US7317908B1 - Transferring voice mail messages in text format - Google Patents

Transferring voice mail messages in text format Download PDF

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Publication number
US7317908B1
US7317908B1 US10109975 US10997502A US7317908B1 US 7317908 B1 US7317908 B1 US 7317908B1 US 10109975 US10109975 US 10109975 US 10997502 A US10997502 A US 10997502A US 7317908 B1 US7317908 B1 US 7317908B1
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Prior art keywords
voice mail
mail message
text file
system
method
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US10109975
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Wendy Eason
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AT&T Delaware Intellectual Property Inc
Nuance Communications Inc
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AT&T Delaware Intellectual Property Inc
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M3/00Automatic or semi-automatic exchanges
    • H04M3/42Systems providing special services or facilities to subscribers
    • H04M3/50Centralised arrangements for answering calls; Centralised arrangements for recording messages for absent or busy subscribers ; Centralised arrangements for recording messages
    • H04M3/53Centralised arrangements for recording incoming messages, i.e. mailbox systems
    • H04M3/533Voice mail systems
    • H04M3/53333Message receiving aspects
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M1/00Substation equipment, e.g. for use by subscribers; Analogous equipment at exchanges
    • H04M1/72Substation extension arrangements; Cordless telephones, i.e. devices for establishing wireless links to base stations without route selecting
    • H04M1/725Cordless telephones
    • H04M1/72519Portable communication terminals with improved user interface to control a main telephone operation mode or to indicate the communication status
    • H04M1/72522With means for supporting locally a plurality of applications to increase the functionality
    • H04M1/72547With means for supporting locally a plurality of applications to increase the functionality with interactive input/output means for internally managing multimedia messages
    • H04M1/72552With means for supporting locally a plurality of applications to increase the functionality with interactive input/output means for internally managing multimedia messages for text messaging, e.g. sms, e-mail
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M2203/00Aspects of automatic or semi-automatic exchanges
    • H04M2203/25Aspects of automatic or semi-automatic exchanges related to user interface aspects of the telephonic communication service
    • H04M2203/251Aspects of automatic or semi-automatic exchanges related to user interface aspects of the telephonic communication service where a voice mode or a visual mode can be used interchangeably
    • H04M2203/253Aspects of automatic or semi-automatic exchanges related to user interface aspects of the telephonic communication service where a voice mode or a visual mode can be used interchangeably where a visual mode is used instead of a voice mode
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS
    • H04W4/00Services specially adapted for wireless communication networks; Facilities therefor
    • H04W4/20Services signaling; Auxiliary data signalling, i.e. transmitting data via a non-traffic channel

Abstract

In different embodiments, the invention contemplates a device, system, and method of transferring a voice mail message in text format on a per use basis. The inventive method includes receiving a voice mail message directed to a telephone number, correlating the telephone number to at least one data network address, and forwarding the voice mail message to the data network address. The data network address may be associated with an e-mail address, pager, wireless telephone, personal digital assistant (PDA) or other device capable of displaying text messages. The inventive method may further include converting the voice mail message to an electronic data file, such as a text tile, for example. Also, the electronic data file may provide a name of a party initiating the voice mail message, a telephone number of a party initiating the voice mail message, a time and a date of the voice mail message, and/or a duration of the voice mail message, for example. The inventive method may further include storing the voice mail message on a computer-readable medium associated with the data network address. Typically, the user enters the data network address using characters on a telephone keypad. Because special characters are sometimes needed to enter e-mail addresses, the “*” key and “#” key may be utilized to enter special characters such as “@”, “.”, “-”, etc. The service provider may charge for the voicemail forwarding service on a per use basis or based on the number of characters entered by the user.

Description

TECHNICAL FIELD

The invention relates generally to telecommunication systems and services, and more particularly to transferring a voice mail to a data network such as a pager or wireless telephone with text capabilities.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

In the past, voice mail systems provided a convenient way of asking someone to return a missed call. Today, perhaps due to the expectations brought about by its counterpart email system, the voice mail system has become more than a way of communicating brief “return-call” messages with others. For many, voice mail systems have become an extension of their other electronic tools. For example, many use their voice mail systems like a data storage system to store important voice messages, much like one would store an email for a longer period of time or a memorandum in a paper-based file.

Many legacy voice mail systems, however, are ill equipped to provide anything more than very short-term data storage. In fact, legacy voice mail systems often have relatively small storage capabilities that were designed for the more elementary purposes of days past. As companies add personnel, these older systems necessarily reduce the number of messages that may be stored for each employee. Moreover, these legacy systems often are impossible or too expensive to upgrade. As a result, a caller often will be frustrated by hearing the dead end message “I'm sorry mailbox 4321 is full, and unable to receive additional messages.” The owner of the mailbox, also may be frustrated by being forced to delete certain voice mail messages that should continue to be stored, or perhaps to have the voice mail message manually typed into text for storage on a computer medium.

In addition to its limited storage capabilities, legacy voice mail systems do not provide the ability to intelligently categorize, sort, and/or search the stored messages (e.g., by titles, times, types, parties) like its email counterpart. Again, in part because voice mail systems are being used for purposes beyond their originally intended purposes, they do not provide a means of intelligently interacting with the data that they capture. For example, although most traditional voice mail systems are capable of capturing the name and number of the calling party, the time and date of the incoming call, and the duration of the voice mail message, none of these attributes are available for anything other than a simple audible report to the voice mail user. Yet, sorting and searching these attributes are critical in permitting the data captured by the voice mail system to be useful in today's communications environment. Although newer voice mail systems may provide some of these capabilities, many are not willing to undergo the aggravation and expense of a wholesale transfer to these newer systems, especially organizations with a large number of users.

It is with respect to these and other considerations that the present invention has been made.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In different embodiments, the invention contemplates a device, system, and method of transferring a voice mail message in text format on a per use basis. The inventive method includes receiving a voice mail message directed to a telephone number, correlating the telephone number to at least one data network address, and forwarding the voice mail message to the data network address. The data network address may be associated with an e-mail address, pager, wireless telephone, personal digital assistant (PDA) or other device capable of displaying text messages. The inventive method may further include converting the voice mail message to an electronic data file, such as a text tile, for example. Also, the electronic data file may provide a name of a party initiating the voice mail message, a telephone number of a party initiating the voice mail message, a time and a date of the voice mail message, and/or a duration of the voice mail message, for example. The inventive method may further include storing the voice mail message on a computer-readable medium associated with the data network address. Typically, the user enters the data network address using characters on a telephone keypad. Because special characters are sometimes needed to enter e-mail addresses, the “*” key and “#” key may be utilized to enter special characters such as “@”, “.”, “-”, etc. The service provider may charge for the voicemail forwarding service on a per use basis or based on the number of characters entered by the user.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Other features of the invention are further apparent from the following detailed description of the embodiments of the invention taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, of which:

FIG. 1 is a block diagram a telecommunications network;

FIG. 2 is a flow diagram of a method for transferring a voice mail message;

FIG. 3 is a flow diagram of a method for transferring a voice mail message;

FIG. 4 is a flow diagram of a method for transferring a voice mail message;

FIG. 5 is a flow diagram of a method for transferring a voice mail message; and

FIG. 6 is a block diagram of a CPE-based converter for transferring a voice mail message.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

FIG. 1 is a block diagram of data network 100 that provides communication to a subscriber via a public switched telecommunication network (PSTN) 125 and an Internet 105. It should be appreciated that the term “communication” is used to include all data transmissions that may be exchanged between a subscriber, for example, and other network terminations. The relevant portion of PSTN 125 is shown as part of an Advanced Intelligent Network (AIN) of a typical local exchange carrier. For brevity, only a basic explanation of the AIN-based PSTN as provided herein. Where PSTN 125 operates or is composed differently in an important aspect from that which would be understood by those skilled in the art, additional details are provided. For further information regarding PSTNs in general and their AIN aspects, the interested reader is referred to U.S. Pat. No. 5,430,719, to Weisser, entitled “Mediation of Open Advanced Intelligent Network Interface by Shared Execution Environment,” and is incorporated herein by reference.

As shown in FIG. 1 PSTN 125 includes at leas two different types of switching points: a Service Switching Point (SSP) 123 and a Service Control Point (SCP) 114. SSP 123 is a central switch that serves a designated group of subscriber lines and thus acts as the hub of operations for PSTN 125. Although a PSTN may have a plurality of SSPs each connected to each other with trunk circuits and each serving vast regions of the PSTN, for the purpose of simplicity FIG. 1 illustrates just one SSP. SSP 123 is coupled to a subscriber telephone 124 via a subscriber line. A subscriber line may also be referred to as a “calling line.” SSP 123 is further in communication with Internet server 110 over line 108. Internet server 110 is in communication with subscriber PC 114. For the purposes of simplicity and brevity, line 108 may be referred to as the “data network” to distinguish it from a discussion of PSTN 125, although it should be appreciated that in practice a data network may be a part of or the same as the PSTN.

Each calling line typically is connected to terminating equipment. Terminating equipment may include a telephone, a personal computer, and/or a computer server, for example. Although not shown, those skilled in the art will appreciate that such termination equipment may include other communication devices, including facsimile machines and modems, for example. As shown in FIG. 1, a subscriber may access data network 100 using either subscriber telephone 124 or subscriber PC 114. Although a single calling line is shown connecting subscriber telephone 124 to data network 100, it should be appreciated that the subscriber may have a plurality of calling lines connected to PSTN 125. Each calling line is assigned a ten-digit “directory number” (DN). Therefore, the term “directory number” is used to describe the number that is dialed or input by a caller or source to reach certain terminating equipment. A DN is commonly referred to as a “telephone number” or “calling line number.”

SSP 123 is further coupled to SCP 114. SCP 114 contains control logic and service-specific feature data, and is a centralized node in PSTN 125. Much of the intelligence behind the enhanced features of the AIN-based PSTN 125 resides in SCP 114, which typically is a computer-based device. SCP 114 also includes one or more subscriber databases 116. Alternatively, although subscriber database 116 is shown in SCP 114, it should be appreciated that subscriber database 116 may be located anywhere within system 100, including within a voice mail system 106. Subscriber database 116 may identify particular customers and their subscribed services. Typically, SCP 114 is a repository of many serve package applications (SPAs) 115, each associated with a particular service or enhanced feature available to customers (e.g., “800” SPA). In particular, SPA 115 is a program that queries database 116 and provides instructions to SSP 123 for how to direct incoming calls, based on a look-up in database 116. Therefore, for example, when a subscriber enters certain service-specific digits (e.g., *69-Call Return), SPA 115 will conduct a look-up in database 115 to ensure that the subscriber has access to the requested service. If the look-up confirms the subscriber's access to the requested service, SPA 115 will direct SSP 123 to route the call accordingly.

Communication between SSP 123 and SCP 114 typically employs a Common Channel Signaling System No. 7 protocol or “SS7”, well known to those skilled in the art. SS7 defines the procedures and protocol by which network elements in PSTN 125 exchange information over a digital signaling network to effect wireless and wireline call setup, routing and control. SS7 communication between SSP 123 and SCP 114 typically occurs over 56 or 64 kilobit per second (kbps) bi-directional channels called “signaling links.” Signaling occurs “out-of-band” on dedicated channels rather than “in-band” on voice channels.

Within SSP 123 are defined a relatively small set of termination attempt triggers (TAT or trigger). A trigger is an event associated to a particular subscriber line that generates a signal to be sent to SCP 114. Triggers may be established both for incoming calls directed to the subscriber and for outgoing calls initiated by the subscriber. For example, if the subscriber enters a certain sequence of numbers in addition to a called number, SCP 114 will interpret the significance of the sequence and set a trigger on SSP 123. SCP 114 may then direct SSP 123 to route the call to the called number. When an incoming call from a caller, for example, is made to subscriber telephone 124, the trigger will be activated. Activating the trigger causes a signal to be sent to SCP 114. In response to the signal, SPA 115 in SCP 114 queries database 116 for processing instructions. The results of database 116 inquiries by SCP 114 are sent back to SSP 123 in the form of commands that instruct SSP 123 on how to process the call. The instructions may be to take some special action as a result of a customized calling service or enhanced feature available to the subscriber. In response, SSP 123 routes the call in accordance with the instructions.

In AIN-based PSTN 125, SSP 123 also may be coupled to an intelligent peripheral (IP). The term “intelligent peripheral” is used to refer to an AIN device that terminates an ISDN interface to an AIN Switching System. Functionally, an IP provides information to a subscriber and/or collects information from the subscriber via a circuit-switched bearer connection. The IP is dedicated to perform certain intelligent processes, including for example, voice and dual tone multi-frequency (DTMF) signal recognition, voice recognition, and messaging services.

Voice mail system 106 and computer telephone integration (CTI) platform 107 may be two examples of such an IP that are relevant to the invention. As will be discussed in greater detail, voice mail system 106 provides network-based voice mail services well known to those skilled in the art. Also, CTI platform 107 represents any of a number of systems that enable a computer-based device to operate like a call center to accept and route incoming calls to the appropriate device or person. For example, CTI platform may be sophisticated enough to handle all sorts of incoming and outgoing communications, including phone calls, faxes, and Internet messages. In the context of the invention, CTI platform 107 may operate to correlate a subscriber's directory number with one or more other network addresses (e.g., email address, Internet relay chat address. Internet Protocol (IP) address, telephone number, wireless telephone number, pager telephone number, etc.). Also, CTI platform 107 may have certain computer-executable instructions capable of permitting CTI platform 107 to interface with voice mail system 106, so as to convert the audio files stored in voice mail system 106 (representing the voice messages left for a particular subscriber) to other audio file formats for transmission to the other network addresses (e.g., an email address). Voice mail system 100 and CTI platform 107 may be connected to SCP 114, to SSP 123, or to both SCP 114 and SSP 123, as shown in FIG. 1. Also, the functionality of voice mail system 106 and CTI platform 107 may exist in other components in system 100.

The wireless network 150, such as a cellular network, comprises a mobile switching center (MSC) 52. The MSC 52 is a switch providing services and coordination between wireless users in the network 150 and external networks. The MSC 52 may be connected to STP 102 to provide information to the wireline network 100 and receive information from the wireline network. The MSC 52 also communicates with a wireless subscriber, such as wireless telephones 54 and 55, pager 58 and personal digital assistant (PDA) 59.

The MSC 52 may also be connected to a home location register (HLR) 56. The HLR is an SS7 database used to identify/verify a wireless subscriber. The HLR also comprises data related to features and services subscribed to by the wireless subscriber. The HLR is also used during roaming to verify the legitimacy of the subscriber and to provide them with their subscribed features. The HLR 56 may also be connected to the STP 34 and/or SCP 42 of the wireline network. In certain embodiments of the present invention, such as when the calling party is a wireless phone customer, the HLR may be used to provide the calling party's name and calling party's number for the caller ID service.

A customer premises equipment (CPE)-based converter 109 also is shown in FIG. 1. CPE-based converter 109 is in communication with subscriber telephone 124, and may be located within the subscriber's residence next to, or integrated with, subscriber telephone 124, for example. Also, CPE-based converter 109 may be in communication with subscriber PC 114 and/or SSP 123. Because the connections of CPE-based converter 109 with subscriber PC 114 and SSP 123 are optional, they are shown dashed in FIG. 1. As will be discussed with reference to FIG. 6, CPE-based converter 109 operates to store voice mail messages located in voice mail system 106 on subscriber PC 114. In so doing, CPE-based converter 109 may act to convert the audio files stored in voice mail system 106 to different audio file formats compatible with the software resident on subscriber PC 114. For example, CPE-based converter 109 may convert the audio files on voice mail system 106 to .wav files. Also, CPE-based converter 109 may act to correlate the DN for subscriber telephone 124 with the Internet protocol address or email address accessed by subscriber PC 114, for example.

In other embodiments, the CPE-based converter 109 may act to convert the audio files stored in voice mail system 106 to different text file formats compatible with the software resident on subscriber PC 114. Also, CPE-based converter 109 may act to correlate the DN for subscriber telephone 124 with the Internet protocol address or email address accessed by subscriber PC 114, for example. The CPE-based converter 109 or subscriber PC 114 may forward the text files to a text-compatible device such as a wireless telephone 54, a wireless pager 58, a wireless personal digital assistant (PDA) 59 or another wireless device with text display capabilities.

There are three main ways for a subscriber to access AIN-based PSTN 125 (1) via subscriber PC 114, and/or (2) via subscriber telephone 124, and/or (3) via wireless devices 54, 58, 59 through the wireless network 150. The subscriber may enter the Internet service provider's DN using subscriber PC 114. The DN is carried over a subscriber line using a point-to-point protocol (PPP), for example, well known to those in the art. Subscriber PC 114 connects to Internet server 110 located with the Internet service provider, allowing the subscriber to access Internet 105.

The subscriber may call a particular DN using subscriber telephone 124. For example, the subscriber may dial a DN or a sequence of numbers representing voice mail system 106, so as to gain access to the subscriber voice mailbox. SCP 114 simply instructs SSP 123 to connect subscriber 101 to the desired DN over the subscriber line. Once the connection is made, SCP 114 interprets the requests made by the subscriber (via alphanumeric keypad entries) to properly listen to and/or handle the received voice mail entry. For example, voice mail system 106 may indicate that the subscriber has a number of “unheard” voice mail messages. After listening to the voice mail messages, the subscriber may enter certain alphanumeric entries indicating that the voice mail message should be saved, deleted, and/or forwarded, for example. Similarly, the subscriber may call the DN using the wireless devices 54, 58, 59 as is well known to those skilled in the art.

FIG. 2 is a flow diagram of a method 200 for transferring a voice mail message. In step 201, a subscriber using, for example, subscriber telephone 124 accesses voice mail system 106. Such access may be accomplished, for example, using an alphanumeric user name and password. In step 202, the subscriber receives a voice mail message associated with subscriber telephone 124. The voice mail message may be stored in the voice mail system 106, and played by the subscriber by entering certain alphanumeric keys on subscriber telephone 124. Therefore, when the subscriber accesses voice mail system 106, the voice mail message associated with subscriber telephone 124 permits the subscriber to retrieve voice mails associated with an identifier, like the telephone number of subscriber telephone 124.

In step 203, the voice mail received in step 202 is converted to a data file having a certain file format. For example, if the voice mail system 106 is a legacy system that stores the individual voice messages in a certain proprietary file type, method 200 acts to convert that proprietary file type to a different audio file format. For example, the audio file may be converted to a .wav file format, well known by those skilled in the art. The file created in step 203 is capable of being transmitted over a communication system, like the Internet. Therefore, in one embodiment for example, following step 203, a .wav file may be an attachment to an email message. In addition, the voice mail message may be converted to a text-based file and transmitted to subscriber PC as a text file, for example, in the body of or as an attachment to an email.

In another embodiment, the voice mail message may be converted to a text-based file and transmitted over a wireless network 150 to a wireless telephone with text display capabilities, a wireless pager 58, a personal digital assistant (PDA) 59, or other electronic device with text display capabilities. The text-based file may be sent to a telephone number of the pager or wireless telephone or may be sent to an IP address of a wireless device or sent to another network address. In any event, it should be appreciated that the electronic data file is not limited to its form or format, but may include without exclusivity an instant message, an Internet relay chat message, a desktop icon, a hypertext markup language link, and/or an electronic file with a directory mapping. Also, it should be appreciated that the data file may include information other than the content of the voice message including without exclusivity a name of a party initiating the voice mail message, a telephone number of a party initiating the voice mail message, a time and a date of the voice mail message, and/or a duration of the voice mail message.

In step 204, at least one network address associated with the telephone number is received. The network address may be different than the telephone number associated with the subscriber telephone 124, but still represent a network address that is identified with or owned by the subscriber. For example, the network address may be an Internet protocol address or email address assigned to subscriber PC 114. The network address may be an Internet Protocol (IP) address or telephone number assigned to a wireless telephone 54, pager 58, PDA 59 or other device with text display capabilities. The network address received in step 204 may be transmitted by CTI platform 107, upon request of voice mail system 106. For example, when the subscriber communicates to the voice mail system 106 (using keypad entry on subscriber telephone 124) that a certain voice mail message is to be directed to another network address, voice mail system 106 may request CTI platform 107 to provide the other network address. Such network address may have been provided by the subscriber and stored in CTI platform 107 at an earlier date. In any case, the network address is received by voice mail system 106.

Alternatively, the network address received in step 204 may be transmitted by the subscriber using subscriber telephone 124 at the time the subscriber identifies a certain message to be so forwarded. According to an embodiment of the invention, the user may enter the network address using a telephone keypad. The user may enter special characters, such as “.”, “@” and “-”, among others using the “*” and “#” keys of the telephone keypad. The voicemail prompting system notifies the user that he can enter special characters using the “*” and/or “#” keys on the telephone keypad. If the user selects the “*” and/or “#” key then the voicemail prompting system provides an audible list of special characters, such as press “1” to enter a period, press “2” to enter an ampersand, press “3” to enter a dash, etc. After the network address is completed, the user is requested to enter the “#” key or “*” key and review the entire network address making changes if necessary. The service provider may then charge for the service on a per character basis or on a fixed per use fee. For example, the subscriber may use subscriber telephone 124 to enter an Internet protocol address assigned to subscriber PC 114, upon request of voice mail system 106. Regardless of the above example, it should be appreciated that the network address may be received at a location other than voice mail system 106. Also, it should be appreciated that the network address may be transmitted by any device located within the telecommunications system, other than subscriber telephone 124 and CTI platform 107.

In step 205, the network address received in step 204 is correlated with the identifier. For example, where the other network address is an email address, it will be correlated with the telephone number assigned to subscriber telephone 124. Such correlation may take place automatically based on the number owned by the subscriber telephone 124 and the network address entered by the subscriber. For example, voice mail system 106 automatically may be able to identify the telephone number assigned to subscriber telephone 124 via SCP 114. Therefore, if CTI platform 107 is capable of communicating with voice mail system 106, voice mail system 106 may transmit the telephone number to CTI platform 107. CTI platform 107 may operate to correlate the received telephone number with the other network address (e.g., email address, IP address, etc.) previously identified. CTI platform 107 may forward the other network address to voice mail system 106.

In step 206, the data file created in step 203 is forwarded to the network address correlated in step 205. For example, voice mail system 106 or CTI platform 107 may transmit a .wav file to subscriber PC 114 via PSTN 125 and Internet 105. In another example, voice mail system 106 or CTI platform 107 may transmit a text file to a wireless device via PSTN 125, Internet 105 and a wireless network 150 as is well-known to those skilled in the art. In step 207, the data file may be stored on a computer-readable medium that is associated with the network address. For example, the data file may be transmitted from PSTN 125 to subscriber's PC 114 via Internet server 100 and Internet 105. In this way, therefore, a subscriber is permitted to store a received voice mail on a subscriber PC 114 or on a wireless device such as a wireless telephone 54, pager 58 or PDA 59. As a result, the subscriber may be able to save and/or categorize the voice mail now in data format using subscriber PC 114. For example, such categorization may be similar to the sorting and categorization of received emails using a typical email application, like Microsoft's Outlook™

FIG. 3 is another method 300 for transferring a voice mail message to an email system or other network address. In particular, method 300 describes how a subscriber may accomplish transferring a voice mail message to an email system or other network address. In step 301, the subscriber accesses the voice mail system 106 and gains access to the dedicated voice mail using, for example, a password. In step 302, the subscriber retrieves the voice mail message from the voice mailbox and perhaps listens to the voice mail message as it is played by voice mail system 106. Retrieving and listening to the voice mail message may be initiated by the subscriber by entering certain alphanumeric entries, as required by voice mail system 106.

In step 303, the subscriber may be prompted to identify one or more email addresses to be correlated with a voice mailbox to which the subscriber has gained access. Therefore, the user having gained access to a particular voice mail box to which the telephone number of subscriber telephone 124 is assigned, may be prompted to identify one or more email addresses that should be associated with that voice mail box. Such identification of one or more email addresses may take place during a “setup” of the subscriber's account on the system. Alternatively, identification of the email addresses may be accomplished during the subscriber's retrieval and forwarding of a particular voice message. Instead of an email address, a telephone number, IP address or other network address may be correlated at step 303 in different embodiments of the invention.

In step 304, the user selects an option that identifies to voice mail system 106 that the subscriber wishes to forward the recently played voice mail message to an email address, IP address, telephone number or data network address of a wireless device with text capabilities. Such selection may take place, for example, by depressing a key on subscriber telephone 124 in response to a specific prompt by voice mail system 106. For example, voice mail system may prompt the subscriber to “select” “1” if you wish to delete the voice mail message, select “2” if you wish to save the voice mail message in the voice mail system, and select “3” if you wish to forward the voice mail message to an email address. Therefore, voice mail system 106 may be programmed to request such information and to proceed accordingly upon receiving the proper response. Also, it should be appreciated that such prompting and processing may be conducted by other components within the telecommunications system, including for example, CTI platform 107.

In step 305, the user may be prompted to select one or more email addresses or other network addresses from a list of available email addresses previously identified in step 303. Again, such prompting may be accomplished by voice mail system 106 or other components in the telecommunication system, including CTI platform 107. Therefore, step 305 may not be required where one email address or network address has been identified. As a result of the prompts and responses entered by the subscriber, in step 306, voice mail system 106 forwards the voice mail message (e.g., in the form of an electronic data file) to an email system or as a text file to a pager, wireless telephone, PDA or other wireless device. Referring to FIG. 1, voice mail system 106 may transmit the data file to the email system represented by Internet server 110, Internet 105, and subscriber PC 114, all via PSTN 125 and its components.

In step 307, the subscriber receives the data file at subscriber PC 114 via the email system represented by Internet server 110 and Internet 105. The subscriber may also receive the data file as a text file at a wireless telephone, pager, PDA or other wireless device via Internet server 110, Internet 105 and/or a wireless network well-known to those skilled in the art. The data file may appear on subscriber's PC 114 as an email on an email application. Also, the data file may appear on subscriber's PC as a desktop icon, a text message or any other type of visual and/or sound prompt indicating that a data file representing a voice mail has been received. In step 308, the subscriber, using subscriber PC 114, may store the data file on the computer-readable medium of subscriber PC 114. In addition, depending upon the particular application that processes the data file, the subscriber may categorize, sort and/or organize the received data file with other data files including non-voice mail files like traditional email files. In this way, the user may have a central repository for viewing, sorting, and/or organizing traditional emails and the data file representing a voice mail that has been converted to an email type message. The same options described above with respect to subscriber PC 114 may also be performed with a pager 58, PDA 59 or other wireless device.

FIG. 4 provides a method 400 for transferring a voice message to an email system or other network address. In particular, method 400 describes how a service provider may provide for a method of transferring a voice mail message to an email system or other network address. In step 401, the service provider provides access to a voice mail system. Such access may be provided by the service provider to a subscriber by requiring the subscriber to establish a voice mailbox account in the voice mail system, for which the provider receives a certain subscription fee. In step 402, the service provider prompts the subscriber for the transfer of a particular voice mail to an email system or other network address. Such a prompt may be conducted by playing a message to the subscriber. The message may ask the subscriber to respond by depressing certain keys on the keypad of subscriber telephone 124 so as to transfer the voice mail message to the email system or other network address.

In step 403, the service provider may then prompt the user to identify a particular email address on the email system to which the voice mail should be transferred. Again, such prompting may occur by a request for the email address. The subscriber may enter the email address through a series of keys on subscriber telephone 124. The subscriber may also identify another network address such as the IP address or telephone number of a wireless device. Once the service provider has received indication that the subscriber wishes to transfer the voice mail system to an identified email address or other network address, in step 404, the service provider may convert the voice mail message to an email compatible message or to a text file. For example, where the voice mail message is a proprietary sound file, the service provider may ask to convert the file to a more standard sound file, like a .wav file. It should be appreciated, however, the converting the voice mail to a standard email file may not be necessary where voice mail system 106 already provides an acceptable file format.

In step 405, the service provider transfers the voice mail to the email address or network address identified in step 403. Alternatively, or in addition, in step 406 the service provider may store the file on a computer-readable medium associated with voice mail system, for example, located within voice mail system 106. Such storage in a central repository may permit the subscriber to access the data file representation of the voice mail message without having to subsequently store the particular data file on subscriber PC 114.

Although method 400 was described in the context of a service provider providing for transfer of a voice mail message to an email system or other network address, it should be appreciated that the invention is not limited to a service provider. For example, method 400 applies to any entity that permits the transfer of a voice mail system to another communication system, like an email system or wireless system. Furthermore, although method 400 was described in the context of a voice mail being transferred to an email system or other network address, it should be appreciated that the invention is not limited to email systems. For example, method 400 may include a transfer of a voice mail message to any type of data communication system, including but not limited to an email system.

FIG. 5 provides another method 500 for transferring a voice mail message. In particular, method 500 describes a technique for transferring a voice mail message where voice mail system 106 is not able to communicate and interact with CTI platform 107, or where is it not desired for CTI platform to be modified to do so. In particular, method 500 provides an alternative method of transferring a voice mail message where subscriber telephone 124 can communicate with both voice mail system 106 and CTI platform 107, but where voice mail system 106 and CTI platform 107 can not communicate with each other.

As shown in FIG. 5, in step 501, the subscriber establishes communication with CTI platform 107 by identifying the subscriber (e.g., via a telephone number and/or password). As discussed above, CTI platform 107 may be an IP device capable of having an assigned network identifier (i.e., telephone number, a private branch exchange number, a subscriber name) and capable of interacting with the subscriber using subscriber telephone 124. Once the subscriber establishes communication with CTI platform 107, in step 502 the subscriber also establishes communication with voice mail system 106. Such duel communication with CTI platform 107 and voice mail system 106 may be accomplished, for example, using a three-way calling technique, well known to those skilled in the art.

Once the three-way calling is established among subscriber telephone 124, CTI platform 107 and voice mail system 106, in step 503, the subscriber using subscriber telephone 124 manipulates voice mail system 106 (as described above) to play the voice mail message that is stored in voice mail system. In addition, the subscriber uses subscriber telephone 124 to permit CTI platform 107 to hear and record the voice mail message over the three-way communication, in step 504. As a result, voice mail message is now received and stored as an audio file or text file in CTI platform 107. In step 505, CTI platform 107 creates a file representing the recorded voice mail message. CTI platform 107 may operate to convert the data file to a text-based file and/or an audio file, for example. In step 506, CTI platform 107 transmits the data file to subscriber PC 114 via PSTN 125, Internet server 100 and Internet 105. The data file may be transmitted, for example, as an email and/or an attachment to an email, for example, Therefore, method 500 illustrates a method for allowing the data file (representing a voice mail system 106) to be transmitted to subscriber PC 114, even where CTI platform 107 and voice mail system 106 are not capable of communicating with each other directly. It should also be appreciated that the CTI platform 107 may also transmit the data file to a wireless device, including but not limited to a pager 58, PDA 59 or wireless telephone 54.

FIG. 6 is a block diagram of a CPE-based converter 109. As discussed, CPE based converter operates to forward a voice mail message stored in voice mail system 106 to another network address on data network 108. CPE-based converter 109 may be a device that is located adjacent to, or integrated within, subscriber telephone 124.

As shown in FIG. 6, CPE-based converter 109 includes an input 601 that is in communication with voice mail system 106. CPE-based converter 109 also includes an output 605 that is in communication with data network 108. Alternatively, or in addition to, output 605 may be in direct communication with subscriber PC 114. Input 601 is in communication with a converter 602. Converter 602 is in communication with a database 604 via a computer 603. Computer 603 is in communication with output 605.

In operation, CPE-based converter 109 receives a voice mail message from a voice mail system 106 to input 601. Communication between input 601 and voice mail system 106 may be facilitated by certain entries made by the subscriber using subscriber telephone 124. Input 601 routes the voice mail message to converter 602. Converter 602 acts to convert the audible voice mail message to a certain audio file (e.g., .wav file), and/or text-based file. Converter 602 then provides the converted data file to computer 603.

Computer 603 conducts a lookup in database 604. Database 604 is populated with data tables that correlate the originating network address of the voice mail message (e.g., telephone number and/or voice mail box for subscriber telephone 124) to another network identifier appropriate for data network 108 (e.g. an email address assigned to subscriber PC 114 or network address of a pager 58, PDA 59, wireless telephone 54, etc.). Once computer 603 uses database 604 to correlate the voice mail message with the appropriate network address, computer 603 transfers the data file and the destination address to data network 108 via output 605. Alternatively, or in addition, computer 603 may transfer the data file directly to subscriber PC 114. As a result, the subscriber has access to an audio or text-based version of the voice mail message that was received to voice mail system 106, using subscriber PC 114 or a wireless device. The subscriber is thus able to sort, categorize, and organize the data file. In addition, the subscriber may be able to re-forward the data file to other parties that may be interested in the voice mail message, for example, by forwarding the data file as an attachment to an email message.

The invention is directed to a system and method for transferring a voice mail message. The invention was described in the context of wired voice and data communication system, but is not so limited to, regardless of any specific description in the drawing or examples set forth herein. For example, the invention may be applied to wireless networks, as well as non-traditional networks like voice-over-IP-based networks. Also, the invention was described in the context of transferring a voice mail to an email system, but is not so limited. For example, the invention contemplates transferring a voice mail message on a data network in any form (e.g., an html link, an audio file, a data file with directory instructions) to any type of system (e.g., a hard drive associated with an Internet protocol address). Also, the methods described are not limited to any specific components described herein. Instead, the methods may be performed by any existing or new component within a telecommunication system.

It will be understood that the invention is not limited to use of any of the particular components or devices herein. Indeed, this invention can be used in any application that requires the transfer of a voice mail message. Further, the system disclosed in the invention can be used with the method of the invention or a variety of other applications.

While the invention has been particularly shown and described with reference to the embodiments thereof, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that the invention is not limited to the embodiments specifically disclosed herein. Those skilled in the art will appreciate that various changes and adaptations of the invention may be made in the form and details of these embodiments without departing from the true spirit and scope of the invention as defined by the following claims.

Claims (29)

1. A method of transferring a voice mail message to a wireless device, comprising:
establishing communications with a computer telephone integration (CTI) platform and a voice mail system using three way calling when the CTI cannot interact directly with the voice mail system;
receiving the voice mail message at a voicemail system, wherein the voice mail message is directed to a telephone number;
correlating the telephone number to at least one data network address, wherein the data network address is associated with the wireless device; prompting a subscriber by the voice mail system to transfer the voice mail message to the wireless device using the associated data network address, wherein the prompting is initiated using the (CTI) platform; converting
the voice mail message to a text file, wherein the text file includes content of the voice mail message and information identifying when the voice mail message was received;
after converting the voice mail message to a text file, storing a copy of the text file at the voice mail system; and
forwarding the text file to the address associated with the wireless device.
2. The method of claim 1, wherein storing a copy of the text file at the voice mail system includes storing a copy of the text file on a computer-readable medium associated with the voice mail system.
3. The method of claim 1, wherein the text file is at least one of the following: an instant message, an Internet relay chat message, a hypertext markup language link, and an electronic file with a directory mapping.
4. The method of claim 1, wherein the text file includes at least one of the following: a name of a party initiating the voice mail massage, a telephone number of a party initiating the voice mail message, a time and a date of the voice mail message, and a duration of the voice mail message.
5. The method of claim 1, further comprising storing the text file on a computer-readable medium associated with the wireless device.
6. A method of transferring a voice mail message to a wireless device, comprising:
establishing communications with a computer telephone integration (CTI) platform and a voice mail system using three way calling when the CTI cannot interact directly with the voice mail system;
retrieving the voice mail message from a voice mailbox in the voice mail system; prompting a subscriber by the voice mail system to transfer the voice mail message to the wireless device using an associated network address, wherein the prompting is initiated using the (CTI) platform; converting
the voice mail message to a text file;
after converting the voice mail message to a text file, storing a copy of the text file at the voice mail system;
forwarding the text file to the wireless device;
receiving the text file via a wireless system associated with the wireless device, wherein the text file includes content of the voice mail message and information identifying when the voice mail message was received at the voice mailbox;
re-forwarding the text file to a second email address as an attachment; and
categorizing the text file using the wireless device.
7. The method of claim 6, further comprising accessing the voice mailbox.
8. The method of claim 7, wherein accessing the voice mailbox comprises receiving an alphanumeric password.
9. The method of claim 6, further comprising selecting an option that conducts forwarding of the voice mail.
10. The method of claim 9, wherein the option is selected by at least one of the following: depressing a key on a telephone keypad, depressing a key on a computer keyboard, and providing an audible command.
11. The method of claim 6, further comprising identifying at least one network address on the wireless system to be correlated with the voice mailbox.
12. The method of claim 11, further comprising selecting the at least one network address from a plurality of identified network addresses.
13. The method of claim 6, wherein the text file is at least one of the following: an instant message, an Internet relay chat message, a hypertext markup language link, and an electronic file with a directory mapping.
14. The method of claim 6, wherein the text file includes at least one of the following: a name of a party initiating the voice mail message, a telephone number of a party initiating the voice mail message, a time and a date of the voice mail message, and a duration of the voice mail message.
15. The method of claim 6, further comprising storing the voice mail message on a computer-readable medium associated with the wireless device.
16. A method of transferring a voice mail message to a wireless device, comprising:
establishing communications with a computer telephone integration (CTI) platform and a voice mail system using three way calling when the CTI cannot interact directly with the voice mail system;
providing access to the voice mail message associated with a telephone number, wherein the voice mail message is stored at the voice mail system;
correlating the telephone number to at least one data network address, wherein the data network address is associated with the wireless device;
receiving subscriber input from a telephone to determine if the voice mail message should be forwarded to the wireless device;
if the voice mail message should be forwarded, prompting a subscriber by the voice mail system to transfer the voice mail message to the wireless device using the associated data network address, wherein the prompting is initiated using the (CTI) platform;
converting the voice mail message to a text file, wherein the text file includes content of the voice mail message and information identifying when the voice mail message was received;
after converting the voice mail message to a text file, storing a copy of the text file at the voice mail system; and
transferring the text file to the wireless device.
17. The method claim 16, wherein storing a copy of the text file at the voice mail system includes storing a copy of the text file on a computer-readable medium associated with the voice mail system.
18. The method of claim 16, further comprising prompting for at least one network address associated with the telephone number.
19. The method of claim 16, further comprising storing the text file on a computer-readable medium associated with the wireless device.
20. A method of transferring a voice mail message, comprising:
establishing communications with a computer telephone integration (CTI) platform and a voice mail system using three way calling when the CTI cannot interact directly with the voice mail system;
receiving the voice mail message at the voice mail system, wherein the voice mail message is associated with an identifier;
converting the voice mail message to a text file, wherein the text file includes content of the voice mail message and information identifying when the voice mail message was received;
after converting the voice mail message to a text file, storing a copy of the text file at the voice mail system;
correlating the identifier to a data network address associated with a wireless device;
prompting a subscriber to transfer the text file to the wireless device using the associated data network address by the voicemail system, wherein the prompting is initiated using the (CTI) platform; forwarding
the text file to the data network address; and
categorizing the text file using a personal computer.
21. The method of claim 20, further comprising receiving at least one network address associated with the identifier.
22. The method of claim 20, further comprising storing the text file on a computer-readable medium associated with the wireless device.
23. An on-demand method of transferring a voice mail message to a network address, comprising:
establishing communications with a computer telephone integration (CTI) platform and a voice mail system using three way calling when the CTI cannot interact directly with the voice mail system;
receiving the voice mail message at the voice mail system, wherein the voice mail message is directed to a telephone number;
converting the voice mail message to a text file, wherein the text file includes content of the voice mail message and information identifying when the voice mail message was received;
after converting the voice mail message to a text file, storing a copy of the text file at the voice mail system;
receiving subscriber input from the telephone keypad to determine if the voice mail message should be forwarded to the network address;
prompting a subscriber to select one or more network addresses from a list of network addresses by the voicemail system, wherein the prompting is initiated using the (CTI) platform; and forwarding
the text file to the network address based on the selected one or more network addresses from the list of network addresses.
24. The method of claim 23, wherein storing a copy of the text file at the voice mail system includes storing a copy of the text file on a computer-readable medium associated with the voice mail system.
25. The method of claim 23, wherein at least one of the following is used to enter at least one special character of the network address: a “*” key and a “#” key of the telephone keypad.
26. The method of claim 25 wherein the special character is at least one of the following characters: an ampersand, a dash and a period.
27. The method of claim 23, wherein the text file includes at least one of the following: a name of a party initiating the voice mail massage, a telephone number of a party initiating the voice mail message, a time and a date of the voice mail message, and a duration of the voice mail message.
28. The method of claim 23, further comprising storing the text file on a computer-readable medium associated with the network address.
29. A system for transferring a voice mail message to a wireless device, comprising:
means for establishing communications with a computer telephone integration (CTI) platform and a voice mail system using three way calling when the CTI cannot interact directly with the voice mail system;
means for receiving the voice mail message, wherein the voice mail message is directed to a telephone number; means for prompting a subscriber by the voice mail system to transfer the voice mail message to the wireless device, wherein the prompting is initiated using the (CTI) platform; means
for converting the voice mail message to a text file, wherein the text file includes content of the voice mail message and information identifying when the voice mail message was received;
means for storing a copy of the text file after the voice mail message is converted to a text file;
means for transferring the text file to at least one address, wherein the address is associated with the wireless device; and
means for categorizing the text file using the wireless device.
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