US688810A - Pneumatic separator. - Google Patents

Pneumatic separator. Download PDF

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US688810A
US688810A US66919298A US1898669192A US688810A US 688810 A US688810 A US 688810A US 66919298 A US66919298 A US 66919298A US 1898669192 A US1898669192 A US 1898669192A US 688810 A US688810 A US 688810A
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Prior art keywords
cone
discharge
hopper
separator
cones
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US66919298A
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Albert Raymond
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RAYMOND BROTHERS IMPACT PULVERIZER Co
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RAYMOND BROTHERS IMPACT PULVERIZER Co
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B07SEPARATING SOLIDS FROM SOLIDS; SORTING
    • B07BSEPARATING SOLIDS FROM SOLIDS BY SIEVING, SCREENING, SIFTING OR BY USING GAS CURRENTS; SEPARATING BY OTHER DRY METHODS APPLICABLE TO BULK MATERIAL, e.g. LOOSE ARTICLES FIT TO BE HANDLED LIKE BULK MATERIAL
    • B07B4/00Separating solids from solids by subjecting their mixture to gas currents
    • B07B4/02Separating solids from solids by subjecting their mixture to gas currents while the mixtures fall
    • B07B4/025Separating solids from solids by subjecting their mixture to gas currents while the mixtures fall the material being slingered or fled out horizontally before falling, e.g. by dispersing elements

Description

, No. esame. Patented um. m, lam.
. A. RAYMUN.
PNEUMATIC S'EPARATR.
y 1 (Appliuation filed Feb, 5, 189B.) `(No Mle'I.) i i' 6 Sheets-Sheet l.
' No. 688,8l0. Patented Dec. l0, |901.
A. RAYMOND'; PNEUMA'TIC SEPAHATOB;
(Application filed Feb. 5, 1898.) (No Model.) 6 Slaaeta-Sheet 2.
TH: uhmm Pz'rms ou', moro-umol. wAsnms'roN. uv c.
No. 683,8lo. Paiented nec. lo, Ism.
i A. nAYMuNn.
PNEUMATIC SEYPARATDR.
(Application med Feb. 5, 189s.) l (No Model.)
6 Sheei's-Sheet 3.
ma Normas PETERS cn. PuomLl-mm wAsmNGToN. D. c
No. 688,8!0. "Patented Dec. I0, |90I.
A. RAY'UND. PNEUMATIC SEPARTUR.
(Application filed Feb. 5, 1898.) (No Mdel.) 6 Sheets-$heat 4,
fm: Ncnms Pneus co.. Fumo-urna, wAsnmzsmn, D. c.
No. 688,8!0. Patented Dec. Il), |901. A. RAYMOND.
(Application filed Feb. 5, 189B.) (No Model.) 6 Sheetsv-Sheet 5.
mage@ TME nonxs wenns co, PHoTcLLmaa, wAsHmaToN, n c.
I' No. l688,8I0. Patented Dec. l0, 190|.
' A. RAYMOND.
PNEUMATIC SEPABATOR. n
(Application led Fem 5. 1898.)
(NoMdel.) 6 Sheets--Sheet 6.
' iran Sterns arent* rrrcn.
ALBERT RAYMOND, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, ASSIGNOR TO THE RAYMOND BROTHERS IMPACT PULYERIZER COMPANY, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, A
CORPORATION OF ILLINOIS.
PN EU lVlATlC SEPARATOR.
SPECIFICATION formingpart of Letters Patent No. 688,810, dated December 10, 1901.
Application filed February 5, 1898. Serial No. 669,192. (No model.)
To all whom t 711,607/ concern.-
Be it known that I, ALBERT RAYMOND, of Chicago, in the county of Cook and State of Illinois, have invented certain new and use ful Improvements in Pneumatic Separators,
of which the following is a specitication.
This invention relates to pneumatic separators of that classv in which the material to be separated is carried by an air-current and ro the separation is effected by gravity.
The present invention lhas for its object, among other things, to provide a separator of this class wherein a multiple separation or grading of the material may be etfectually obtained, although the construction is such that the machine may be readily adapted for use in the treatment of materials when it is desired to separate therefrom one grade only thereof and that the lightest.
zo To this end the present invention consists in certain novel features, which I Will now proceed to describe and will then particularly point out in the claims.
In the accompanying drawings, Figure lis a front elevation, partlyin section, of an apparatus embodying my invention in one form, the same being shown in connection with an elevator for supplying the material thereto. Fig. 2 is a side elevation of the same, the elevator being omitted. Fig. 3 is a transverse vertical sectional detail View, on an enlarged scale, through the hopper shown in Figs. I and 2, taken on the line 3 3 of Fig. 2. Fig. 4t
/ is a similar view taken in a plane at right angles to Fig. 3 on the line 4. et of Fig. l, the casing of the hopper being shown in section and parts of the inclosed structure being removed. Fig. is adetail View, partlyin front elevation and partly in section, illustratinga 4o modified form of construction. Fig. 6 is a similar View illustrating a further modification. Fig. 7 is a view similar to Fig. 3, illustrating a modification of the portion of the structure therein shown. Fig. 8 is a View similar to Fig. 4. of the construction shown in Fig. 7. Fig. 9 is an enlarged transverse sectional view of the separator proper, taken on the line 4l. 4. of Fig. l. Fig. l0 is a similar View taken in a plane at right angles to the plane `of section of Fig. 9 or on the line 3 3 of 5o Fig. 2, and Fig. ll is a detail view of one of the air-valves.
Referring rst to the form of construction shown in Figs. l to 4: of said drawings, IO in* dicates the main hopperof the apparatus, into which the material to be operated upon is fed through a cylindrical feeding-spout ll from a receiving-hopper l2, which latter may be supplied by means of a suitable elevator 13 in case the location of the machineis such as 6o to require the employment of an elevator.
I4 indicates a shaft extending transversely through the hopper provided externally thereof with a driving-pulley 15, by means of which power may be supplied to the shaft llt from any suitable source, and being also provided Within the feeding spout or conduit 1l with a spiral feeding-screw or conveyer 16. This conveyer is comparatively short, occupying only the outer end of the feeding-conduit ad- 7o jacent to the inlet thereof and leaving free the discharge end of said conduit, which is extended some little distance within the hopper. Above the hopper l0, its lower end communicating With the upper end of said llopper, is the separator proper, I7, or main portion of the separator, comprising an external shell or body i8, conical in shape and having its open lower end communicating with the upper end of the hopper IO. In the construc- 8o tion shown in Figs. i to Ltof the drawings this communication is direct or immediate. The shell 18 is provided at its top with a cover 19, also preferably conical in shape, although of very slight inclination, and receives at its central point a discharge-pipe 20, which, as shown in dotted lines in Figs. l and .2, extends some little distance downward into the shell or body 1S.
Wit-hin the shell or body 1S are located a 9o plurality of cones arranged concentrically to each other with their apexes downward. In the present instance I have shown three of these internal cones, although the number may obviously be varied. The outer cone 21 95 nearest to the shell or casing 18 extends downward into the hopper lO,Wherein its dischargemouth is located, the same being provided with controlling mechanism hereinafter' described.
22 indicates the second internal cone, the upper edge of which is located above the upper edge of the cone 21, while the shell or casing 18 or the cover 19 thereof is provided with an annular bafde-plate 23, similar in inclination to and extending downward between the upper edges of the cones 2l and 22. The cone 22 is provided at its lower or discharge end with a discharge-spout 24, extending to the exterior of the shell or casing 18, and provided with a terminal valve 25 to control the discharge of the material, and with4 an air-valve 26. The cone 22 is also provided at its lower end with a second discharge-spout 27, opening into the space between said cone 22 and the cone 21, and this second dischargespout is provided with a controlling-valve 28, which may be operated in any suitable manner from the exterior of the shell or casing 18.
29 indicates athird internal cone located within the cone 22 with its upper edge above the upper edge thereof, and the shell or cas'- ing 18 or its cover 19 is provided with an ann ular baffle-plate 30, extending downward be-` tween the upper edges of the cones 22 and 29 and having, preferably, an inclination similar to that of said cone. The cone 29 is provided at its lower end with a discharge-spout 3l, which extends to the exterior of the shell or casing 18 and is provided with a terminal valve 32, controlling the discharge of the material, and with an air-controlling valve 33. Said cone 29 is further provided with a second discharge-valve 34,0peninginto the space between the cones 22 and 29, and provided with a controlling-valve 35, which may be operated from the exterior of the shell or casing 18.
The discharge-pipe 2O has its lower end extended some distance downward into the interior of the shell'or body 18, such extension being sufficient to carry the lower end of said pipe within said casing below the upper edge of the cone 29, as indicated in Fig. 1 and shown in dotted lines in Fig. 2. The other end of said pipe is connected to the inlet or eye ot' an exhaust-fan 36, and the discharge of said fan is connected, by means of a pipe 37, with a dust-collector 38, which is preferably a centrifugal separator of any approved type. The dust-collector is provided with a valved discharge-pipe 39 for the separated material.
40 represents a return-pipe by which the air is conducted from the collector 38 to the discharge-trunk 4l of the hopper 10. This trunk extends downward from the open lower end of the hopper, its lower portion beinginclined, as shown, and provided with a controlling-valve 42 and with a plurality of deflecting-plates 43 to deflect the current of air from the return-pipe 40 and prevent its affecting the lower portion of the discharge-trunk and the material therein. The pipe 40 is provided with an opening 44, which serves to ree88,s1o v permitted to pass freely from said cone into the hopper 10. In the construction shown this structure comprises a casting 45, which is joined to and forms a part of the mouth of the cone, it being supported within the hopper by means of rods 46, the inner ends of which may be inserted in suitable sockets 47 in the casting 45, while their outer ends rest` in notched seats 48, provided on the inner face of the hopper. ing 45 and extending downwardly therefrom are secured parallel plates 49, and to the front and rear of said casting are hinged plates 50. The shaft 14 passes through the plates 49 and between the plates 50 and has mounted on it in the space inclosed between said four plates a grooved or fluted feed-roller 5l.. The outward movement ot' the hinged or pivoted plates 50 is limited by transverse bolts 52, and there is secured on said bolts, being clamped between sleeves 53 thereon, a deiiecting-plate 54, which extends in a downwardly-inclined direction toward that side of the hopper 10 opposite to that at which the material is fed into said hopper through the conduit 11.
The operation of the machine as thus constructed is as follows when the machine is being employed as a separator and grader for the purpose of separating material into a plurality ot' grades of different ineness: The operation of the exhaust-fan 36 produces an upward current of air through the hopper 10 and separator proper, 17, the current passing through the pipe 37,'dust-collector 38, and return-pipe 40 and thence upward through the discharge-trunk 41 to the hopper 10, thus effecting a continuous circulation of the current. The material which is fed into the receiving-hopper 12, either by the elevator 13 or in any other suitable manner, is fed for.- ward by the screw conveyer 16 on the shaft 14, and since this conveyer terminates short of the inner end of the conduit 11 the material will ill that end of said conduit and will pack therein, and thereby cut oit' connection between the hopper and the external air. As the material is discharged into the hopper 10 it encounters the upward current of air, and while the heavier portions of said material may fall directly into the discharge-trunk 41 the remainder is carried upward into the space between the shell or body 18 and the cone 21. This space expands upward, owing to the increase in diameter of the cones and the consequent increase in horizontal area of the space between them, so that the carrying power of the air-current gradually diminishes To the sides of the casty,
IOO
IIO
'essere and only the finer particles are carried up over the upper end of the cone 21. The larger and heavier portions of the material are carried back into the hopper. rlhe finer material as it passes successively under the deflecting-plates 23 and 30 and under the lower end of the pipe 2O and over the edges of the cones 21, 22, and 29 is successively deflected from its course at the mouth of each cone, the lower end of the pipe serving as a delector for the uppermost cone 29, and a portion of the material carried by the current is deposited in each one of these cones, the
heaviest material being deposited in the space between the cones 21 and 22, the intermediate grade between the cones 22 and 29, and the lightest material within the cone 29. The finest material, which is too fine to be detained in the separator proper, is carried through the pipe 20, exhaust-fan 36, and pipe 37 to the dust-collector 38, where it is deposited, the purified air returning through the pipe 40 to the discharge-truuk l1 and hopper 10. The tailings or heavier particles descend through the trunk 41 and are discharged through the gates or valves L12 thereof. The material accumulating in the cones 29 and 22 may be separately withdrawn therefrom through their respective spouts 31 and 24, while the material which accumulates in the cone 21 is fed downward through the mouth of said cone by reason of the rotation of the feed-roller 51 and is again discharged into the hopper 10 in order to be again subjected to the blast for the purpose of removing the iiner particles. This is done for the reason that the larger particles accumulating in the cone 21 retain along with them smaller and finer particles, which may be separated out by being again subjected to the action of the blast. I have found in practice that the suction ot' the current suffices to draw the hinged plates 50 inward, so as to keep them in contact with the blades of the feed-wheel 51, and by reason of this construction the blast is prevented from entering the cone 21 from below, and thereby affecting the separation by disturbing the action of the air-current in the separator proper, while the hinging of the plates permits them to swing outward to allow the passage between them and the feedwheel of the material being fed downward by this latter. The deiiectingplate 54 serves to distribute the material more equally at the mouth of the hopper 10,where it first encounters the blast, and since a portion of the material returning from the cone 21 is in this way deflected to that side ot the hopper farthest from the feed-conduit l1 the distribution of material is thus equalized.
In case it is desired to make but a single separation, or, in other words, to separate out only the tine dust without grading the remaining material, the valves 35 and 28 are opened and the valves 32 and 25 closed, whereupon the lnaterial which gathers in the upper and intermediate cones 29 and 22 is discharged into the cone 21 and thence returned to the hopper.
The air-valves 26 and 33 may be of any approved construction-as, for instance, the ordinary damper form shown in detail in Fig. 11 of the drawings. By means of these valves l am enabled to insure superior uniform-ity in the product delivered from each of the cones and delivery chutes. As heretofore pointed out, the heavier particles sometimes retain among themselves finer and lighter particles, and when, for instance, the lower portion of the cone 22 and its chute 24 have become filled or partially filled with. material by opening the' air-valve 26 to a greater. or less extent a current of air is admitted into the lower end of the chute, and passing up through the material therein and in the cone serves to withdraw the finer or lighter particles, leaving only the heavier ones, and thus insuring uniformity. The current of air is of course produced by the suction of the blastfan.
The valves 28 and 35 may be operated in the manner shown in detail in Fig. 10 of the drawings, in which G7 indicates a valve-operating rod, extending downward through a suitable openingin the shell of the separator proper to a point immediately adjacent to the valve and outwardly from the same. The lower end of this rod is supported by a pivoted link 68, while its upper end passes through a fixed collar G9, provided with a set- `screw 70, by means ot' which the rod maybe secured in any position to which it may be adjusted. It will be seen that by pressing the rod downward it will bear against the valve and hold the same closed, while by withdrawing the rod upward the valve will be permitted to open by reason of the pressure of the material,and thus permit its discharge.
AThe outer valves 25 and 32 may be held closed in any suitable manner, as by means of a locking-pin 71 passing through suitable apertures in the walls of the chute outside of the valve, said pins being removable to permit the valves to open under pressure of the weight of the material in the chutes.
In Fig. 5 I have shown a means of obtain- `ing a separation of the tailings or coarser portions of the material which may be employed intermediate the separator proper, 17, and the hopper 10. In this construction there is located between the lower end of the shell or body 18 and the upper end of the hopper, which is contracted, as shown at 10, a separating-chamber 55, consisting of two frustoconical portions 55 and 55h, joined together by their larger portions and having located in the upper portion or throat of' the chamber thus formed a deflector 56 having a body the shape of which is that of two conesjoined by their bases. Below this deflect-or is located in the wider portion of the chamber 55 a receiving cone or hopper 57, provided with a valved discharge-spout 58. A portion of the tailings intermediate between the heavier IOO IIO
particles and those carried by the current into the separator proper will be collected in the chamber 55 and may be withdrawn from the cone or hopper 57 through the spout 5S. When this intermediate separating device is employed, however, it will be understood, of course, that the cone 2l does not return its material to the hopper 10, as in the construction shown in Figs. 1 to 4, but is provided with a separate valved discharge-spout 21, so that an additional grading of the material may be had. Of course in this case the casting 45 and feed-roller 51, with its inclosing plates, are dispensed with.
A separating-chamber 59, similar to the chamber 55 just described, may be employed in the discharge-trunk 41 below the hopper 10, or, as shown in Fig. 6, two of these separating-chambers 59 may be located one below the other in said trunk. These separatingchambers, however, when located below the hopper do not effect a grading of the tailings, but merely serve to subdivide the tailings and present them more effectually to the action of the blast, the material drawn from the several chambers 59 being substantially the same.
In Figs. 7 and 8 I have shown a mod/ification of the construction shown in Figs. 3 and 4, whereby the apparatus is adapted to either return the material from the cone 2l to the `hopper 10 or discharge it separately, as desired. In this construction the lower mouth of the space between the plates inclosing the feed-roller 5l may be closed by a detachable plate 60, and there extends laterally outward from the space thus inclosed a discharge pipe or conduit 61, inclosing the shaft 14, on which is mounted a spiral conveyer 62. This spiral conveyer is secured on a sleeve 63, which maybe rigidly connected to the shaft 14 by means of a set-screw 64 or in any other suitable manner, so as to cause said conveyer to rotate along with the said shaft. The conduit 61 is provided with a suitably-valved discharge-pipe 65. The sleeve 63 may be disconnected from the shaft 14 and may be locked to prevent rotation by any suitable means-such, for instance, as a set-screw 66,
passing through a xed portion of the machine.
When the set-screw 64is loosened and the set-screw 66 tightened, the plate 60 being removed, the material from the cone 21 will be fed back into the hopper 10 in the manner already described. When, however, the set- -screw 66 is loosened, the set-screw 64 tightened, and the plate 60 secured in place, the material from the cone 21 is fed outward by the conveyer 62 and discharged through the spout 65.
It should be noted that in addition to the hinged plates 50 permanent side plates 50a are secured to or form a part of the casting 45 in order to form a rigid casing for the feed-roller 51 when the bottom plate 60 is in use. When this plate is in position and the material is being fed laterally outward, the hinged side plates 50 are inoperative and assume the position shown in full lines in Fig. 8. When, however, the plate 60 is removed and the material is being returned to the hopper 10, the plates 50 assume the positions shown in dotted lines in Fig. 8.
The apparatus is more particularly devised for use in the separation of pulverized ores, especially those of the precious metals; but itis obviously capable of being applied tothe separation of pulverized materials generally and is adapted for wide application.
I do not wish to be understood as limiting myself to the precise details of construction hereinbefore set forth, as it is obvious that various modifications in the construction shown and described may be made without departing from the principle of my invention.
I claim- 1. A pneumatic separator, comprising an outer conical shell having a closed head, an opening in its lower contracted portion intol which the material to be separated is delivered, and an air-supply opening below said delivery-point, a plurality of internal cones concentrically arranged within each other in an ascending series, open at their tops and having separate discharge-spouts at their lower contracted ends, detlectors extending downward from the head between said cones, a central discharge-pipe extending downward through the head below the upper edge of the uppermost cone, and a fan adapted to cause a current of air to pass through said separator, substantially as described.
2. A pneumatic separator, comprising an outer conical shell having a closed head, an opening in its lower contracted portion into which the material to be separated is delivered, and an air-supply opening below said delivery-point, a plurality of internal cones concentrically arranged within each other in an ascending series, open at their tops and having separate discharge spouts at their lower contracted ends, deflectors extending downward from the head between said cones, a central discharge-pipe extending downward through the head below the upper edge of the uppermost cone, an exhaust-fan connected to said discharge-pipe, and a dust-collector into which the exhaust-fan discharges, substantially as described.
3. A pneumatic separator, comprising an outer conical shell having a closed head, an opening in its lower contracted portion into which the material to be separated is delivered, and an air-supply opening below said delivery-point, a' plurality of internal cones concentrically arranged within each other in an ascending series, open at their tops and having separate discharge-spouts at their lower contracted ends, delectors extending downward from the head between said cones, a central discharge-pipe extending downward through the head below the upper edge of the uppermost cone, an exhaust-fan connected to said discharge-pipe, a dust-collector into IOO IIO
which the exhaust-fan discharges,'and a re turn-pipe for returning the air-current from the dust-collector back to the separator at its air-supply opening, substantially as described.
4. In a pneumatic separator, a separator proper,comprising an outer conical shell havinga closed head, an inlet-opening at its lower contracted end and an outlet-opening at its upper end, a plurality of concentric cones arranged in an ascending series within A.said shell, and deflectors extending downward from the head .between said cones, said cones being provided with valved delivery-spouts whereby each cone may be separately discharged externally of the casing, or the several cones may be discharged th rough the series to the inlet-point, and means for causing a current of air to pass upward through said separator, substantially as described.
5. In a pneumatic separator, the combination, with an external conical shell or casing having a closed head, an inlet-opening at its contracted lower end and a discharge-opening, of an internal cone concentric with said shell, open at its upper end and having a discharge-opening at its lower end, a grooved or Iiuted revoluble feed-roller located in the throat of said discharge opening, hinged plates located laterally of said feedroller,and an exhaust-f an connected to the discharge of the separator, whereby said hinged plates are held in contact with said feed-roller to pre vent the air-current from entering the discharge end of the internal cone, substantially as described.
6. In a pneumatic separator of the character described, the combination, with the external conical body or casing of the separator proper, and anintern al cone concentric therewith and adjacent thereto, and having a dischargelopening at its lower end, of a grooved or fluted feed-roller within the throat of said discharge-opening, lateral hinged plates adjacent to said feed-roller, means for closing the mouth of said discharge-opening, and a lateral conduit provided with a conveyerand external discharge,substantially as described.
7. In a pneumatic separator, the combination, with a separator proper, substantially such as described, of a downwardly-extending tailings-discharge trunk below said separator, having its lower extremity inclining to the vertical and provided with similarly-inclined deflecting plates, an exhaust-fan connected to said separator at its top, a dustcollector connected to the exhaust-fan, and an air-return conduit opening into the discharge-trunk in an upwardly-inclined direction corresponding with that of the lower inclined end thereof,substantially as described.
ALBERT RAYMOND.
US66919298A 1898-02-05 1898-02-05 Pneumatic separator. Expired - Lifetime US688810A (en)

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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2641335A (en) * 1946-01-12 1953-06-09 Union Oil Co Gas-solid separator
US2802280A (en) * 1954-10-13 1957-08-13 Smidth & Co As F L Heat-exchange apparatus including cyclone separators
US5976224A (en) * 1998-05-04 1999-11-02 Durant; James F. Separating carbon from ash

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2641335A (en) * 1946-01-12 1953-06-09 Union Oil Co Gas-solid separator
US2802280A (en) * 1954-10-13 1957-08-13 Smidth & Co As F L Heat-exchange apparatus including cyclone separators
US5976224A (en) * 1998-05-04 1999-11-02 Durant; James F. Separating carbon from ash

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