US746977A - Electric railway signaling system. - Google Patents

Electric railway signaling system. Download PDF

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US746977A
US746977A US16279203A US1903162792A US746977A US 746977 A US746977 A US 746977A US 16279203 A US16279203 A US 16279203A US 1903162792 A US1903162792 A US 1903162792A US 746977 A US746977 A US 746977A
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conductor
rails
rail
contact
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Charles W Mills
William W Piddington
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Charles W Mills
William W Piddington
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B61RAILWAYS
    • B61LGUIDING RAILWAY TRAFFIC; ENSURING THE SAFETY OF RAILWAY TRAFFIC
    • B61L3/00Devices along the route for controlling devices on the vehicle or vehicle train, e.g. to release brake, to operate a warning signal
    • B61L3/16Continuous control along the route
    • B61L3/18Continuous control along the route using electric current passing between devices along the route and devices on the vehicle or vehicle train
    • B61L3/185Continuous control along the route using electric current passing between devices along the route and devices on the vehicle or vehicle train using separate conductors

Description

V PATENTED DEC. 15, 1903-. C. W. MILLS A: W. W. PIDDINGTON. I ELECTRIC RAILWAY SIGNALING SYSTEM;
APPLICATION FILED JUNE 23, 19-03. NO MODEL. ZSHEBTS-QJIEBT 1.
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No. 746,977. 1 'PATBNTED DEC. 15, 1903.
C. W. MILLS & W. W. PIDDINGTON-, ELECTRIC RAILWAY SIGNALING SYSTEM. APLmATmN IILBD JUNE 23, 1903.
2 8HEETS-SHEBT 2.
N0 MODEL.
T "cams PETERS co Facts-unis. wumuqmu, n c
NlTED STATES iatented December 15, 1903.
CHARLES 'W. MILLS AND WILLIAM W. PIDDINGTON, OF LOS ANGELES,
CALIFORNIA.
ELECTRICRAILWAY-SIGNALING SYSTEM.
, srnornrcn'rron forming part of Letters Patent No. 746,977, dated December 15, 1903.
Application filed June 23, 1903. Serial No. 162,792. (No model.)
To all whom it may concern.-
Be it known that we,'GHARLES W. MILLS and WILLIAM W. PIDDINGTON, citizens of the United States, residing at Los Angeles, in the county of LosAngeles and State of California, have invented new and useful Improvements in Electric Railway Signaling Systems, of which the following is a specification.
This invention relates to an electric railway signaling system, and is in the nature of an improvement upon an invention for which we filed an application for United States Letters Patent on the 14th day of July, 1902, Serial No. 115,539. In said application we described a novel arrangement whereby as two trains approach one anotherin the same block or section of a single track the engineers of the respective trains are automatically notified of the approach of the other train in the same block or system. In. the same application was also described means for automatgiving a visual signal to indicate to the engiuser in charge of the locomotive when the track is clear and therefore when it is safe for him to run over any particular block or section of the rails.
It has for another object to provide novel.
means for indicating when it will be perfectly safe for a train to run from a siding onto the main track. V
It has for a further object to provide autoinatic indicating mechanism to give warning to the engineer in charge of atrain approaching a-certain point on the main line when a car or train has been improperly switched from the main track onto a siding.
I It also has for its object to provide certain other improvements which will be made apparent in the description hereinafter following.
To these ends the invention consists in the features and in the construction, arrangement, and combination of parts hereinafter described, and particularly defined in the claims following the description, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, forming a part of this specification, wherein- Figure 1 is a diagrammaticview of our improved signaling system, illustrating two trains approaching one another in the same block or track-section. Fig. 2 is a similar view showing a switchor turnout. Fig. 3 is a detail sectional view illustrating theduplex conductor and the contacts carried by a locomotive for effecting electrical contact with said conductor.
In the application. for patent referred to we described an arrangement of parts so organized that when two trains approached one another in the same block or track-section the engineers of the respective'trains were enabled, by means of suitable signals, to determine the location of the other train, and in said application the-signalingsystem was illustrated as being employed in connection with a steam-railway inwhich the signals were situated in thecabs of the locomotives and consisted in each cab of a green and red lamp. The arrangement was such that as two trains approached one another in the same block the red lamps in the cabs were simultaneouslyflashed, indicating to the engineers that there was danger ahead,and when one train followed another in the same block the green lamp in the foremost engine was flashed,=while'the red lamp in the following engine was simnltaneously'tlashed. We also showed anddescribed in said. application for patent telephonic apparatus which was adapted to be put into circuit and by means of which the engineer on one train could communicate with the engineer on the'other train, so as to instruct him to take a'siding or to transmit to him other communications or orders. In said invention we employed the rails of the railway to form a part of the conducting system and also a duplex conductor, which was coextensive with the rails and for the sake of convenience was arranged midway between the same, and in connection therewith contact members carried by the 10- comotive cab and consisting of contactwheels which were in constant electrical contact with the duplex conductor.
All the parts referred to we employ in the present invention, and in addition thereto we also employ the novel features which will hereinafter be described.
Referring to Fig. 1 of the drawings, the numerals 1 and 2 indicate, respectively, the track-rails. One of the rails of the track is divided up at suitable points into sections separated from one another by suitable insulations 3, the rails of the tracks constituting a part of the conductors for carrying the currents to operate the signals in the cabs of the locomotives traveling on the track. Form-- ing a part of the circuit which includes the rails 1 and 2 is a duplex conductor, (denoted in a general way by the numeral 4,) which is preferably arranged midway between the track-rails and comprises a wooden stringer 5, having secured to its upper opposite edges two parallel metallic strips 6 and 7, which form electrical conductors, said strips being separated and insulated at suitable points, as indicated at 8 in Fig. 1 of the drawings.
On the bottom of the cab of each locomotive are arranged two contacts 9 and 10,consisting of wheels that are arranged to have respectively a rolling contact with the metallic strips 6 and 7 and are fixed on a metallic shaft 11, which is journaled in yielding bearings 12, movably mounted in pendent hangers 13, suspended from the bottom of the cab. The said contact-wheels are arranged to engage at all times the contact-strips 6 and 7 of the duplex conductor. The adjacent ends of the conductor strips 6 and 7 at the points where they are separated are connected together by resistances 14 and 15, and one of the rails of the track -sectionsuch as 1, for example-in each section or blockis connected by a crossover-wire 16 to one of the conductorstrips, such as 7, and the same rail of the adjacent track-section is connected to the conductor-strip 6 by a wire 18. This arrangement is followed outin all the different blocks or sections of the track, and the two rails of each block or section of the track are connected together by resistances 19.
The apparatus installed in each locomotive comprises three signal-lamps, respectively colored red, white, and green, a telephone, an electric bell, a battery, and a switch, arranged and connected up in a manner which we will now describe, the arrangement being shown for the sake of clearness in a diagrammatic manner. Inasmuch as the arrangement in the several differentlocomotives is the same, it will only be necessary to describe one of them.
Referring to Fig. 1 of the drawings, the letters A, B, and 0 indicate, respectively, the red, white, and green lamps which are included in a local circuit which also includes a battery 20, said circuit consisting of a wire 21, which leads from the positive side of the battery to one blade 22 of a switch 23 and from a contact 24, which is adapted to be engaged by said switch-blade, leads a wire 25, which is connected to a lever 26, which is pivoted at one end and forms the armature of an electromagnet 27. Said lever is adapted to make electrical contact with a contact 29, from which leads a wire 30 to the white lamp B, and from said white lamp leads a wire 31, which connects with a common return-wire 32,that is connected 'by a Wire 33 to the negative side of the battery.
To the lever 26 is connected a spring 34, which is constructed or adjusted to have a tension which will be coextensive with a current passing through either one of the resistances 14 or 15 and through the electromagnet, as will hereinafter be more fully explained, so that said spring and current will counterbalance one another in such a manner as to hold the end of the armature-lever 26 in engagement with the contact 29.
Leading from the electromagnet to abattery 35 is a wire 36, and leading from said battery is a wire 37, that connects with the wheels of the locomotive-truck, and leading from the contact-wheel 9, carried by the locomotive, is a wire 38, which connects with the blade 39 of the switch before referred to, and leading from a contact 40, adapted to be engaged by said switch-blade,is a wire 41, that returns to the magnet 27.
The red lamp A is included in a circuit one side of which is formed by the wire 32, before referred to, and the other side of which comprises a wire 42, which leads to a contact 43, that is arranged adjacent to another contact 44, from which leads a wire 45, said wire being connected to an electric hell 46, from which latter leads a wire 47 back to the battery 20. The wire 45 is connected to a contact 48, which is disposed adjacent to a contact 49, and from the contact 49 leads a wire 50, which passes to the green light 0, and said green light is connected to the battery by the return-wire 32, before referred to.
The contact-blades 22 and 39 of the switch when the latter is reversed are adapted to effect electrical engagement with two contacts 51 and 52, the contact 51 being connected by a wire 53 with the contact-wheel 10, which is in engagement with the strip 6 of the duplex conductor, and the other contact, 52, is connected by a wire 54 with a telephone 55, and from said telephone a return-Wire 56 leads to the wire 47 to the negative side of the battery 20. As clearly shown in Fig. 1 of the drawings, the contacts 43 44 and 48 49 are so disposed that as the armature-lever 26 is oscillated either to the right or left each pair of said contacts will be electrically connected by said lever for a purpose which will presently be made apparent.
As before stated, the arrangement immediately above described is duplicated in the cab of each locomotive of the system, and should two of the locomotives enter the same block the operation will be as follows: Startthe current flows from said battery by means of the wire 37 to the wheel 57 of the locomotive-truck, to the track-rail 2, to the wheel 58 of the other locomotive, through the trucks of the latter to the wheel 58, thence to trackrail 1 over the crossover-wire 16, to the rail 7, from the latter to the contact-wheel 9, thence by wire 38 through the blade 39 of the switch 23, from the latter by the wire 41 to the magnet 27, and from the latter by the wire 36 to the battery 35, thus completing the circuit. The magnet will thus be energized and will attract the armature-lever 26, and said lever will be thrown into engagement with the contacts 43 and 44, thus closing the local circuit through the red lamp, which may be traced as follows: Starting from the battery 20, the current flows over the wire 21 to the blade 22 of the switch 23 and from the latter by the Wire 25 to the armature-lever 26, thence over the contacts 44 and 43 to the wire 42, to the red lamp A, and from the latter back to the battery by the wires 32 and 33. The red lamp will thus be thrown into action, notifying the engineer that another train is approaching him in the same block, and simultaneously with the flashing of the red light the bell 46 will be sounded,giving him audible notice,as follows: A portion of the current that passes to the red lamp will pass by means of the wire 45 to the bell 46 and from the latter by means of the return-wire 47 to the battery 20. The engineer will thus be given both audible and visual warning of the fact that another train is approaching him in the same track-section. The same result will occur in the cab of the other locomotive, and when the engineers receive such signals they will reverse their switches 23, throwing the blades 22 and 39 into engagement with the contacts 51 and 52. They can then communicate with each other over a circuit which is traced as follows: Starting from the battery 20, the cur-.
rent flows over the wire 21 to the blade 22 of the switch and from the latter to the contact 51 and then over the wire 53 to the contactwheel through the contact-rail 6' to and over the resistance to the corresponding contact-rail 6 thence to the contact-wheel 10 and by the wire 53 to the blade 39 of the switch 23 on the other locomotive, thence to the contact 52 and from the latter by the wire 54" to the telephone 55*. From the latter the current flows by the wire 56 through the battery and from the latter by wire 21 to the switch-blade 22*, which is in engagement with the contact 51 and from the latter by the wire 41 to the contact-wheel 9 over the contact-rail 7 and resistance 14 to the contact-wheel 9, thence by the wire 38 to the switch-blade 39, to the contact 52, and finally by the wire 54 to the telephone 55, and from the latter back to the.
the telephonic circuit and enabling the engineers of the respective locomotives to communicate with each other.
As before described, the resistances are of such strength and the spring 34, which controls the armaturelever, is placed under such tension that normally the current and said spring will counterbalance each other in such a manner that the armature-lever will be held in a central position-that is to say, in such a position that its end will rest in engage ment with the contact 29, and when a train enters a block, there being no other train in the same block, the white lamp will be thrown into action, indicating safety, the current under such conditions being traced as follows: Starting from the battery 35 the current will flow by means of the wire 37' to the locomotive-wheel 57, thence over the rail 2 to the resistance 59, over the latter to the track-rail 1 thence by the crossover-wire 16 to the contact-rail 7, thence through the contactwheel 9 and by the wire 38 to the switchblade 39, and from the latter by the Wire 41 to the electromagnet 27, and thence over the wire 36back tothe battery 35. This will close the local circuit, but, as before described, the resistance 59 is of such strength that it will just counterbalance the spring 34 and will hold the armature-lever 26 in engage ment with the contact 29, and the local cir-. cuit can then be traced as follows: Starting from the battery 20, the current flowsover the wire 21 to the switchblade 22 and by the wire to the contact-lever 26, thence by contact 29 and wire to the white lamp B, and from the latter by wires 31, 32, and 33 back to the battery, thus completing the circuit and lighting the white lamp and so indicating to the engineer that there is no other locomotive or train in the block.
Should one of the track-rails become broken 20,the current passes by means of the wire 21 to the switch-blade 22, thence by the wire 25 to the armature-lever 26, thence to contact 49, and from the latter by the wire to the green lamp and from the latter back to the battery by the wires 32 and 33. The green lamp will IIO then be lighted and simultaneously with the lighting of said lamp the bell will be sounded, as a portion of the current will be diverted from the armature-lever 26 to the contact 48, thence by wire 45 to the bell 46, and from the latter by the wire 47 back to the battery. The engineer will thus be given both visual and audible warning that it is unsafe for him to proceed.
Means are also provided for indicating when a switch has been left open, as illustrated in Fig. 2 of the drawings. Referring to said figure, the numerals 60 and 61 indicate, respectively, the switch-rails, the rail 60 being connected by a wire 62 to a contact 63 and the track-rail 1 being provided with a contact 64. The track-rails 1 and 1 are electrically connected by a bridge-wire 65. WVhen the switch is open, the contacts 63 and 64 will be thrown into engagement with each other, and the open condition of the switch will be indicated in the cab of the locomotive entering the block as follows, reference being had to the right-hand side of Fig. 2 of the drawings: Starting from the battery 35, the current flows over the wire 37 to the wheel 58, thence by the track-rail 2 to the switch rail 60, over the wire 62 and contacts 63 and 64 through the track'rail 1, thence by the crossover-wire 18 to the contact-rail 6 to the contact-wheel 10 and by the wire 65 to the blade 39 of the switch 23, and from said blade by the wire 41 to the electromagnet 27 and from the latter by the Wire 36 back to the battery, thus energizing the electromagnet and attracting the armature-lever 26 and throwing the sameinto engagement with the contacts 48 and 49. The local circuit will then be closed through the red lamp A, in dicatingdanger,as follows: Startingfrom the battery the current flows by wire 21 to the blade 22 of the switch, from the latter by the wire 28 to the armature-lever 26", thence to the contact 49 and by the wire 42 to the red lamp A, and from the latter by the wires 30 and 33 back to the battery. Simultaneously a portion of the current will be diverted from the armature-lever 26 to the contact 48 and will pass, by wire through the bell 46 and from the latter by wire 47 back to the battery. The red lamp and the bell will thus be simultaneously thrown into action and will indicate to the engineer that it is unsafe for him to proceed.
We also make provision for throwing the signal to danger in case a car is left standing on a siding in such a manner as to foul the trackthat is to say, when a car has been shunted onto a sliding, but not sufficiently far to entirely clear the track, as indicated in Fig. 2 of the drawings. Referring to said figure, the numerals 66 and 67 indicate two electromagnets which are disposed opposite one another ata point alongside the track opposite the siding. Arranged between the poles of the said magnets is an armaturelever 68, which is pivoted intermediate its ends, as at 69, and is provided at one end on its opposite sides with armatu res 70,which are disposed opposite the ends of the poles of the two magnets. The other end of the said armature-lever is in the form of an index-hand or pointer and is adapted to traverse a graduated scale 71, which will bear suitable indications to' designate the conditions of the track-section or blockopposite which the device is'locatedas, for example, the opposite ends of said graduated scale will be marked East and West or North or South, as the case may be, and the central portion of said scale will be marked, for example, Clear. We have shown in Fig. 2 of the drawings a pair of wheels standing on the switch or siding in such a position that the car which is supposed to be supported by said wheels would project over onto the main track, and thus would interfere with a train traveling over said main track. This condition will be indicated to the engineer on an approaching train, as follows, reference being had to the left-hand side of Fig. 2 of the drawings: Commencing at battery 35, the current will flow by wire 37 to the wheel 57, thence over the track-rail 2 to a wire 72, which connects said track-rail with the switch-rail 60. From the rail it passes over the axles 73 of the wheels on the switch to the switch-rail 61 and by the latter to the trackrail 1*, thence over the bridge-wire to the track-rail 1,thence overby the crossover-wire 16 to the contact-rail 7, and from the latter to the wheel 9, and thence by Wire 38 to the blade 39 of the switch 23. From said blade the current passes by wire 41 to the electromagnet 27 and from the latter by wire 36 back to the battery 35. The circuit being thus completed, the armature-lever 26 in the manner before described closes the local circuit and throws the red lamp into operation in the manner before described.
Now let it be assumed that a train is standing on the siding-such, for example, as a local train or what is known as a worktrain-and that it is about to proceed out onto the main track. Before going ahead on the main track it is necessary for the engineer to know whether or not the main track is clear. If the main track should not be clear, it will be indicated to the engineer on the local train, as follows, (it being assumed, for example, that a train has entered the block from the right-hand side of the diagram illustrated in said Fig. 2, which for the purpose of illustration will be presumed to be from the west:) A battery 74 is connected on one side by a wire 75 with the track-rail 2 and on the other side is connected bya wire 76 and by branch wires 77 and 78 to the electromagnets 66 and 67, the terminal of the magnet 66 being connected by a wire 79 to the conductor-rail 6, and the terminal of the magnet 67 is in like manner connected by a wire 80 to the conductor-rail 7 Starting from the battery 74, the current flows by Wire 75 to the track-rail 2, thence to the wheel 58, through the truck of the train to the opposite track -rail, thence by wire 16 over to the conductor-rail 7 thence by wire 80 to theelectromagnet 67, Over the Wires 77 and 76 back to the battery 74, thus completing the circuit. The magnet 67 will thus be energized, attracting thereto the upper end of the armature-lever 68, thus throwing the other or indicating end of the said lever onto the left-hand end of the graduated scale 71, whichvin the example illustrated is marked West, thus indicating that a train has ontered that particular block from the west and but it will of course be evident that the invention is not limited in this respect and that the signals maybe arranged in an electric car, for example.
Having thus described our invention, what we claim as new, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is-
1. In an electric signaling system, a pair of rails,a duplex cond uctor cooperative and substantially coextensive with the rails, said conductor and one of said rails being divided into sections insulated from one another, crossover-wires connected with one part of the conductor and the section-rail at each break, and connecting-wires united with the other part of the conductor and the sectionrail at said breaks, in combination with vehicles each having three signals distinguish able from one another and respectively indicating danger, safety and an abnormal condition of the track or apparatus, generators electrically connected with the signals, connections between the generators and parts of the vehicles which travel in contact with said rails, and compound contact members adapted to travel with the vehicles and having sections insulated from each other and arranged to engage the parts of said duplex conductor and electrically connected with said signals.
2. In an electric signaling system, a pair of rails, a duplex conductor cooperative and substantially coextensive with the rails, said conductor and one of said rails being divided into sections insulated from one another, crossover-wires connected with one part of the conductor and the section-rail at each break, and
connecting-wires united with the other part of the conductor and the section-rail at said breaks, in combination with vehicles each having three signals distinguishable one from of said duplex conductor and electrically connected with said signals, and resistances connecting the adjacent ends of'the duplex conductor and operating to normally hold the safety signal set.
3. In an electric signaling system, a pair of rails, a duplex conductor cooperative and substan tiall y coextensive with the rails, said conductor and one of said. rails being divided into sections insulated from one another, the parts of the duplex conductor being insulated from each other and connected together by resistance coils, crossover wires connected with one part of the conductor and the sectionrail at each break, connecting-wires united with the other part of the conductor and the section-rail at said breaks, in combination with vehicles having three signals distinguishable from one another and respectively indicating danger, safety and an abnormal condition of the track or apparatus, generators electrically connected with the signals, connections between the generators and a part of the vehicles which travels in contact with the said rails, compound contact members adapted to travel with the vehicles and having sections insulated from each other arranged to engage the parts of said duplex conductor and electrically connected with said signals, electromagnets in circuit with the respective signals, local circuits havinga signal of a different nature from the firstnamed signals, and armatures for said magnets constituting circuit-closers for said local circuits. 7
4. In an electric signaling system, a pair of rails, a duplex conductor-cooperative and substantially coextensive with the rails, said condoctor and one of said rails being divided into sections insulated from one another, and
connected together by resistance coils, the
parts of the duplex cond'uctor being insulated from each other, crossover-wires connecting one part of the duplex conductor to the section-rail at each break, connectingwires united with the other part of the conductors and the section-rail at another break, in combination with vehicles having lamps of three different colors, generators electrically connected with the lamps, connections between the generators and a part of the vehicles which travels in contactwith the said rails, compound contact members adapted to travel with the vehicles and having the sections insulated from each other and arranged to engage the parts of said duplex conductor and electrically connected with said signals, electromagnets in circuit with said lamps, local circuits each having a bell, armatures for said magnets constituting circuit-closers for said local circuits, and springs arranged, when the current passes through said resistances, to hold the armatures in a position to close the circuit through the lamps indicating safety.
5. In an electric signaling system, a pair of IIO rails,a duplex conductor cooperative and substantially coextensive with the rails, said con ductor and oneof said rails being divided into insulated sections, the parts of the duplex conductor being insulated from each other and connected together by resistances, crossover-wires connecting one part of the conductor to the section-rail at each break, counecting-wires united with the other part of the conductor and each rail at said breaks, in combination with vehicles having three visual signals distinguishable from each other and respectively indicating danger, safety and an abnormal condition of the track or apparatus, generators electrically connected with said signals, connections between the generators and a part of the vehicles which travels in contact with said rails, compound contact members adapted to travel with the vehicle and having sections insulated from each other, arranged to engage the parts of said duplex conductor and electrically connected with said signals, electromagnets in circuit with said signals, local circuits each having audible signals, and armatures for said magnets constituting circuit-closers for said local circuits.
6. In an electric signaling system, a pair of rails, a duplex conductor arranged between the rails and substantially coextensive therewith, said conductor and one of said rails being divided into sections separated from one another, the parts of the duplex conductor beinginsulated from each other and connected together by resistance-coils, crossover- Wires connecting one part of the conductor and the section-rail at each break, connecting-wires united with the other part of the conductor and the section-rail at said breaks, combined with vehicles having three signals distinguishable from each other and respectively indicating danger, safety and an abnormal condition of the track or apparatus,
generators electrically connected with said signals, connections between the generators and the wheels of the vehicles, and compound contact members arranged to travel with the vehicles and having sections insulated from each other, arranged to engage the parts of said duplex conductor and electrically connected with said signals.
7. In an electric signaling system, a pair of rails, a duplex conductor cooperative and substantially coextensive with the rails, said conductor and one of said rails being divided into sections separated from one another, the parts of the duplex conductor being insulated from each other and connected together by resistance-coils, crossover-Wires connecting 'one part of the duplex conductor and the section-rail at each break, and con necting-wires uniting the other part of the conductor and the section-rail at said breaks, in combination with vehicles each carrying three signals distinguishable from each other and respectively indicating danger, safety and an abnormal condition of the track or apparatus, telephones carried by said vehicles, electrical connections between the signals, telephones, rails and duplex conductor, each of the connections including a battery, and switches on the vehicles for closing either the signal or telephone circuits at Will. a
- 8. In an electric signaling system, a pair of rails,a duplex cond uctor cooperative and substan tially coextensive with the rails, said conductor and one of said rails being divided into sections separated from one another, the parts of the duplex conductor being insulated from each other and connected together by resistances, crossover-wires connecting one part of the duplex conductor and the section rail at each break, connectingwires uniting the other part of the conductor and the section-rail at said breaks, in combination with vehicles, three signals carried by each vehicle distinguishable from one another and respectively indicating danger, safety and an abnormal condition of the track or apparatus, means for normallly placing one of said signals in operation to indicate safety, and electrical connections between the signals, rails and duplex conductor. 9. In an electric signaling device, a pair of rails, a duplex conductor cooperative and substantially coextensive with the rails, said conductor and one of said rails being divided into sections separated from one another, the parts of the duplex conductor being insulated from each other and connected together by resistance-coils, crossover-wires connect-,
ing one part of the duplex conductor and the section-rail at each break, and connectingwires uniting the other part of the conductor and the section-rail at said breaks, a pair of switch-rails, one of said switch-rails being electrically connected with one of the trackrails, means for connecting said switch-rail with the other track-rail when the switch is open, two electromagnets arranged opposite one an other and respectively electrically connected with the parts of the duplex conductor, a battery connected to said electromagnets and to one of the track-rails, an oscillatory armature lever disposed between the poles of said magnets, and a graduated index over which the free end of said armature is arranged to travel, for the purpose specified.
10. In an electric signaling device, a pair of rails, a duplex conductor cooperative and substantially coextensive with the rails, said conductor and one of said rails being divided into sections separated from one another, the parts of the duplex conductor being insulated from each other, crossover-wires connecting one part ofthe duplex conductor and the section rail at one break, connecting wires uniting the other part of the conductor and the section-rail at said breaks, two electromagnets arranged opposite one another, two corresponding terminals of said magnets being connected to a battery which is also 5 mature constituting an index-hand disposed electrically connected to one of the trackrails, the other terminals of said magnets being respectively connected to the parts of the duplex conductor, and an oscillating arour hands in presence of two subscribing witmesses.
CHARLES V. MILLS. WILLIAM W. PIDDINGTON.
Witnesses:
EMMET H. WILSON, G. C. D GARMO.
between the poles of said electromagnets, for the purpose specified.
In testimony whereof we have hereunto set
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