US7349776B2 - Vehicle control - Google Patents

Vehicle control Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US7349776B2
US7349776B2 US10249551 US24955103A US7349776B2 US 7349776 B2 US7349776 B2 US 7349776B2 US 10249551 US10249551 US 10249551 US 24955103 A US24955103 A US 24955103A US 7349776 B2 US7349776 B2 US 7349776B2
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
vehicle
mode
driving
plurality
modes
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Active, expires
Application number
US10249551
Other versions
US20030200016A1 (en )
Inventor
Anthony Francis Spillane
William Burdock
David Andrew Clare
Derek Leslie Jones
John Anthony Kellett
Jan Pieter Prins
Keith Gary Reginald Parsons
Paul Malcolm Darnell
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Jaguar Land Rover Ltd
Original Assignee
Ford Global Technologies LLC
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60WCONJOINT CONTROL OF VEHICLE SUB-UNITS OF DIFFERENT TYPE OR DIFFERENT FUNCTION; CONTROL SYSTEMS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR HYBRID VEHICLES; ROAD VEHICLE DRIVE CONTROL SYSTEMS FOR PURPOSES NOT RELATED TO THE CONTROL OF A PARTICULAR SUB-UNIT
    • B60W30/00Purposes of road vehicle drive control systems not related to the control of a particular sub-unit, e.g. of systems using conjoint control of vehicle sub-units, or advanced driver assistance systems for ensuring comfort, stability and safety or drive control systems for propelling or retarding the vehicle
    • B60W30/18Propelling the vehicle
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60GVEHICLE SUSPENSION ARRANGEMENTS
    • B60G17/00Resilient suspensions having means for adjusting the spring or vibration-damper characteristics, for regulating the distance between a supporting surface and a sprung part of vehicle or for locking suspension during use to meet varying vehicular or surface conditions, e.g. due to speed or load
    • B60G17/015Resilient suspensions having means for adjusting the spring or vibration-damper characteristics, for regulating the distance between a supporting surface and a sprung part of vehicle or for locking suspension during use to meet varying vehicular or surface conditions, e.g. due to speed or load the regulating means comprising electric or electronic elements
    • B60G17/0195Resilient suspensions having means for adjusting the spring or vibration-damper characteristics, for regulating the distance between a supporting surface and a sprung part of vehicle or for locking suspension during use to meet varying vehicular or surface conditions, e.g. due to speed or load the regulating means comprising electric or electronic elements characterised by the regulation being combined with other vehicle control systems
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60KARRANGEMENT OR MOUNTING OF PROPULSION UNITS OR OF TRANSMISSIONS IN VEHICLES; ARRANGEMENT OR MOUNTING OF PLURAL DIVERSE PRIME-MOVERS IN VEHICLES; AUXILIARY DRIVES FOR VEHICLES; INSTRUMENTATION OR DASHBOARDS FOR VEHICLES; ARRANGEMENTS IN CONNECTION WITH COOLING, AIR INTAKE, GAS EXHAUST OR FUEL SUPPLY OF PROPULSION UNITS IN VEHICLES
    • B60K28/00Safety devices for propulsion-unit control, specially adapted for, or arranged in, vehicles, e.g. preventing fuel supply or ignition in the event of potentially dangerous conditions
    • B60K28/10Safety devices for propulsion-unit control, specially adapted for, or arranged in, vehicles, e.g. preventing fuel supply or ignition in the event of potentially dangerous conditions responsive to conditions relating to the vehicle
    • B60K28/16Safety devices for propulsion-unit control, specially adapted for, or arranged in, vehicles, e.g. preventing fuel supply or ignition in the event of potentially dangerous conditions responsive to conditions relating to the vehicle responsive to, or preventing, skidding of wheels
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60KARRANGEMENT OR MOUNTING OF PROPULSION UNITS OR OF TRANSMISSIONS IN VEHICLES; ARRANGEMENT OR MOUNTING OF PLURAL DIVERSE PRIME-MOVERS IN VEHICLES; AUXILIARY DRIVES FOR VEHICLES; INSTRUMENTATION OR DASHBOARDS FOR VEHICLES; ARRANGEMENTS IN CONNECTION WITH COOLING, AIR INTAKE, GAS EXHAUST OR FUEL SUPPLY OF PROPULSION UNITS IN VEHICLES
    • B60K28/00Safety devices for propulsion-unit control, specially adapted for, or arranged in, vehicles, e.g. preventing fuel supply or ignition in the event of potentially dangerous conditions
    • B60K28/10Safety devices for propulsion-unit control, specially adapted for, or arranged in, vehicles, e.g. preventing fuel supply or ignition in the event of potentially dangerous conditions responsive to conditions relating to the vehicle
    • B60K28/16Safety devices for propulsion-unit control, specially adapted for, or arranged in, vehicles, e.g. preventing fuel supply or ignition in the event of potentially dangerous conditions responsive to conditions relating to the vehicle responsive to, or preventing, skidding of wheels
    • B60K28/165Safety devices for propulsion-unit control, specially adapted for, or arranged in, vehicles, e.g. preventing fuel supply or ignition in the event of potentially dangerous conditions responsive to conditions relating to the vehicle responsive to, or preventing, skidding of wheels acting on elements of the vehicle drive train other than the propulsion unit and brakes, e.g. transmission, clutch, differential
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60TVEHICLE BRAKE CONTROL SYSTEMS OR PARTS THEREOF; BRAKE CONTROL SYSTEMS OR PARTS THEREOF, IN GENERAL; ARRANGEMENT OF BRAKING ELEMENTS ON VEHICLES IN GENERAL; PORTABLE DEVICES FOR PREVENTING UNWANTED MOVEMENT OF VEHICLES; VEHICLE MODIFICATIONS TO FACILITATE COOLING OF BRAKES
    • B60T8/00Arrangements for adjusting wheel-braking force to meet varying vehicular or ground-surface conditions, e.g. limiting or varying distribution of braking force
    • B60T8/32Arrangements for adjusting wheel-braking force to meet varying vehicular or ground-surface conditions, e.g. limiting or varying distribution of braking force responsive to a speed condition, e.g. acceleration or deceleration
    • B60T8/58Arrangements for adjusting wheel-braking force to meet varying vehicular or ground-surface conditions, e.g. limiting or varying distribution of braking force responsive to a speed condition, e.g. acceleration or deceleration responsive to speed and another condition or to plural speed conditions
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60WCONJOINT CONTROL OF VEHICLE SUB-UNITS OF DIFFERENT TYPE OR DIFFERENT FUNCTION; CONTROL SYSTEMS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR HYBRID VEHICLES; ROAD VEHICLE DRIVE CONTROL SYSTEMS FOR PURPOSES NOT RELATED TO THE CONTROL OF A PARTICULAR SUB-UNIT
    • B60W10/00Conjoint control of vehicle sub-units of different type or different function
    • B60W10/04Conjoint control of vehicle sub-units of different type or different function including control of propulsion units
    • B60W10/06Conjoint control of vehicle sub-units of different type or different function including control of propulsion units including control of combustion engines
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60WCONJOINT CONTROL OF VEHICLE SUB-UNITS OF DIFFERENT TYPE OR DIFFERENT FUNCTION; CONTROL SYSTEMS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR HYBRID VEHICLES; ROAD VEHICLE DRIVE CONTROL SYSTEMS FOR PURPOSES NOT RELATED TO THE CONTROL OF A PARTICULAR SUB-UNIT
    • B60W10/00Conjoint control of vehicle sub-units of different type or different function
    • B60W10/10Conjoint control of vehicle sub-units of different type or different function including control of change-speed gearings
    • B60W10/11Stepped gearings
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60WCONJOINT CONTROL OF VEHICLE SUB-UNITS OF DIFFERENT TYPE OR DIFFERENT FUNCTION; CONTROL SYSTEMS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR HYBRID VEHICLES; ROAD VEHICLE DRIVE CONTROL SYSTEMS FOR PURPOSES NOT RELATED TO THE CONTROL OF A PARTICULAR SUB-UNIT
    • B60W10/00Conjoint control of vehicle sub-units of different type or different function
    • B60W10/20Conjoint control of vehicle sub-units of different type or different function including control of steering systems
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60WCONJOINT CONTROL OF VEHICLE SUB-UNITS OF DIFFERENT TYPE OR DIFFERENT FUNCTION; CONTROL SYSTEMS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR HYBRID VEHICLES; ROAD VEHICLE DRIVE CONTROL SYSTEMS FOR PURPOSES NOT RELATED TO THE CONTROL OF A PARTICULAR SUB-UNIT
    • B60W10/00Conjoint control of vehicle sub-units of different type or different function
    • B60W10/22Conjoint control of vehicle sub-units of different type or different function including control of suspension systems
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60WCONJOINT CONTROL OF VEHICLE SUB-UNITS OF DIFFERENT TYPE OR DIFFERENT FUNCTION; CONTROL SYSTEMS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR HYBRID VEHICLES; ROAD VEHICLE DRIVE CONTROL SYSTEMS FOR PURPOSES NOT RELATED TO THE CONTROL OF A PARTICULAR SUB-UNIT
    • B60W50/00Details of control systems for road vehicle drive control not related to the control of a particular sub-unit, e.g. process diagnostic or vehicle driver interfaces
    • B60W50/08Interaction between the driver and the control system
    • B60W50/082Selecting or switching between different modes of propelling
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60GVEHICLE SUSPENSION ARRANGEMENTS
    • B60G2600/00Indexing codes relating to particular elements, systems or processes used on suspension systems or suspension control systems
    • B60G2600/20Manual control or setting means
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60GVEHICLE SUSPENSION ARRANGEMENTS
    • B60G2800/00Indexing codes relating to the type of movement or to the condition of the vehicle and to the end result to be achieved by the control action
    • B60G2800/85System Prioritisation
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60GVEHICLE SUSPENSION ARRANGEMENTS
    • B60G2800/00Indexing codes relating to the type of movement or to the condition of the vehicle and to the end result to be achieved by the control action
    • B60G2800/90System Controller type
    • B60G2800/91Suspension Control
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60GVEHICLE SUSPENSION ARRANGEMENTS
    • B60G2800/00Indexing codes relating to the type of movement or to the condition of the vehicle and to the end result to be achieved by the control action
    • B60G2800/90System Controller type
    • B60G2800/92ABS - Brake Control
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60GVEHICLE SUSPENSION ARRANGEMENTS
    • B60G2800/00Indexing codes relating to the type of movement or to the condition of the vehicle and to the end result to be achieved by the control action
    • B60G2800/90System Controller type
    • B60G2800/96ASC - Assisted or power Steering control
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60GVEHICLE SUSPENSION ARRANGEMENTS
    • B60G2800/00Indexing codes relating to the type of movement or to the condition of the vehicle and to the end result to be achieved by the control action
    • B60G2800/90System Controller type
    • B60G2800/97Engine Management System [EMS]
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60KARRANGEMENT OR MOUNTING OF PROPULSION UNITS OR OF TRANSMISSIONS IN VEHICLES; ARRANGEMENT OR MOUNTING OF PLURAL DIVERSE PRIME-MOVERS IN VEHICLES; AUXILIARY DRIVES FOR VEHICLES; INSTRUMENTATION OR DASHBOARDS FOR VEHICLES; ARRANGEMENTS IN CONNECTION WITH COOLING, AIR INTAKE, GAS EXHAUST OR FUEL SUPPLY OF PROPULSION UNITS IN VEHICLES
    • B60K17/00Arrangement or mounting of transmissions in vehicles
    • B60K17/34Arrangement or mounting of transmissions in vehicles for driving both front and rear wheels, e.g. four wheel drive vehicles
    • B60K17/344Arrangement or mounting of transmissions in vehicles for driving both front and rear wheels, e.g. four wheel drive vehicles having a transfer gear
    • B60K17/346Arrangement or mounting of transmissions in vehicles for driving both front and rear wheels, e.g. four wheel drive vehicles having a transfer gear the transfer gear being a differential gear
    • B60K17/3462Arrangement or mounting of transmissions in vehicles for driving both front and rear wheels, e.g. four wheel drive vehicles having a transfer gear the transfer gear being a differential gear with means for changing distribution of torque between front and rear wheels
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60KARRANGEMENT OR MOUNTING OF PROPULSION UNITS OR OF TRANSMISSIONS IN VEHICLES; ARRANGEMENT OR MOUNTING OF PLURAL DIVERSE PRIME-MOVERS IN VEHICLES; AUXILIARY DRIVES FOR VEHICLES; INSTRUMENTATION OR DASHBOARDS FOR VEHICLES; ARRANGEMENTS IN CONNECTION WITH COOLING, AIR INTAKE, GAS EXHAUST OR FUEL SUPPLY OF PROPULSION UNITS IN VEHICLES
    • B60K17/00Arrangement or mounting of transmissions in vehicles
    • B60K17/34Arrangement or mounting of transmissions in vehicles for driving both front and rear wheels, e.g. four wheel drive vehicles
    • B60K17/348Arrangement or mounting of transmissions in vehicles for driving both front and rear wheels, e.g. four wheel drive vehicles having differential means for driving one set of wheels, e.g. the front, at one speed and the other set, e.g. the rear, at a different speed
    • B60K17/35Arrangement or mounting of transmissions in vehicles for driving both front and rear wheels, e.g. four wheel drive vehicles having differential means for driving one set of wheels, e.g. the front, at one speed and the other set, e.g. the rear, at a different speed including arrangements for suppressing or influencing the power transfer, e.g. viscous clutches
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60KARRANGEMENT OR MOUNTING OF PROPULSION UNITS OR OF TRANSMISSIONS IN VEHICLES; ARRANGEMENT OR MOUNTING OF PLURAL DIVERSE PRIME-MOVERS IN VEHICLES; AUXILIARY DRIVES FOR VEHICLES; INSTRUMENTATION OR DASHBOARDS FOR VEHICLES; ARRANGEMENTS IN CONNECTION WITH COOLING, AIR INTAKE, GAS EXHAUST OR FUEL SUPPLY OF PROPULSION UNITS IN VEHICLES
    • B60K23/00Arrangement or mounting of control devices for vehicle transmissions, or parts thereof, not otherwise provided for
    • B60K23/08Arrangement or mounting of control devices for vehicle transmissions, or parts thereof, not otherwise provided for for changing number of driven wheels, for switching from driving one axle to driving two or more axles
    • B60K23/0808Arrangement or mounting of control devices for vehicle transmissions, or parts thereof, not otherwise provided for for changing number of driven wheels, for switching from driving one axle to driving two or more axles for varying torque distribution between driven axles, e.g. by transfer clutch
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60TVEHICLE BRAKE CONTROL SYSTEMS OR PARTS THEREOF; BRAKE CONTROL SYSTEMS OR PARTS THEREOF, IN GENERAL; ARRANGEMENT OF BRAKING ELEMENTS ON VEHICLES IN GENERAL; PORTABLE DEVICES FOR PREVENTING UNWANTED MOVEMENT OF VEHICLES; VEHICLE MODIFICATIONS TO FACILITATE COOLING OF BRAKES
    • B60T2201/00Particular use of vehicle brake systems; Special systems using also the brakes; Special software modules within the brake system controller
    • B60T2201/04Hill descent control
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60TVEHICLE BRAKE CONTROL SYSTEMS OR PARTS THEREOF; BRAKE CONTROL SYSTEMS OR PARTS THEREOF, IN GENERAL; ARRANGEMENT OF BRAKING ELEMENTS ON VEHICLES IN GENERAL; PORTABLE DEVICES FOR PREVENTING UNWANTED MOVEMENT OF VEHICLES; VEHICLE MODIFICATIONS TO FACILITATE COOLING OF BRAKES
    • B60T2220/00Monitoring, detecting driver behaviour; Signalling thereof; Counteracting thereof
    • B60T2220/02Driver type; Driving style; Driver adaptive features
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60TVEHICLE BRAKE CONTROL SYSTEMS OR PARTS THEREOF; BRAKE CONTROL SYSTEMS OR PARTS THEREOF, IN GENERAL; ARRANGEMENT OF BRAKING ELEMENTS ON VEHICLES IN GENERAL; PORTABLE DEVICES FOR PREVENTING UNWANTED MOVEMENT OF VEHICLES; VEHICLE MODIFICATIONS TO FACILITATE COOLING OF BRAKES
    • B60T2260/00Interaction of vehicle brake system with other systems
    • B60T2260/08Coordination of integrated systems
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60WCONJOINT CONTROL OF VEHICLE SUB-UNITS OF DIFFERENT TYPE OR DIFFERENT FUNCTION; CONTROL SYSTEMS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR HYBRID VEHICLES; ROAD VEHICLE DRIVE CONTROL SYSTEMS FOR PURPOSES NOT RELATED TO THE CONTROL OF A PARTICULAR SUB-UNIT
    • B60W50/00Details of control systems for road vehicle drive control not related to the control of a particular sub-unit, e.g. process diagnostic or vehicle driver interfaces
    • B60W2050/0062Adapting control system settings
    • B60W2050/0063Manual parameter input, manual setting means, manual initialising or calibrating means
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60WCONJOINT CONTROL OF VEHICLE SUB-UNITS OF DIFFERENT TYPE OR DIFFERENT FUNCTION; CONTROL SYSTEMS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR HYBRID VEHICLES; ROAD VEHICLE DRIVE CONTROL SYSTEMS FOR PURPOSES NOT RELATED TO THE CONTROL OF A PARTICULAR SUB-UNIT
    • B60W2520/00Input parameters relating to overall vehicle dynamics
    • B60W2520/14Yaw
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60WCONJOINT CONTROL OF VEHICLE SUB-UNITS OF DIFFERENT TYPE OR DIFFERENT FUNCTION; CONTROL SYSTEMS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR HYBRID VEHICLES; ROAD VEHICLE DRIVE CONTROL SYSTEMS FOR PURPOSES NOT RELATED TO THE CONTROL OF A PARTICULAR SUB-UNIT
    • B60W2540/00Input parameters relating to the driver
    • B60W2540/04Driver selection, e.g. driver confirmation
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60WCONJOINT CONTROL OF VEHICLE SUB-UNITS OF DIFFERENT TYPE OR DIFFERENT FUNCTION; CONTROL SYSTEMS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR HYBRID VEHICLES; ROAD VEHICLE DRIVE CONTROL SYSTEMS FOR PURPOSES NOT RELATED TO THE CONTROL OF A PARTICULAR SUB-UNIT
    • B60W2540/00Input parameters relating to the driver
    • B60W2540/30Driving style
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60WCONJOINT CONTROL OF VEHICLE SUB-UNITS OF DIFFERENT TYPE OR DIFFERENT FUNCTION; CONTROL SYSTEMS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR HYBRID VEHICLES; ROAD VEHICLE DRIVE CONTROL SYSTEMS FOR PURPOSES NOT RELATED TO THE CONTROL OF A PARTICULAR SUB-UNIT
    • B60W2550/00Input parameters relating to exterior conditions
    • B60W2550/14Road conditions, road types or road features
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60WCONJOINT CONTROL OF VEHICLE SUB-UNITS OF DIFFERENT TYPE OR DIFFERENT FUNCTION; CONTROL SYSTEMS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR HYBRID VEHICLES; ROAD VEHICLE DRIVE CONTROL SYSTEMS FOR PURPOSES NOT RELATED TO THE CONTROL OF A PARTICULAR SUB-UNIT
    • B60W2550/00Input parameters relating to exterior conditions
    • B60W2550/14Road conditions, road types or road features
    • B60W2550/141Type of road
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60WCONJOINT CONTROL OF VEHICLE SUB-UNITS OF DIFFERENT TYPE OR DIFFERENT FUNCTION; CONTROL SYSTEMS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR HYBRID VEHICLES; ROAD VEHICLE DRIVE CONTROL SYSTEMS FOR PURPOSES NOT RELATED TO THE CONTROL OF A PARTICULAR SUB-UNIT
    • B60W2550/00Input parameters relating to exterior conditions
    • B60W2550/14Road conditions, road types or road features
    • B60W2550/142Road slope
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F16ENGINEERING ELEMENTS AND UNITS; GENERAL MEASURES FOR PRODUCING AND MAINTAINING EFFECTIVE FUNCTIONING OF MACHINES OR INSTALLATIONS; THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16HGEARING
    • F16H2300/00Determining of new ratio
    • F16H2300/14Selecting a state of operation, e.g. depending on two wheel or four wheel drive mode
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02TCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO TRANSPORTATION
    • Y02T10/00Road transport of goods or passengers
    • Y02T10/80Technologies aiming to reduce greenhouse gasses emissions common to all road transportation technologies
    • Y02T10/84Data processing systems or methods, management, administration

Abstract

A vehicle control system has a plurality of subsystem controllers including an engine management system 28, a transmission controller 30, a steering controller 48, a brakes controller 62 and a suspension controller 82. These subsystem controllers are each operable in a plurality of subsystem modes, and are all connected to a vehicle mode controller 98 which controls the modes of operation of each of the subsystem controllers so as to provide a number of driving modes for the vehicle. Each of the modes corresponds to a particular driving condition or set of driving conditions, and in each mode each of the functions is set to the function in mode most appropriate to those conditions.

Description

BACKGROUND OF INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates to the control of vehicles, in particular to the coordinated control of a number of subsystems of a vehicle.

2. Background Art

Various systems are known in which operation of various subsystems of a vehicle can operate in different configuration modes so as to suit different conditions. For example, automatic transmissions can be controlled in sport, winter, economy and manual configuration modes in which the changes between gear ratios and other subsystem control parameters are modified so as to suit the prevailing conditions or the taste of the driver. Air suspensions are known with on-road and off-road configuration modes. Stability control systems can be operated at reduced activity so as to give the driver more direct control over the operation of the vehicle. Power steering systems can be operated in different configurations modes where the level of assistance is at different levels or varies in different ways. Vehicle transmissions can be switched to provide drive to different numbers of wheels. Also the locking or partial locking of differentials can be controlled to suit the prevailing driving conditions.

As the number of controllable systems increases, the driver will become faced with an increasing number of choices as to which configuration modes to select for each of the systems. Unless the driver is very experienced, this can become complicated and confusing.

Therefore, systems have been proposed in which the control of a number of the vehicle subsystems is coordinated by a central vehicle controller, which can be switched between a number of modes thereby controlling all of the subsystems in a coordinated way which is simple for the driver to control. Such a system is disclosed in GB2273580.

While GB2273580 teaches an integrated control system to control and configure vehicle operating subsystems in response to control signals, drivers often encounter a broad range of surfaces and terrains in both on-road and off-road settings. Unfortunately, the operating characteristics of such an integrated control system does not provide the driver with the ability to provide direct input regarding the surface terrain in an attempt to better select the appropriate subsystem configuration modes. This deficiency results in the less than optimal stability, handling, and safety performance of the vehicle. Therefore, to further expand the performance of motor vehicles including integrated control systems as noted above, there is a need for an integrated control system which will provide improved control of the vehicle on a broad range of surfaces.

SUMMARY OF INVENTION

The present invention aims to provide a vehicle control system which can be operated so as to provide improved control of the vehicle on a broader range of surfaces, and in particular in a plurality of different off-road surfaces and terrains such as might be encountered when driving off-road.

Accordingly the present invention provides a vehicle control system arranged to control a plurality of vehicle subsystems each of which is operable in a plurality of subsystem configuration modes, wherein the vehicle control system is operable in a plurality of driving modes in each of which it is arranged to select the subsystem configuration modes in a manner suitable for a respective driving surface.

Preferably each of the subsystems is operable in a plurality of subsystem configuration modes and in each of the driving modes the subsystem configuration modes are selected in a manner suitable for driving on the respective surface.

Preferably one of the subsystems comprises a suspension system and said plurality of subsystem configuration modes comprises a plurality of ride heights.

Preferably one of the subsystems comprises a fluid suspension system in which fluid interconnection can be made between suspensions for wheels on opposite sides of the vehicle, and said plurality of subsystem configuration modes provide different levels of said interconnection.

Preferably one of the subsystems comprises a steering system which can provide steering assistance, and said plurality of subsystem configuration modes provides different levels of said steering assistance.

Preferably one of the subsystems comprises a braking system which can provide braking assistance, and said plurality of subsystem configuration modes provides different levels of said braking assistance.

Preferably one of the subsystems comprises a brake control system which can provide an anti-lock function to control wheel slip, and said plurality of subsystem configuration modes allow different levels of said wheel slip.

Preferably one of the subsystems comprises a traction control system which is arranged to control wheel spin, and said plurality of subsystem configuration modes allow different levels of said wheel spin.

Preferably one of the subsystems comprises a yaw control system which is arranged to control vehicle yaw, and said plurality of subsystem configuration modes allow different levels of divergence of said vehicle yaw from an expected yaw.

Preferably one of the subsystems comprises a range change transmission and said subsystem configuration modes include a high range mode and a low range mode of said transmission.

Preferably one of the subsystems comprises a powertrain system which includes a powertrain control means and a throttle pedal, the subsystem configuration modes providing different levels of responsiveness of the powertrain control means to movement of the throttle pedal.

Preferably one of the subsystems comprises a transmission system operable in a plurality of transmission ratios and including a transmission control means arranged to monitor at least one parameter of the vehicle and to select the transmission ratios in response, and wherein the subsystem modes include a plurality of transmission configuration modes in which the transmission ratios are selected differently in response to said at least one parameter.

Preferably one of the subsystems comprises a differential system operable to provide a plurality of levels of differential lock, and the subsystem configuration modes are arranged to provide different levels of said lock.

Preferably the differential system is arranged to control the level of differential lock on the basis of a plurality of inputs, and to respond differently to said inputs in each of the modes.

The differential may be a center differential, a front differential, or a rear differential.

Preferably one of the subsystems comprises a roll control system arranged to provide roll correction to reduce vehicle roll and the subsystem configuration modes provide different levels of roll correction of the vehicle, at least under some driving conditions.

Preferably one of the subsystems is a speed control system arranged to control the speed of the vehicle when descending a hill. The speed control system may be arranged to control the vehicle to different speeds in the different configuration modes.

Preferably the driving modes include an off-road mode in which the subsystems are controlled in a manner suitable for driving on rough terrain and an on-road mode in which the subsystems are controlled in a manner suitable for driving on-road.

Preferably the suspension system is arranged to provide a higher ride height in the off road mode than in the on-road mode.

Preferably in the off-road mode a higher level of said interconnection is provided than in the on-road mode.

Preferably the traction control system is arranged to allow less wheel spin in the off-road mode than in the on-road mode.

Preferably the yaw control system is arranged to allow a higher degree of said divergence in the off-road mode than in the on-road mode.

Preferably in the off-road mode the range change transmission is operated in the low range.

Preferably in the off-road mode the powertrain control means is arranged to provide lower levels of drive torque, for a given throttle pedal position, at least at low levels of throttle pedal depression, than in the on-road mode.

Preferably the differential system is arranged to provide higher levels of differential lock in the off-road mode than in the on-road mode.

Preferably the roll control system is arranged to provide a higher roll stiffness in the on-road mode than in the off-road mode.

Preferably the speed control system is arranged to be switched on in the off-road mode and switched off in the on-road mode.

Preferably the driving modes include at least one low friction mode in which the subsystems are controlled in a manner suitable for driving on low friction surfaces and a high friction mode in which the subsystems are controlled in a manner suitable for driving on high friction surfaces.

Preferably the brake control system allows higher levels of slip in the high friction mode than in the low friction mode.

Preferably the traction control system allows higher levels of wheel spin in the high friction mode than in the low friction mode.

Preferably the braking control system provides a greater level of braking assistance in the high friction mode than in the low friction mode.

Preferably the powertrain control means is arranged to provide lower levels of drive torque, for a given throttle pedal position, at least at low levels of throttle pedal depression, in the low friction mode than in the high friction mode.

Preferably the transmission system is arranged to operate in higher gears for a given value of said at least one parameter in the high friction mode than in the low friction mode.

Preferably the differential system is arranged to provide higher levels of differential lock in the low friction mode than in the high friction mode.

The high friction mode may comprise a standard or default mode in which the vehicle will operate normally and which is suitable for on-road driving.

Preferably there are two such low friction modes and the suspension system is arranged to provide a higher ride height in one of the low friction modes than in the other.

Preferably there are two such low friction modes and the suspension system is arranged to provide a higher level of said cross linking in one of the low friction modes than in the other.

For example the two low friction modes may comprise a mud mode suitable for traveling through deep mud, and another low friction mode suitable for driving in snow, on grass, or on gravel.

Alternatively there may be a plurality of low friction modes, one of which may be a grass mode in which the subsystems are controlled in a manner suitable for driving on grass, one of which may be an ice mode in which the subsystems are controlled in a manner suitable for driving in ice, and one of which may be a mud mode in which the subsystems are controlled in a manner suitable for driving on mud.

Preferably one of the modes is a sand mode in which the subsystems are controlled in a manner suitable for driving on sand. Preferably at least one of the subsystems is arranged, in the sand mode, to allow only relatively low levels of wheel spin when the vehicle is traveling at low speeds so as to avoid the vehicle wheels becoming submerged in sand, but to allow relatively high levels of wheel spin when the vehicle is traveling at higher speeds.

Preferably the powertrain control system is arranged to provide relatively low levels of drive torque for a given throttle pedal position at low vehicle speeds and to provide relatively high levels of drive torque for a given throttle pedal position at higher vehicle speeds.

The off-road mode may be a rock crawl mode in which the subsystems are controlled in a manner suitable for driving over rocks. Alternatively it may be set up for more general off-road use.

One of the modes may be a rough-road mode in which the subsystems are controlled in a manner suitable for driving on rough roads, for example for driving at relatively high speeds over rough surfaces.

At least one of the modes may be a plough surface mode in which the brake control subsystem is arranged to allow a relatively high degree of wheel slip under braking. This is useful, for example on snow or sand, where the build up of matter in front of the wheels under braking can improve braking performance.

Preferably at least one of the modes is an on-road mode in which the subsystems are controlled in a manner suitable for driving on-road. For example, one of the modes may be a motorway mode in which the subsystems are controlled in a manner suitable for driving at high speed on a flat road surface, or one of the modes may be a country road mode in which the subsystems are controlled in a manner suitable for driving on country roads.

The driving modes may be selectable by means of two inputs, one of which is a terrain selection input arranged to influence the mode selected on the basis of the terrain selected, and the other which is a mode of use input arranged to influence the mode selected on the basis of a selected mode of use of the vehicle. Each of these inputs may be user-controlled inputs, or may be derived from one or more sensors.

The mode of use input may be arranged to allow selection between a plurality of driving styles, which may include, for example, a normal style, a sport style, and an economy style.

Alternatively, or in addition, the mode of use input may be arranged to allow selection between a plurality of states of the vehicle, for example including a towing state or a loaded state.

The present invention further provides a vehicle comprising a system according to the invention and said plurality of subsystems. Preferred embodiments of the present invention will now be described by way of example only with reference to the accompanying drawings and the appended claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a diagrammatic representation of a powertrain subsystem of a vehicle according to an embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a diagrammatic representation of steering and brakes subsystems of the vehicle of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a diagrammatic representation of a suspension subsystem of the vehicle of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a diagrammatic representation of a vehicle mode controller controlling the subsystems of FIGS. 1 to 3;

FIGS. 5 and 6 make up a table showing operation of the vehicle mode controller of FIG. 4;

FIG. 7 is a graph showing throttle characteristics in a second embodiment of the invention;

FIGS. 8 and 9 are graphs showing control of differentials forming part of the second embodiment;

FIG. 10 is a graph showing traction control characteristics in the second embodiment

FIG. 11 is a graph showing yaw control characteristics in the second embodiment;

FIG. 12 is a graph showing control of the differentials of the second embodiment;

FIG. 13 shows user inputs forming part of a third embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 14 is a diagrammatic representation of a powertrain subsystem of a vehicle according to a fourth embodiment of the invention; and

FIG. 15 is a diagrammatic representation of part of a suspension subsystem of the vehicle according to the fourth embodiment of the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Referring to FIG. 1, according to a first embodiment of the invention a vehicle 10 has four wheels 11, 12, 13, 14 and a powertrain 16 for providing driving torque to the wheels. The powertrain 16 comprises an engine 18, an automatic transmission 20 which transmits drive torque at any of a number of transmission ratios, via a transfer box 21 to the input side of a center differential 22. Front and rear differentials 24, 26 receive torque from the center differential 22 and transmit it to the front wheels 11, 12 and rear wheels 13, 14 respectively. An engine controller 28 in the form of an engine management system controls operation of the engine 18 so as to control its speed and output power and torque in response to inputs from the driver from a throttle pedal 27, the position of which is measured with a throttle pedal position sensor 29. A transmission controller 30 controls the transmission ratio of the automatic transmission 20, and the selection of high or low range in the transfer box 21. It also controls the center differential 22 so as to control the distribution of drive torque between the front and rear axles, and the rear differential 26 so as to control the distribution of drive torque between the two rear wheels 13, 14. The transmission controller 30 could also control the distribution of drive torque between the front two wheels 13, 14.

Referring to FIG. 2, the vehicle further comprises a steering system 40 for steering the front wheels 11, 12, and a brake system 50 for braking all four wheels 11, 12, 13, and 14. The steering system 40 comprises a steering wheel 41, a steering column 42 for transmitting steering input torque input by the driver to the steering wheel to pinion 43 of a rack and pinion steering system. The pinion 43 transmits the steering torque to a rack 44, which is connected to steering arms 45 by means of which it applies a steering force to the steering knuckles 46 of the front wheels to steer them. A PAS (power assisted steering) motor 47 applies steering forces to the rack 44 to assist the driver in steering the vehicle, under the control of a steering controller 48 which receives inputs from a steering angle sensor 49, which measures the steering angle of the steering wheel 41.

The brake system 50 comprises a brake disk 51, 52, 53, 54, and a brake caliper 55, 56, 57, 58 for each of the wheels each of which is actuated hydraulically from a hydraulic brake control block 60. The hydraulic control block 60 controls the hydraulic pressure and hence the braking torque at each wheel under the control of a brake controller 62 which receives wheel speed signals from wheels speed sensors 63, 64, 65, 66 at each of the wheels. A driver operated brake pedal 67 provides via a master cylinder the driver input to the brake system 50 and creates hydraulic pressure to operate the brakes at a first inlet port 60 a to the control block 60, with the assistance of a brake booster 68. The booster 68 is also controlled by the controller 62 so as to vary the amount of assistance provided by the brake booster 68 and therefore the level of braking effort required from the driver to produce any particular level of braking torque at the wheels. A pump 60 b is also provided which can provide hydraulic pressure to actuate the brakes independently of the brake pedal. The pump 60 b is also controlled by the controller 62. Brake fluid is returned to a reservoir 60 c on return from the brake calipers 55, 56, 57, and 58 from where it is supplied to the pump 60 b or the master cylinder operated by the brake pedal 67. The brake controller 62 also receives an input from a yaw sensor 69 which measures the yaw rate of the vehicle.

Referring to FIG. 3, the vehicle further comprises a suspension system 70 which includes an active air suspension system 72 and an active roll control system 74. The active air suspension system 72 comprises an air spring 76, 77, 78, 79 at each wheel, and a valve block 80 which controls the ride height of each of the wheels 11, 12, 13, 14 and the spring rates of the air springs 76, 77, 78, 79 by controlling the air pressure in each of the air springs, the supply of air under pressure to each of the air springs and the release of air from the air springs. The valve block 80 further controls the degree to which the two front air springs 76, 77 are interconnected, the degree to which the rear air springs 78, 79 are interconnected, and the degree to which the front air springs 76, 77 are interconnected to the rear air springs 78, 79. The valve block 80 is controlled by an air suspension controller 82 which receives ride height signals from ride height sensors 83, 84, 85, 86 arranged to measure the ride height of each of the wheels 11, 12, 13, 14. The suspension controller 82 can also measure the air pressure in each of the air springs 76, 77, 78, 79 using a pressure sensor 88 in the valve block 80, as well as the lateral acceleration of the vehicle using a lateral accelerometer 89.

The active roll control system 74 comprises a front anti-roll bar 90 which is connected between the two front wheels 11, 12 and acts to resist roll of the front of the vehicle, and a rear anti-roll bar 92 which is connected between the two rear wheels 13, 14 and acts to resist roll of the rear of the vehicle. Each of the anti-roll bars 90, 92 is in two halves with a rotary actuator 94, 96 acting between the two halves. These roll control actuators can actively increase (or decrease) the resistance to roll provided by the anti-roll bars by applying a roll correction torque under the control of the suspension controller 82. They can therefore control the roll stiffness of the vehicle.

Within the systems described above there are various functions which can be controlled in different ways depending on the prevailing driving conditions. These functions will now be described.

The suspension system 70 is adjustable between a plurality of ride heights. In this case there are three possible ride heights: “high” which is suitable for off-road driving; “low” which is suitable for high speed driving, for example on motorways, where a low wind resistance is required; and “standard” which is between the “high” and “low” settings and is suitable for most normal on-road driving.

The interconnection between air springs of the active air suspension system 72 on opposite sides of the vehicle is variable between an “open” condition where there is interconnection between the two sides of the vehicle, and “closed” where there is no interconnection. In the “closed” condition the roll stiffness of the vehicle is increased, and so is the overall spring rate of the suspension. This therefore makes the vehicle more suitable for driving on smooth surfaces at higher speeds. In the “open” condition the roll stiffness is decreased, but the suspension can articulate more easily, making it more suitable for driving on rougher surfaces and at lower speeds. The interconnection valves are normally kept in the closed condition to provide high roll stiffness and stabilize the vehicle. Under certain conditions when there is a lot of vertical wheel travel the interconnection valves are opened to reduce resistance to this travel. However the system also needs to close the interconnection at high vehicle speeds to stabilize the vehicle because opening the interconnection reduces resistance to roll as well as resistance to articulation. The system can be varied to vary the amount of wheel travel that is required to cause opening of the interconnection valves, so that the interconnection will open more or less easily, and to vary the vehicle speed above which the interconnection will be kept closed. The system has three settings: standard, medium and maximum. In the standard setting the interconnection will happen up to quite high speeds, of about 50 kph but only at quite high levels of articulation. In the medium setting the interconnection will occur only at lower speeds, but also at lower levels of articulation. In the maximum setting interconnection will occur only up to low speeds, of about 15 kph, but at even lower levels of articulation.

The brake pedal effort is controllable according to a plurality of, in this case two, basic characteristics. These are “high” and “low” requiring relatively high and low levels of braking effort from the driver. However further brake control functions can also be added to these basic characteristics under certain circumstances. For example a “panic assist” function detects very rapid brake pedal depression indicative of emergency braking and provides an increased level of braking assistance in response.

The brake controller 62 provides an ABS (anti-lock) function which is also operable in a number of different configuration modes. There is a “high mu” mode for use on surfaces with a high coefficient of friction. In this mode a relatively high level of slip is allowed to maximize deceleration rates. There is also a “low mu” mode in which only much lower levels of slip are allowed so as to ensure that good control over the vehicle will be maintained at all times. Finally there is also a “plough” mode which is designed for surfaces, such as sand and snow, in which a barrier of matter will build up in front of a wheel which is slipping under braking. In this mode higher levels of slip are allowed even than in the “high mu” mode to take advantage of the braking effect of the build up of material in front of the wheels.

The brake controller 62 and the engine management system 28 also provide an E.T.C. (electronic traction control) function in which the brakes are applied using the pump 60 b to counteract wheel spin caused by the powertrain 16 applying more torque to one or more of the wheels than can be transmitted through the tires to the ground. The detection of wheel spin is carried out using the wheel speed sensors 63, 64, 65, 66. If just one of the wheels is spinning, then that wheel is braked under the control of the brake controller 62. If enough of the wheels are spinning to indicate that the overall drive torque is too high for the surface on which the vehicle is traveling, the engine management system 28 intervenes to reduce the overall power output of the engine 18, thereby reducing wheel spin and maintaining traction. The E.T.C. function has “high mu” and “low mu” modes which, in similar manner to the A.B.S. function, allow higher and lower degrees of wheel spin, or slip, to allow more aggressive driving on higher friction surfaces, but maintain control on lower friction surfaces.

The E.T.C. function also has a sand mode which keeps wheel spin low at low speeds, following the “low mu” mode, to prevent the wheels from digging into the sand, but allows more spin at higher speeds, following the “high mu” mode because at higher speeds on sand higher levels of wheel spin are less of a problem and can even improve traction.

The brake controller 62 also provides a D.S.C. (dynamic stability control) function. This function monitors the vehicle speed and the steering angle using the wheel speed sensors 63, 64, 65, 66 and the steering angle sensor 49 and determines the expected yaw rate of the vehicle. This is compared with the actual yaw rate as measured by the yaw sensor 69, and the brakes are applied at individual wheels to control the vehicle yaw if it starts to deviate in an undesirable way from the expected yaw. Braking one or more of the outside wheels on a corner helps to neutralize oversteer, and braking one or more of the inside wheels on a corner helps to neutralize understeer. This function also has “high mu” and “low mu” modes in which the level of yaw deviation allowed is relatively high and relatively low respectively.

The throttle pedal characteristic, which relates the amount of torque provided by the engine 18 to the position of the throttle pedal 27, can take a number of different forms. These include “quick” characteristic which is highly progressive, causing the torque to increase rapidly at low degrees of pedal displacement and then to increase more slowly at higher degrees of pedal displacement, and a “slow” characteristic in which the torque increases more slowly at lower levels of pedal displacement and more quickly at higher levels of pedal displacement. In an alternative to this type of arrangement the throttle pedal characteristic may relate the vehicle speed directly to the throttle pedal position. In this case the rate at which vehicle speed varies with throttle pedal position can be varied between more and less progressive characteristics.

The transfer box 21 can be shifted between a “high range” and a “low range” to select the range of gear ratios most suitable to the prevailing conditions in known manner.

The automatic transmission 20 has a number of configuration modes each of which defines when shifts between gears will take place, in response to changes in throttle pedal position, vehicle speed, engine speed, engine torque and throttle pedal position, and some other factors which are occasionally relevant such as gearbox temperature and ambient temperature. There is a “normal” mode which provides a reasonable compromise between fuel economy and driving performance, a “performance” which generally keeps the transmission in lower gears than in the normal mode, particularly when the driver is requesting a high level of driving torque to accelerate the vehicle, and a “manual” mode in which the control of gear changes is given completely to the driver. There is also an “ice” mode which generally keeps the transmission in higher gears than the normal mode, in particular under acceleration from rest, to avoid loss of traction due to wheel spin, and a “sand” mode which keeps the transmission in relatively high gears at low speed to avoid excessive wheel spin which can result in the wheels digging themselves into the sand, but uses relatively low gears at higher speeds where a relatively high degree of wheel slip can be desirable to provide maximum traction, and lower gearing helps the engine 18 to remain in an operating region where the engine speed is high and the power output is high, thereby helping to avoid the vehicle becoming “bogged down” by a lack of power.

The center differential 22 and the rear differential 26 each include a clutch pack and are controllable to vary the degree of locking between a “fully open” and a “fully locked” state. The actual degree of locking at any one time is controlled on the basis of a number of factors in a known manner, but the control can be adjusted so that the differentials are “more open” or “more locked”. Specifically the pre-load on the clutch pack can be varied which in turn controls the locking torque, i.e. the torque across the differential that will cause the clutch, and hence the differential, to slip. The front differential could also be controlled in the same way.

Referring to FIG. 4, all of the subsystem controllers, that is the engine management system 28, the transmission controller 30, the steering controller 48, the brakes controller 62 and the suspension controller 82 are all connected to a vehicle mode controller 98 which controls the configuration modes of operation of each of the subsystem controllers. In one example, the vehicle mode controller 98 stores input regarding driving conditions in its memory and provides the appropriate control commands to each subsystem controller. The subsystems, and each of the functions described above, are controlled so as to provide a number of driving modes for the vehicle. Each of the driving modes corresponds to a particular driving condition or set of driving conditions, and in each driving mode each of the functions is set to the function mode most appropriate to those conditions.

The driving modes are selected by means of a driver input 99 which takes the form of a rotary knob which can be rotated by the driver to select any of the driving modes displayed as being available. As an alternative to this rotary knob a touch screen, or a number of push buttons, one for each driving mode, could be used.

Referring to FIGS. 5 and 6, the driving modes include three on-road modes, namely a motorway mode, a country road mode and a city driving mode, four off-road modes, namely a grass mode, a sand mode, a boulder or rock crawl mode and a mud mode, and also a rough road mode, a towing mode, which in this case is arranged for towing on-road and can therefore also be considered one of the on-road modes, and an ice mode. The function modes that these vehicle driving modes include are as follows.

When the vehicle mode controller 98 is in “motorway” mode the vehicle functions and subsystem configurations are optimized for traveling at high speeds on flat surfaces with good levels of friction. The suspension ride height is set at “low” for low wind resistance and good stability. The air suspension interconnection is set at “standard” for good stability. The steering assistance is set so that it will be low at high speeds to give a firm steering feel, but will be speed dependent and increase at low vehicle speeds. The brake pedal effort is set at “high” to avoid rapid deceleration at high speed, but with “panic assist” to ensure that the vehicle can be slowed rapidly in an emergency. The A.B.S, E.T.C and D.S.C are all set to “high mu”. The throttle progression is set to the “slow” characteristic because this is actually more responsive to changes in throttle pedal position at higher levels of pedal displacement which will generally be used on a motorway. The transfer box 21 is set to “high range”, the transmission is set to “normal mode” and the center and rear differentials are both “more open”.

When the vehicle mode controller 98 is in “country road” mode the function settings are the same as for the “motorway” mode, except for the suspension ride height and the transmission. The suspension ride height is set to “standard” because reduced wind resistance is less important and the road may be rougher requiring more ground clearance and more suspension bump travel. The transmission is set to “performance” mode, but the driver has the option of selecting “manual” mode. In an alternative in the country road mode, the throttle progression is set to “quick” and the brake effort set to “low” so as to assist the driver with rapid acceleration and braking.

When the vehicle mode controller 98 is in “city driving” mode, the function settings are again the same as for the “motorway” mode except the suspension ride height and the brake pedal effort. The ride height is set to standard and the brake pedal effort is set to low to assist the driver with the rapid and frequent starting and stopping associated with city driving. The transmission is set to use relatively high gears such as by using the “ice” mode so as to reduce the jerkiness of driving, and can even be set to start in second gear rather than first for the same reason. The throttle is set to the “slow” mode, again to reduce jerkiness. The throttle pedal characteristic is also set to high degree of damping, which uses a low-pass filter on the throttle pedal position signal so that if the pedal is moved quickly, the engine torque does not change as quickly. This also helps to reduce jerkiness. In some cases it might be preferred to use the “quick” mode characteristic with a high degree of damping so as to reduce the amount of pedal movement required from the driver, but still minimize jerkiness.

When the vehicle mode controller 98 is in “towing” mode, this is assumed to be on-road towing and therefore many of the functions are again similar to the other on-road modes. Specifically all of the functions are at the same settings as in “motorway” mode, except the suspension ride height, the D.S.C., and the transfer box. The ride height is again set to “standard”. The D.S.C. is operated in a special “towing” mode which is designed to counteract instability brought about by the trailer. The transfer box 21 is in “high range” since towing will generally be carried out on-road. As an alternative to the selection of “high range” the transmission could be operated in a different configuration mode to help the vehicle to manage heavy towed loads. This could be using the “performance” mode which would tend to keep the transmission in lower gears than normal to help with pulling away under heavy loads. In an alternative towing mode the throttle pedal progression is set to “quick” so as to help avoid stalling on pull-away from rest.

When the vehicle mode controller 98 is in “dirt track” mode many of the vehicle functions will need to be in different configuration modes from the on-road modes described above to take account of the fact that the surface is rough, although the vehicle might still be traveling at quite high speeds, so stability is still important. The ride height is set to “standard”. This is a compromise between being higher to give more suspension travel to accommodate the rough surface, and being lower for better stability. The air suspension interconnection is set to “medium” for good stability. However, if it is assumed that the dirt track will be very rough the interconnection could be set to “maximum” to accommodate the rough surface. The steering assistance is set to be speed dependent as in the motorway driving mode. The brake pedal effort is set to “high” to avoid sudden braking resulting from the jolting of the vehicle due to the rough surface. The A.B.S., E.T.C. and D.S.C. are all set to “low mu” because dirt tracks generally have a relatively high amount of loose material on them, and the friction is therefore generally quite low. The throttle progression is set to “slow” to avoid the jolting of the vehicle, and the resulting bouncing of the driver's foot on the accelerator pedal from producing undesired changes in the demanded level of torque. The transfer box 21 is in “high range” because speeds will generally be reasonably high. The transmission is in “normal” configuration mode for the same reason. The differential locks are both set to “more open”.

When the vehicle mode controller 98 is in “ice” mode, the functions are set up to provide maximum stability on a slippery surface. The ride height setting is not critical to this requirement, but is set to “standard” configuration mode for the same reasons as in “dirt track” driving mode. The air suspension interconnection is set to “standard” to give good stability. The steering assistance is set to a low level of assistance because steering tends to become very “light” on ice and reducing the assistance will reduce the tendency of the driver to change the steering angle too much and too quickly. The brake pedal effort is set to “high” to avoid sudden braking which might reduce stability. The A.B.S., E.T.C. and D.S.C. are all set to “low mu” to maintain stability. The throttle progression is set to “slow” to avoid too rapid changes in torque demand which could cause wheel spin. The transfer box 21 is set to high range because speeds might still be relatively high, particularly if the vehicle is being driven on snowy roads. The automatic transmission 20 is set to “ice” mode configuration mode described above. Both of the differentials are set to “more open” for maximum stability.

‘Grass’ driving mode is similar to ‘ice’ driving mode because both are reasonably flat surfaces with low friction. Therefore many of the functions are in similar configuration modes to the “ice” mode. The differences are that the air suspension interconnection is set to “medium” or “maximum” to give better articulation which helps to improve traction, the transfer box 21 is in “low range” because driving speeds will generally be low on grass, and the center differential 22 is set to “more locked” to improve traction, in particular when climbing and descending hills. The rear differential 26 could be closed to improve traction, but this would adversely affect stability under some circumstances. It can therefore be closed at low speeds, but open increasingly as speed increases, for example above a threshold of 15 or 20 kph, to increase stability.

In “sand” driving mode the functions are the same as for “grass” mode configuration modes except the A.B.S., throttle progression and transmission. The A.B.S. is in the “plough surface” mode described above. The throttle progression is set to “quick” and the transmission is in the specifically designed “sand” mode described above. The E.T.C. is also set to the “sand” mode. The differentials are set to a standard setting.

In “boulder” driving mode the vehicle will generally be traveling at very low speeds and the chances of complete loss of traction at one or more wheels is quite high. The suspension is set to “high” to give good ground clearance. The air suspension interconnection is set to “maximum” to give good articulation. The steering assistance is set to high because required steering torques can be high. The A.B.S. is set to “high mu”, although another possibility is to operate the A.B.S. in a de-sensitized mode. In this mode, at least at low speed and when the steering angle is low, i.e. the driver is steering straight, very high levels of slip, or even total wheel lock are allowed. However, as the steering angle increases above a set limit indicating that steering is required, wheel lock is again prevented to improve steering control. The E.T.C. is set to “low mu” because wheel spin is very likely to occur. Another option is to provide a special E.T.C. mode in which the brakes are pre-pressurized either permanently or when high degrees of wheel articulation are detected, to pre-empt the occurrence of wheel spin. The D.S.C. is set to “high mu” because it is unlikely that it will be used. Again, another option here is to disable the D.S.C. function altogether, at least below a relatively low threshold speed of, for example, 10 or 15 kph. The throttle progression is set to “slow” to give the driver the best possible control at low speeds. The transfer box 21 is set to “low range”. The automatic transmission 20 is set to “manual mode” because it is unlikely that the driver will want to change gear at all, and any undesired change of gear might affect the stability of the vehicle. The center and rear differentials are both set to “more locked” to give good traction.

Finally, in “mud” driving mode the functions are set to the same settings as in “grass” driving mode, except for the suspension ride height which is set to “high” to give better clearance over deep mud, and the rear differential 26 which is set to “more locked” to give better traction. The air suspension interlock can also be set to “maximum” in order to maximize traction.

A second embodiment of the invention will now be described. In this embodiment all of the subsystem configurations are substantially the same as in the first embodiment, the second embodiment differing only in the manner in which the subsystems configurations are controlled. Some of the controlled functions described above are not altered by the driving mode selected, and one further function, a hill descent function, is included in the brake controller 62, as will be described in more detail below. The second embodiment will therefore also be described with reference to FIGS. 1 to 4.

In the second embodiment the functions which are controlled by the vehicle mode controller 98 are the throttle pedal characteristic, the gear changes in the transmission 20, the locking torque of the center and rear differentials 22, 26, the traction control function, the yaw control function provided by the D.S.C. system, the air suspension ride height, the suspension cross linking, and the hill descent control function. The hill descent control defines a target speed and uses the brakes to control the vehicle speed to the target speed as the vehicle descends a hill. The target speed has a default value which is nominally 6 kph, but can be increased by depressing the accelerator pedal 27 and decreased by depressing the brake pedal down to a minimum value of 3 kph. The default target speed can be varied depending on the mode selected. The differential controller 30 is also arranged to receive inputs from the steering angle sensor 49 and the ride height sensors 83, 84, 85, 86, and to vary the locking torque of each of the center and rear differentials 22, 26 in response to those inputs. When high steering angles are detected the locking torque, in particular of the rear differential 26 26, is reduced so as to allow the wheels to rotate at different speeds as is required under cornering. When high levels of suspension articulation, indicated by large differences is ride heights between the wheels, is detected, the locking torque is generally increased as there is an increased likelihood of wheels slipping.

The driving modes which are selectable in the second embodiment are: a standard mode, a grass/gravel/snow mode, a mud/ruts mode, a sand mode, a rock crawl (boulder)mode, and a dynamic mode. The control of the vehicle in each of these modes will now be described.

In the standard driving mode, the configuration modes for the various systems are designed to be a compromise that will be suitable for all conditions. The throttle characteristic, gearbox control, traction control and DSC are set to be suitable for normal on-road driving. Referring to FIG. 7 the throttle characteristic, which relates engine drive torque to throttle pedal depression, is indicated by curve A which provides a steady increase in torque with increasing throttle depression. The differentials are also controlled in a manner suitable for normal on-road driving. Referring to FIG. 8 the differential locking torque is arranged to start at a pre-load level and increase gradually with slip across the differential as shown in curve A. Referring to FIG. 9, the locking torque is also arranged to increase gradually with suspension articulation as indicated by curve A. The differential controller are also arranged to give a degree of yaw control via the rear differential 26. The HDC system is switched off, the suspension ride height is set to standard ride height and the suspension cross linking is set to its minimum. Referring to FIG. 10, the traction control is arranged to provide a braking torque to any wheel which is detected as spinning, the torque starting when the spinning reaches a predetermined threshold level, and increasing gradually with increasing wheel spin as indicated by curve A. Referring to FIG. 11, the D.S.C. system is arranged to provide a steering torque by applying a differential in braking torque between the two sides of the vehicle. This brake steering torque starts when the yaw error rate, which is the difference between the expected yaw rate and the measured yaw rate, reaches a predetermined level and increases with increasing yaw error rate as shown by curve A.

The grass/gravel/snow driving mode is intended for use on grass, gravel and snow and other low friction surfaces into which the wheels of the vehicle will not sink to a significant depth. In this driving mode the throttle characteristic is set to provide a gentle response, that is a low increase in drive torque for any change in throttle pedal position over most of the range of throttle pedal position, as shown by curve B. At high levels of pedal depression the torque increases at a more rapid rate so that the maximum torque can be achieved at full throttled pedal depression. This characteristic is arranged to avoid wheel spin by giving a gentle response within the normal range of throttle pedal positions. The gearbox control is also arranged to avoid wheel spin, and is therefore arranged to change up gears relatively early, i.e. at relatively low throttle pedal depressions and engine speeds, and to change down gears relatively late, i.e. at relatively low engine speeds. The differentials are arranged to have an increased locking torque generally, compared to the standard driving mode, as shown by curve B in FIG. 8, so as to reduce the amount of wheel spin which is more likely to occur on low friction surfaces. The differential controller 30 is also arranged to respond more rapidly to detected slipping of the differentials, increasing the locking torque more rapidly in response to detected slip of the differentials than in the standard mode. The response of the differentials to suspension articulation is the same as in standard mode. The traction control is arranged to respond more quickly to wheel spin, as shown by curve B in FIG. 10, by braking spinning wheels more rapidly and therefore allowing less spin than in the standard mode. The braking starts at lower levels of spin and increases more rapidly with increasing spin, compared to the standard mode. The engine intervention within the traction control is switched on so as to further reduce the likelihood of wheel spin. The D.S.C. system is set up as for the standard mode. The hill descent control function is switched on with a low default target speed of, for example, 3 or 4 kph to improve control of the vehicle when descending hills in slippery conditions. The suspension ride height is set to standard, and the suspension cross linking is set to standard since on these surfaces high degrees of articulation are not expected. Alternatively the cross linking could be set to medium or even maximum to improve traction, provided the cut-out speed at which the interconnection is closed is low to avoid loss of stability.

In the mud/ruts driving mode, the throttle characteristic, gearbox control, differential control and stability control are the same is in grass/gravel/snow driving mode. The traction control is also the same except that the engine intervention is switched off, or at least minimized. The differential control is the same as for grass/gravel/sand driving mode, but the sensitivity of the control to changes in steering angle is reduced since the relatively small amount of wheel slip that will result from cornering is less likely to cause a loss of traction than is the spinning of one of the wheels due to a loss of grip. Specifically referring to FIG. 12, the differential control includes a turning factor which starts to decrease the locking torque when the steering angle increases above 120° and reduces the locking torque to zero when the steering angle reaches 200°. This is to prevent the differentials from inhibiting cornering. In the mud/ruts driving mode the reduction in locking torque in response to turning is reduced because maintaining traction takes a higher priority than accurate steering under those conditions. The D.S.C. system is de-sensitized as shown by curve B in FIG. 11. The hill descent control is switched on with the standard default target speed of 6 kph to provide maximum control on hills, the suspension ride height is set to the high setting so as to increase ground clearance, which is desirable in deep mud and ruts, and the suspension cross linking is set to the maximum setting to maximize traction.

In the sand driving mode, the subsystem configuration modes are set up for driving on sand, and in particular to provide the best traction on sand. The throttle characteristic is as shown by curve C in FIG. 7, and is arranged to be relatively gentle at low degrees of throttle pedal depression so as to reduce the chances of wheel spin at low speeds. Therefore at low degrees of pedal depression the torque produced is lower, for any given pedal position, than in the standard mode. However at high degrees of throttle pedal progression the drive torque demand increase more rapidly with throttle pedal depression so as to produce more power more quickly than in the standard mode. Therefore at high degrees of throttle pedal depression the torque produced for any given pedal position is higher than in the standard mode. Similarly the transmission control operates in the sand mode described above in the first embodiment. The differential control is the same as in the mud/ruts mode, again having a low sensitivity to steering angle for the same reason. The traction control system is set up to allow higher levels of wheel spin than in the standard mode as shown by curve C in FIG. 10. As an alternative to this the traction control may use a special sand mode configuration as described above for the first embodiment in which wheel spin is kept very low at low vehicle speeds, but is allowed to increase to relatively high levels at higher vehicle speeds. The engine intervention is switched off to prevent undesirable reductions in drive torque. The D.S.C. system is set to a low sensitivity as shown by curve C in FIG. 11, brake steer torque being introduced only at high levels of yaw rate error and increasing slowly with increasing yaw rate error. As an alternative the D.S.C. system can be turned off altogether in sand mode. The hill descent control is switched off because sand generally provides a high degree of drag and the vehicle either needs to be driven positively down a hill rather than braked, or, if braking is required, engine braking is generally sufficient. The suspension ride height is set to standard height and the suspension cross linking is set to minimum.

In the rock crawl driving mode the throttle characteristic is set, as in grass/gravel/snow and mud/ruts driving modes, to follow curve B in FIG. 7, i.e. to be relatively insensitive to changes in throttle pedal position over the range of positions usually used. Gearbox control is also set up as for grass/gravel/snow and mud/ruts driving modes. The differentials are set up to follow curve B in FIG. 8, i.e. to have a higher starting locking torque than in grass/gravel/snow and mud/ruts driving modes, and to increase the locking torque more rapidly in response to differences in wheel speeds between the vehicles wheels, as measured by slip across the differentials. The response of the differential control to suspension articulation is also increased as shown by curve B in FIG. 9, with the rate of change of locking torque with increasing articulation being higher than in the standard mode. The traction control and D.S.C. are set up as in the mud/ruts mode, the traction control following curve B in FIG. 10 to provide an increased sensitivity to wheel spin, and the D.S.C. following curve B in FIG. 11 to provide a decreased sensitivity to yaw rate error. The hill descent control is switched on with a low default target speed of, for example 3 kph, the suspension ride height is set to high to give best ground clearance and the suspension cross linking is set to maximum to allow maximum suspension articulation.

As an alternative, an improved rock crawl driving mode may be included in which the subsystem configuration modes are selected to achieve and maintain the requested vehicle speed. The engine controller 28 in the form of an engine management system controls operation of the engine 18 so as to control its speed and output power and torque in response to driver inputs. The driver inputs may be in the form of the traditional cruise control switches, or preferably via the accelerator pedal. The engine controller 28 will operate as a torque controller and will determine the error between actual road speed and the requested road speed demanded by the driver. This error will then be managed by the engine controller 28. One alternative for managing the error would consist of a proportional, integral and differential term strategy. The engine controller 28 will be optimized to enable the requested road speed to be achieved and maintained, using up to maximum available torque while providing comfort and predictability to the driver. As shown in FIG. 7, the accelerator pedal will allow large throttle movement resulting in small requested changes in road speed. This will help to alleviate the movement of the driver's foot caused by the sometimes-violent movement of the vehicle over rough terrain. As the accelerator pedal moves toward full travel, it may transfer from a vehicle speed controller to a torque controller, to enable the driver to accelerate at a higher rate. AT zero pedal position, the road speed request will be zero to provide maximum engine braking and idle.

The improved rock crawl mode may also include an improved Hill Descent control system. In the event in which the brakes are used to control road speed where maximum engine braking has been reached but the road speed is still higher than the requested driver input speed, the hill descent control would control to a specific road speed or zero road speed if the throttle were closed.

Finally, a dynamic driving mode is included which is intended for more sporty driving. In this mode the throttle pedal characteristic follows curve D in FIG. 7, being arranged to produce the most engine torque for any given throttle pedal position, and the most rapid increase in engine torque in response to throttle pedal depression, over the lower range of throttle pedal depressions. The gearbox control is also arranged to keep the gearbox in lower gear then in the standard mode, with the changes up being delayed when the vehicle is accelerating and changes down being made early when the vehicle is slowing, so as to give the best acceleration and the most engine braking on deceleration. The traction control and D.S.C and differentials are set to the same settings as in standard driving mode, the suspension is set to its lowest ride height, and the hill descent control is turned off.

Referring to FIG. 13, in a third embodiment of the invention the driving mode in which the vehicle operates is determined by two separate inputs. One input, a rotary terrain knob 100, allows the user to input the type of terrain over which the vehicle is being driven. The other input, a rotary “mode of use” knob 102 allows the user to input the mode in which the vehicle is to be used. This can include vehicle modes relating to the manner in which the vehicle is to respond to the driver's inputs, such as a sport mode or an economy mode, as well as modes relating to the state of the vehicle, such as a towing mode suitable for towing a trailer, and a laden mode for when the vehicle is carrying a particularly heavy load. In this example the vehicle “mode of use” knob allows selection of normal, sport, and towing vehicle driving modes. The sport driving mode is adapted for use when the vehicle is being driven in a “sporty” manner, characterized for example by one or more of: rapid acceleration and braking, high cornering speeds, high engine speeds and relatively low gears for any given vehicle speed.

The terrain selection input allows the selection of standard, grass/gravel/snow, mud/ruts, sand, and rocks driving modes as in the second embodiment. When the “mode of use” input is set to normal the operating modes of the vehicle correspond to the driving modes in the second embodiment. If the mode-of-use input is turned to towing mode, then each of the terrain modes selected is modified to make the vehicle more effective at towing. For example, the suspension ride height is locked, or changes in height restricted, so as to avoid tilting the trailer, and the throttle map and gear change map are modified so as to provide a high level of torque when pulling away from rest. When the sport mode-of-use is selected, the subsystem configuration modes are controlled so as to provide a sporty driving feel: the suspension is lowered, the throttle map and gear change maps are modified to provide rapid acceleration and high levels of engine braking.

In some terrains, one or more of the mode-of-use selections may be inappropriate and selection of those modes-of-use may not result in modification of the vehicle control when those terrains are selected. For example the sport mode-of-use may not be selectable, or may have no effect on the vehicle, of selected in combination with rock crawl, mud/ruts or grass/gravel/snow. Towing is, however, selectable with all terrain selections.

Referring to FIG. 14 a vehicle according to a fourth embodiment of the invention has a powertrain similar to that of the first embodiment and shown in FIG. 1, and corresponding parts are indicated by the same reference numeral increased by 100. The difference between this embodiment and the first is that the center differential is replaced by a power take off system 122 which includes a direct coupling 122 a between the transfer box 121 and the front differential 124, and a clutch mechanism 122 b which can be controlled by the powertrain controller 130 to redirect drive torque to the rear differential 126 and hence to the rear wheels 113 114. Under normal driving conditions the clutch mechanism 122 b allows substantially all of the driving torque to be transmitted directly to the front wheels via the front differential 124. However, if the front wheels start to slip, as detected for example by wheel speed sensors, then the clutch mechanism 122 b is operated to direct drive torque to the rear wheels 113, 114 via the rear differential 126. The proportion of the drive torque which is re-directed to the rear differential 126 is controlled so as to reduce the amount of slip at the front wheels to an acceptable level. The clutch 122 b is set to a pre-load which is variable, and the clutch load is then increased in response to detected slip of the front wheels 111, 112. In situations where good traction is required, a high pre-load and high sensitivity to slip are desirable. For good dynamic performance a low re-load is desirable and sensitivity to slip is less important. For on-road driving, low pre-load and sensitivity are provided, and for off-road driving a higher pre-load and higher sensitivity are provided. If a sand mode is provided the degree of slip is set to be low at low speeds and higher at higher speeds in a similar manner to the traction control system.

Referring to FIG. 15, the fourth embodiment also includes, as well as springs 176 in its suspension system, dampers 177 arranged to damp vertical movement of the wheels 111 relative to the vehicle's body 115. The dampers 177, only one of which is shown, are electrically controlled, having a variable damping rate, which is variable between a high level, where relatively high resistance is provided to vertical wheel travel, and a lower rate at which less resistance is provided. The damping of each of the dampers 177 is controlled by the suspension controller 182. The damping can be controlled in response to a number of parameters such as vehicle speed and steering angle to improve ride and handling. The amount of damping is also varied depending on which mode is selected. In on-road modes a high degree of damping is generally provided to give good handling, and in off-road modes lower damping is provided to give good traction.

In this fourth embodiment, the vehicle mode controller 98 uses information passed on from the various subsystem controllers relating to the nature of the surface over which the vehicle is traveling, the manner in which the vehicle is being driven, and the way in which the vehicle is being used, to select an appropriate mode automatically. For example, the wheel speed sensors and ride height sensor are used to classify the nature of the surface as on-road or off-road, high friction or low friction, etc. The powertrain controller 130 and steering angle sensor 49 are used to classify the driving style as normal or sporty. It is also possible to determine from the various sensors whether the vehicle is heavily laden.

The automatic mode selection can either be the sole means of selecting modes, giving the driver no input to the mode selection process. Alternatively it may be advisory, with the driving having the option to override the automatic selection of mode. In a further alternative the driver may have the primary control over the selection of the driving mode, with the vehicle mode controller 98 over-riding the driver's selection if the driving conditions or driving style of the driver make the driver's selection unsafe.

It will be appreciated that the number of available modes can be varied depending on the requirements for a particular vehicle. For example in the simplest case, it might be that only two modes were required, which might be the standard mode which would be suitable for “on-road” driving and the rock crawl mode which would be suitable for “off-road driving”. Alternatively, there could be one on-road mode and two off-road modes, for example the rock crawl mode and the grass/gravel/snow mode.

Having thus described the invention of the present application in detail and by reference to preferred embodiments thereof, it will be apparent that modifications and variations are possible without departing from the scope of the invention defined in the appended claims.

Claims (20)

1. A vehicle control system having a driver input for selecting a driving surface, the vehicle control system arranged to control a plurality of vehicle subsystems each of which is operable in a plurality of subsystem configuration modes, wherein the vehicle control system is operable in a plurality of driving modes in each of which it is arranged to select the subsystem configuration modes in a manner suitable for a respective driving surface.
2. A vehicle control system according to claim 1, wherein the driving modes comprise a plurality of different driving modes suitable for different conditions of the vehicle.
3. A vehicle control system according to claim 1 wherein the driving modes include an off-road mode in which the subsystem configurations are controlled in a manner suitable for driving on rough terrain and an on-road mode in which the subsystem configurations are controlled in a manner suitable for driving on-road.
4. A vehicle control system according to claim 1 wherein the driving modes include at least one low friction mode in which the subsystem configurations are controlled in a manner suitable for driving on low friction surfaces and a high friction mode in which the subsystem configurations are controlled in a manner suitable for driving on high friction surfaces.
5. A vehicle control system according to claim 4 wherein the low friction mode is arranged to be suitable for driving on grass, gravel and snow.
6. A vehicle control system according to claim 1 wherein the driving modes are selectable by a driver of the vehicle.
7. A vehicle control system according to claim 6 wherein the driving modes are selectable by means of two inputs, one of which is a terrain selection input arranged to influence the configuration mode selected on the basis of the terrain selected, and the other which is a mode of use input arranged to influence the configuration mode selected on the basis of a selected mode of use of the vehicle.
8. A vehicle control system according to claim 6 wherein the mode of use input is arranged to allow selection between a plurality of driving styles.
9. A vehicle control system according to claim 8 wherein the driving style includes a sport style.
10. A vehicle control system according to claim 1 further comprising sensing means arranged to sense at least one parameter wherein the control system is arranged to select said driving modes on the basis of said parameter.
11. A vehicle control system according to claim 10 wherein the parameter varies with the manner in which the vehicle is being used.
12. A vehicle control system according to any one of claims 1-11 in which the vehicle control system is further included in a motor vehicle.
13. A vehicle control system according to claim 1 further comprising a driver input for selecting a mode of use.
14. A method of controlling a plurality of subsystems within a motor vehicle in a manner suitable for a respective driving surface, the subsystems each being operable in a plurality of subsystem configuration modes, the method comprising the steps of:
connecting a vehicle mode controller to the vehicle subsystems, the vehicle mode controller having a plurality of driving modes and a driver input for selecting a driving surface;
storing a set of control commands from the plurality of driving modes in a memory of the vehicle mode controller in response to the driver input of a driving surface;
transmitting the set of stored control commands to each of the plurality of vehicle subsystems; and
selecting of a set of subsystem control parameters by each of the plurality of vehicle subsystems so as to provide the appropriate operation of each of the vehicle subsystems.
15. The method claimed in claim 14, wherein at least one of the driving modes is a rock crawl mode.
16. A method of controlling a plurality of subsystems within a motor vehicle in a manner suitable for a respective driving surface, the subsystems each being operable in a plurality of subsystem configuration modes, the method comprising the steps of:
connecting a vehicle mode controller to the vehicle subsystems, the vehicle mode controller having a plurality of driving modes, a driver input for selecting a driving surface, and a plurality of subsystem sensor information;
storing a set of control commands from the plurality of driving modes in a memory of the vehicle mode controller in response to the plurality of subsystem sensor information and the driver input of the driving surface;
transmitting the set of stored control commands to each of the plurality of vehicle subsystems; and
selecting of a set of subsystem control parameters by each of the plurality of vehicle subsystems so as to provide the appropriate operation of each of the vehicle subsystems.
17. A computer program product comprising a medium on which or in which, when executed in a computer system, will perform the method as in any one of claims 14-16.
18. A vehicle control system having a driver input for selecting a surface terrain, the vehicle control system arranged to control a plurality of vehicle subsystems each of which is operable in a plurality of subsystem configuration modes, wherein the vehicle control system is operable in a plurality of driving modes in each of which it is arranged to select the subsystem configuration modes in a manner suitable for a respective surface terrain.
19. A vehicle control system according to claim 18, wherein one of the plurality of vehicle subsystems is a suspension subsystem.
20. A vehicle control system according to claim 19, wherein the plurality of vehicle subsystems further comprise a steering subsystem, a brake subsystem, an engine management subsystem, and a transmission subsystem.
US10249551 2002-04-18 2003-04-17 Vehicle control Active 2024-10-27 US7349776B2 (en)

Priority Applications (4)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB0208877A GB0208877D0 (en) 2002-04-18 2002-04-18 Behicle control
GB0208877.1 2002-04-18
GB0229951.9 2002-12-20
GB0229951A GB0229951D0 (en) 2002-04-18 2002-12-20 Vehicle control

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US15277516 USRE46828E1 (en) 2002-04-18 2016-09-27 Vehicle control

Related Child Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US15277516 Reissue USRE46828E1 (en) 2002-04-18 2016-09-27 Vehicle control

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20030200016A1 true US20030200016A1 (en) 2003-10-23
US7349776B2 true US7349776B2 (en) 2008-03-25

Family

ID=28676507

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10249551 Active 2024-10-27 US7349776B2 (en) 2002-04-18 2003-04-17 Vehicle control

Country Status (2)

Country Link
US (1) US7349776B2 (en)
EP (1) EP1355209A1 (en)

Cited By (70)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20050004730A1 (en) * 2003-07-03 2005-01-06 Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki Kaisha Vehicle-rollover detecting apparatus and vehicle-rollover detecting method
US20060231314A1 (en) * 2005-04-14 2006-10-19 Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki Kaisha Four-wheel drive vehicle running normally and with object towed thereby
US20070101236A1 (en) * 2005-11-03 2007-05-03 Bauerle Paul A Method and system for performing function-specific memory checks within a vehicle-based control system
US20080243336A1 (en) * 2006-05-09 2008-10-02 Fitzgibbons Patrick J Mobility Traction Control System and Method
US20090099727A1 (en) * 2006-03-22 2009-04-16 Gm Global Technology Operations, Inc. Vehicle subsystem control method and apparatus
US20090112437A1 (en) * 2007-10-29 2009-04-30 Ford Global Technologies, Llc Traction Control for Performance and Demonstration Spin
US20090143937A1 (en) * 2007-12-04 2009-06-04 Lockheed Martin Corporation GPS-based traction control system using wirelessly received weather data
US20090143936A1 (en) * 2007-12-03 2009-06-04 Craig William C GPS-based system and method for controlling vehicle characteristics based on terrain
US20090150036A1 (en) * 2007-12-05 2009-06-11 Craig William C GPS-based traction control system and method using data transmitted between vehicles
US20090210112A1 (en) * 2004-06-25 2009-08-20 Continental Teves Ag & Co. Ohg Process and device for stabilising a vehicle
US20100179726A1 (en) * 2007-07-16 2010-07-15 Knorr-Bremse Systeme Fuer Nutzfahrzeuge Gmbh Apparatus and Method for Identifying in Advance Overrun Phases of a Vehicle
US20100211277A1 (en) * 2009-02-17 2010-08-19 Lockheed Martin Corporation System and method for stability control of vehicle and trailer
US20100211248A1 (en) * 2009-02-17 2010-08-19 Lockheed Martin Corporation System and method for stability control using gps data
US20100211278A1 (en) * 2009-02-17 2010-08-19 Lockheed Martin Corporation System and method for stability control
US20100320703A1 (en) * 2009-06-19 2010-12-23 Pin Hsiu Rubber Co., Ltd. Intelligent electronic air suspension system that automatically adjusts its air pressure
US20110021301A1 (en) * 2007-08-02 2011-01-27 Tetsushi Asano Hydraulic vehicle clutch system, drivetrain for a vehicle including same, and method
US7878178B2 (en) 2005-08-18 2011-02-01 Honeywell International Inc. Emissions sensors for fuel control in engines
US20110071653A1 (en) * 2009-09-24 2011-03-24 Honeywell International Inc. Method and system for updating tuning parameters of a controller
US20110087404A1 (en) * 2008-06-17 2011-04-14 Continental Automotive Gmbh Method for Operating A Control Device of A Motor Vehicle and Control Device of A Motor Vehicle for Carrying Out The Method
US20110112743A1 (en) * 2009-11-06 2011-05-12 Ahn Samuel S Throttle compensation for second gear starts in manual transmission vehicles
US20110196584A1 (en) * 2010-02-05 2011-08-11 Fox Andrew J Control system and method for automatic selection of a low range gear ratio for a vehicle drivetrain
US20110195812A1 (en) * 2010-02-05 2011-08-11 Bobbie Burke Transversely mounted transaxle having a low range gear assembly and powertrain for a vehicle including same
US20110218725A1 (en) * 2010-03-02 2011-09-08 Toyota Motor Engineering & Manufacturing North America, Inc. Method and system for varying an output of a driveforce unit based on load data
US20110307130A1 (en) * 2010-05-13 2011-12-15 Coda Automotive, Inc. Selectable driving modes
WO2012000806A1 (en) 2010-07-01 2012-01-05 Avl List Gmbh Method for controlling a hybrid vehicle
US20120083981A1 (en) * 2010-09-30 2012-04-05 Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki Kaisha Vehicle running control apparatus
US8165786B2 (en) 2005-10-21 2012-04-24 Honeywell International Inc. System for particulate matter sensor signal processing
US8265854B2 (en) 2008-07-17 2012-09-11 Honeywell International Inc. Configurable automotive controller
WO2012127503A2 (en) * 2011-03-18 2012-09-27 Indian Institute Of Technology Bombay Yaw rate control in motor vehicles
WO2013004764A1 (en) 2011-07-04 2013-01-10 Land Rover Vehicle control system and method for controlling a vehicle
WO2013007800A1 (en) 2011-07-13 2013-01-17 Land Rover Vehicle control system and method
US8364369B2 (en) 2010-07-30 2013-01-29 Honda Motor Co., Ltd. Low range drive ratio transfer changeover anti-rollback system and method
CN103068658A (en) * 2010-08-30 2013-04-24 丰田自动车株式会社 The vehicle control system
US8452504B2 (en) 2010-07-30 2013-05-28 Honda Motor Co., Ltd. Control system and method for automatic control of selection of on-demand all-wheel drive assembly for a vehicle drivetrain
WO2013104641A1 (en) 2012-01-09 2013-07-18 Jaguar Land Rover Limited Vehicle rollback control apparatus and method
WO2013110759A2 (en) 2012-01-25 2013-08-01 Jaguar Land Rover Limited Adaptive control of motor vehicle powertrain
WO2013110761A1 (en) 2012-01-25 2013-08-01 Jaguar Land Rover Limited Adaptive control of motor vehicle powertrain
WO2013110758A1 (en) 2012-01-25 2013-08-01 Jaguar Land Rover Limited Adaptive control of motor vehicle powertrain
WO2013110760A1 (en) 2012-01-25 2013-08-01 Jaguar Land Rover Limited Adaptive control of motor vehicle powertrain
US8504175B2 (en) 2010-06-02 2013-08-06 Honeywell International Inc. Using model predictive control to optimize variable trajectories and system control
WO2013120546A1 (en) 2012-02-13 2013-08-22 Jaguar Cars Ltd Driver advice system for a vehicle
USRE44452E1 (en) 2004-12-29 2013-08-27 Honeywell International Inc. Pedal position and/or pedal change rate for use in control of an engine
WO2013124321A1 (en) 2012-02-20 2013-08-29 Jaguar Land Rover Limited Method of speed control for a vehicle
US8534409B2 (en) 2010-07-30 2013-09-17 Honda Motor Co., Ltd. Drivetrain for a vehicle and method of controlling same
US20130253756A1 (en) * 2012-03-21 2013-09-26 Fuji Jukogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Vehicle control system
US8561749B2 (en) 2011-09-19 2013-10-22 Hb Performance Systems, Inc. ATV or UTV differential with integrated sensors
US8600614B2 (en) 2011-02-05 2013-12-03 Ford Global Technologies, Llc System and method for integrated control of vehicle control systems
US20140005898A1 (en) * 2012-06-29 2014-01-02 Caterpillar Inc. Machine control system
WO2014139875A1 (en) 2013-03-15 2014-09-18 Jaguar Land Rover Limited Vehicle speed control system and method
US8874346B2 (en) 2012-11-15 2014-10-28 Caterpillar Inc. System with blended anti-lock and stability control
GB2514162A (en) * 2013-05-16 2014-11-19 Jaguar Land Rover Ltd Vehicle speed control system
US20150073658A1 (en) * 2013-09-06 2015-03-12 Volkswagen Ag Method and apparatus for operating a cushioning system for a motor vehicle
US9007199B2 (en) 2013-01-29 2015-04-14 Honda Motor Co., Ltd. Drive mode selector
WO2015059235A2 (en) 2013-10-23 2015-04-30 Jaguar Land Rover Limited Improvements in vehicle speed control
US20150226134A1 (en) * 2014-02-11 2015-08-13 Pao Shan AN Apparatus for increasing vehicle drive power output
US9205869B2 (en) 2010-08-16 2015-12-08 Honda Motor Co., Ltd. System and method for determining a steering angle for a vehicle and system and method for controlling a vehicle based on same
US9333975B2 (en) 2011-02-05 2016-05-10 Ford Global Technologies, Llc Method and system to detect and mitigate customer dissatisfaction with performance of automatic mode selection system
US9376108B2 (en) 2012-06-07 2016-06-28 Jaguar Land Rover Limited Vehicle steering
US20160194001A1 (en) * 2013-08-07 2016-07-07 Jaguar Land Rover Limited Vehicle speed control system and method
US20160311444A1 (en) * 2014-01-09 2016-10-27 Kawasaki Jukogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Vehicle, and method of assisting driving of same
US9493160B2 (en) 2012-08-16 2016-11-15 Jaguar Land Rover Limited Vehicle speed control system
US9623879B2 (en) 2014-02-18 2017-04-18 Honda Motor Co., Ltd. System for operating vehicle in different driving modes and methods for same
US9650934B2 (en) 2011-11-04 2017-05-16 Honeywell spol.s.r.o. Engine and aftertreatment optimization system
US9677493B2 (en) 2011-09-19 2017-06-13 Honeywell Spol, S.R.O. Coordinated engine and emissions control system
US9701308B2 (en) 2012-08-16 2017-07-11 Jaguar Land Rover Limited Vehicle speed control system
US9701309B2 (en) 2012-08-16 2017-07-11 Jaguar Land Rover Limited Vehicle speed control system
US9969392B2 (en) 2013-10-23 2018-05-15 Jaguar Land Rover Limited Vehicle speed control system
US10036338B2 (en) 2016-04-26 2018-07-31 Honeywell International Inc. Condition-based powertrain control system
US10035510B2 (en) 2016-05-27 2018-07-31 Ford Global Technologies, Llc Adaptive drive control low-traction detection and mode selection
US10053102B2 (en) 2014-06-11 2018-08-21 Jaguar Land Rover Limited Vehicle control system and method for automatic control of vehicle subsystems

Families Citing this family (94)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6879898B2 (en) * 2003-01-03 2005-04-12 General Motors Corporation Method and apparatus for vehicle integrated chassis control system
US7765043B2 (en) * 2003-05-12 2010-07-27 Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki Kaisha Power supply control apparatus and method
GB0314236D0 (en) * 2003-06-19 2003-07-23 Ford Global Tech Llc Improved method of vehicle control
US6874383B2 (en) * 2003-06-23 2005-04-05 Zf Meritor, Llc Adaptive shift sequencing
US7004870B2 (en) 2004-02-25 2006-02-28 Dana Corporation Integrated torque and roll control system
JP4161923B2 (en) * 2004-03-09 2008-10-08 株式会社デンソー Vehicle stability control system
US7207409B2 (en) 2004-03-10 2007-04-24 American Axle & Manufacturing, Inc. Two speed all wheel drive system
US8380416B2 (en) * 2004-03-18 2013-02-19 Ford Global Technologies Method and apparatus for controlling brake-steer in an automotive vehicle in reverse
GB2412448B (en) * 2004-03-22 2008-05-28 Ford Global Tech Llc Powertrain control systems
DE102004015311A1 (en) * 2004-03-30 2005-10-20 Bosch Gmbh Robert Adapting a vehicle stabilization system to the road surface
CN1680160A (en) * 2004-04-07 2005-10-12 丰田工机株式会社 Steering system for vehicle
US7021723B1 (en) * 2004-04-23 2006-04-04 Thomas Neil Kaufman Operating system for towed vehicle electric brakes
JP4549738B2 (en) * 2004-05-27 2010-09-22 株式会社日立製作所 The control system and control system and a control method for a vehicle
DE102004040829B4 (en) * 2004-08-24 2013-09-12 Daimler Ag Control device for motor vehicles
US7743606B2 (en) 2004-11-18 2010-06-29 Honeywell International Inc. Exhaust catalyst system
US20060212205A1 (en) * 2005-03-15 2006-09-21 Continental Teves, Inc. Method for detecting when a vehicle is in a downhill situation
US7752840B2 (en) 2005-03-24 2010-07-13 Honeywell International Inc. Engine exhaust heat exchanger
DE102006023575A1 (en) * 2005-07-18 2007-02-01 Daimlerchrysler Ag A device for internal-combustion engine / drive train control for a motor vehicle
DE102005036924A1 (en) * 2005-08-05 2007-02-08 Bayerische Motoren Werke Ag Driver assistance system for a motor vehicle
US7445079B2 (en) * 2005-11-21 2008-11-04 Gm Global Technology Operations, Inc. Automatic calibration of vehicle transmission using load sensing
US7577508B2 (en) 2006-05-09 2009-08-18 Lockheed Martin Corporation Mobility traction control system and method
DE102006022692B4 (en) 2006-05-16 2008-07-10 Volkswagen Ag Apparatus and method for enabling and disabling functions of a vehicle
DE102006054703A1 (en) * 2006-06-27 2008-01-03 Robert Bosch Gmbh A method and control device for detection of a trailer with a towing vehicle operation
US7287760B1 (en) 2006-08-21 2007-10-30 Bfs Diversified Products, Llc Vehicle suspension system and method
DE102006049727A1 (en) 2006-10-21 2008-04-24 Bayerische Motoren Werke Ag Operating concept for adjusting various driving dynamics characteristics on a motor vehicle
FR2909065B1 (en) * 2006-11-27 2009-07-10 Peugeot Citroen Automobiles Sa driver for the improvement of motor skills of a vehicle.
JP2010516556A (en) * 2007-01-25 2010-05-20 本田技研工業株式会社 Control method for a vehicle system for improving the stability of the vehicle
DE102007036402A1 (en) * 2007-07-27 2009-02-19 Dr. Ing. H.C. F. Porsche Aktiengesellschaft Method for operating an electrical machine control unit and vehicle
JP4281830B2 (en) * 2007-09-13 2009-06-17 トヨタ自動車株式会社 Control device for a vehicle, a program for realizing a control method and method
DE102008052134A1 (en) * 2007-10-22 2009-04-23 Continental Teves Ag & Co. Ohg Method and apparatus for improving driveability of a motor vehicle
US8055425B2 (en) * 2008-03-14 2011-11-08 Ford Global Technologies, Llc Increased capability modular vehicle-dynamics control architecture
US8393446B2 (en) 2008-08-25 2013-03-12 David M Haugen Methods and apparatus for suspension lock out and signal generation
EP2349805B1 (en) 2008-10-21 2016-03-09 Continental Teves AG & Co. oHG Method for controlling a motor vehicle, and device therefor
EP3216495A1 (en) 2008-11-25 2017-09-13 Fox Factory, Inc. Methods and apparatus for virtual competition
US9422018B2 (en) 2008-11-25 2016-08-23 Fox Factory, Inc. Seat post
US8175785B2 (en) * 2008-12-22 2012-05-08 GM Global Technology Operations LLC System and method for performance launch control of a vehicle
US8200408B2 (en) * 2008-12-22 2012-06-12 GM Global Technology Operations LLC System and method for active traction control of a vehicle
US9452654B2 (en) 2009-01-07 2016-09-27 Fox Factory, Inc. Method and apparatus for an adjustable damper
US10047817B2 (en) 2009-01-07 2018-08-14 Fox Factory, Inc. Method and apparatus for an adjustable damper
US8627932B2 (en) 2009-01-07 2014-01-14 Fox Factory, Inc. Bypass for a suspension damper
US10060499B2 (en) 2009-01-07 2018-08-28 Fox Factory, Inc. Method and apparatus for an adjustable damper
JP4741012B2 (en) * 2009-02-17 2011-08-03 本田技研工業株式会社 Traveling mode switching device
US8936139B2 (en) 2009-03-19 2015-01-20 Fox Factory, Inc. Methods and apparatus for suspension adjustment
US10036443B2 (en) 2009-03-19 2018-07-31 Fox Factory, Inc. Methods and apparatus for suspension adjustment
US9140325B2 (en) 2009-03-19 2015-09-22 Fox Factory, Inc. Methods and apparatus for selective spring pre-load adjustment
EP2248691A1 (en) * 2009-05-04 2010-11-10 Fox Factory, Inc. Suspension system for a vehicle
GB0908115D0 (en) * 2009-05-12 2009-06-24 Gm Global Tech Operations Inc Method and apparatus for controlling an active vehicle subsystem
WO2011075014A1 (en) * 2009-12-18 2011-06-23 Volvo Lastvagnar Ab Anti-slip support system and method for improving traction of a truck
DE102010003251A1 (en) * 2010-03-25 2011-09-29 Bayerische Motoren Werke Aktiengesellschaft Method for adjusting e.g. driver assistance function, of motor car, involves setting regulation for function to adjust manipulated variable depending on input variable based on received values, and controlling function based on regulation
EP2402239A1 (en) 2010-07-02 2012-01-04 Fox Factory, Inc. Adjustable seat post
EP2407356A1 (en) * 2010-07-17 2012-01-18 Valeo Schalter und Sensoren GmbH Method for autonoumously braking a motor vehicle and autonomous braking system for a motor vehicle
DE102011010714A1 (en) 2011-02-09 2012-08-09 GM Global Technology Operations LLC (n. d. Gesetzen des Staates Delaware) Motor vehicle with adaptive chassis
GB2489211B (en) * 2011-03-15 2013-11-20 Jaguar Land Rover Ltd Vehicle and method of control thereof
EP2567839A3 (en) 2011-09-12 2018-01-10 Fox Factory, Inc. Methods and apparatus for suspension set up
GB2490751B (en) * 2011-09-13 2013-04-24 Land Rover Powertrain control system
US9031754B2 (en) * 2011-10-04 2015-05-12 Bendix Commercial Vehicle Systems Llc Towing vehicle controller providing brake control to a towed vehicle and method
DE102011085140A1 (en) * 2011-10-25 2013-04-25 Robert Bosch Gmbh A method and control device for operating a vehicle dynamics control system of a vehicle and control system for controlling vehicle dynamics of a vehicle using environment sensor data
DE102012010490A1 (en) 2011-12-17 2013-06-20 Volkswagen Aktiengesellschaft A method and control apparatus for adjusting vehicle functions
GB201204419D0 (en) * 2012-03-13 2012-04-25 Jaguar Cars Regeneration of diesel particle filter
WO2014027069A1 (en) * 2012-08-16 2014-02-20 Jaguar Land Rover Limited System and method for controlling vehcile speed to enhance occupant comfort
GB2505023B (en) * 2012-08-16 2015-01-14 Jaguar Land Rover Ltd System and method for controlling the speed of a vehicle using vehicle configuration
GB201215963D0 (en) * 2012-09-06 2012-10-24 Jaguar Cars Vehicle control system and method
GB201215967D0 (en) * 2012-09-06 2012-10-24 Jaguar Cars Vehicle control system and method
GB201215968D0 (en) * 2012-09-06 2012-10-24 Jaguar Cars Vehicle control system and method
GB2505679B (en) * 2012-09-06 2015-02-18 Jaguar Land Rover Ltd Vehicle control system and method
GB2506116B (en) * 2012-09-19 2015-10-21 Jaguar Land Rover Ltd Powertrain control system
EP2712782B1 (en) * 2012-09-28 2018-01-31 Hitachi, Ltd. Method and apparatus for performing driving assistance
US9205717B2 (en) 2012-11-07 2015-12-08 Polaris Industries Inc. Vehicle having suspension with continuous damping control
EP2917054B1 (en) * 2012-11-07 2018-09-05 Polaris Industries Inc. Vehicle having suspension with continuous damping control
DE102012023969A1 (en) * 2012-12-07 2014-06-12 Volkswagen Aktiengesellschaft A method for controlling a reduction gear of a motor vehicle
WO2014089580A3 (en) * 2012-12-07 2014-10-23 Kelsey-Hayes Company Vehicle speed control system
US8843288B1 (en) * 2013-03-14 2014-09-23 Chrysler Group Llc Vehicle speed control system and method
GB201304781D0 (en) * 2013-03-15 2013-05-01 Jaguar Land Rover Ltd Vehicle speed control system and method
GB2545791B (en) 2013-07-25 2018-04-04 Jaguar Land Rover Ltd Vehicle control system and method
GB201313260D0 (en) * 2013-07-25 2013-09-11 Jaguar Land Rover Ltd Vehicle speed control system and method
GB201314152D0 (en) * 2013-08-07 2013-09-18 Jaguar Land Rover Ltd Vehicle speed control system and method
GB201316039D0 (en) * 2013-09-09 2013-10-23 Jaguar Land Rover Ltd Vehicle control system and method
GB2517995B (en) * 2013-09-09 2018-04-11 Jaguar Land Rover Ltd Vehicle control system and method
JP5949735B2 (en) * 2013-11-29 2016-07-13 トヨタ自動車株式会社 Body vibration control apparatus for a vehicle
JP6288417B2 (en) 2013-11-29 2018-03-07 三菱自動車工業株式会社 Control apparatus for a vehicle
GB2523323B (en) * 2014-02-19 2016-06-01 Jaguar Land Rover Ltd Motor vehicle controller and method
US9199640B2 (en) * 2014-02-28 2015-12-01 Ford Global Technologies, Llc Control of electronic limited slip differential while towing
GB201406563D0 (en) * 2014-04-11 2014-05-28 Jaguar Land Rover Ltd System and method for driving scenario configuration
DE102014215258A1 (en) 2014-08-04 2016-02-04 Bayerische Motoren Werke Aktiengesellschaft Method and apparatus for automatically selecting drive modes
DE102014215259B4 (en) 2014-08-04 2017-03-02 Bayerische Motoren Werke Aktiengesellschaft Method and apparatus for automatically selecting a driving mode of a motor vehicle
GB2531327B (en) * 2014-10-17 2017-08-23 Jaguar Land Rover Ltd Traction control system modified by vehicle pitch and/or heave
GB2534117B (en) * 2014-11-19 2018-09-12 Jaguar Land Rover Ltd Control system and method of controlling a driveline
US20160167646A1 (en) * 2014-12-12 2016-06-16 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Automated preparation methods and systems
JP2016153272A (en) 2015-02-20 2016-08-25 三菱自動車工業株式会社 Four-wheel drive car controller
GB201507352D0 (en) * 2015-04-29 2015-06-10 Jaguar Land Rover Ltd Improvements in vehicle speed control
GB201520482D0 (en) * 2015-04-29 2016-01-06 Jaguar Land Rover Ltd Improvements in vehicle speed control
US9828044B2 (en) * 2015-09-25 2017-11-28 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Feedback control of vehicle aerodynamics
GB201522748D0 (en) * 2015-12-23 2016-02-03 Jaguar Land Rover Ltd Control system for a vehicle and method
DE102016220313B3 (en) * 2016-10-18 2018-03-29 Audi Ag A method of operating a motor vehicle having a plurality of driver assistance systems in motor vehicles

Citations (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4651290A (en) 1983-06-16 1987-03-17 Nippondenso Co., Ltd. Road condition discriminating system
US4829434A (en) * 1987-04-29 1989-05-09 General Motors Corporation Adaptive vehicle
DE3817495A1 (en) 1988-05-21 1989-11-30 Bayerische Motoren Werke Ag Motor vehicle with user-specific, adjustable, electronically controllable functions
US4922427A (en) 1986-11-28 1990-05-01 Nissan Motor Company, Limited Combined power steering and variable suspension control arrangement
JPH04257759A (en) 1991-02-12 1992-09-11 Nissan Motor Co Ltd Brake control device for vehicle
GB2273580A (en) 1992-12-17 1994-06-22 Ford Motor Co Methods and apparatus for controlling operating subsystems of a motor vehicle
US5487002A (en) * 1992-12-31 1996-01-23 Amerigon, Inc. Energy management system for vehicles having limited energy storage
EP1028011A2 (en) 1999-02-13 2000-08-16 Rover Group Limited A user interface unit for a vehicle
FR2796893A1 (en) 1999-07-30 2001-02-02 Renault Autoadaptive control system for propulsion unit of motor vehicle to provide adaptation of control of engine and transmission to different driving styles
US6188945B1 (en) 1996-09-12 2001-02-13 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Drive train control for a motor vehicle
GB2353872A (en) 1999-08-28 2001-03-07 Roke Manor Research Vehicle drive control, speed warning and navigation apparatus
GB2357159A (en) 1999-12-07 2001-06-13 Rover Group Terrain responsive control system for land vehicle
US6591937B2 (en) * 2001-12-05 2003-07-15 Delphi Technologies, Inc. Adaptive variable effort power steering system
US6654671B2 (en) * 2002-02-15 2003-11-25 Delphi Technologies, Inc. Vehicle rollover detection having variable sensitivity

Patent Citations (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4651290A (en) 1983-06-16 1987-03-17 Nippondenso Co., Ltd. Road condition discriminating system
US4922427A (en) 1986-11-28 1990-05-01 Nissan Motor Company, Limited Combined power steering and variable suspension control arrangement
US4829434A (en) * 1987-04-29 1989-05-09 General Motors Corporation Adaptive vehicle
DE3817495A1 (en) 1988-05-21 1989-11-30 Bayerische Motoren Werke Ag Motor vehicle with user-specific, adjustable, electronically controllable functions
JPH04257759A (en) 1991-02-12 1992-09-11 Nissan Motor Co Ltd Brake control device for vehicle
GB2273580A (en) 1992-12-17 1994-06-22 Ford Motor Co Methods and apparatus for controlling operating subsystems of a motor vehicle
US5513107A (en) 1992-12-17 1996-04-30 Ford Motor Company Methods and apparatus for controlling operating subsystems of a motor vehicle
US5487002A (en) * 1992-12-31 1996-01-23 Amerigon, Inc. Energy management system for vehicles having limited energy storage
US6188945B1 (en) 1996-09-12 2001-02-13 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Drive train control for a motor vehicle
EP1028011A2 (en) 1999-02-13 2000-08-16 Rover Group Limited A user interface unit for a vehicle
FR2796893A1 (en) 1999-07-30 2001-02-02 Renault Autoadaptive control system for propulsion unit of motor vehicle to provide adaptation of control of engine and transmission to different driving styles
GB2353872A (en) 1999-08-28 2001-03-07 Roke Manor Research Vehicle drive control, speed warning and navigation apparatus
GB2357159A (en) 1999-12-07 2001-06-13 Rover Group Terrain responsive control system for land vehicle
US6591937B2 (en) * 2001-12-05 2003-07-15 Delphi Technologies, Inc. Adaptive variable effort power steering system
US6654671B2 (en) * 2002-02-15 2003-11-25 Delphi Technologies, Inc. Vehicle rollover detection having variable sensitivity

Cited By (117)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20050004730A1 (en) * 2003-07-03 2005-01-06 Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki Kaisha Vehicle-rollover detecting apparatus and vehicle-rollover detecting method
US20090210112A1 (en) * 2004-06-25 2009-08-20 Continental Teves Ag & Co. Ohg Process and device for stabilising a vehicle
US8862327B2 (en) * 2004-06-25 2014-10-14 Continental Teves Ag & Co., Ohg Process and device for stabilizing a vehicle
USRE44452E1 (en) 2004-12-29 2013-08-27 Honeywell International Inc. Pedal position and/or pedal change rate for use in control of an engine
US7549497B2 (en) * 2005-04-14 2009-06-23 Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki Kaisha Four-wheel drive vehicle running normally and with object towed thereby
US20060231314A1 (en) * 2005-04-14 2006-10-19 Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki Kaisha Four-wheel drive vehicle running normally and with object towed thereby
US7878178B2 (en) 2005-08-18 2011-02-01 Honeywell International Inc. Emissions sensors for fuel control in engines
US8360040B2 (en) 2005-08-18 2013-01-29 Honeywell International Inc. Engine controller
US8109255B2 (en) 2005-08-18 2012-02-07 Honeywell International Inc. Engine controller
US8165786B2 (en) 2005-10-21 2012-04-24 Honeywell International Inc. System for particulate matter sensor signal processing
US20070101236A1 (en) * 2005-11-03 2007-05-03 Bauerle Paul A Method and system for performing function-specific memory checks within a vehicle-based control system
US7533322B2 (en) * 2005-11-03 2009-05-12 Gm Global Technology Operations, Inc. Method and system for performing function-specific memory checks within a vehicle-based control system
US20090099727A1 (en) * 2006-03-22 2009-04-16 Gm Global Technology Operations, Inc. Vehicle subsystem control method and apparatus
US8370038B2 (en) * 2006-03-22 2013-02-05 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Vehicle subsystem control method and apparatus
US20080243336A1 (en) * 2006-05-09 2008-10-02 Fitzgibbons Patrick J Mobility Traction Control System and Method
US8280582B2 (en) * 2007-07-16 2012-10-02 Knorr-Bremse Systeme Fuer Nutzfahrzeuge Gmbh Apparatus and method for identifying in advance overrun phases of a vehicle
US20100179726A1 (en) * 2007-07-16 2010-07-15 Knorr-Bremse Systeme Fuer Nutzfahrzeuge Gmbh Apparatus and Method for Identifying in Advance Overrun Phases of a Vehicle
US20110021301A1 (en) * 2007-08-02 2011-01-27 Tetsushi Asano Hydraulic vehicle clutch system, drivetrain for a vehicle including same, and method
US8900086B2 (en) 2007-08-02 2014-12-02 Honda Motor Co., Ltd. Hydraulic vehicle clutch system, drivetrain for a vehicle including same, and method
US7853389B2 (en) * 2007-10-29 2010-12-14 Ford Global Technologies, Llc Traction control for performance and demonstration spin
US20090112437A1 (en) * 2007-10-29 2009-04-30 Ford Global Technologies, Llc Traction Control for Performance and Demonstration Spin
US20090143936A1 (en) * 2007-12-03 2009-06-04 Craig William C GPS-based system and method for controlling vehicle characteristics based on terrain
US8589049B2 (en) 2007-12-03 2013-11-19 Lockheed Martin Corporation GPS-based system and method for controlling vehicle characteristics based on terrain
US20090143937A1 (en) * 2007-12-04 2009-06-04 Lockheed Martin Corporation GPS-based traction control system using wirelessly received weather data
US8145402B2 (en) 2007-12-05 2012-03-27 Lockheed Martin Corporation GPS-based traction control system and method using data transmitted between vehicles
US20090150036A1 (en) * 2007-12-05 2009-06-11 Craig William C GPS-based traction control system and method using data transmitted between vehicles
US20110087404A1 (en) * 2008-06-17 2011-04-14 Continental Automotive Gmbh Method for Operating A Control Device of A Motor Vehicle and Control Device of A Motor Vehicle for Carrying Out The Method
US8265854B2 (en) 2008-07-17 2012-09-11 Honeywell International Inc. Configurable automotive controller
US20100211278A1 (en) * 2009-02-17 2010-08-19 Lockheed Martin Corporation System and method for stability control
US8244442B2 (en) 2009-02-17 2012-08-14 Lockheed Martin Corporation System and method for stability control of vehicle and trailer
US20100211277A1 (en) * 2009-02-17 2010-08-19 Lockheed Martin Corporation System and method for stability control of vehicle and trailer
US20100211248A1 (en) * 2009-02-17 2010-08-19 Lockheed Martin Corporation System and method for stability control using gps data
US8352120B2 (en) 2009-02-17 2013-01-08 Lockheed Martin Corporation System and method for stability control using GPS data
US8229639B2 (en) 2009-02-17 2012-07-24 Lockheed Martin Corporation System and method for stability control
US20100320703A1 (en) * 2009-06-19 2010-12-23 Pin Hsiu Rubber Co., Ltd. Intelligent electronic air suspension system that automatically adjusts its air pressure
US8113521B2 (en) * 2009-06-19 2012-02-14 Pin Hsiu Rubber Co., Ltd. Intelligent electronic air suspension system that automatically adjusts its air pressure
US9170573B2 (en) 2009-09-24 2015-10-27 Honeywell International Inc. Method and system for updating tuning parameters of a controller
US8620461B2 (en) 2009-09-24 2013-12-31 Honeywell International, Inc. Method and system for updating tuning parameters of a controller
US20110071653A1 (en) * 2009-09-24 2011-03-24 Honeywell International Inc. Method and system for updating tuning parameters of a controller
US20110112743A1 (en) * 2009-11-06 2011-05-12 Ahn Samuel S Throttle compensation for second gear starts in manual transmission vehicles
US8099226B2 (en) 2009-11-06 2012-01-17 Toyota Motor Engineering & Manufacturing North America, Inc. Throttle compensation for second gear starts in manual transmission vehicles
US20110195812A1 (en) * 2010-02-05 2011-08-11 Bobbie Burke Transversely mounted transaxle having a low range gear assembly and powertrain for a vehicle including same
US8527160B2 (en) 2010-02-05 2013-09-03 Honda Motor Co., Ltd. Control system and method for automatic selection of a low range gear ratio for a vehicle drivetrain
US8449430B2 (en) 2010-02-05 2013-05-28 Honda Motor Co., Ltd. Transversely mounted transaxle having a low range gear assembly and powertrain for a vehicle including same
US20110196584A1 (en) * 2010-02-05 2011-08-11 Fox Andrew J Control system and method for automatic selection of a low range gear ratio for a vehicle drivetrain
US8655569B2 (en) * 2010-03-02 2014-02-18 Toyota Motor Engineering & Manufacturing North America, Inc. Method and system for varying an output of a driveforce unit based on load data
US20110218725A1 (en) * 2010-03-02 2011-09-08 Toyota Motor Engineering & Manufacturing North America, Inc. Method and system for varying an output of a driveforce unit based on load data
US20110307130A1 (en) * 2010-05-13 2011-12-15 Coda Automotive, Inc. Selectable driving modes
US8504175B2 (en) 2010-06-02 2013-08-06 Honeywell International Inc. Using model predictive control to optimize variable trajectories and system control
WO2012000806A1 (en) 2010-07-01 2012-01-05 Avl List Gmbh Method for controlling a hybrid vehicle
US8452504B2 (en) 2010-07-30 2013-05-28 Honda Motor Co., Ltd. Control system and method for automatic control of selection of on-demand all-wheel drive assembly for a vehicle drivetrain
US8534409B2 (en) 2010-07-30 2013-09-17 Honda Motor Co., Ltd. Drivetrain for a vehicle and method of controlling same
US8364369B2 (en) 2010-07-30 2013-01-29 Honda Motor Co., Ltd. Low range drive ratio transfer changeover anti-rollback system and method
US9205869B2 (en) 2010-08-16 2015-12-08 Honda Motor Co., Ltd. System and method for determining a steering angle for a vehicle and system and method for controlling a vehicle based on same
US20130151074A1 (en) * 2010-08-30 2013-06-13 Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki Kaisha Vehicle control system
CN103068658B (en) * 2010-08-30 2016-08-10 丰田自动车株式会社 The vehicle control system
US8954232B2 (en) * 2010-08-30 2015-02-10 Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki Kaisha Vehicle control system
CN103068658A (en) * 2010-08-30 2013-04-24 丰田自动车株式会社 The vehicle control system
US20120083981A1 (en) * 2010-09-30 2012-04-05 Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki Kaisha Vehicle running control apparatus
US9333975B2 (en) 2011-02-05 2016-05-10 Ford Global Technologies, Llc Method and system to detect and mitigate customer dissatisfaction with performance of automatic mode selection system
US8600614B2 (en) 2011-02-05 2013-12-03 Ford Global Technologies, Llc System and method for integrated control of vehicle control systems
WO2012127503A2 (en) * 2011-03-18 2012-09-27 Indian Institute Of Technology Bombay Yaw rate control in motor vehicles
WO2012127503A3 (en) * 2011-03-18 2013-01-10 Indian Institute Of Technology Bombay Yaw rate control in motor vehicles
US9873436B2 (en) 2011-07-04 2018-01-23 Jaguar Land Rover Limited Vehicle control system and method for controlling a vehicle
JP2016020215A (en) * 2011-07-04 2016-02-04 ジャガー ランド ローバー リミテッドJaguar Land Rover Limited Vehicle control system and vehicle control method
CN103648880A (en) * 2011-07-04 2014-03-19 捷豹路虎有限公司 Vehicle control system and method for controlling a vehicle
WO2013004764A1 (en) 2011-07-04 2013-01-10 Land Rover Vehicle control system and method for controlling a vehicle
WO2013007800A1 (en) 2011-07-13 2013-01-17 Land Rover Vehicle control system and method
JP2014520712A (en) * 2011-07-13 2014-08-25 ジャガー ランド ローバー リミテッドJaguar Land Rover Limited Control system and method for controlling a vehicle
US9415779B2 (en) 2011-07-13 2016-08-16 Jaguar Land Rover Limited Vehicle control system and method
US8561749B2 (en) 2011-09-19 2013-10-22 Hb Performance Systems, Inc. ATV or UTV differential with integrated sensors
US9677493B2 (en) 2011-09-19 2017-06-13 Honeywell Spol, S.R.O. Coordinated engine and emissions control system
US9650934B2 (en) 2011-11-04 2017-05-16 Honeywell spol.s.r.o. Engine and aftertreatment optimization system
WO2013104641A1 (en) 2012-01-09 2013-07-18 Jaguar Land Rover Limited Vehicle rollback control apparatus and method
WO2013110759A2 (en) 2012-01-25 2013-08-01 Jaguar Land Rover Limited Adaptive control of motor vehicle powertrain
US20140358393A1 (en) * 2012-01-25 2014-12-04 Jaguar Land Rover Limite Adaptive control of motor vehicle powertrain
WO2013110761A1 (en) 2012-01-25 2013-08-01 Jaguar Land Rover Limited Adaptive control of motor vehicle powertrain
US9555703B2 (en) * 2012-01-25 2017-01-31 Jaguar Land Rover Limited Adaptive control of motor vehicle powertrain
US10081371B2 (en) * 2012-01-25 2018-09-25 Jaguar Land Rover Limited Adaptive control of motor vehicle powertrain
WO2013110758A1 (en) 2012-01-25 2013-08-01 Jaguar Land Rover Limited Adaptive control of motor vehicle powertrain
WO2013110760A1 (en) 2012-01-25 2013-08-01 Jaguar Land Rover Limited Adaptive control of motor vehicle powertrain
WO2013120546A1 (en) 2012-02-13 2013-08-22 Jaguar Cars Ltd Driver advice system for a vehicle
US10093323B2 (en) * 2012-02-13 2018-10-09 Jaguar Land Rover Limited Driver advice system for a vehicle
WO2013124321A1 (en) 2012-02-20 2013-08-29 Jaguar Land Rover Limited Method of speed control for a vehicle
JP2018030587A (en) * 2012-02-20 2018-03-01 ジャガー ランド ローバー リミテッドJaguar Land Rover Limited Improvement in cruise control of vehicle
US20130253756A1 (en) * 2012-03-21 2013-09-26 Fuji Jukogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Vehicle control system
US9145142B2 (en) * 2012-03-21 2015-09-29 Fuji Jukogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Vehicle control system
US9376108B2 (en) 2012-06-07 2016-06-28 Jaguar Land Rover Limited Vehicle steering
US9221340B2 (en) * 2012-06-29 2015-12-29 Caterpillar Inc. Machine control system
US20140005898A1 (en) * 2012-06-29 2014-01-02 Caterpillar Inc. Machine control system
US9701308B2 (en) 2012-08-16 2017-07-11 Jaguar Land Rover Limited Vehicle speed control system
US9701309B2 (en) 2012-08-16 2017-07-11 Jaguar Land Rover Limited Vehicle speed control system
US9908528B2 (en) 2012-08-16 2018-03-06 Jaguar Land Rover Limited Vehicle speed control system
US9493160B2 (en) 2012-08-16 2016-11-15 Jaguar Land Rover Limited Vehicle speed control system
US8874346B2 (en) 2012-11-15 2014-10-28 Caterpillar Inc. System with blended anti-lock and stability control
US9007199B2 (en) 2013-01-29 2015-04-14 Honda Motor Co., Ltd. Drive mode selector
US9446771B2 (en) 2013-01-29 2016-09-20 Honda Motor Co., Ltd. Drive mode selector
WO2014139875A1 (en) 2013-03-15 2014-09-18 Jaguar Land Rover Limited Vehicle speed control system and method
GB2514162B (en) * 2013-05-16 2015-08-05 Jaguar Land Rover Ltd Vehicle speed control system
US9855933B2 (en) 2013-05-16 2018-01-02 Jaguar Land Rover Limited Vehicle speed control system
JP2016517825A (en) * 2013-05-16 2016-06-20 ジャガー ランド ローバー リミテッドJaguar Land Rover Limited Vehicle speed control system
GB2514162A (en) * 2013-05-16 2014-11-19 Jaguar Land Rover Ltd Vehicle speed control system
US20160194001A1 (en) * 2013-08-07 2016-07-07 Jaguar Land Rover Limited Vehicle speed control system and method
US9873430B2 (en) * 2013-08-07 2018-01-23 Jaguar Land Rover Limited Vehicle speed control system and method
US20150073658A1 (en) * 2013-09-06 2015-03-12 Volkswagen Ag Method and apparatus for operating a cushioning system for a motor vehicle
US9809077B2 (en) * 2013-09-06 2017-11-07 Volkswagen Ag Method and apparatus for operating a cushioning system for a motor vehicle
US9849879B2 (en) 2013-10-23 2017-12-26 Jaguar Land Rover Limited Vehicle speed control
JP2016536194A (en) * 2013-10-23 2016-11-24 ジャガー ランド ローバー リミテッドJaguar Land Rover Limited Improvement of vehicle speed control
US9969392B2 (en) 2013-10-23 2018-05-15 Jaguar Land Rover Limited Vehicle speed control system
WO2015059235A2 (en) 2013-10-23 2015-04-30 Jaguar Land Rover Limited Improvements in vehicle speed control
WO2015059235A3 (en) * 2013-10-23 2015-07-23 Jaguar Land Rover Limited Improvements in vehicle speed control
US20160311444A1 (en) * 2014-01-09 2016-10-27 Kawasaki Jukogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Vehicle, and method of assisting driving of same
US20150226134A1 (en) * 2014-02-11 2015-08-13 Pao Shan AN Apparatus for increasing vehicle drive power output
US9623879B2 (en) 2014-02-18 2017-04-18 Honda Motor Co., Ltd. System for operating vehicle in different driving modes and methods for same
US10053102B2 (en) 2014-06-11 2018-08-21 Jaguar Land Rover Limited Vehicle control system and method for automatic control of vehicle subsystems
US10036338B2 (en) 2016-04-26 2018-07-31 Honeywell International Inc. Condition-based powertrain control system
US10035510B2 (en) 2016-05-27 2018-07-31 Ford Global Technologies, Llc Adaptive drive control low-traction detection and mode selection

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
US20030200016A1 (en) 2003-10-23 application
EP1355209A1 (en) 2003-10-22 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
Van Zanten Bosch ESP systems: 5 years of experience
US5002147A (en) Power transmitting system for a four-wheel drive vehicle
US5927421A (en) Device for controlling engine intake throttle for turn stability control of vehicle
US20060180372A1 (en) Electronic stability system on a three-wheeled vehicle
US20010003805A1 (en) Traction control system of vehicles combining feedback control with feedforward control
US5702165A (en) Behavior control system of vehicle distinctive of oversteered and understeered conditions
US6879898B2 (en) Method and apparatus for vehicle integrated chassis control system
US7401871B2 (en) Method of controlling an automotive vehicle having a trailer using rear axle slip angle
US4840247A (en) Device for controlling 4wd vehicle central differential restriction device according to front and rear wheels rotational speed difference, and method of operation thereof
US20060074530A1 (en) Roll stability control using four-wheel drive
US7690737B2 (en) Method of controlling an automotive vehicle having a trailer
US20100049408A1 (en) Control device for improving the traction of a vehicle
US8380416B2 (en) Method and apparatus for controlling brake-steer in an automotive vehicle in reverse
US20120136506A1 (en) Vehicle control system
US5297646A (en) Control system for optimizing operation of vehicle performance/safety enhancing systems such as 4WS, 4WD active suspensions, and the like
US7950751B2 (en) Method and apparatus for maintaining a trailer in a straight position relative to the vehicle
US6959970B2 (en) Method and apparatus for controlling a trailer and an automotive vehicle with a yaw stability control system
US7319927B1 (en) Constant speed control system
US7070247B2 (en) Method and apparatus for controlling brake-steer in an automotive vehicle in a forward and reverse direction
US7229139B2 (en) Control system for brake-steer assisted parking and method therefor
US20050206225A1 (en) Method and apparatus for predicting the position of a trailer relative to a vehicle
US20050209762A1 (en) Method and apparatus for controlling a vehicle using an object detection system and brake-steer
US20050206231A1 (en) Method and apparatus for controlling an automotive vehicle using brake-steer and normal load adjustment
Liebemann et al. Safety and performance enhancement: The Bosch electronic stability control (ESP)
US5251719A (en) Active torque-split control system for actively distributing driving torques applied to wheels in four-wheel drive vehicles

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: FORD MOTOR COMPANY, MICHIGAN

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:SPILLANE, ANTHONY FRANCIS;BURDOCK, WILLIAM;CLARE, DAVID ANDREW;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:013583/0078;SIGNING DATES FROM 20030319 TO 20030414

AS Assignment

Owner name: FORD GLOBAL TECHNOLOGIES, INC., A MICHIGAN CORPORA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:FORD MOTOR COMPANY, A DELAWARE CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:013639/0970

Effective date: 20030416

AS Assignment

Owner name: LAND ROVER, UNITED KINGDOM

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:FORD GLOBAL TECHNOLOGIES, LLC;REEL/FRAME:021109/0182

Effective date: 20080530

Owner name: LAND ROVER,UNITED KINGDOM

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:FORD GLOBAL TECHNOLOGIES, LLC;REEL/FRAME:021109/0182

Effective date: 20080530

FPAY Fee payment

Year of fee payment: 4

AS Assignment

Owner name: JAGUAR LAND ROVER LIMITED, UNITED KINGDOM

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:LAND ROVER;REEL/FRAME:030716/0192

Effective date: 20130107

FPAY Fee payment

Year of fee payment: 8

RF Reissue application filed

Effective date: 20160927

RF Reissue application filed

Effective date: 20180410