US712420A - Sight for ordnance. - Google Patents

Sight for ordnance. Download PDF

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US712420A
US712420A US7773901A US1901077739A US712420A US 712420 A US712420 A US 712420A US 7773901 A US7773901 A US 7773901A US 1901077739 A US1901077739 A US 1901077739A US 712420 A US712420 A US 712420A
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sight
curve
gun
range
lever
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US7773901A
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Lothian Kerr Scott
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Lothian Kerr Scott
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41GWEAPON SIGHTS; AIMING
    • F41G1/00Sighting devices
    • F41G1/44Spirit-level adjusting means, e.g. for correcting tilt; Means for indicating or correcting tilt or cant

Description

L. K. SCOTT. SIGHT FOR ORDNANCE.
(Application filed Oct. 6, 1901.)
Patented Oct. 28,. I902.
3 Silesia-Sheet I.
(No Model.)
No. 7|2,420. Patented coma; I902.
L. K. soon. SIGHT FOR ORDNANCL (Application filed Oct. 5, 1901.) (N o M 0 d el Jamaa Z tgoffizkrzzzwz No. 7|2,420. Patented Oct. 28, I902.
L. 'K. scan. SIGHT FOR ORDNANCE. (App dictation filed Oct. 5, 1901.
(No Model.) A v 3 Sheets-sheaf 3.
"m: NORRIS PETERS co. Pflcmu'nya, wnsmncron. n. a
V a subject of the King of Great Britain, resid-z .UNITED STATE-s PATE T OrFIcE.
LOTHIAN, KERR SCOTT, or FARNBOROUGH, ENGLAND.
SIGHT FOR 'ORDNANCE.
SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 712,426, dated October 28, 1902'.
i Application filed OctoberEQlQOl. Serial No. 77,739- (N model.)
I To all whom it may concern:
0.13., lieutenant-colonel late royal engineers,
ing at Forest Lodge, Farnborough, in the county of Hants, England, have invented certain new and useful Improvements Relating elevating-gear.
' the direction'of the arrow.
to Sights for Ordnance, of which the 'following is a specification. V
This invention relates to improvements in gun-sights of the kind described in the specification of my United States of America Patent No. 658,287, dated'September 18, 1900,
in which all that need .be done when laying the gun is to bring the line of sight upon the object aimed at, no matter at what range the said object may be, the sight when moved with the gun effecting automatically the adjustment required for range, provided an initial adjustment according to the position of the gun is properly made. V
According to my present invention I have arranged the automatic sight to be carried by some standingpart of thogun-carriage or support or to a loose arm of the duplex elevating-gear and not by the trunnion or other part of thegun or its crate, and to be openated by a lever or other device connected to the elevating-gear of the gun, and I therefore term this sight a gun-carriage sight. This gun-.carriagesight can be operated at some distance from the gun itself, and may be therefore readily adapted to disappearing guns, and to naval guns on revolving platforms, and to ghns supplied with the duplex side elevation of the gun-carriage sight ap- Fig. 1 is a de" pliedto a disappearing gun. tail plan of the means'for automatically giving to the sight the correction for dril't. Fig; 1 is an end view.of Fig. li looking in Fig. 2 is an end view, partly in section, of the apparatus shown in Fig. 1.. Fig. 3 is a plan viewof the free'end of the range-curveand its bracket shownin Fig.1. Fig. 4 is a side elevation,
I also provide the automatic sighting mechanism with a curve adapted,
partly in section, of part of the range-curve frame andan interchangeable adjustable curve. Fig. 5 is a detail view of a rod shown at right angles to Fig. 4. Fig. 6 is a modification of the range-curve shown in Fig. I.
Fig. 7 is a side elevation of the sighting apparatus 'applied to a non-disappearing gun. Fig. 8 is an enlarged view of part. of the apparatus shown in Fig. 7, one of the rangecu rve screws being shown in vertical section.
Fig. 9 is a detail of a modification of the apparatus shown in Fig. 8. Fig. 10 is a plan of part of the range-curve frame and the device for automatically giving to the sight the necessarycorrection for drift. Fig. 11 isaview of a detail of the mechanism shown in Figs. '7
and 8.
Referring to Fig. 1, 1 is a telescope-sight carried by a range-curve frame or sight-bar 2, pivoted at 3 to a bracket 4, centered around a pivot 5, carried by a standard 6, fixed to the floor of a revolving platform or turret or some part of the gun-carriage, which moves in a horizontal plane with the gun.
9 10 are set-screws carried by the standard .6 for leveling the bracket 4 for adjusting the sight and for correcting for fore-and-aft dip in the gun-platform.
11 is a clinometer-level.
The rangecurve frame 2 is provided with a projecting piece 12, which is adapted to slide in a groove 13 in the bracket 4. To the piece 12 is attached a Vernier to read to minutes and seconds the graduated edge of the bracket 4. When vertically adjusted in the required position with respect to the bracket 4, either in order to form the range-curve, as hereinafter described, or to set the sight when used as an ordinary sight to any required elevation, the frame 2 can he clamped by means of a screw 14.
The frame 2 is so constructedthat it may be em ployed with a range-curve composed of a number of double-acting screws, as described in the specification of my prior patent, No. 658,287, and is for'this purpose provided with the necessary number of perforations for the reception of such screws. On the right-hand side of the frame shown in Fig. 1 is abridging-plate 15, upon which the ends of the double-acting screws rest. The frame 2 is also provided with extensions 16 16, having longitudinal channels adapted to receive the bent-up ends of a single rigid range-curve, suchas 17, Figs. 1 and 4. The curve 17 is provided at its center with a slot 18, with which the T-shaped end of a rod 19 engages. The opposite end of the rod 19 passes through a cylindrical space 20 in the frame 2 and carries a piston 21, adapted to slide in said space. The top of the rod 19 is provided with a pushpiece 22, and 23 is a spring, the ends of which bear upon the lower side of the piston 21 and the bottom of the cylinder 20.
24 24 are adjusting-screws which engage.
with suitable screw-threaded holes in the frame 2 and have their ends bearing upon the turned-up end of the curve 17. These screws 24 serve to adjust the curve 17 against the pressure of the spring 23 for correcting the position of the curve 17 for errors of the daythat is to say, for errors due to the quality of the powder and for fore-and-aft wind correction.
25 is a crank sight-lever having its pivot 5 carried by the standard 6. The longerarm of this lever carries a roller or traveler 26, upon which the range-curve rests, and the shorter arm of said lever is connected by an adjustable screw-coupling 27 to a rod 27, pivoted to the gun-elevating gear-block 28. The gun-elevating arm 28 is also pivoted to the block 28, which is adapted to reciprocate in a groove 28 to elevate or depress the gun, as is well understood. The bracket 4 must be centered around the axis of the lever-pivot 5 and must be capable of being turned by the screws 9 and 10 at will either in conjunction with or independently of the crank-lever 25, first, for correcting for fore-and-aft dip in the platform and for enabling the sight and lever to be depressed together onto the buoy at the nearest range without disturbing the lever from the zero position on the rangecurve, the coupling 27 having been previously released; second, for the adjustment of the lever to the zero on the range-curve independently of the bracket, both as hereinafter described.
The bracket4 is provided with aseglnental or arc-shaped groove 29, in which a Vernier 30, carried by the lever 25, is adapted to slide. Both edges of the groove 29 are graduated, the upper edge, say, in degrees and the lower edge, say, in yards, so that the Vernier 30 indicates both the elevation of the gun and also the range.
The sighting apparatus may also carry an ordinary Scott telescopic gunsight, as shown in broken lines at 31, if required, instead of the telescopic sight 1. This Scott sight will give the correction for lateral inequality of the gun-platform.
The telescopic sight 1 is pivoted at 32 and is provided with a forward extension 32, having a driftcurve or cam 34, held against a stationary pin or boss 32 carried by the bracket 4.
33 is a spring which holds the drift-curve 34 against the pin 32".
35 is a deflection-screw working in this piece, automatically moved for drift, whereby the sight 1 may independently of the curve .34 be given the necessary horizontal deflection for various causes, such as wind or speed of moving target across the range other than drift which is corrected automatically.
Fig. 6 illustrates a similar range-curve and range-curve frame to Fig. 4; but in this case screws 30' for adjusting the curve 17 are each provided with a nut 37 for regulating the screw to correct errors of the day and with a head 38 for regulating the screw in accordance with the state of the tide, if firing at objects at sea. The screw-coupling 27 permits of the adjustment of the roller 26 in the required position on the range-curve without altering the elevation of the gun. The screws 9 and 10 are employed in conjunction with thescrew-coupling 27 for correcting the positions of the bracket 4 and the lever 25 for any accidental fore-and-aft dip of the gun-platform, 850.
The clinometer-level 11, which must be permanently set level and not disturbed after the bracket 4 has been correctly adjusted, indicates whether the gun-platform is level.
After the preliminary adjustments of the automatic sighting mechanism have been made as the gun is elevated or depressed the necessary angular adjustment between the line of sight and the longitudinal axis of the gun for range is given automatically to the sight 1 by the lever 25, which is moved about its pivot 5 as the block 28 is raised or lowered in the groove 28 for elevating or depressing the gun. The movement of the lever 25 in addition to moving the traveler 26 along the range-curve causes the Vernier 30 to register both the elevation of the gun and the range of the object fired at for one fixed height of tide. If the roller is accidentally caused to leave the range-curve by the over elevation or depression of the gun, the frame 2 is supported by a spring 39, carried by the frame 4.
To construct the adjustable range-curve for the carriage-sight, Fig. 1, supposing the height of the gun above the sea to be one hundred feet and that the angles of depression of the telescope and the elevations of the gun are known for all ranges and that the nearest range of the gun has been fixed at, say, one thousand yards, first set the sight 1 and the Scott telescopic gun-sight 31 to zero elevation and deflection; second, depress the sight bar or frame 2 (whose longitudinal axis is parallel to the zero axis of the telescope) through the angle of depression required at a height of one hundred feet to make the cross-wires of the telescopic sight 1 or the pointer of 3l cut the "sea at either high water or low water or mean water, as may be required, at one thousand yards range, as indicated bya buoy or otherwise, the angle being ICC read ofi the graduated edge of the bracket 4 by the Vernier, and temporarily clamp the sight-' bar in. that position by the screw 14; third,
bridging-plate 15 of thejrange-curve into contact with the roller 26 byturning the head of the screw 36; .fourth, give the gun the required I elevation to strike the Water-line of the buoy at' one thousand yards; fifth, connect the shortend of the lever to the rod 2,7,which is pivoted to the block 28, as being the point of the elevating-gear'which isthe least likely to create loss of time between the movementof the gun and that of the lever, taking care that the angl'eof depression of the sight-bar has in no way been altered; sixth, unclamp the sight-bar by loosening the nut 14. This formsthe zero-point of-therange-curve, and
, moved from the frame2.- The bent-up ends} of a rigid curve 17 are theninserted in the by repeating the aboveo'perations for-every hundred yards of range the range-.cnrvefor.
one hundred feet above the sea at high tide,
or low tide, or mean tide, as the case may be,
is obtained. It is obvious that the bridging-f plate may then be copied for the production of a rigid range-curve.
The special advantage of the adjustable;
curve is that thesame automatic sight can be used at any height abovethe sea and that corrections for all errors for tide, &c., canbe readily and accurately; made all alongthe' curve before firing, thereby rendering the" working of the sight truly automatic.
If interchangeable/rigid curves are preferred, a diiferent'curve would be employed,
say, for each foot of tide.
When it is required to substitute a rigid range-curve,suchas 17,. for the compound range-curve, all the double-acting screws,with the exception of the two end ones 36, are reextensions 16 on the frame 2, the push-piece 22 is depressed to lower the T-shaped end of the rod 19 into engagement'with the slot 18, and the push-piece 22 isthen released, so as to permit the spring 23 to bringthe ends of the curve into contact with the screws 24 or 36.
errors of the day.
sand yards, say, at hightide, a shot should be fired at'this range, and the point where the shot strikes should be carefullymarked by depressing the'zero-line of sight of the telescope onto it andclamping it there by: means of the screwl t. The c'linometer level should then be leveled and the position of the lever 25 marked on the are 29. A buoy should be placed at this point for future ref erence, so thatif the gun-platform remains level whenever the zero line of sight of the telescope-sight l is turned'on the water-line .of the buoy at high tide, say, the lever 25 will indicate the same elevation'on the are 29. 1
To use the carriage-sight, Fig.1, as an ordinary sight,the range must first be found by depressing the sight with its tidal and error-ofthe-day screws set to zero onto the water-line of the target by the elevating-gear of the gun and allowance made for the rise or fall of tide with reference to the datum height of tide assumed; The automatic sighting rangecurve must then be removed and replaced by a range-curve of such curvature as-to cause the line of sight'of the telescope to move parallel with the axis of the gun when elevated or depressed. The telescopic sight 31 is then set to the range found and, if necessary, corrected fortide, and the gun is laid in the ordiuary way by its elevating-gear. When the automatic sight is to be used a a range-finder as well, the range may be indicated in yards either on the are 29 or on a rigid range-curve, such as 17. The position of the lever 25 or of the roller 26 will then indicate the range, requiring, however, the minus or plus correction for .rise or fall of tide. 1
Examples: If a graduated rigid range-curve is employed for indicating the range at, say, one hundred feet above the sea, it will only indicate the range correctly at that particular state of the tide. If the reading of such rigid curve is, say, one thousand yards for one hundred feet above the sea at high tide, the reading for onehundred and one feet above the sea should be one thousand plus ten or one thousand and ten yards, so that all that is nec-' essary in this case is to add to therange found foot of fall of the tide andto subtract that amount from the range for every foot of rise of the tide. r 7 General formula forfinding the amount to be addedto or subtracted from the range given by the sight for every foot of fall or If interchangeable curves are-to be employed for each foot of tide, the two end screws need only be single-acting screws, such as 24, for making the necessary correction for rise of the tide below or above the assumed datum level for which the cam-curve has .been constructed: Let h equal height of gun above the sea in feet, R equal rangeof tar-;
get, say, at high tide (datum level) in yards, f equal number of feet of rise or fall of tide above or below datum level. The increment of range to be added to the range "given by of R) and the true range sight willproduce on the shooting ofthegun by the slightest error in the curvatureof the the sight at hightide duetoffeet fall of tide is I range curve or cam it is essential that the layer should have at all times in combination with the automatic sighting apparatus itself the means of testing and adjusting any part of said curve. This is the reason why my automatic sighting apparatus is provided with 'graduated arcs and verniers, as above described, so that by having calculated tables for the angles of elevation of the gun and for the corrcspondingangles of depression of the line of sight for various heights above the sealevel the layer may for any point of the curve read off the angles given by the graduated arcs and compare them with the tables.
A great advantage of the carriage-sight is that the layer can keep his eye on the telescope and observe the point of impact of the shot with reference to the target and measure the errors in range and direction mechanically by turning the line of sight horizontally and vertically onto the point of impact by the elevation and deflection screws of the Scott sight.
The great advantage of connecting the shorter arm of the lever 25 to the elevatinggear block 28 is that this enables the gun to be laid while in the recumbent or loading position.
Referring to Figs. 7 and 8, 6 is the fixed standard carried by a pivoted gun-carriage and in which the trunnion 51 of the gun is journaled and which supports a bracket 52, carrying a worm-wheel or elevating-screw 53, gearing with a toothed sector 54 on one arm of a crank-lever 55, pivoted loosely on the trunnion 51. The other arm of the lever 55 has pivoted to it a laterally-grooved block 56. 57 is a crank-lever fixed to the gun-trunnion 51 and having one of its arms provided with a toothed sector 58, gearing with a wormwheel or elevating-screw 59, carried by the lever 55. The other arm of the lever 57 has pivoted toit a lever 60, the ends of which are forked. The lever 57 also carries a bracket 61, provided with bearings 62, which support a rod 63, situated parallel to the longitudinal axis of the gun. Upon the rod 63 a collar 64, carrying the traveler or roller 65, is adapted to slide. The collar 6 L is also provided with a trunnion 66, which carries a laterallygrooved block 67. The forked ends of the lever are adapted to respectively slide in the grooves of the blocks 56 and 67. The toothed elevating-sectors 58 and 54 are placed at the ends of crank-levers instead ofstraight levers, depending from the trunnion in order to take 06 the teeth of said sectors the cross strain from the jump of the gun to which they would be subjected in the case of straight levers. The sight bar or frame 2 is pivoted at 68 to a sleeve 69, mounted on the rod 63. The forward end of the frame 2 has a depending piece 70, which is graduated in degrees for cooperating with a Vernier carried by a sleeve 71, mounted on the rod 63. The sleeve 71 carries an elevating pinion 72, which gears with teeth formed on the piece 70, for giving the adjustment for range to the sight by hand, or this adjustment of the sight by hand may be given by turning the graduated screw 63 which engages a screw-threaded hole in the bar 63 and bears on the bar 2, as shown in Fig. 9.
The range-curve is constructed, as above described, of a number of doubly-adjustable range-curve screws bearing upon a bridgingplate which rests upon the roller or traveler 65. The telescopic sight 1 is mounted in a bracket 73, pivoted at 74 to the frame 2, so as to be capable of adjustment in a horizontal plane.
74* is a camway or slot in the forward end of the bracket 73 for engaging the end of an arm 75, fixed or clamped to the pivot 68. 76 is a spring which tends to press the side of the slot or cam way 74 against the end of the arm 75.
76 is a level carried by the frame 2 at right angles to the axis of the gun.
The doubly-adjustable range-curve screws preferably comprise a central screw 77, provided with a head or finger piece 78, engaging an internally-screw-threaded sleeve 79, provided with a feather or key 80, adapted to slide in a longitudinal groove or keyway 81 in the frame 2. The lower end of the sleeve 79 is also externally screw-threaded and carries an adjusting-nut 82. By turning the heads 78 the screw is raised or lowered for giving the necessary corrections to the rangecurve for the height 6f the gun above the sea and for tide. By turning the nut 82 the sleeve 79,together with the screw 77,is raised or lowered for giving to the range-curve the necessary corrections for errors of the daythat is to say, for errors due to variations in the powder and to fore-and-aft wind.
The sleeve 69 carries a toothed sector 83, which gears with a worm-wheel 84, journaled in a standard 85, carried by one of the bearings 62. By turning the worm 85 the rangecurve and sight 1 may be turned angularly about the rod 63, and thereby leveled.
Referring to Fig. 11, which is a plan of the elevating-pinion 72 and shows also part of the sleeve 71 in section, the axis of the toothed elevating-pinion 72 carries a screw-threaded drum 86, graduated in yards, say, for high water. 87 is an indicator-arm which engages with the screw-threaded drum 86 and is provided with lugs 88 to slide in guides 89.
To operate the sighting mechanism (shown in Figs. 7 and 8) automatically, the elevationpinion 72 is moved out of engagement with the teeth on the piece by an eccentric 72, which causes the block holding the pinion 72 to slide back in a groove. When the elevating-screw 59 is then turned, the toothed sector 58 is raised or lowered. The gun, together with the rod 63, is thereby elevated or depressed, and the pivot of the lever 60is caused to move angularly about the trunnion 51. This angular movement of the pivot of the lever 60 causes the lower forked arm of said lever to slide in the grooves of the pivoted block 56 as said block moves about its pivot andcauses the upper forked arm of said lever while similarly sliding on the pivoted block t6 to. move the collar 64 and the traveler 65 along'the rod 63, and thereby cause the range-. curve to move about the pivot 68 as the gun is elevated or depressed, and thus give the necessary angular correction for range be- 'tween the line'of sight and the longitudinal axis of thegun. Asthe sight-bar 2 is moved vertically about the pivot 68 the camway or slot 74slides on the free end of the fixed arm '75, and thereby moves the bracket 73 and telescopic sight 1 horizontally, so as to automatically give to the said sight the necessary giving it theadjustments for range anddrift, the elevating-screw '53 is employed. When this elevating-screw is turned, .the levers 55,
57, and 60,the gun, and the sight 1 are together'elevatedor depressed without giving automatically to said sightthe adjustments for range and drift. 92 is a clinometer-level carried bythe lever 55 and capable of being adjusted by a cam 93; 7 By disconnecting a 'screw conpling 920 the lever 60 may be disconnectedfrom the sleeve 64 and traveler 65.
For giving the corrections for range to the sight by hand the elevation-pinion 72 ismoved into gear with the teeth on the piece 70, As
'- the elevating-pinion 72 is turned the arrow on the indicator arm' 87 indicates for one height of tide only the true range in yards on the drum 86, and the Vernier on the bracket '71 indicatesthe elevation of the gun, in degrees, for the same height of tid e.
Various Uses of the Carriage-Sight, Fig. 1.
Disappearing gunk-To lay the gun, using theadjustable cam-curve:
' First. By turning the head 38 of the doubleactionadjusting-screws, the spirals of which are graduated to each foot of rise or fall of tide, adj ust the curve-plate 15 to the required curvaturefor the height of tide.
Second. By turning the nuts 37 of theabove screws adjust the cu rveplat e 15 so as to increase or decrease the range according to the force and direction of the wind and force of powder. Each spiral of a nut is graduated to minutes of elevation.
Third. By the elevating-gearand traversing arrangements'of the gun bring'the telescopic sight onto the water-line of the target.
*Fourth. Raise the gun into the firing position, fire, and, observing the shot through the .65 j sight) bythe horizontal and vertical, movement' of the diaphragm holding the horiz'ousight, turnthe horizontal pointer onto the pointfof impacttct) (with theScott telescopic sight) by the deflection and elevation screws of the sight and (b) (with the autotelescopic tal pointer. This operation will give the required correction in range and direction which, through the intermediary of the nuts 37, will have to be given to the curve-plate 15 before the next round. If the target is moving from or toward the gun, the horizontal and vertical scales inside the telescope must be used to guide the layer in laying a definite amount to the right or left of it and above or below the water-line,according to the speed of the target.
Fifth. In all cases the telltale-level 11 must be level before li ring. Kit is not level, the platform is not level, and the bracket 4 must be adjusted levelby screws 9 and 10, previously taking care to unclamp the lever 25 by clamp 27 and" to reclamp it to 27 when releveled before using the elevating-gear of the gun.
To fire at any point of the target above the water-line. First, having laid the gun, as above described, on the water-lino of the target, measure (by the vertical scale in the telescopic sight or by the deflection scale turned into a vertical position .by revolving the telescope in its bearings or by the elevation-screw of the Scott sight) the angle subtended between the water-line andthe point to be fired at, and by the elevating gear elevate the gun that amount, as indicated by the Vernier 30. Then fix the point of aim by turning the pointer onto it by its own screws.
To continue the firing, lay in future on that point,and the gun will automatically receive the required elevation to hit it. This change of fire from one point to another of the target is done very much more readily when the dufling or subtracting therefron1,according tothe state of the tide.
Second. Take out the range-curve and substitute therefor a special cam-curve, which will make the sight-bar follow the axis of the gun when the elevating gear is worked.
Third. Put the Scott sight into itsbearings at the side of thesight-bar, if there is no other telescopic sight fitted to thesight-bar.
' Fourth. Set the sight to the elevation and deflection for the range." 7
What I claim, and desire to securebyLetters Patent of the UnitedStates, is-
l. In sighting apparatus for ordnance the combination with the gun, ofa range-curve and sight carried by the gun carriage or support, means operated by the elevating-gear of the gun for actuating said range-curve so as to automatically alter the angle between the line ofv sight and the longitudinal axis of the gun in accordance with the range, and means for automatically adj ustiug the sight horizontally to allow for the drift of the shot,
ICO
as the rangc-curve is elevated or depressed, substantially as and. for the purpose specified.
2. In sighting apparatus for ordnance, the combination with the gun and means for elevating said gun, of a range-curve, means operated by the elevating-gear of the gun for actuating said range-curve so as to automatically alter the angle between the line of sight and the longitudinal axis of the gun in accordance with the range, a sight-bracket pivoted to the range-curve and provided with a camway or slot, and a fixed arm with which said camway engages so as to give the sightbracket a horizontal adjustment to allow for the drift of the shot as the range-curve is elevated or depressed, substantially as and for the purpose specified.
3. In sighting apparatus for ordnance, the combination with the gun and means for elevating said gun, of a standard fixed to the gunplatform, a bracket pivoted to said standard, means for adjusting the bracket in a vertical plane with reference to the standard, a rangecurve and sight pivoted to the bracket, a lever pivoted to the standard, a roller carried by said lever and upon which the range-curve hears, and means connecting the lever with the elevating-gear of the gun, substantially as and for the purpose specified.
4:. In sighting apparatus for ordnance, the combination with the gun and means for elevating said gun, ofa standard fixed to the gunplatform, a bracket pivoted to said standard, means for adjusting the bracket in a vertical plane with reference to the standard, a rangecurve and sight pivoted to the bracket, a lever pivoted to the standard about the same pivot as that of the bracket, a roller carried bysaid lever and upon which the range-curve bears, and means connecting the lever with the elevating-gear of the gun, substantially as and for the purpose specified.
5. In sighting apparatus for ordnance, the combination with the gunand means for elevating said gun, ofa standard fixed to the gunplatform, a bracket pivoted to said standard, a range-curve and sight pivoted to said bracket, a lever pivoted to the standard about the same pivot as that of the bracket, a roller carried by said lever and upon which the range-curve bears means connecting said leverwith the elevating-gear of the gun, and means for automatically adjusting the sight horizontally to allow for the drift of the shot, as the range-curve is elevated or depressed, substantially as and for the purpose specified.
6. In sighting apparatus for ordnance, the combination with thegun and means for elevating said gun, of astandard fixed to the gunplatform, a bracket pivoted to said standard, a range-curve pivoted to said bracket, a sigh tbracket pivoted to the range-curve and provided with a camway or slot, a fixed arm with which said camway engages so as to give the sight bracket a horizontal adjustment to allow for the drift of the shot, as the rangecurve is elevated or depressed, and means operated by the elevating-gear of the gun for actuating said range-curve so as to automatically alter the angle between the line of sight and the longitudinal axis'of the gun in accordance with the range, substantially as and for the purpose specified.
7. In sighting apparatusfor ordnance, the combination with the gun and means for elevating said gun, of a standard fixed to the gunplatform, a bracket pivoted to said standard, a lever pivoted to the standard about the same pivot of said bracket, a range-curve pivoted to said bracket, a sight-bracket pivoted to the range-curve and provided with a camway or slot, a fixed arm with which said camway engages so as to give the sight-bracket a horizoutal adjustment to allow for the drift of the shot as the range-curve is elevated or depressed, a roller carried by said lever and upon which the range-curve bears, and means connecting the lever with the elevating-gear of the gun, substantially as and for the purpose specified.
8. In a sighting apparatus for ordnance, the combination with the gun and means for elevating said gun, a range-curve comprising a frame having perforations a central cylindrical space and a channeled extension at each end, a curve or cam provided with a central slot and having its ends adapted to slide in the channels in said extensions, a piston in the central cylindrical space in the frame, a spring which tends to raise said piston, a piston-rod carried by said piston and having one end adapted to engage the central slot in the curve and the otherend provided with a pushpiece, and adj usting-screws which engage perforations in the frame and bear upon the ends of the curve or cam, a sight carried by the ran ge-curve frame-or partcarrying the rangecurve, and means operated by the elevatinggear of the gun for actuating said range-curve so as to automatically alter the angle between the line of sight and the longitudinal axis of v the gun in accordance with the range, substantially as and for the purpose specified.
9. In sighting apparatus for ordnance, the combination with the gun and means for elevating said gun, of a standard fixed to the gunplatform, a bracket pivoted to said standard, a range-curve pivoted to said bracket and comprising a frame having perforations a central cylindrical space and a channeled extension at each end, a curve or cam provided with a central slot and having its ends adapted to slide in the channels in said extensions, a piston in the central cylindrical space in the frame, a spring which tends to raise said piston, apiston-rod carried by said piston and having one end adapted to engage the central slot in the curve and the other end provided with a push-piece, and adjusting-screws which engage perforations in the frame and bear upon the ends of the curve or cam, a sight carried by the range-curve frame, a lever pivoted to the standard, a roller carried plane with reference to the standard, a rangecurvepivoted to said bracket and comprising a frame having perforations a central cylindrical space and achauneled extension at each end, a curve or cam provided with a central slot and having its ends adapted to slide in the channels in said extensions, a piston in the central cylindrical space in the frame, aspring which tends to raise said piston, a piston-rod carried by said piston and having'one end adapted to engage the central slot in the curve and the other end provided with a push-piece, and adjusting-screws which engage perforations in the frame and bear upon the ends of the curve or cam, a sight carried by the rangecurve frame,a lever pivoted to the standard,
a roller carried by said lever and upon which pivot as said bracket, a range-curve pivoted to said bracket and comprising a frame having perforations a central cylindrical space and a channeled extension at each end, a curve or cam provided with a central slot and having its ends adapted to slide in the channels in said extensions, apiston in the central cylindrical space in the frame, a spring which tends to raise said piston, a piston-rod carried by said piston and having one end adapted toeugage the central slot in the curve and the other end provided with a push-piece, and adjusting-screws which engage perforations in the frameand bear upon the ends of the curve or cam, a sight-bracket pivoted to the range-curve frame and provided with a curve or cam, a fixed pin or boss with whichsaid cam engages so as to give the sight-bracket a, horizontal adjustment to allow for the drift of the shot as the telescopic sight which moves with the range-curve is elevated 0,; depressed in a vertical plane, a roller carried by said lever and upon which the rangecurve bears, and means connecting the lever with the elevating-gear of the gun, substantially as and for the purpose specified.
In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand, in presence of two subscribing witnesses, this 18th day of September, 1901.
LOTHIAN KERR SCOTT.
Witnesses:
'IHiREsE GAUBERT, 'l. M. FOSTER.
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Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2008157508A1 (en) 2007-06-15 2008-12-24 Savvis, Inc. Shared data center disaster recovery systems and methods
US20180328696A1 (en) * 2017-05-11 2018-11-15 Inventure Engineering And Machine, Llc System and method for aligning a vertical and/or horizontal reticle of an optical device

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2008157508A1 (en) 2007-06-15 2008-12-24 Savvis, Inc. Shared data center disaster recovery systems and methods
US20180328696A1 (en) * 2017-05-11 2018-11-15 Inventure Engineering And Machine, Llc System and method for aligning a vertical and/or horizontal reticle of an optical device
US10962330B2 (en) * 2017-05-11 2021-03-30 Inventure Engineering And Machine, Llc System and method for aligning a vertical and/or horizontal reticle of an optical device

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