US669944A - Telephone. - Google Patents

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Publication number
US669944A
US669944A US100800A US1900001008A US669944A US 669944 A US669944 A US 669944A US 100800 A US100800 A US 100800A US 1900001008 A US1900001008 A US 1900001008A US 669944 A US669944 A US 669944A
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Prior art keywords
instrument
receiver
diaphragm
transmitter
box
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US100800A
Inventor
Albion Parris Merrill
Jenny Ward Hays
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Albion Parris Merrill
Jenny Ward Hays
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M1/00Substation equipment, e.g. for use by subscribers
    • H04M1/02Constructional features of telephone sets

Description

No. 669,944. Patented Mar. 12, I90l. A. P. MERRILL &. J. W. HAYS.
TELEPHONE.
(Application filed Jan. 10, 1900,; (No Model.)
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No 669,944. Patented Mar. I2, I901.
A. P; MERRILL 81. J. W. HAYS.
TELEPHGNE.
(Application filed Jan. 10, 1900.; I
(No Model.) 3 Sheets--Sheet 2.
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No. 669,944. Patented Mar. I2, 1901. A. P. MERRILL & J. W. HAYS.
T E L E P H o N E.
(Application filed Jan. 10, 1900.
3 Sheets Sheet 3.
(No llodel.)
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Urvi'Tnn STATES PATENT @FFICE.
ALBION PARRIS MERRILL AND JENNY WARD HAYS, OF SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA.
TELEPHONE.
rEPEGIFIOATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 669,944, dated March 12, 1901.
Application filed January 10, 1900. Serial No. 1,008- (No model.)
, transmit sound as originally produced, but reproduce it in decreased volume and strength, necessitating the closest attention at the receiver and with the instrument held to the ear in order to distinguish and understand the sounds or message transmitted.
It is one object of the present invention to construct a telephone to overcome this objection and render possible the reproduction or transmission of sound with nearly or quite its original volume and strength, so that the same will be audible and distinguishable in any part of a room or chamber in which the receiving instrumentis located and Without the necessity of holding an instrument to the car.
A further object is the production of a telephone in the use of which it is not necessary for the party sending a message to approach the transmitter and talk directly into the same,-as is required in the use of the common types of telephones, but which transmitter will properly transmit speech or sounds produced in the room in which the transmitter soften the sounds entering the transmitter.
-the receiver-magnet.
tem of wires and switches whereby a transmitter can be cut out while the telephone is being u ed, so that while sounds will be transmitted to and received by oneinstru ment they will not be transmitted from said instrument.
A further object is to prevent the formation of a dead-air cushion against a receiverdiaphragm, which, if permitted, would prevent the successful operation of the receiver for the intended purpose.
With such and other objects in view the invention is embodied in the novel parts, arrangement, and combination of parts hereinafter described, and particularly set forth in the claims.
In the accompanying drawings we have illustrated an embodimentv of our invention, but desire it understood that we do not limit the invention in its useful applications to the construction which is there shown simply to give a better understanding of the invention.
In said drawings, Figure l is a perspective view of the instrument without the electrical connections. Fig. 2 is a longitudinal sectional view of the transmitter. Fig. 8 is a similar View of the receiver, showing a portion of the box of the instrument and part of Fig. 4 is a perspective View showing two instruments with their electrical connections. Fig. 5 is a diagrammatic View showing the application of the telephone for use in theaters, public halls, or the like. Fig. 6 is a perspective view of a mute intended to be used with the receiver when it is desired to diminish the volume of the sound so that it may only be heard by the intended person.
Referring to said drawings, wherein like reference characters refer to similar parts throughout the several views, A indicates a box which constitutes the support and inclosure for the several parts of the instrument. The receiver, which is indicated at C, is fixed to a part of this box, and in order to prevent the formation of a dead-air cushion against the diaphragm of the receiver the box is provided with a hole or holes A In this respect the invention differs from the ordinary telephone in general use in which the receiver is not a fixture of the box and in which the box is closed. To close the box entirely deadens or muffles the vibration of the diaphragm, whereas the open framework or perforated box, as shown, insures a louder and clearer reproduction of the sound by the receiver. If desired, suitable screens or reticulated material A may be provided to cover the openings to prevent the entrance of dust or foreign matter into the box.
B indicates a transmitter, which is shown as secured to an extension A. of the rear por tion of the box. The transmitter extends forwardly from this extension A over the body of the box A. The transmitter proper may be of any suitable or preferred construction, it forming no part of the present invention, and we have illustrated in the drawings what is known as the long-distance transmitter. It comprises, briefly stated, a sheet-metal box or shell B holding a cup B, of carbon or other suitable substance, through which is passed a screw B", to which one of the wires of the local or primary circuit is attached. An annular groove is formed in the cup B in which groove is placed a ringB conveniently made of plush, cotton, or felt, and within this ring 13 is located a circular piece of soft rubber B, provided with circuiar concentric corrugations or grooves B adapted to hold the carbon granules indicated at 15 13 indicates the transmitter diaphragm, which is placed over the granules. Connected to the shell B by means of a bindingscrew B is the other wire of the local or direct circuit.
We make no claim to the portions of the transmitter thus far described, our invention in the transmitter relating to a novel mouthpiece (shown at B) and an outer large front diaphragm B secured over the mouth or arge end of the mouthpiece. Txe mouthpiece is secured in any preferred manner to the transmittm' proper, and its inner or operative surface is parabolic in contour. The
object of providing the mouthpiece with the inner parabolic surface is to focus the sounds received by the mouthpiece to a given point at th center of the transmitter-(iiaphragm B as indicated by the dotted lines in Fig. 2, thereby concentrating the sounds and increasing the efficiency of the transmitter. The diaphragm B is conveniently made of bladder, paper, parchment, isinglass, or other suitable light material and is adapted and acts to soften the sounds when the same are too harshas, for instance, when produced by brass instruments. The diaphragm B creates an aircushion in the mouthpiece between itself and the transmitter-diaphragm which acts on the transmitter diaphragm. While the diaphragm B provides better results, we do not wish to limit our invention necessarily to the employment of the same, as the receiver will operate in a highly satisfactory manner without said diaphragm.
Referring to the receiver, which is shown in detail in Fig. 3, 0 indicates a mouthpiece or trumpet comprising two portions, the outer or larger portion having, like the mouth of the transmitter, an inner parabolic surface and the inner or base portion C having a 11y perbolic inner surface, which is preferably provided with a lining C", of felt or similar material, which is smoothly secured thereto and has substantially the same contour as the inner surface of the portion 0 of the moutln piece. The portion of the mouthpiece is provided with a base-securing flange C, by means of which it is secured directly to the box A or a door A of the box. interposed between this flange and the box or the door is an annular washer or pad C, its purpose being to prevent the resonance of the wood or other material of which the box is formed.
C indicates the diaphragm of the receiver, which, it will be observed, is of com parat ively large area and is secured at its outer circum ferential edge to the flange C, an annular pad or washer C being-interposed between the diaphragm and said flange, which pad prevents the metallic sound or ring of the base of the mouthpiece being transmitted to the receiverdiaphragm.
C indicates an annular pad, which lies flat against the inner surface of the diaphragm C and extends over a large part thereof.
The several pads C 0 and 0 together with the diaphragm and flange G, are secured to the box or box-door in any preferred manner-as, fol-instance, by means of the metallic ring C placed on the pad 0 and secured to the box, as by screws, (indicated at C.)
It will be noticed from the construction of the reeeiver-mouthpiece, as indicated by the dotted lineb in Fig. 3, that the sounds prod need by the diaphragm G it' not going out directly through the receiver are directed onto the parabolic surface of the outward portion from any point at which they strike the hyperbolic base portion and that they are re fiected from the parabolic mouth of. the receiver in straight lines. This novel formation of the receiver-mouthpiece affords a deep air-chamber between the diaphragm and the hyperbolic surface of the portion Ciand these, in combination with the parabolic outlet, assist materially in the transmission of the sounds, which are delivered in full volume.
The purpose of the pad C, which lies flat agai nstthe receiver-diaphragm, is to limit the circularvibration of the diaphragm to articulate the sound and has the effect of cutting the words and syllables off short and clear.
TOO
The purpose of the felt lining U in the parabolic portion of the mouthpiece is to soften the speech, take away the resonance of the metal, and make the resultant sound more natural. These are vital points to successful articulation. It will be observed that the hyperbolic base portion of the mouthpiece receives the sounds delivered from any part of the relatively large diaphragm and reflects the same into the parabolic portion of the mouthpiece and that the parabolic outer portion sends the sounds out in straight lines. Located back of the receiver-diaphragm O is an electromagnet of the receiver, (indicated at 0 which is shown as having spools 0 which are flattened and are placed on tlattened cores, the purpose being to obtain a magnet of large working area and at the same time one having its force concentrated on the center of the diaphragm. The magnet is supported conveniently by a bracket, such 0 secured to the box A or box-door A D indicates an induction coil, which is shown as located in the inst rumentbox and having, as usual, a primary and secondary winding.
E indicates a battery for the local circuit located also in the box of the instrument.
One battery is provided for each instrument, being connected up in the local circuit thereof.
For an understanding of the electrical connections attention is directed particularly to Fig. t,which illustrates two instruments, each comprising a receiver, transmitter, inductioncoil, and local-circuit battery, the two instruments being electrically connected. It will be observed that the primary coil of the induction-coil in each instrument is in and operated by the direct current from the battery of the instrument E. The receiverin each instrument, on the other hand, is operated by and located in the secondary or induced current circuit. The current for each transmitter tiows, say, from the point marked at the battery E in the upper instrument, (indicated in Fig. 4,) thence along the primary-circuit wire F to the primary coil of the induction-coil D, along the wire G tothe transmitter B,through the transmitter along the wire H to the switch J, and thence back to the battery at the place indicated by the sign by the wire K. The primary circuit of the lower or other instrument shown in Fig. at follows an exactly similar course and, like the primary circuit of the upper instrument, is provided with a switch. These switches when open not only save the current from the batteries when the instruments are not in use, but also permit of one transmitter being cut out when the instruments are being used ,so that sounds can be received by either instrument, but will not be transmitted from the instrument at which the switch is opened.
The receiver-circuit for the receiver of the upper instrument (shown in Fig. 4:) is connected with the transmitter of the lower instrument and begins, say, with the secondary winding of the induction-coil D of said lower instrument and follows the course indicated by the arrows X along the wire a to the post No. l of the lower instrument, along the wire I) to post No. 2 of the upper instrument, thence along wire 0, plate d, flexible connection c, which latter is interposed for the purpose of permitting the swing of the door, to post f, thence along wire 9 to the electromagnet O of the receiver of the upper instrument, thence along wire ft to post i, tlexible connection j to post No. of the upper instrument, thence along wire m to post No. 3 of the lower instrument and wire m which latter is practically a continuation of the wire in, and finally back to the secondary winding of the induction-coil D of the lower instrument, thus com pletiug the receiver-oircuit for the upper instrument. The circuit for the receiver of the lower instrument follows a like course, as will beseen from Fig. i. It begins, say, with the secondary winding of the upper coil D, following the course indicated by the. arrows y along the wire a to post No. l of the upper instrument, the wire I) to post No. 2 of the lower instrument, wire 0, plate (1, and flexible connection 6 to the electromagnet of the receiver of the lower instrument, which latter is not shown, thence to the iiexible connection j, to post No. 3 of the lower instrument, along the wire on in the direction indicated by the arrow 1 to the post No. 3 of the upper instrument, wire 712. which latter, like wire m in the lower instrument, is, in effect, a continuation of the wire m, and back to the secondary winding of the induction-coil D of the upper instrument, thus completing the circuit.
It is to be noted that the circuit for both receivers is completed through a single wire in with its continuations m m In other words,this wire in is common to both receivercircuits and is, in effect, a third wire or single return-wire for both circuits.
M, Fig. 6, indicates a mute or attachment which maybe used in connection with the receiver above described when desired. This mute comprises a parabolic trumpet or portion M provided with a suitable handle M which trumpet M is adapted to be placed over the funnel-mouth or large end of the receiver, as indicated by dotted lines in Fig. 1. It also comprises a flexible tube M and earpiece M at the end of said flexible tube. The object of the mute is to concentrate, deaden, or diminish the volume of the sound from the receiver, so that it may be heard only by the person using the instrument and who holds the earpiece M to the car.
In Fig. 5 of the drawings we have shown diagrammatically one application of our improvement, wherein an instrument having a transmitter is shown as located at a convenient point on the stage of a theater, hall, or the like, said instrument (indicated at 0) being properly connected to other instruments 0 O O 0 provided with our novel receivers and located at various points about the body of the hall or theater. With this arrangement the speech or song or other sounds desired to be heard which are produced on the stage are received by the several instrumeuts about the auditorium and are delivered in full volume at the various points where the instruments are located,
thus enabling the audience in the remote parts of the auditorium to hear distinctly and understand the sounds produced on the stage.
Many other applications of the telephone will readily suggest themselves.
IVe do not deem it necessary here to go into a lengthy discussion of thenuinerousand various applications of the apparatus.
It is believed that from the above description and the drawings the operation of the telephone will be readily understood.
Having thus described the invention, what we claim as new, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is-- 1. In a telephone, a receiver, and a fixed box or frame on Which the same is mounted and in which the operating parts of the receiver and battery are located, said box or frame having an opening or openings to prevent a dead-air cushion therein, substantially as described.
2. In a telephone, a transmitter provided with a mouthpiece having an inner parabolic surface increasing in diameter from the inner small end to the outer large end, and so positioned relative to the transmitter-diaphragm as to focus the sounds received by the m outhpiece at the center of the diaphragm, substantially as described.
3. In a telephone, a transmitter provided with a mouthpiece having an inner parabolic surface increasing in diameter from the inner small end to the outer large end, and so positioned relative to the transmitter-diaphragm as to focus the sounds received by the mouthpiece at the center of the diaphragm, and a diaphragm closing the large or outer end of the mouthpiece, substantially as described.
4:. In a telephone, a receiver comprising a diaphragm and a mouthpiece or trumpet for said diaphragm provided With an inner hyperbolic portion, and outer parabolic portion, substantially as and for the purpose specified.
5. In a receiver for telephones, the combination of a support, a receiver-mouthpiece secured to said su pport and having interposed between it and said support a cushion or pad, a pad or cushion O on said mouthpiece, a receiver-diaphragm on said pad G a pad C extending over a large area of the diaphragm on the side opposite said pad 0 and means for securing the several pads and diaphragm to said support, substantially as described.
6. In a telephone, a receiver comprising a diaphragm, and a mouthpiece or trumpet therefor provided with an inner hyperbolic portion, and an outer parabolic portion said inner portion having a soft lining, substantially as described.
7. In a telephone, a box, orframe, a receiver fixed thereon, the operative parts of which receiver are located in the box or frame, a transmitter fixed on said box, an induction-coil for the transmitter located within said box, a battery located in said box or frame, said box or frame having an opening or openings to prevent a dead-air cushion therein, and suitable electrical connections, substantially as described.
In testimony whereof we have signed our names to this specification in the presence of two subscribing Witnesses.
ALBION lAltRIS Mliltlillili. JENNY WARD lllll'S.
US100800A 1900-01-10 1900-01-10 Telephone. Expired - Lifetime US669944A (en)

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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2660943A (en) * 1948-09-22 1953-12-01 Walter G Dion Sound and heating apparatus for drive-in theaters

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2660943A (en) * 1948-09-22 1953-12-01 Walter G Dion Sound and heating apparatus for drive-in theaters

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