical activity assessment
CA2325635C (en) Efficient pre-alarm buffer management
US6700605B1 (en) Apparatus for monitoring
US7088387B1 (en) Video recording device responsive to triggering event
US7507946B2 (en) Network sensor system and protocol
US7158167B1 (en) Video recording device for a targetable weapon
JP5143212B2 (en) Method and apparatus for modeling behavior using probability distribution functions
Tabar et al. Smart home care network using sensor fusion and distributed vision-based reasoning
Downes et al. Development of a mote for wireless image sensor networks
US7038820B1 (en) Automatic exposure control for an image sensor
US20030052985A1 (en) Image processing apparatus, image processing method and record medium having program computer-readably recorded therein
US6246321B1 (en) Movement detector
CN100337253C (en) Video tripwire
US6421080B1 (en) Digital surveillance system with pre-event recording
US20090195382A1 (en) Video sensor and alarm system and method with object and event classification
CN102089770B (en) Apparatus and method of classifying movement of objects in a monitoring zone
US20080030302A1 (en) Finger sensing device with low power finger detection and associated methods
US7158022B2 (en) Automated diagnoses and prediction in a physical security surveillance system
LiKamWa et al. Energy characterization and optimization of image sensing toward continuous mobile vision
CN101325694B (en) System and method for monitoring intelligent video combining wireless radio frequency recognition technique
US6665805B1 (en) Method and apparatus for real time monitoring of user presence to prolong a portable computer battery operation time
US20140247360A1 (en) Image surveillance and reporting technology
CA2179801C (en) Security sensor arrangement with overlapping fields of view
US7211802B1 (en) X-ray impingement event detection system and method for a digital radiography detector

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: AGILENT TECHNOLOGIES, INC., COLORADO

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:UEBBING, JOHN J.;REEL/FRAME:013884/0397

Effective date: 20030424

AS Assignment

Owner name: AVAGO TECHNOLOGIES GENERAL IP PTE. LTD., SINGAPORE

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:AGILENT TECHNOLOGIES, INC.;REEL/FRAME:017206/0666

Effective date: 20051201

Owner name: AVAGO TECHNOLOGIES GENERAL IP PTE. LTD.,SINGAPORE

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:AGILENT TECHNOLOGIES, INC.;REEL/FRAME:017206/0666

Effective date: 20051201

AS Assignment

Owner name: AVAGO TECHNOLOGIES SENSOR IP PTE. LTD., SINGAPORE

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:AVAGO TECHNOLOGIES IMAGING IP (SINGAPORE) PTE. LTD.;REEL/FRAME:017675/0691

Effective date: 20060430

Owner name: AVAGO TECHNOLOGIES IMAGING IP (SINGAPORE) PTE. LTD

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:AVAGO TECHNOLOGIES GENERAL IP (SINGAPORE) PTE. LTD.;REEL/FRAME:017675/0738

Effective date: 20060127

Owner name: AVAGO TECHNOLOGIES SENSOR IP PTE. LTD.,SINGAPORE

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:AVAGO TECHNOLOGIES IMAGING IP (SINGAPORE) PTE. LTD.;REEL/FRAME:017675/0691

Effective date: 20060430

AS Assignment

Owner name: MICRON TECHNOLOGY, INC., IDAHO

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:AVAGO TECHNOLOGIES IMAGING HOLDING CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:018757/0159

Effective date: 20061206

Owner name: MICRON TECHNOLOGY, INC.,IDAHO

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:AVAGO TECHNOLOGIES IMAGING HOLDING CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:018757/0159

Effective date: 20061206

XAS Not any more in us assignment database

Free format text: CORRECTED COVER SHEET TO ADD PORTION OF THE PAGE THAT WAS PREVIOUSLY OMITTED FROM THE NOTICE AT REEL/FRAME 018757/0183 (ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNOR'S INTEREST);ASSIGNOR:AVAGO TECHNOLOGIES IMAGING HOLDING CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:019028/0237

AS Assignment

Owner name: MICRON TECHNOLOGY, INC., IDAHO

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:AVAGO TECHNOLOGIES IMAGING HOLDING CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:019407/0441

Effective date: 20061206

Owner name: MICRON TECHNOLOGY, INC.,IDAHO

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:AVAGO TECHNOLOGIES IMAGING HOLDING CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:019407/0441

Effective date: 20061206

AS Assignment

Owner name: AVAGO TECHNOLOGIES IMAGING HOLDING CORPORATION, MA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:AVAGO TECHNOLOGIES SENSOR IP PTE. LTD.;REEL/FRAME:022509/0487

Effective date: 20061122

Owner name: APTINA IMAGING CORPORATION, CAYMAN ISLANDS

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:MICRON TECHNOLOGY, INC.;REEL/FRAME:022507/0395

Effective date: 20081003

STCF Information on status: patent grant

Free format text: PATENTED CASE

FPAY Fee payment

Year of fee payment: 4

AS Assignment

Owner name: AVAGO TECHNOLOGIES GENERAL IP (SINGAPORE) PTE. LTD

Free format text: CORRECTIVE ASSIGNMENT TO CORRECT THE ASSIGNEE NAME PREVIOUSLY RECORDED AT REEL: 017206 FRAME: 0666. ASSIGNOR(S) HEREBY CONFIRMS THE ASSIGNMENT;ASSIGNOR:AGILENT TECHNOLOGIES, INC.;REEL/FRAME:038632/0662

Effective date: 20051201

FPAY Fee payment

Year of fee payment: 8